Issuu on Google+

Vocation to serve the poor

From orphanage to Church School

Supporting the city-centre homeless

Fond memories of a good education

crosslincs page 22

page 12

No 31 Summer 2011 FREE Diocese of Lincoln newspaper www.lincoln.anglican.org

Preparing to lead the Diocese New house will be “big improvement”

Will Harrison he 72nd Bishop of Lincoln will be consecrated Bishop at a special service in Westminster Abbey in September by the Archbishop of Canterbury. The Ven Christopher Lowson will ordained as Bishop on St Matthew’s Day at the Abbey, where he is currently a priestvicar. Christopher is Director of the Ministry Division of the Archbishops’ Council, where his role has been to lead a team responsible for developing policy and delivering support to those in lay and ordained ministry throughout the Church of England. The Ministry Division advises the House of Bishops, the Archbishops’ Council and the General Synod on ministry matters and is responsible for the selection and the oversight of the training of more than 900 new clergy, Readers and others admitted to ministry each year. The Diocese will provide coaches to allow people − for a small charge − to attend the service on 21 September, which will begin at 11am. The Chief Executive of the Diocese, Max Manin, said: “This service is a chance for the church communities of the Diocese to show their prayerful support for Christopher as he begins a new phase in his ministry. “The ceremony is very much an occasion for the church family to celebrate together the appointment of our new Bishop, and for the community of the Diocese to be part of the start of this new ministry.” Tickets for the service, which are free and distributed on a first-come-first-served basis, are available by postal application, and coach travel is available to and from London from Grimsby, Scunthorpe, Lincoln, Louth, Horncastle, Sleaford, Grantham, Boston, Bourne, Spalding and Stamford for £12.50 per person. Then in November, the Diocese and counties of Lincolnshire will celebrate Bishop Christopher’s new ministry at his enthronement in Lincoln Cathedral. The service, to be held on 12 November at 11.30am, will be attended by clergy, churchgoers from every deanery and representatives from all walks of life from the counties, including the armed forces and schools.

T

> Ticket application form: page 17

he See of Lincoln is to have a new house for its new Bishop when he takes up his appointment in September. The new house is just a few minutes walk from the cathedral and will be ready for the new Bishop in October, following some ingoing works to extend the entertaining space. The Bishop elect, the Venerable Christopher Lowson said: “The decision where a diocesan bishop is to live is made by the Church Commissioners and not by the bishop himself. “However, Susan and I are delighted with the new house. I’ve been saying for some time that it is good when bishops find ways of living more simply. “With the alterations the Church Commissioners have agreed to do, the new house will be large enough for us to be able to offer hospitality to quite large groups. But the house won’t be so large that it will be a drain of the Church’s resources. “This is important because every penny the Church Commissioners are able to save by housing bishops in more modest properties will be available to dioceses to support their mission and ministry.” The old See house, on Eastgate in Lincoln, had around 25 rooms and a very large garden, whereas the new one is a more modest five bed room house. One of the advantages of the change is that the offices and living accommodation will be separate which means that the house itself doesn’t have to be so huge. The Church Commissioners, who currently fund houses for Diocesan Bishops, have carried out a review of housing provision for the Bishop of Lincoln and have determined that the old house had many problems. Chief among these is the fact that almost every room is on a different level from its neighbour which means that it is not very accessible. > More, and photographs: page 16 > New offices for Bishop: page 5

PHOTOGRAPH: WILL HARRISON

T

Christopher Lowson will be enthroned as Bishop of Lincoln in November.


2

crosslincs Crosslincs 01522 504034 crosslincs@lincoln.anglican.org

News

Cooking up a passion for RE Nick Edmonds

upils from two North Lincolnshire Church schools have been leading worship, participating in drama and cooking pancakes, all in the name of finding out more about religion and celebrating 200 years of Church Schools. West Butterwick and St Martin’s schools, which make up the Trentside confederation, followed up on a meeting with Deputy Diocesan Director of Education, Paul Thompson, to launch an RE focus week, entitled ‘How do we talk to God?’ The week, based around a theme which the children themselves devised, began with pupils leading worship by telling the story of Hannah and Samuel. There was then an opportunity to bake bread and make pancakes using homemade tin can and tea light stoves (pictured), exploring the theological links behind the various foodstuffs and their connection to the different seasons. For the remainder of the week, Christian theatre group Rhema Theatre joined the schools, first performing stories from the bible and then working with year 6 pupils for an interactive drama day. Jo Buckle, Head Teacher for both schools, said that it had been a week of vibrant and memorable learning. “We are so pleased to have been able to hold such a worthwhile week of RE-based learning in the year that celebrates 200 years of Church Schools,” she said. “The activities have helped the children to learn new team-building, self-confidence and communication skills, as they have been encouraged to develop their own ideas, share opinions and make group decisions.” During the week, the schools also engaged with the local community, with parents and members of congregations from the two churches joining the children for some of the activity sessions. Paul Thompson, who paid a visit to the schools, said that he had been delighted to be involved in the RE Focus week. “The younger children were really good at retelling the story of the loaves and fishes,” he said. “And their ability to reflect on ‘miracles in the world’ was very moving.” During his visit, Paul also heard Key Stage 2 children explore the Hindu story of ‘The Tiger, The Brahmin and The Jackal’, and had a fish-and-chip lunch with pupil worship leaders – part of the ‘Lighting the Candle’ group. “The Hindu story prompted some very complex thinking from the children and generated some excellent questions as they discussed the story,” he said. “And not only were the fish and chips delicious but it was lovely to hear how the children have developed collective worship. The passion for RE in the school is something clearly worth celebrating!”

P

Ten-year-old Travis Linehn, a pupil at St Martin’s school in Owston Ferry, near Scunthorpe, prepares a pancake.

Jan Roantree of Donington-on-Bain, Louth, sent in this cartoon. Send your cartoons to crosslincs@lincoln.anglican.org or to Crosslincs, The Old Palace, Lincoln LN2 1PU


3

crosslincs

Crosslincs 01522 504034 crosslincs@lincoln.anglican.org

News

New role for former Diocesan Secretary t was an easy decision to return to Lincolnshire to take up a senior role at Lincoln Cathedral, said the new Chief Executive and Chapter Clerk. And Philip Hamlyn-Williams is no stranger to the cathedral, where he previously served on the chapter, or to the Diocese, where he was Diocesan Secretary from 1996 to 2003. “Fifteen years ago, I fell in love with Lincoln Cathedral, and I’m still passionate about the building,” said Philip. And after quickly getting his feet under the table, he listed tourism and communication as high priorities. “My biggest challenge is to work very hard with other agencies in increasing our tourist numbers and the length of their stay,” he said. “Lincoln only gets one-tenth of the tourists York Minster gets.” And securing new sources of money, as well as promoting the cathedral’s ministry and its role as a place of pilgrimage will always be huge tasks of his role. “We need to secure long-term funding, and we need to build on the local support we already have,” said Philip. “And we would love for groups from the Diocese to come to the cathedral more often, and make use of the building.” Leading the staff at the cathedral is another big task, made easy, he said, by their dedication and professionalism. “My predecessor, Roy Bentham, did a fabulous job, and that made it an easy decision to come back to Lincoln.”

Annual cycle of saving churches

I

yearly event to raise money for Lincolnshire’s churches by walking, riding or running between church buildings will take place in September. The annual Bike Ride and Stride, in aid of the Lincolnshire Churches Trust, is an opportunity for people to raise money equally for the trust and for any church of their choosing. “The momentum for this year’s Bike Ride and Stride will really start to build from now until the big event on Saturday 10 September,” said organiser, Nic Ridley. “This event is a tremendous opportunity to raise money for your church. It is also a fun day out for all your friends and family. “Walk, cycle, horse-ride, or even run between Lincolnshire’s churches and enjoy the wonderful scenery of our county. “You choose the route, and you choose which churches you are supporting.” Last year the event raised around £36,000. “For the event to be a success we rely on the support of parishioners not only in taking part in the event but also in promoting the event within their local community,” said Nic. “The money raised directly benefits your parish. Please encourage parishioners and friends to support this event.” If you would like to find out more, contact Nic Ridley at nicridley@btconnect.com or on 01476 550055, or Caroline Cummins at caroline.cummins@btopenworld.com

PHOTOGRAPH: WILL HARRISON

A

Philip Hamlyn-Williams became Chief Executive and Chapter Clerk of Lincoln Cathedral in the spring.

Launched Lincolnshire arts project flagship arts project has been launched by a TV personality and chair of the Churches Conservation

A

Trust. The trust’s Archway project aims to encourage people to discover the rich heritage of the east of Lincolnshire through an engagement with 14 historic Grade I and Grade II* churches that the Church Commissioners of the Church of England have vested in the CCT − a national charity that preserves and protects churches that are considered to be at risk. Loyd Grossman, chair of the Churches Conservation Trust (CCT), officially launched

the Archway project at Alford Manor House in March. As well as repairing and conserving church buildings the CCT also develops projects intended to establish churches at the very heart of communities by expanding and increasing their usage. Loyd Grossman said that Archway was one such project, a means of “using our churches to revitalise communities”. Archway has commissioned architectural glass artist Derek Hunt and arts organisation Glassball to inspire local communities and produce artwork in response to the beautiful architecture of five of the church-

es taking part in the project. Archway churches will also be developed as a resource for local artists and arts groups, as well as being offered as venues for arts or literature groups to meet, to hold exhibitions and to stage music, dance or theatre events. The churches in the project are located in Burwell, Goltho, Great Steeping, Halthamon-Bain, Haugham, Kingerby, Little Cawthorpe, North Cockerington, Saltfleetby, Skidbrooke, South Somercotes, Theddlethorpe, Waithe and Yarburgh. For more information about the Archway project visit www.visitchurches.org.uk or call Sandra Kelley on 07730 530388.

Loyd Grossman is chair of the Churches Conservation Trust.


4

crosslincs Crosslincs 01522 504034 crosslincs@lincoln.anglican.org

News

Passion, conviction and hospitality Nick Edmonds he younger son of the 20th Baron Saye and Sele, Oliver Fiennes had the unique distinction of being born in the Palace of Westminster – not, as he put it, because of an accident in the Distinguished Strangers’ Gallery, but because his grandfather was an official of the Commons. With a father in the armed forces, Oliver spent a good deal of his early years travelling, before education at Eton College and New College, Oxford. He was ordained in 1954, following a period as a soldier when he won the sword of Honour at Sandhurst just before the end of the war. An elegant batsman, who developed codes for transmitting cricket scores to fellow clergy during quiet moments, Oliver took up roles as Chaplain of Clifton College and Rector of Lambeth, before being made Dean of Lincoln in 1969. Appointed at the early age of 43, he admitted he didn’t really know what a Dean did, but was to have a revolutionary impact. PHOTOGRAPH: NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, LONDON

T

Canon John Nurser, formerly Chancellor of Lincoln, wrote: “From the beginning, it was clear that the Chapter had organised effectively in the interregnum to defend itself against any takeover from the direction of Honest to God. “Trench warfare ensued, and a less determined solider than Oliver would have surrendered.” In addition to modernising the liturgy, Oliver founded the Cathedral bookshop, the mystery plays, and developed international and ecumenical links, accompanying the Magna Carta on a tour of the USA, meeting then president Ronald Reagan, whom he described as “a very intelligent man, who really knew about Magna Carta.”

he second annual lecture of the Issues in Science and Religion series was this year given by Dr Denis Alexander, Director of the Faraday Institute for Science and Religion, writes Sarah Tyler. Dr Alexander explored the question, ‘Creation or Evolution − do we have to choose?’ He compared the choice between creation and evolution as essentially a false choice, although the popular atheism of Richard Dawkins would suggest otherwise, claiming: “God is a competing explanation for the universe and life.” However, rather than seeing creation and evolution as rival explanations for the universe, Dr Alexander observed that they are best seen as complementary explanations which describe one reality in different, but not isolated or conflicting, narratives. Dr Alexander explained the Christian model of creation as depicting God as the composer and conductor of the music of life: God is the complete explanation for all else which exists and He holds it together. It should therefore be no surprise that a creation is thus an investigation into what God has brought into being. In his lecture, Dr Alexander also clearly explained Christian responses to Darwinism in the 19th century, dispelling the popular myth that religious leaders were universally opposed to its claims. It was largely recognised − even in the United States (which in the 21st century ironically boasts a high proportion of Young Earth Creationists) − that evolution was no rival to creation. Interestingly, Dr Alexander observed that even the early church writers had interpreted the Genesis narratives metaphorically, and laid the foundations for an acceptance of evolution as the answer to the central question about creation: ‘How did God do it?’ Dr Alexander’s lucid conclusion was that as complementary narratives address different things, there is no need to choose between creation and evolution, as one would between chocolate and vanilla icecream. Rather, as Aubrey Moore claimed: “Darwinism appeared, and in the guise of a foe, did the work of a friend.” The well-informed question-and-answer session which followed revealed the keen level of interest in Dr Alexander’s lecture, and as thanks go to him for such an informative talk.

T

Oliver Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes Dean Emeritus of Lincoln: 17 May 1926 – 8 June 2011

I can’t help but wonder what kites he is flying now.

Exploring creation in lecture

The Very Revd the Hon Oliver Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes died on 8 June 2011. Oliver retired as Dean in 1989, moving to the village of Colsterworth before returning to Lincoln in 2009 following the death of his beloved wife, Juliet. Here he once more engaged with the daily worship of his Cathedral, even in the weeks prior to his death. At his funeral The Venerable Roderick Wells, formerly Archdeacon of Stow and Lindsey, described a man of restless imagination and charm with a passionate conviction for seeing things through.

“‘Let’s fly a kite and see,’ was one of his favourite phrases,” he said. “Whoever he met, he wanted to show them something of God, and at Lincoln he envisioned a place where people could be touched by God.” “He made sure people knew that he had faith in them, and sought to make the Dean and Chapter more accountable to the congregation.” “I can’t help but wonder what kites he is flying now.”

Enjoying long standing relationships with our clients... Streets has been associated with and has looked after the Diocese of Lincoln for nearly 100 years

We are delighted to support Crosslincs For a brochure and further information please call 0845 880 0320 or visit www.streetsweb.co.uk


5

crosslincs

Crosslincs 01522 504034 crosslincs@lincoln.anglican.org

News

Church purchase will benefit mission Will Harrison he purchase of a church building near the top of Lincoln’s Steep Hill will produce a greater yield than any other investment, according to the Chief Executive of the Diocese. The former church of St Michael on the Mount in Lincoln was declared redundant some years ago, and has since been used as an arts faculty for the University of Lincoln. Most recently, the building was being developed as private dwellings, until a new plan was proposed to make the building a hotel. “It was suggested some years ago that the Diocese should acquire the building, and we are continually looking at ways in which we can increase the income from our assets in the difficult economic climate,” said Max Manin, the Diocese of Lincoln’s Chief Executive. When the proposals were put forward to turn the building into a hotel, concerns were raised that the former church, just yards from The Old Palace, which incorporates the Diocese of Lincoln’s retreat centre, could impact on this function of the building.

“We are continually looking at ways in which we can increase the income from our assets.”

“The Assets Committee, the Finance Committee, and then Diocesan Council considered and approved a business plan that would see income drawn from using the building as an extension of The Old Palace, in this case offering rooms commercially,” said Max. The building will also provide office space for the new diocesan Bishop, who is to live in a smaller house without office accommodation, and for his staff. “The Bishop will be close to many of the Diocesan staff, which means there will be much easier access,” said Max. “It also means that we will receive rental income from the Church Commissioners for the offices.”

PHOTOGRAPH: WILL HARRISON

T

The former St Michael’s Church will provide office space for the diocesan Bishop and his staff, and a number of bedrooms as an extension of The Old Palace.

Max Manin

Work had already begun by the previous owners to turn the building into houses, and that work will now be developed to create the bedrooms and the offices. “Many hotels have annexes that are separate from the main building, and this will provide people with an opportunity to stay in a very desirable part of Lincoln in beautiful surroundings,” said Max. “At present, we’ve been managing to get a return of between two per cent and five per cent on our historic income, which is distributed to the deaneries to support the mission of the Diocese. “This development will bring in at least a seven per cent return, making it by far our most lucrative investment. “The infrastructure of the hospitality business is already in place and well established, so the additional resources needed to run the extra rooms are very small, and we have the added benefit of being able to

Sponsor this page. Advertise your business* and support Crosslincs for £200 per edition. Contact 01522 504033 or crosslincs@lincoln.anglican.org for more information. *Terms and conditions apply. Call for more details.

widen the opportunities for offering events at The Old Palace. “By having control of the space, it will also mean that we can ensure retreats and quiet days held at The Old Palace can remain peaceful and effective. “If the building had become an independent hotel, were there a big party such as a wedding reception, it would have an unacceptable impact on people staying at The Old Palace.” Work is expected to begin soon to continue and complete the conversion of the church, with the building being in use by Easter 2012. “The cost of the conversion will be in the region of £500,000. This sounds like a lot of money,” said Max. “However, we invest assets in all sorts of ways in order to maximise our return, and this will be a significant support to the Diocese.”


6

crosslincs Children and Young People 01522 504067

Children and Young People

youth@lincoln.anglican.org www.lincoln.anglican.org/youth

Young people’s love seat

PHOTOGRAPH: SUZANNE STARBUCK

Luke Scutt, Loyd Emmerson and Damien Stewart get to work making the seat.

n eco-activity camp allowed seven young people from around the Diocese to become skilled ‘bodgers’ − or traditional green wood-workers. The camp, held at Hill Holt Wood, near Newark in the late spring, allowed the group to develop their skills with traditional green wood-working tools, including broad and side axes, draw knives, wedges, wooden mallets, chisels, a shave horse, a two-man cross cut saws and a pole lathe. “The group set up camp and were given a site induction by the green wood-working project ranger Alan Eley,” said the organiser, the Diocese’s projects worker Suzanne Starbuck. “The concept was a little overwhelming for some, but by Tuesday the group had designed and planned their woodworking project on paper and were quickly developing their bodging skills.” The group was presented with a barkcovered tree trunk which needed to be split with axes, mallets and wedges. “The group worked well as a team and supported each other to perfect their skills in each area,” said Suzanne.

Hill Holt Wood is a 34-acre woodland operating as an environmental social enterprise and controlled by a voluntary board of directors representing local com-

PHOTOGRAPH: SUZANNE STARBUCK

A

munities and councils as well as local and national businesses. The project manages the woodland in a traditional sense, as a habitat to be conserved but we also look to

Lead ranger Alan Eley with Alex Bowyer, Joe Rose, Damien Stewart, Anthony PageStabler, Siobhan Thompson, Luke Scutt and Loyd Emmerson with the love seat they made at Hill Holt Wood, near Newark.

the future and utilises the natural resources to achieve employment, education and training goals. By the end of the week, the original tree trunk had been split to create a love seat − a bench with two seats facing in opposite directions. The wood had been shaved, trimmed and turned to create four legs, spindles for the chair back and a back rest. “The weather was relatively kind throughout the week, although it was a little cold camping at night,” said Suzanne. “The composting toilets at Hill Holt wood were an unusual concept to most, but by the end of the week were an accepted part of eco camp life.” Families, parents and carers visited the group at the end of the week to see their achievements. “The eco camp and green woodworking activities have made it possible for many of the group to complete their Duke of Edinburgh Gold Award,” said Suzanne. “The two students from St Francis School in Lincoln have completed the residential part at the eco camp and are now planning their expedition.”


7

crosslincs

A paten for Anglo-American friendship Could you be paying less?

Lincolnshire congregation has welcomed a party of visitors from a church at the foot of a mountain over 5,000 miles away. One weekend in June 2008, thunderstorms set off thousands of fires in North California, including in an area where Val and Vic Rampton from Beckingham near Newark were due to be staying. As a result, they found themselves on a Saturday night in a rather remote part of North California, with no bed for the night. Deciding to head to the nearby town of Mount Shasta, they eventually found a room, and the following morning – Sunday – headed to the Episcopal Church of St Barnabas in the town. They found an inspiring service, and a group of very friendly people. On arrival back to England, Father Ted Ridgway, the Priest in Charge of St Barnabas’s wrote to Val and Vic asking them to tell him about their home church. Correspondence was exchanged, and soon followed an invitation for All Saints’, Beckingham and St Barnabas’s to become Sister congregations. With the idea passed by both PCCs in September the same year Val and Vic were invited back to California for a service of thanksgiving for the completion of mortgage payments for St Barnabas’s. And now 16 members of the St Barnabas congregation have swapped mountains, lakes, waterfalls and wildlife including bears, eagles, and mountain lions for the rural English village idyll of Beckingham for a four-day schedule, getting to know the Parish and the area. Meeting at the Church on Friday morning, following a late start to recover from the gruelling 13-hour flight, tea and coffee preceded a welcome from Rector Alan Megahey, who then conducted a tour of the church. He detailed All Saints’ miraculous recovery from a state of disrepair, and

A

pointed out details including a Green Man carving above the North porch, and where unsympathetic 1960s waterproof blue paint in the chancel had begun to be stripped away to reveal Victorian restoration paintwork beneath. Staying with host families in the village, the remainder of the visit included a trip to other churches in the group including Brant Broughton and Stragglethorpe, a visit to Whisby Nature Reserve, and on Saturday a tour of Lincoln Cathedral followed by evensong at which Father Ted read the Old Testament lesson. After the service, Ted said that it had been one of the highlights of his 52 years in ordained ministry. “It was a real privilege,” said the 81-yearold. “We’ve certainly had a good taste of the different Anglican worship styles. I don’t think I’ve ever had so much Church in a short time!” And the semi-retired Episcopalian priest noticed differences in more than just the church environment compared to his native California. “Everyone back home drives a truck,” he said. “And on the way from the airport I didn’t see a single one!” On Sunday, a festival service at All Saints saw the exchange of gifts, including the donation to Beckingham of a Chalice and Paten set from St Barnabas’s. “We’re very grateful for the generous gift as we only had a very, very small chalice before,” said Val, who organised much of the programme. “We’re hoping that there will be a return visit to California in a year or two.” The weekend was rounded off with a fine meal at The Black Swan Restaurant in Beckingham, before the visitors were waved off on the next stage of their pilgrimage, including visits to York, Stratfordon-Avon and Cadbury World.

Electricity Elec tricity • Gas • Telec T Telecommunications elecommunications ffor or chur church ch buildings and homes

You Y ou ccould ould be spending less on y your our elec electricity, tricity,, tricity gas, and phone bills. Check for for fr free ee at

www.churchsave.org A pioneering utilities saving partnership from fr om the Dioc Diocese ese of Linc Lincoln. oln.


8

crosslincs

Police cash supports church youth project t was five years ago that a Lincolnshire parochial church council decided to provide local young people with more opportunities for fun and recreation. The result was a weekly, non-religious drop-in for teenagers in the village church, with no fixed activities and free refreshments. Since then, around 20 local teenagers regularly visit Cranwell parish church to listen to music, play pool and partake in refreshments, all under discreet supervision. Churchwarden of Cranwell, Trevor Bush, said: “The teenagers continue to appreciate the church making them welcome without expecting any reciprocal commitment. “In the view of the local Neighbourhood

I

Policing Panel it has been a significant factor in the reduction of problems previously caused by anti-social behaviour.” Such was the success of the event that the local young people asked the church to extend the scheme to provide activities on one day a week during the school summer holidays. “These activities have typically included a bouncy castle, organised team games, circus skills, craft sessions and ten pin bowling,” said Trevor. And now, as a result of a grant of £470 from the Police Property Fund to cover the cost of hiring a coach, the PCC will be able to take a large party of youngsters to the Jorvik Centre at York.

Tuning in on a Sunday arly birds can tune in to Lincolnshire’s local radio stations to hear stories of faith and news from local churches. BBC Radio Lincolnshire’s Sunday Breakfast show begins at 6am with an hour of traditional hymns mixed in with some more contemporary Christian music. Presenter Sue Taylor said: “Sunday Breakfast doesn’t just include the morning’s news, but also plenty of what’s happening at churches around the county.

E

Sue Taylor “One week we could be hearing about a church in Horncastle collecting old gold earrings to pay for a new roof, and the next we could be talking to the new Bishop of Lincoln. “It’s not just churches that feature on the programme, but other faiths as well.

The Bible read out loud

“Whether it be celebrating Diwali or marking Passover, we’ve got it covered.” Events and requests are also part of the programme, and Sue is always keen to hear about favourite hymns. “It’s always nice when people get in touch with the programme so if you would like us to play two of your favourites, why not email me at, sue.taylor@bbc.co.uk? “You can also send us details of any events you’re organising so we can give them a mention as well.”

Sally Elkington And on Sunday mornings on Lincs FM, Sally Elkington discusses a range of topics with a variety of guests about everyday life and life changing experiences. Lincs FM can be found at 102.2FM, and BBC Radio Lincolnshire on 94.9FM.

Steve Griffiths of the Lincoln Independent Minyan Jewish prayer group with Canon Ian Silk at St George’s, Swallowbeck. here are more than three-quarters of a million words in the Bible, and every single one was read out during a Bibleathon at a church in the Diocese. Regular churchgoers to St George’s, Swallowbeck in Lincoln were joined by a representative of the city’s Jewish community to read the entire Bible. The enormous task was the idea of the parish priest, Canon Ian Silk. “I’ve long wanted to attempt a Bibleathon in Lincoln and this year we decided to go for it at St George’s,” said Ian. “Groups and organisations connected with the parish and our ecumenical partners were invited to contribute teams of readers over a three-day period, and various ‘owls’ and ‘larks’ filled in the remaining hours with plenty of water available at the lectern.” Altogether 113 people took part, with the youngest reader being 13-years-old, and the most senior in their nineties. “A leading member of the Lincoln Independent Minyan Jewish prayer group then read the Days of Creation using Hebrew chant,” said Ian.

“In the course of the Bible-athon other parts of the Scriptures were read in Latin and Greek and also French, German, Dutch and Swedish (mother tongues or second languages of various members of the congregation) – as well as at least seven English translations. “I think we all heard parts of Scripture we never realised were there, and it was an enriching experience of attentiveness, prayer, fellowship, teamwork and witness.” The entire reading took 81 hours, and ended with the singing of Praise God from whom all blessings flow. “Coming out of the church, the first bird was beginning to sing in the dark before the dawn,” said Ian. “In this year of the 400th Anniversary of the King James Bible, which was one of the versions of the Bible we used, donations towards the translation work of The Bible Society in Burkina Faso were given by those coming into church to listen. A 24/7 prayer room was also in operation for quiet meditation and ‘hands-on’ prayer activities.

participants for what is known as the “Fourth Day,” when they return to every-day life enriched by what they have experienced. Driven by talks on ideals, grace, the life of prayer, study, action and subsequent discussion groups, Cursillo leans toward the practicalities of spirituality and faith in dayto-day existence, and showing Christian lay people how to become effective leaders. The 2011 event will start with a grand gathering at Bishop Grosseteste University College for a time of fellowship, praise and prayer followed by a colourful Banner Parade from Lincoln Castle to the Cathedral. Here there will be a Eucharist presided over by the Bishop of Grimsby. The Preacher will be Bishop Idris Jones, former Bishop of Glasgow and Galloway, and national Spiritual leader of Cursillo. Bishop Idris told Crosslincs that churches

seeking involvement in the faith and lifestyle of their members would find Cursillo an attested asset. “We identify Jesus Christ as the one through whom life makes sense and the praise of God as the mainspring of outreach and action,” he said. “Our National gathering is an opportunity to celebrate this as part of the fellowship of the church in Diocese and Province.” Lay Director Piers Carter added that it was a great honour for Lincoln to have been chosen for the 2011 National Ultreya. “Cursillistas from Parishes large and small have been working since April last year to ensure that our visitors will enjoy a wellorganised event,” he said. Everybody is invited to join in the service, about which more information can be found at www.lincolncursillo.org.uk

T

Taking the short course to Lincoln incoln is poised to host an annual national event with an international feel. The event in question is the national Cursillo gathering, known as Ultreya (‘onward’), which takes place in a different part of the country each year, and will bring together around 600 people who have attended Cursillo weekends around the country.  Cursillo (pronounced “kur-see-yo”) is a Spanish word, meaning ‘a short course,’ which began in Spain some fifty years ago. It spread to the Episcopal Church of North America in 1972, before arriving in the UK in 1981. Cursillo is now a world-wide movement, which is active in more than 30 UK dioceses. Held over a three-day weekend, the objective of the Cursillo course is to prepare

L


9

crosslincs

Letters to the editor, Crosslincs, Church House, Minster Yard, Lincoln LN2 1PU crosslincs@lincoln.anglican.org A name and address and telephone number must be supplied with every letter and e-mail. Letters may be edited for style and length.

Comment & letters New disciples of Christ and a new cathedral in Tanzania From Canon Ian Silk The Diocese of Mara, part of The Anglican Church of Tanzania, covers a very large area from the eastern shore of Lake Victoria to the Serengeti. I was part of a teaching team working from St John’s Cathedral in the bustling fishing port of Musoma. Here the Mara River, after flowing through Maasailand in Kenya, empties into the Lake – a boulder-strewn environment filled with swaying palm trees and beautiful birdsong. Mara Diocese was founded in 1985 and has multiplied into three dioceses since then; the Cathedral was built in the year 2000. Much faith-sharing and merciful outreach is happening, so that many people are starting to follow Jesus. New congregations are starting in villages all around as far as the Serengeti, as well as in the rapidly developing neighbourhoods of Musoma itself. Church members are engaged in projects to bring encouragement to AIDS sufferers and to help families protect their children from malaria. A 24/7 prayer-forhealing centre right next to the cathedral receives many visitors with all sorts of conditions and I heard of some wonderful ministry and answers to prayer. The task of our team in this dynamic environment was to teach a course on Christian discipleship to a hundred potential group leaders from twenty deaneries (lay and clergy, men and women), equipping them to lead in their own localities. The course is called ‘Rooted in Jesus’ and is currently being used in ten countries in Africa. It helps meet the great need for good Christian foundations for those new to the faith − who are so eager to learn. Group discussion, the sharing of personal experience, practical demonstration and simple visual aids develop themes in discipleship that build on one another over a two year period – themes familiar to us from our own nurture and confirmation courses as well as many subjects particularly pertinent to pastoral issues in the African context. Since Bibles may be scarce in some localities, only the group leader needs a Bible for the course to be effective, together with one copy of the course book in Swahili. Each lesson contains a Scripture memory verse, which can be learned in a variety of ways and summarises the particular area of Christian growth being explored. We used Book One, Lesson One to model the teaching methods for the whole course, and learned John 10 verse 9 together: ‘I am the gate. Whoever enters by me will be saved, and will come in and go out and find pasture.’ There are moving accounts of faith and encouragement coming from the dioceses in Africa that have embarked on using ‘Rooted in Jesus’ (see the website ‘ReSource – Rooted in Jesus’) and it was a privilege to experience for two weeks the sense of purpose of the Anglican Church in Mara and their commitment to making joyful, fruitbearing disciples of Christ. I’d like to thank Ecclesiastical Insurance, St Boniface Trust and Lincoln Diocese for

Comment was killing a bit of time in a second hand bookshop when I came across some sort of Victorian sociological study of London. In the back I found a map showing where the different classes lived all in delicate pastel shades. The East End was a huge black blot. The key informed you that this was inhabited by ‘the criminal classes’. No one would dare, but you could produce just such map of any town in the UK. A brief visit to the Magistrates to view the lists will show you that most ‘crime’ is committed by people living in the inner urban areas of the town. I have worked for 39 years in one of the most deprived areas of the UK, and yes, it is dogged by ‘crime’ so that it is easy to draw a correlation between poverty and crime. But this is a false impression. The ‘law’ is a human construct. It is carefully designed by the rich and powerful to protect their interests. Like a sort of financial body armour, it protects them in tough times while leaving the unprotected limbs to bear the full force of the blast. These are such barefaced brazen immoral shenanigans that I wonder how people just put up with them. The banks turn themselves into casinos with full government backing; they run out of luck, we then have to bail them out and then they pay themselves more money in one year than most people see in a lifetime. And we all sit there listening to tripe about deficits and cuts and we’re all in it together. At the same time entrepreneurs like Mr High Street salt away a fortune perfectly within the law avoiding UK Tax. It is estimated that they collectively owe the taxman £49bn − half the defence budget.

I

The damaging effects of the Big Society The Biblical concept of justice is little understood but still speaks directly to our situation. You can look in vain for wigs and ermine in the book of Judges. The concept of ‘shophet’ is that you raise up the lowly and pull down the mighty. It is of course classically expressed in the Magnificat: He brought down the mighty from their thrones and lifted up the lowly. (Incidentally banned from Evensong by the East India Company in case the natives got the wrong idea about Christianity!)

Justice requires this two-fold action. The lowly cannot be raised up unless the mighty are pulled down. Everybody agrees that the poor should be lifted up − but you cannot do this unless you lay siege to the bastions of power and privilege. That is Biblical justice expressed in the jubilee principle. Reaching out to the poor while leaving the power structures untouched is sentimentality and patronising ‘do-gooding’. Until the Kingdom comes the rich and powerful will have their day. They are invincible, untouchable but we are supposed to be God’s Resistance Movement sabotaging the system wherever we can to raise the lowly and pull down the mighty. These actions are signs of the Kingdom keeping hope alive. The demonic powers are ultimately doomed; we need to demonstrate that by our actions and decision making. Thy Kingdom Come!

The Comment is written by a different anonymous author each edition with the intention of provoking thought and debate, and is not necessarily the view of the Diocese of Lincoln. Letters are welcomed on any subject.

help towards the expenses of this visit. I’ve been asked to bring greetings back to our Cathedral and Diocese from the many Christians who so value links with their brothers and sisters in Christ in the UK. One 32 year old called David, ordained two years ago, told me some of the story of his life. ‘Because I was a poor Christian my wife’s family did not want me to marry her, and both our families turned their backs on us and told us we would not have children. So when our first child came along we named him Emmanuel to say ‘God is with us’, our second Victor, because God has given us the victory, and our third is called Angel because when she was born she looked like one.’ Ian Silk Member of The College of Evangelists Swallowbeck, Lincoln

Backing for Ladies’ Choir From Mr Richard Jones We have just had a marvellous concert, Music for a Summer Afternoon, both sacred and secular, performed by the Diocesan Ladies’ Choir at St Margaret’s Church, Roughton, conducted by Rosemary Field. It was an afternoon of both singing and instrumentation enjoyed by all who attended, and, I believe, by the singers themselves. I would highly recommend this choir to anyone. I understand that it was formed at the instigation of Bishop John, so I hope our new Bishop Christopher will encourage the choir in its endeavours. Richard Jones Roughton Moor, Woodhall Spa

From Mr Richard Mair It is easy to characterise opposition to David Cameron’s ‘Big Society’ project with suspicion and cynicism (Comment, Crosslincs 30). Surely only a cynic could argue with a vision of selfless community involvement working for the good of our neighbours to make bureaucratic petty government unnecessary. Unfortunately, political theories, unlike philosophical theories, are tested in the harsh world of reality, and we are all part of the experiment. What the Big Society seems to lack is any notion of how its vision of the future can be achieved. Instead, the Government is concentrating on the ‘need to reduce Government expenditure’ part of the equation in the hope that this blunt instrument can somehow bludgeon the population into taking more personal responsibility. In Lincolnshire, the museum of one town will remain open despite the cuts because some local enthusiasts have volunteered to run it. Is this the Big Society taking shape? Yet in the neighbouring town no-one has come forward so the museum will close. This is survival-of-the-fittest decision-making. And how long will a museum run by retired enthusiasts remain fit? Once a museum − or library, community police officer or lollipop man −has been cancelled due to lack of interest, don’t expect to see it ever return.

What the Big Society seems to lack is any notion of how its vision of the future can be achieved.

Central Government has tried to wash its hands of responsibility for tough decisions by delegating them to local councils but offered no process, no system, and certainly no safeguard for the weak or vulnerable. Blessed are the educated, affluent and well-connected. The meek have only themselves to blame. The Comment writer said that “the substance of his [David Cameron’s] rhetoric will be measured by how the funds flow, where decisions are made and legislation which moves power to the local.” We can measure by all of these scales already, and see that Big Society is not a vision for the future − it is merely a mirage. It feels to me like that Government has got fed up with the thankless task of supporting society, and flounced off saying “do it yourselves then!” But you can’t teach a man with broken legs to walk again by kicking away his crutches. Richard Mair Lincoln


10

crosslincs

Music Making a focus for bee-line quiet day to church ilence and music will help focus the mind at a quiet day being held at the Diocese’s retreat centre in September. Canon Peter Godden, parish priest of the Owmby Group and the Springline Group, north of Lincoln, is also a trained musician, and is leading the day on Saturday 10 September. “The main focus of the day will be four periods of silence, but instead of an address to lead into each of these, there will be some music, not necessarily church music,” said Peter. “Depending on who comes for the day, and their own performing skills, if any, one of the pieces just might be music that we make together, rather than simply listen to.” Performance, said Peter, is not necessary to participate in the day. “The day is for anyone who wishes to be moved by music, rather than necessarily to do it,” he said.

S

ictured on the roof of St Mary le Wigford church hall in Lincoln is churchwarden Jackie Kirk, who is caring for three hives of bees after a wild colony took up residence on the church. “The plan is to create an urban bee farm as part of the activities we do in the BeAttitude project,” said parish priest Jeremy Cullimore. “We already have five allotments and these are proving to be a popular activity with some of the unemployed members of that community.” The church is home to 10,000 bees, and is looking for more locations for hives as more colonies of bees have been promised.

P

T H E E D WA R D K I N G C E N T R E a t T h e O l d Pa l a c e

Peter Godden “At the deepest level, music is a more basic method of human communication than words. “ The Edward King Centre at the Old Palace is in the heart of Lincoln, just next to the Cathedral. The Old Palace is the former home of Bishop Edward King, Bishop of Lincoln between 1885 and 1910, who won the affection of people of all classes for his reverence and saintliness of character. Since 2009 retreats and quiet days have been hosted at The Old Palace.

Welcome and Hospitality • Peace and Quiet • Reflection and Prayer In the heart of Lincoln’s historic Cathedral Quarter, the completely refurbished Edward King Centre hosts a series of retreats and quiet days throughout the year

Retreats and Quiet Days 2011

crosslincs is available in a recorded format for the partially sighted. Call Dorothy Selfe on 01507 603809.

Tuesday 12 July Quiet Day led by Pat Dale (Acorn Christian Healing) Saturday 10 September Quiet Day with music led by Canon Peter Godden

Friday to Sunday, 7 to 9 October Weekend retreat led by the Revd Stephen Hoy Saturday 19 November Quiet Day led by Nicola Slee Tuesday 6 December Quiet Evening led by Tracey Byrne

The Edward King Centre | The Old Palace | Minster Yard | Lincoln | LN2 1PU T: 01522 504075 www.bishopedwardking.org


11

crosslincs

Simon Payne Safeguarding adviser

Statement of Principles for Safeguarding  We will carefully select, supervise and train all those with any responsibility within the Church, in line with Safer Recruitment principles, including the use of criminal records disclosures and registration/ membership of the relevant vetting and barring schemes.  We will respond without delay to every complaint made which suggests that an adult, child or young person may have been harmed, cooperating with the police and local authority in any investigation.  We will seek to work with anyone who has suffered abuse, developing with him or her appropriate ministry of informed pastoral care.  We will challenge any abuse of power, especially by anyone in a position of trust

Protecting people has been a basic principle of the Church since its foundation, and legislation and good practice now give churches and communities clear guidance on how to put the principles into practice.

 We will seek to offer pastoral care and support, including supervision, and referral to the proper authorities, to any member of our church community known to have offended against a child, young person or vulnerable adult. In all these principles we will follow legislation, guidance and recognised good practice.

Protecting in the future ast year the Church of England and the Methodist Church agreed a statement of principles to guide their joint approach to safeguarding. There are three main points in these principles which need to have a resonance in the diocese. First, the careful selection and training of those who minister or serve others in the local parishes. Second, the principles speak to those who are victims of abuse and finally the principles offer support to offenders. The Diocesan website, under “safeguarding” is a useful source of guidance for approving volunteers and gives access to the list of approved safeguarding trainers who are available to each parish in every deanery. These trainers provide free training to parishes. As has often been said safeguarding is about prevention rather than rescue. It is about identifying those who will be working closely with children, young people and vulnerable adults. It is about making sure that we appoint the best people be they those in the ministry team, youth or children’s workers and organists/choir leaders or ringers where there are children to be taught or supervised.

L

It is about PCC approved home visiting, transport and clubs wholly or mainly for vulnerable people. The agreed principles require all of us to listen to anyone who makes a complaint. It is not about ignoring concerns, hoping they may go away or sweeping them under the carpet. In a society where the iPod, TV or background music and adverts in the home, supermarket or shop intrude and become the norm it may well be that we all listen but sometimes in our noisy world we do not hear. While there are people who are malicious, most people who make a complaint about abuse are telling the truth and need to be heard however difficult or unbelievable the message. Disclosing something as sensitive and hurtful as abuse requires courage and needs corresponding understanding. Not only do we need to listen but we must also act if that is appropriate, speaking in confidence with someone who can help. The safeguarding website has guidance on what to do if you have concerns. The Church also has a role in healing. Some survivors of abuse can find that the church is a source of peace and recovery.

Some will just need the involvement and acceptance in the local community; others will need sensitive pastoral care. Other people will require therapy and treatment. The Church has a role in guiding those to find what is suitable and supporting them. This is not usually about a ‘quick fix’ as the personal issues tend to be ongoing. Finding someone to talk to and share concerns at critical times can be important. Local churches are also involved when ex-offenders wish to worship locally. The Church of England and the Methodist Church have similar arrangements to help ex-offenders, many of whom are on the sex offenders register, to attend church under a worship agreement. The worship agreement identifies what church activities the ex-offender can safely be involved in and what areas are a risk. The worship agreements require the offender to disclose what he or she has done and involves a ‘small group of people who need to know’ in the parish recognising the reality that the parish priest cannot be everywhere. The small group will offer both support and be vigilant. In this way the needs of the victims, the congregation and the ex-

offender are recognised and addressed. Some say that the Church has been in the business of safeguarding vulnerable people for more than 2,000 years. Finding the balance between prevention and support to victims, survivors and ex-offenders is always going to difficult. If it were that easy we would have nothing to do. The Diocese is committed to safeguarding and provides advice and guidance on its website. 

For a complete list of those whom the Diocese has agreed need careful selection go to the safeguarding website and see the section when a Criminal Record Bureau (CRB) check will apply. You can also contact the safeguarding adviser on 01673 863280 or email simon.payne@lincoln.anglican.org


12

crosslincs

13

crosslincs

Coming in from the cold

The homeless of Lincoln found a safe haven in a city-centre church during the cold winter.

inter 2010-11 was one of recordbreaking severity. The end of 2010 saw the earliest snowfall for 17 years, the lowest recorded temperature in 26 years, and the busiest day in the Automobile Association’s entire 105-year history. As the cold closed in, a church group from Lincoln agreed they could not stand idly by while a number of men sleep rough on the frozen streets. Their response, with little idea of how such action would be sustained, was to open the church hall as an emergency 24-hour shelter. Roll back the clock to May 2004, and the wake of the Madrid Train bombings. Eight Eastern European countries had just been admitted to the European Union. Citizens of these ‘A8’ former Communist-bloc countries received sudden freedom to work anywhere in the EU without the need for a visa. Many were quick to take up the opportunity, leaving their lands of birth in search of promised lands of greater employment opportunities and prosperity. But over the following months it transpired that this new-found freedom had developed caveats. The UK feared that the wave of workers could stifle its welfare state, and swiftly drafted a protective legislation. Called the ‘Worker Registration Scheme’, this decreed that immigrant workers must be in continuous employment for 12 months before qualifying for any state benefits. Nonetheless, over the following years, more than half a million Eastern Europeans arrived on British shores. Some were lucky and found work, and many areas − Lincolnshire included − reported a positive

W

economic impact as a result of the migrant workforce. But in late 2008 the world economy suffered a catastrophic crash, and conditions worsened for the UK’s native and migrant workers alike. The full impact of the Worker Registration Scheme hit unemployed migrants, many of whom – devoid of work and state support – were forced onto the streets.  In Lincoln, a group bedded down on a section of muddy riverbank, achieving notoriety in the local media, who dubbed them ‘The Tent Poles’. “Most of these men want to work, and are desperate to work,” said Liz. “But the job climate has been very slow for some time.” Liz Jackson is Curate of St Mary-leWigford, the church next to Lincoln Central railway station, which predates the cathedral in age. Liz has been chiefly responsible for the coordination of a team of volunteers who have helped to clean the church and cook meals for the 35 men who have become the shelter’s patrons. “We need to say an enormous thank you to everyone who has helped with the appeal, not just to those who have been involved in a hands-on way, but to those who have donated money, food and clothing,” she said. “But we need people’s help just as much as ever.” On a bright spring morning outside St Mary’s, the alpine conditions seemed a world away. Having remained open 24/7 for nearly six months, the shelter was about to close its doors. During its time of operation, Liz and her colleagues enlisted the help of volunteers including a policeman, members of the Salvation Army and the Quakers, many of whom took it in turns to stay overnight to supervise the shelter. “This could never have been a long-term solution,” Liz explained. “Running the shelter has consumed so much volunteer time, and we’ve lived hand-to-mouth with what people have given.” It was just after 10am and, for the final time, St Mary’s was changing from bedroom to dining room. The starting point for the homeless project, The BeAttitude café, first opened for a few hours on a Tuesday morning. This was singled out for praise by the Archbishop of Canterbury during his visit to the Diocese last year. It now runs from 7am to 7pm every day of the week. “After five days on the street, you could be Albert Einstein and you wouldn’t stand a chance,” Alex told me in excellent English. “Say you need a worker. You look at me now and it’s ok, but with five days’ beard, maybe my clothes smell, you don’t want to give me a job.” In 2007, three years after the A8 countries joined the EU, Romania and Bulgaria were also admitted. But despite EU membership, in order for Romanian or Bulgarian immigrants to work in the UK they must apply for an accession worker card, for which

they must demonstrate skill in a particular field. Alex, who is Romanian, does not have this card. “Polish guys can get jobs easily. Anyone can chop carrots, but because I’m from Romania, that’s not enough,” he said. Alex explained that St Mary’s had saved him from the streets over the gruelling winter months. “I’ve never met people like this,” he said with fervour.   “They don’t give up on anybody, no matter what you’ve done or what you’ve been through. I really think you should know that.”

The A8 countries Poland The Czech Republic Hungary Estonia Lithuania Latvia Slovenia Slovakia

“Maybe because it’s a church too, that helps to make it work.” More patrons arrived, some of whom had slept rough on the streets or, if lucky, at a hostel or friend’s house. Figures published by the government earlier this year indicated that a total of 1,768 people were sleeping out across England on a given night, but Liz explained that this category of temporarily-housed people is often overlooked by the compilers of such statistics. “Real numbers have been hidden for a decade or so,” she said. Although recent reports revealed that homelessness on the streets of Lincoln had dropped by around 70% since a peak of 275 in 2005, Liz told me the number could be three times the quoted figure if they were properly inclusive. “When the shelter closes, we know that a few of the guys will get into a hostel or a friend’s house, but we still consider them to be vulnerable,” she explained. “We have some guys who are now sleeping in a car, and others who will be living in a tent – but these aren’t long term solutions.” As more patrons arrived, Liz, and St Mary’s parish priest, Jeremy Cullimore, were on hand to meet and greet visitors, many of whom were well known to them.

PHOTOGRAPH: NICK EDMONDS

Nick Edmonds

The Revd Liz Jackson, new churchwarden Jackie Kirk and the Revd Jeremy Cullimore prepare for a night’s work at St Mary-le-Wigford Church in Lincoln’s city centre.

Jeremy explained that in addition to the basic needs of providing shelter and food, St Mary’s helps its clients check paperwork which can be the difference between failure and success when searching for jobs and accommodation. Plenty of those coming through the door had done what Liz described as ‘scary stuff’, but the focus of St Mary’s is on the here and now. Second chances are in plentiful supply, even for those who had brought crime to the church’s own doorstep. Liz related difficulty when sitting down to discuss

face-to-face the actions of those who had stolen from the church and from Liz personally, on occasions with the threat of physical violence. For some, alcoholism, crime and drug abuse are symptoms of their situation, for others the cause. “Of course we do challenge behaviour,” said Jeremy. “For people who have been living as individuals, confronting problems within a community context is as important a part of the healing process as breaking the drug habit or kicking the drink.”

“Community heals and protects. It is at the centre of everything.” Liz added: “Everyone who walks through these doors is unique, and made in the image of God, and the problem with legislation and statistics is that humanity can fall by the wayside. “Politicians are unable to see people as individuals, but luckily we can.” With the shelter closing, future planning is well afoot. The outreach project will move back into the church hall, and space will again be freed up in St Mary’s − with its

excellent location for passing trade − to welcome tourists and visitors. There are also plans to train volunteers and counsellors, with interested parties encouraged to get in touch. “If you’ve got a skill or something to offer, we want to hear from you,” said Jeremy. “We hope people will continue to keep us in mind.” With the church bustling with activity, Jeremy explained that the fact that the church is open at all is only down to the dogged determination and hard work of a

former churchwarden.   “We all owe a huge debt of gratitude to a man called George Ashton,” he said. Jeremy told me how George, until his recent retirement, had served on PCC committees for more than 60 years, and had almost single-handedly kept the church open for ten years. “He has been a fantastic servant, and we wouldn’t be where we are without his help,” said Jeremy. “I’d give him a day in the lectionary; he definitely deserves the last word.” 


12

crosslincs

13

crosslincs

Coming in from the cold

The homeless of Lincoln found a safe haven in a city-centre church during the cold winter.

inter 2010-11 was one of recordbreaking severity. The end of 2010 saw the earliest snowfall for 17 years, the lowest recorded temperature in 26 years, and the busiest day in the Automobile Association’s entire 105-year history. As the cold closed in, a church group from Lincoln agreed they could not stand idly by while a number of men sleep rough on the frozen streets. Their response, with little idea of how such action would be sustained, was to open the church hall as an emergency 24-hour shelter. Roll back the clock to May 2004, and the wake of the Madrid Train bombings. Eight Eastern European countries had just been admitted to the European Union. Citizens of these ‘A8’ former Communist-bloc countries received sudden freedom to work anywhere in the EU without the need for a visa. Many were quick to take up the opportunity, leaving their lands of birth in search of promised lands of greater employment opportunities and prosperity. But over the following months it transpired that this new-found freedom had developed caveats. The UK feared that the wave of workers could stifle its welfare state, and swiftly drafted a protective legislation. Called the ‘Worker Registration Scheme’, this decreed that immigrant workers must be in continuous employment for 12 months before qualifying for any state benefits. Nonetheless, over the following years, more than half a million Eastern Europeans arrived on British shores. Some were lucky and found work, and many areas − Lincolnshire included − reported a positive

W

economic impact as a result of the migrant workforce. But in late 2008 the world economy suffered a catastrophic crash, and conditions worsened for the UK’s native and migrant workers alike. The full impact of the Worker Registration Scheme hit unemployed migrants, many of whom – devoid of work and state support – were forced onto the streets.  In Lincoln, a group bedded down on a section of muddy riverbank, achieving notoriety in the local media, who dubbed them ‘The Tent Poles’. “Most of these men want to work, and are desperate to work,” said Liz. “But the job climate has been very slow for some time.” Liz Jackson is Curate of St Mary-leWigford, the church next to Lincoln Central railway station, which predates the cathedral in age. Liz has been chiefly responsible for the coordination of a team of volunteers who have helped to clean the church and cook meals for the 35 men who have become the shelter’s patrons. “We need to say an enormous thank you to everyone who has helped with the appeal, not just to those who have been involved in a hands-on way, but to those who have donated money, food and clothing,” she said. “But we need people’s help just as much as ever.” On a bright spring morning outside St Mary’s, the alpine conditions seemed a world away. Having remained open 24/7 for nearly six months, the shelter was about to close its doors. During its time of operation, Liz and her colleagues enlisted the help of volunteers including a policeman, members of the Salvation Army and the Quakers, many of whom took it in turns to stay overnight to supervise the shelter. “This could never have been a long-term solution,” Liz explained. “Running the shelter has consumed so much volunteer time, and we’ve lived hand-to-mouth with what people have given.” It was just after 10am and, for the final time, St Mary’s was changing from bedroom to dining room. The starting point for the homeless project, The BeAttitude café, first opened for a few hours on a Tuesday morning. This was singled out for praise by the Archbishop of Canterbury during his visit to the Diocese last year. It now runs from 7am to 7pm every day of the week. “After five days on the street, you could be Albert Einstein and you wouldn’t stand a chance,” Alex told me in excellent English. “Say you need a worker. You look at me now and it’s ok, but with five days’ beard, maybe my clothes smell, you don’t want to give me a job.” In 2007, three years after the A8 countries joined the EU, Romania and Bulgaria were also admitted. But despite EU membership, in order for Romanian or Bulgarian immigrants to work in the UK they must apply for an accession worker card, for which

they must demonstrate skill in a particular field. Alex, who is Romanian, does not have this card. “Polish guys can get jobs easily. Anyone can chop carrots, but because I’m from Romania, that’s not enough,” he said. Alex explained that St Mary’s had saved him from the streets over the gruelling winter months. “I’ve never met people like this,” he said with fervour.   “They don’t give up on anybody, no matter what you’ve done or what you’ve been through. I really think you should know that.”

The A8 countries Poland The Czech Republic Hungary Estonia Lithuania Latvia Slovenia Slovakia

“Maybe because it’s a church too, that helps to make it work.” More patrons arrived, some of whom had slept rough on the streets or, if lucky, at a hostel or friend’s house. Figures published by the government earlier this year indicated that a total of 1,768 people were sleeping out across England on a given night, but Liz explained that this category of temporarily-housed people is often overlooked by the compilers of such statistics. “Real numbers have been hidden for a decade or so,” she said. Although recent reports revealed that homelessness on the streets of Lincoln had dropped by around 70% since a peak of 275 in 2005, Liz told me the number could be three times the quoted figure if they were properly inclusive. “When the shelter closes, we know that a few of the guys will get into a hostel or a friend’s house, but we still consider them to be vulnerable,” she explained. “We have some guys who are now sleeping in a car, and others who will be living in a tent – but these aren’t long term solutions.” As more patrons arrived, Liz, and St Mary’s parish priest, Jeremy Cullimore, were on hand to meet and greet visitors, many of whom were well known to them.

PHOTOGRAPH: NICK EDMONDS

Nick Edmonds

The Revd Liz Jackson, new churchwarden Jackie Kirk and the Revd Jeremy Cullimore prepare for a night’s work at St Mary-le-Wigford Church in Lincoln’s city centre.

Jeremy explained that in addition to the basic needs of providing shelter and food, St Mary’s helps its clients check paperwork which can be the difference between failure and success when searching for jobs and accommodation. Plenty of those coming through the door had done what Liz described as ‘scary stuff’, but the focus of St Mary’s is on the here and now. Second chances are in plentiful supply, even for those who had brought crime to the church’s own doorstep. Liz related difficulty when sitting down to discuss

face-to-face the actions of those who had stolen from the church and from Liz personally, on occasions with the threat of physical violence. For some, alcoholism, crime and drug abuse are symptoms of their situation, for others the cause. “Of course we do challenge behaviour,” said Jeremy. “For people who have been living as individuals, confronting problems within a community context is as important a part of the healing process as breaking the drug habit or kicking the drink.”

“Community heals and protects. It is at the centre of everything.” Liz added: “Everyone who walks through these doors is unique, and made in the image of God, and the problem with legislation and statistics is that humanity can fall by the wayside. “Politicians are unable to see people as individuals, but luckily we can.” With the shelter closing, future planning is well afoot. The outreach project will move back into the church hall, and space will again be freed up in St Mary’s − with its

excellent location for passing trade − to welcome tourists and visitors. There are also plans to train volunteers and counsellors, with interested parties encouraged to get in touch. “If you’ve got a skill or something to offer, we want to hear from you,” said Jeremy. “We hope people will continue to keep us in mind.” With the church bustling with activity, Jeremy explained that the fact that the church is open at all is only down to the dogged determination and hard work of a

former churchwarden.   “We all owe a huge debt of gratitude to a man called George Ashton,” he said. Jeremy told me how George, until his recent retirement, had served on PCC committees for more than 60 years, and had almost single-handedly kept the church open for ten years. “He has been a fantastic servant, and we wouldn’t be where we are without his help,” said Jeremy. “I’d give him a day in the lectionary; he definitely deserves the last word.” 


14

Educating Peter n announcement of his retirement, the Diocesan Director of Education has told Crosslincs of his enormous pride for an ‘inclusive family’ of Church Schools, predicting a bright future for them, providing their doors remain open to allcomers. Born and educated in Market Rasen, Peter Staves joined the Diocesan education team as Director following 12 years as Head of Nettleham C of E Junior School. At the culmination of 40 years in education, Peter has seen both his current role and the wider world of education undergo a host of changes. “The job now is not the same as the role that I took on,” said Peter. “And I’m sure whoever takes over will see it change again. But that’s the challenge and the excitement; adapting to and making the best of the changes that come our way.” Peter arrived to lead the Education team in 2003. Back then, priorities were centred on making personal contact and building relationships with the 141 primary and five secondary Church Schools in the Diocese – meeting head teachers and strengthening Church School family links. Then in 2005 changes were made to the way in which Church Schools were to be inspected. Triggered by existing OFSTED inspections, new ‘Section 48’ assessments would be carried out to focus on the Christian ethos of the church school, its distinctiveness and effectiveness, and the impact it had on pupils. “Suddenly, we were responsible for the recruitment and training of inspectors, the scheduling of inspections at the school, and the quality control of inspection reports. It was a huge undertaking,” recalled Peter. In response, the department appointed a Schools Adviser, to work closely with the new requirements. But Peter remembers how quickly the department came to recognise the value of Section 48. “Now we had an inspection regime that focused on the impact and effectiveness of Church Schools and which recognised a wider range of the qualities that constitute a good school, and in that respect it has been absolutely transformational,” he said. “If you talk to teachers, you will find a consensus that there is a lot of focus placed on

O

The Rt Revd David Rossdale Bishop of Grimsby and Chair of the Lincoln Diocesan Board of Education

examination results – particularly Maths and English. “And rightly so, because these are absolutely essential knowledge areas, and if we don’t give children these skills, we are doing them a disservice. “But there are other things that are equally important.” Peter explained that Section 48 inspections complemented OFSTED because they were free to focus on less quantifiable measures of success. “There are some pupils who will never enhance the exam statistics for Maths and English, but their contributions and the provision which is made for them are just as important.

“Peter has made the most enormous contribution to the Diocese’s work with schools and in particular has responded to the many policy developments of recent years with great collaboration, proactivity and creativity.” Max Manin Chief Executive Diocese of Lincoln “These are elements which form part of the Section 48 success criteria.” The year 2005 also heralded another turning point for Peter, and one which was to take his role on a yet more strategic bearing: the Diocesan Board of Education resolved to engage actively in the developing Academies programme. Launched earlier in the decade by the Blair government, this initiative would facilitate the founding of new schools to replace failing institutions in areas of the greatest social need, with a combination of private sponsorship and direct central governmental funding – taking them out of local authority control. However, with exam results initially falling well below the national average, the Prime Minister and his Academies quickly became a target for negative press coverage. “At the time, not everyone felt that should be supporting such a controversial new programme,” said Peter. “So it was a very big step to take.” Nonetheless, the wheels were soon in

“Peter has been a truly exceptional Director of Education − offering a ministry which has blended professionalism with a humanity which has touched the lives of many. He is held in high esteem both locally and nationally for his leadership which has ensured that church schools in the Diocese of Lincoln are distinctive not only in their Christian values and ethos, but also in the standards they achieve. It has been an enormous privilege and great fun to have worked closely with him for the past eight years.”

PHOTOGRAPH: NICK EDMONDS

Nick Edmonds

crosslincs

Canon Peter Staves will retire from the Diocese of Lincoln at the end of the summer. motion, and in September 2008 the Archbishop of Canterbury cut the ribbon of the Diocese of Lincoln’s first realisation of the programme, St Lawrence Academy, on the site of the former High Ridge Sports College in Scunthorpe. Six years after the Board of Education’s landmark decision, the Coalition Government has taken the creation of Academies to a new level, actively encouraging all schools to consider Academy status, and a turnaround in results means that many naysayers have been won over. St

Lawrence Academy was validated as ‘good with outstanding features’ in its first OFSTED inspection, and ‘outstanding’ in its subsequent Section 48 assessment. Peter is proud of these achievements, and feels that the decision to engage with the Academies programme has been fully vindicated. “The St Lawrence inspection result is a testament to the outstanding work of everyone connected,” said Peter. “From The Board of Education to the pupils themselves.”

The career of Peter Staves:  Educated at Market Rasen C of E primary, and the De Aston School, Market Rasen: 1955–69 at Berkshire  Studied (Bulmershe): 1969-72

College

 First teaching post at St Peter’s Church in Wales Primary, Blaenavon, South Wales: 1972  Moved back to Lincolnshire to a post at Mablethorpe Community Primary: 1977  Appointed Deputy Head of Isaac Newton Primary school, Grantham: 1982

 First Headship of Toynton, All Saints School: 1984  Moved to become head of Nettleham C of E School: 1991  Appointed Director of Education for the Diocese of Lincoln: 2003  Installed as a Lay Canon of Lincoln Cathedral: 2007  Awarded Honorary Doctorate in Education by Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln in the year of his retirement: 2011


15

crosslincs

“Peter has been instrumental in the transformation of the opportunities for the students and the local community at The St Lawrence Academy because he passionately cares about each and every student. He exudes warmth and positivity at all times, he inspires others to follow his lead and he has successfully had a significant impact on raising aspirations and self belief of both the staff and students. The academy will miss his presence desperately, and I personally will miss him as I have never worked with anyone who I admire and respect so much. However, my memories of working with such an inspirational leader will stay with me forever!” Joan Barnes Principal St Lawrence Academy, Scunthorpe In 2010, St Andrew’s College in Cleethorpes also opened, this time in collaboration between The Diocese of Lincoln and the Roman Catholic Diocese of Nottingham. Peter believes that this represents a heartfelt commitment to be outward-looking and innovative, and demonstrates the inclusivity which can answer secularist critics as Church Schools look to the future. “Very few people would disagree with our core values of truth, justice, respect, forgiveness and generosity of spirit,” he said. “Parents recognise this, and that is why Church Schools are actively sought by people of all faiths and none.” But Peter knows that this is no time for resting on laurels, and that the Church must be prepared to respond to changing agenda in education. “We must fight the perception that Church Schools exist only to advantage a select clique of society, and by doing so we will continue to offer much,” he said. Having set a retirement date for the end of August, Peter, who is also to receive an honorary doctorate from Bishop Grosseteste University College, is looking forward to pursing a broad range of personal interests, and more time with wife Jane. “First and foremost, my wife wants me back, but music, golf, poetry and gardening are great passions,” he said. In addition Peter and Jane, who live in Spilsby, are looking forward to travelling, and plans are afoot to explore more of the British Isles. However, Peter is fully intending to retain the wealth of friends made while working the circles of Diocesan education. “I’m keeping an open mind as to what involvement I have in education in the future, but the high points of this job will always be the people,” he said. “The Annual Church Schools Festival encapsulates everything I love about the job, and the fact that people continue to come back year after year says so much about the strength of our family. “Nothing can surpass the quality of relationships built over time.” 

Children from Allington with Sedgebrook school examine stained glass windows during the 2011 Church Schools Festival

A buzz about the Church Schools Festival eekeeping, calligraphy, country dancing, brass rubbing and orienteering all formed part of a celebratory Church Schools festival, as more than 3,000 pupils from 115 schools flocked to Lincoln Cathedral in the 200th Anniversary year of The National Society (Church Schools), and the 400th of the King James Version of the Bible. Taking place over eight days between May and June, at the centre of this year’s festival was the Garland of Verses, a joint project between Lincoln Cathedral Library, the Diocesan Education Centre and the

B

Church Schools. The volume, which featured 3,000 verses from the original publication of the King James Version of the Bible, had been painstakingly copied by out by primary school children, with illustrations by secondary school children. This was displayed on a giant screen in the Chapter House of the Cathedral, allowing the children a close-up look at their handiwork, pending permanent display in the Cathedral’s Medieval Library. In the afternoon of each day, an organ fanfare signalled the act of worship, where a procession of banners was presented at

Getting stuck in: Deputy Director of Education Paul Thompson has visited Blyton-cum-Laughton, Little Gonerby, Welton and Brant Broughton schools, to capture the action during Celebrating RE weeks.

the altar, before a service of singing and prayers led by pupils. Diocesan Deputy Director of Education Paul Thompson said that the festival had been a great success. “What a lovely occasion it has been, with schools from all over the Diocese coming together in our magnificent Cathedral to celebrate two very special anniversaries,” he said. “We need to say a big thank you to the many volunteers who led workshops and tours, the Cathedral staff, and of course to the many schools who took part.”


16

crosslincs

New See house for Bishop roblems relating to the old See house, which is Grade 1 listed, extend beyond rooms being on different levels, with problems of accessibility being only the tip of the iceberg. Any buyer is likely to be faced with costs of more than £300,000 for updating things like the heating, electrics and plumbing, tying together several different parts of the house that are falling apart from other parts, and creating better foundations for some external walls.

P

They are also likely to have to find more than £10,000 a year for heating bills. A Diocesan spokesperson said: “We are very fortunate that a suitable new house could be found. “The old house had been in use as the Bishop’s residence for only 50 years or so and the Bishops of Lincoln have a history of moving around as times change. “It is so important that we find ways of making all costs affordable for future generations while at the same time ensuring

Continued from page one

that everyone, whether they are a bishop or a lay minister, is resourced in the right way. The new See house combines exactly those characteristics. And of course if our new Bishop is happy, we’re happy too.” New offices are to be provided for the Bishop and his staff close to The Old Palace in Lincoln.

Tribute to “inspirational priest”

> New offices for Bishop: page 5

Adrian Sullivan

The old house was the Bishop’s residence for only 50 years, and costs £10,000 a year to heat.

The new Bishop’s house will be a comfortable family home, with space for entertaining.

Many to be ordained ore than 30 women and men will be ordained at Petertide services around the Diocese. In Grimsby Minster, 13 people will be ordained deacon, including five distinct deacons, who will have that particular ministry in parishes. They are involved in social and community projects and are seen as a visible link between the Church and the wider community. Roy Done (Bain Valley), Harry Jeffery (Bardney), Christine Sulley (Trent Cliff Group), Richard Thornton (Nettleham) and Janet Vasey (Grimsby) will each be ordained Distinct Deacon. Martin Faulkner (Spilsby), Steven Holt (Grimsby) and David Swannack

M

(Frodingham) will stipendiary deacons, and Robert Barratt (Alford), Karen Gooding, Janet Thompkins (Mablethorpe, Trusthorpe and Sutton on Sea), Sally Turnbull (Springline and Owmby Group) and Joan Vickers (Saxilby and Stow in Lindsey) will be Ordained Local Ministers in the service led by the Bishop of Grimsby. At St Wulfram’s Church, Grantham, seven deacons will be ordained, including two Distinct Deacons − Nigel Panting (Ruskington Group) and Rosemary Trevelyan (Washingborough with Heighington, and Canwick). Ordained Local Ministers Frances Clarke (Skellingthorpe with Doddington) and Valerie Greene (Kirkby Laythorpe) will be ordained by the

Bishop of Grantham, the Rt Revd Dr Tim Ellis. In Lincoln Cathedral, the Rt Revd David Rossdale will ordain as priests stipendiary curates Gillian Barrow (Gainsborough All Saints), Julie Donn (Skegness Group), Georgina Huysse-Smith (West Grimsby), Elizabeth Jackson (Lincoln city centre), Hugh Jones (Boston St Botolph), David Oxtoby (St George, Stamford), Julie Timings (Sleaford St Denys) and Jonathan Wright (South Wolds Group). Non-Stipendiary curates Liz Brown (Barton upon Humber) and Erica Crust (Moulton), and Ordained Local Minister Peter Lister (Bourne) will also be ordained priest on 5 July at Lincoln Cathedral.

he Revd Adrian Sullivan, until recently Rector of the Marden Hill group of parishes, and Priest-in-Charge of the Stickney group of parishes, died on 28 April after a long illness, aged 56 years. The Bishop of Grimsby, the Rt Revd David Rossdale, said: “Adrian Sullivan, or ‘Sully’ as he was known to everyone, was an exceptional and inspirational priest. “His approach to ministry was refreshing, pragmatic, idiosyncratic and deeply faithful in equal measure. His honest and direct faith has left its mark on parishioners, colleagues and on so many of the lives which he touched in the course of his ministry. There has been so much to celebrate and for which to give thanks. “For the past 12 years Sully lived with the condition which led to his death last week. Throughout he exhibited, with great dignity, the depth of his faith and a disarming openness about his mortality. Our prayers surround Heather and their children Naomi, Hannah, Leah and Tom as we commend a dear Christian friend on his journey − may his dwelling place be in paradise and peace.”

T

Review: A Just Church – 21st Century Liberation Theology in Action by Chris Howson n his recent work, A Just Church − 21st Century Liberation Theology in Action, Chris Howson, a City Centre Mission Priest for Bradford, sets out to explore the landscape of liberation theology in 21stcentury Britain, writes the Revd Adrian Smith. He opens with an explanation of the ‘mechanics and influences’ at work ‘behind SoulSpace and JustChurch, two fresh expressions that operate in the city of Bradford’ and looks at ‘the movements, the context, the people and the processes that combined to produce a new form of Church that is serious about the task of liberation’. In the second part of the book Howson is concerned with ‘some of the global and local issues of our times, from climate change to supporting those seeking sanctuary’, and he ends his chapters with reference to a theological framework of

I

‘Education, Action, Reflection and Sustaining (EARS)’, an ‘extension of the “action/reflection” model’, which he hopes will be of value to others ‘trying to give shape to a liberating and prophetic ministry’. Howson writes in a style that is at once both accessible and engaging and his arguments are thought-provoking and convincing: ‘In the twenty-first century, churches must commit themselves fully to active engagement with the issues of peace, justice and the environment. A renewed and vigorous programme for social change will see our faith becoming relevant again and, as we have seen in Bradford, will attract people back into the Church’. Howson is certainly committed to such a task. As Barbara Glasson observes in her afterword, Chris is ‘passionate both about his faith and the place where he lives. He is

simply prepared to put his body where his beliefs are. He lives what he speaks, and this is incarnation’. This was certainly my impression upon meeting Chris while on a placement in Bradford as an Ordinand, and I was thrilled to hear of the publication of this book. Indeed, Glasson offers an appropriate tribute to Howson and his gospelinfused work, which will serve to challenge, move and inspire individuals, congregations and communities: ‘This is a joyful book,’ she writes. ‘It is a book about liberation and the way in which faith can liberate the human spirit. ‘But it is also a deeply challenging book, an account of what can happen when we take faith out and about with us, when we let it seep into our souls and bring a thirst for justice’. Further details on Bradford SoulSpace may be found at: www.bradfordsoulspace.org


17

crosslincs

Engage in the conversation e the first to find out the latest news from the Diocese of Lincoln by signing up to a brand new Facebook page. Facebook, the social networking site, has more than 500 million users worldwide, allowing people to keep in touch with friends and organisations. The Diocese of Lincoln’s Facebook page, www.facebook.com/dioceselincoln can be visited, whether or not you are a Facebook user. By clicking “like”, news, video, the daily prayer focus, and much more will all be added seamlessly to your social media feed, allowing you to keep track of day-today developments in the Diocese, and add your opinions and questions in the blink of an eye.

B

Consecration of Christopher Lowson 72nd Bishop of Lincoln 21 September 2011, 11am Westminster Abbey For more information, visit www.lincoln.anglican.org/consecration or call 01522 504037 To secure a coach seat, all reservation forms must be accompanied by appropriate payment. Ticket(s) for the service will be issued on the coach. For those travelling independently, tickets for the service only are available by e-mailing trisha.cook@lincoln.anglican.org We will be unable to respond to reservation requests received after Tuesday, 9 August, 2011. Reservation Form Please complete and return this form as soon as possible Name (in block capitals) Address (including postcode)

Email address Telephone I would like

tickets for the coach at £12.50 per person for the return journey

Please select which coach departure point you wish to be collected from (the return point will be the same):

Crosslincs distributor dies he communications team was saddened by the news of the death of Derek Bray, who for several years had assisted with the distribution of Crosslincs in the Corringham and Lawres Deaneries, and within the city of Lincoln. Passionate about football, Derek had worked as a referees assessor for the Football Association, and representatives from the world of football at the funeral included World Cup Final referee Howard Webb.

T

Derek Bray Derek died in hospital following a bout of pneumonia. He is survived by wife Linda, son Andrew and step-sons Paul and Simon. Will Harrison, editor of Crosslincs, paid tribute saying, “Derek’s warmth and enthusiasm will be sorely be missed by us at Crosslincs. “He was a man who made an impact on an extraordinary number of people. “Our thoughts and prayers are with Linda, Andrew, Paul and Simon at this difficult time.”

Boston  Horncastle  Sleaford  Bourne  Lincoln  Spalding  Grantham  Louth  Stamford  Grimsby  Scunthorpe  A cheque is enclosed for the total amount of £ Cheques should be made payable to the “LDTBF” and envelopes sent to the Diocesan Office clearly marked “Consecration of The Bishop of Lincoln”. Please do not send cash. I will be making my own travelling arrangements and would like

Head of Communications, Will Harrison said, “Social media give us previously inconceivable opportunities to reach a relevant audience in the quickest possible time, but most importantly provides a platform for instantaneous feedback and discussion.” “If you haven’t tried Facebook yet, why not take this opportunity? We’re looking forward to hearing from you!” The Diocese also uses Twitter to share the latest news and information. Visit twitter.com/lincolncomms

free tickets for the service

An early departure time will be necessary for coach passengers to ensure adequate time for travelling and to allow time to be seated in Westminster Abbey, details of which will be confirmed nearer the date. There will be a comfort stop on both the outward and return journeys.

Please return the form to Trisha Cook Diocese of Lincoln, The Old Palace, Minster Yard, Lincoln LN2 1PU Tel: 01522 504037 or e-mail: trisha.cook@lincoln.anglican.org

100 years ago From the Lincoln Diocesan Magazine, May, June and July 1911

The Lincolnshire Labourer When men of education besprinkle their conversation with beastly, awful, oaths and other choice expressions and epithets, what can we expect of the less educated labourer? Bad or foul language is largely a matter of habit, often used unconsciously and without any definitive meaning, as an “epithet,” something added on and thought to make what is said more striking and effective. Often a labourer will use much bad language when quite in a good temper. It is a habit (though a bad one), and he knows no better (though it’s a pity he doesn’t). When in earnest or not quite sober his language is heavily gross.

People’s dwellings Ought the Church of the Diocese to have a policy for promoting improved dwellings for the people? If so, what ought the policy to be? In most parishes it is more than probably that some cottages are overcrowded, producing a low vitality, a dim sense of right and wrong, and an ineradicable tendency to loose living. Other cottages are not healthy. Low ceilings, small

windows, damp floors or walls, no supply, or an inadequate supply of good water, insanitary arrangements−these in part and in varying degrees account for feeble health, germs of diseases or tendencies to certain ailments.

tion of them, dependent upon the endowments consecrated one thousand years ago, presents many inequalities.

The Coronation of George V

They are foolish people who express contempt for the English kingship. The English kingship has been made and moulded by the English people. The King is in every sense the reflection of their own good sense and moderation. He is meant to be the typical Englishman. Loyalty to the King is not loyalty to foibles, or toadyism. It is loyalty to an England embodied in her institutions. We have had a great Queen and a great King; both had failings. Many of us have much greater failings. No man or woman, king, queen or peasant, is perfect. But both were loyal to the spirit of England, and England was loyal to both. And now the grandson and the son is come to reign, and we are glad to hear that in his love of home life, his care for his children, his love of the sea, his patience under gossip, his interest in the poor and the suffering, he is again the typical Englishman.

It is a matter of devout thanksgiving that we have a King and Queen full of the activity of youth, eager in all respects to fulfil their high duties, and setting before their people the example of a godly and happy household. It has been abundantly clear during the last week how completely they have won the confidence and affection of their people: and the young Prince of Wales [the future King Edward VIII] touched all hearts by his simplicity, and his obvious desire to fill aright the high place he has been called to occupy.

Church Finance The subject of Church finance is felt by all to be a very pressing one. The total fund available are inadequate to the Church’s work in the present day, and the distribu-

On Kingship


18

crosslincs

Doctrinal divide Penal substitutionary atonement is the doctrine that Christ died on the cross as a substitute for sinners. Yet scholars from different traditions are divided on the implications of the doctrine. The Revd Stephen Hearn, curate of Market Deeping, and the Revd Edward Bowes-Smith, parish priest of St Peter-in-Eastgate, Lincoln, discuss the implications of penal substitution theory from different sides of the argument.

Stephen Hearn

he idea that Jesus is our substitute is an important one. But the concept of penal substitution is fraught with difficulty. Much of this difficulty flows from seeing a sacrifice as the death of something or someone. This narrow focus on sacrifice as death reduces the cross to punishment. It is much better to see a sacrifice as the offering of something. Jesus’ “fragrant offering and sacrifice”, is not primarily his death; it is his whole, perfect life. Yet the offering of perfect love was always going to be met with the hatred of sin and lead to Jesus’ death. The suffering of the cross comes from human sin not divine wrath. When we talk about God (or God’s holiness) requiring satisfaction for sin we run into trouble. God cannot need anything – he is absolutely sufficient. God does not change. When we say that God forgives us, we are not describing a change in God’s attitude towards us (as when human beings forgive one another). We are describing a change in us. We are enabled to respond to the love of God as God’s beloved children – but that love was always unchangingly

T

Edward Bowes-Smith present towards us. Theologians have had more success talking about what is due to God from his creatures rather than what God requires from his creatures; and what is due to God from us is perfect worship. Giving what is due to God is not about what God needs from us, it is about fulfilling our created destiny – to enter forever more deeply into the life of God. In worshipping God as we ought the Holy Spirit draws us into that deeper experience of the divine life. “For we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit intercedes with sighs too deep for words…” This is where the language of substitution is crucial. We are not able to worship God as we ought, and in worshipping God experience our divine destiny, because of our sin. But, because Jesus was God’s own Son “in the likeness of sinful flesh,” he is a human being capable of giving perfect worship to God; and this is what he offers on the cross. Worship is not only what we do in a liturgical gathering; it is the orientation of our whole lives towards God, and therefore towards the image of God in others. Jesus offers to God a whole life lived in complete obedience to the Father and in loving service to others. Jesus offers the worship to God we cannot. But when we are baptised, the Holy Spirit unites us to Christ so that we can offer with him his perfect sacrifice of praise to God. And we are united with Jesus in the fruit of that worship: resurrection. “Therefore we have been buried with him by baptism into death, so that, just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, so we might walk  in newness of life.”

or Christ, our Passover Lamb, has been sacrificed.Therefore let us keep the Festival. (1 Corinthians 5.7-8). What is it exactly that we celebrate? And where does the doctrine of penal substitution fit in the jigsaw? The usual dismissive caricature of the doctrine of penal substitution goes something like this: ‘a righteous God is angry with sinners and demands justice. His wrath can only be appeased through bringing about the violent death of his Son.’ Put like that it seems grotesque that party A (God), in order to deal with B’s sin (humanity) punishes C (Jesus). Penal substitution rightly understood, however, teaches us that God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit together purposed that the Son should become a man, and as a man, bear on the cross God’s just punishment for sin in the place of sinners. As John Stott puts it: ‘We must never make Christ the object of God’s punishment or God the object of Christ’s persuasion, for both God and Christ were subjects not objects, taking the initiative together to save sinners’ (The Cross of Christ, 2nd edition, p. 151). Father and Son act together, not as two separate agents with their own plans. The cross becomes the place where

F

God’s love for us is shown as well as, and at the same time as, his justice. Sin is seen to be serious, eternal in its consequences. God’s grace is seen in all its glory – my debt is paid; what I could not do for myself, God does for me in and through his one and only Son. It still stirs my soul however many times I hear it or sing it or invite people to make it their own experience. To hold to this understanding of the cross does not involve going around telling people that God is cross with them. It is first and foremost a message of grace. Despite what we are like, God reaches out in a way that both satisfies his holiness and in a way that fulfils his love for what he has made. Critics sometimes dismiss penal substitution as too individualistic and as having nothing to say to society at large. Well, it is personal. I approach Easter knowing that Jesus Christ died for me, personally. It’s what turned a figure of history into my own Lord and Saviour. Let it be said that we must affirm the personal: every individual’s greatest need is reconciliation with God. Yet it is also deeply social in its impact. We learn that sin is serious and we are held responsible for our actions by our Creator. So, we see criminals not just as victims of their upbringing but as being capable of being judged and punished. But with judgement comes mercy for all who want it. Hence the use of schemes like probation and early release. When I trained as a lawyer, many years ago now, I was struck time and again at the way in which Christian concepts had formed and shaped our legal system and our understanding of justice. Penal substitution then has a foundational place in Christian theology. There are other pieces of the Easter jigsaw but this doctrine fits right at the centre. It is the piece that makes sense of the rest and completes the most magnificent of pic tures.


19

crosslincs

New web presence for sector ministry Terry Miller new website for Lincolnshire’s sector chaplaincies has been launched, hand-in-hand with a report highlighting the work chaplains do. These elements mark a new era in the work of Lincolnshire Chaplaincy Services (LCS) on behalf of the churches of Lincolnshire, and it is hoped its presence on the web will make the work much more accessible, and will involve a wider range of people, as the chaplains and the LCS Board share the work in news reports, blogs and in-depth articles. The seven full-time chaplains with the volunteers and associates, work in a wide range of situations from the Humber to the Wash, in chaplaincy to the economy in town and country, in education in colleges and university, in the sustaining of our communities, managing the land and caring for the environment.

A

The seven full-time chaplains work in a wide range of situations from the Humber to the Wash.

The Church’s commitment to chaplaincy in Lincolnshire goes back a long way. Ecumenical partnerships were set up in the 70s, 80s and 90s to cement that shared work and wide co-operation, yet the origins go back further still. Bishop Edward King in the early 20th century was involved in many important developments in the old county of Lincolnshire. He was there when new docks were opened at Immingham, and when the new water reservoirs and pumping stations were opened in Lincoln which marked an end to the terrible cholera epidemics. In his ministry he sought to get out and about to be with the people, especially using the railways. His famous phrase, “Through the villages to Jerusalem” echoes that sense of wanting to be where the people are and recognises that the Church’s ministry is both about the regular life of faith and worship and also the outreach to the wider community in work and leisure. After World War II profound changes took place in the nation’s economic base in both town and country. Bishop Kenneth Riches responded by setting up the Industrial Mission and Agricultural Mission. In the 1970s many in-depth consultations in Lincoln took a national lead on responding to the changes, predating the reports Faith in the Countryside and Faith in the City by some years. Bishops Simon Phipps and

Robert Hardy continued the enthusiastic support of these important chaplaincies, and this spirit continued with Bishop John Saxbee, under whose office LCS was set up as an independent charitable company, receiving its status at the beginning of 2009. The Presidents of Churches Together in All Lincolnshire continue to give strong support to the vision of LCS − the physical, mental and spiritual well-being of the inhabitants of Lincolnshire. Chaplaincy is a distinct ministry, different in character from regular ministry, and some say its origins can be traced as far back as St Martin of Tours who famously cut half his cloak, or ‘capella’, for a destitute man. Others say chaplaincy dates back to the Royal Chaplains who gave pastoral and spiritual care to the King, and because they served a higher authority could also provide moral and ethical challenge to the King. Yet to this day the idea of chaplaincy

is sometimes met with surprise with people sometimes asking if it is a new idea.

To this day the idea of chaplaincy is sometimes met with surprise as people ask if chaplaincy is a new idea. The report Life Changing Stories attempts to highlight the work of the chaplaincy in order to give a better idea of what the chaplains do. Susan Walker for instance, who is chaplain at John Leggott Further Education College in Scunthorpe, challenges her students with the question, “what difference can you make to the world?” Alan Robson, as chaplain to agriculture, is

often involved with big issues such as the Nocton Dairies planning proposal, which stirred strong feelings around the UK, as well as locally. He is also known for going that extra mile to help farming families in crisis and setting up support networks. Each chaplain has stories to tell. Chaplaincy can often find itself in a hard place, where prophetically it is called to say difficult things, or to challenge assumptions. Christians are called to live in the world as ‘Faith in the Countryside’ said well over 20 years ago: “All too often, spirituality has been felt to be confined to the home and leisure time. What is needed is a spirituality of the market place, the shop, the  office and the traffic lights.” To receive a copy of Life Changing Stories, contact Alison McNish on 01522 504073 or at a.mcnish@lincschaplaincy.org.uk Visit the new LCS website at www.lincschaplaincy.org.uk


20

crosslincs

The difficult future of further eduction L

Colleges are facing yet another round of re-organisation and redundancies. Even those colleges whose budgets are still healthy are having to large-scale cuts.

One big issue is the cut in the student entitlement budget by 75%. This budget covers such things as pastoral support, tutorial and enrichment. It is of course vitally important that students get good value education and excellent academic results, but there is more to education than academic qualifications. We are preparing students, whether 16 to 19 year olds or adult returners, for life in a rapidly changing and challenging world, where employment opportunities may well be reduced. There is a important place in post-16 education for spiritual, moral, social and cultural (SMSC) development such as selfawareness, respect for all and open-mindedness. Spiritual development relates to the

More of the best churches in the Diocese of Lincoln chosen by Keith Halliday, DAC Secretary, Matt Cooper, Historic Churches Officer, and Ben Stoker, Open Churches Officer. Coates, St Edith A uniquely un-spoilt church. Small and out of the way, it has a quiet humility which defies its significance. Here is an English parish church which still contains the same interior features present there well before the Reformation. Especially rare is the division between the nave and the chancel. The fifteenthcentury Rood Screen survives well, and is topped by the only medieval Rood Loft of any parish church in the country. Above the Rood Loft are wooden panels which still contain medieval paintwork of the Virgin Mary and countless flowers. Time moves at a different pace between these walls (even the pews are medieval!). It is open to visitors every day, and is short drive from Stow Minster.

Susan Walker ike most of the public sector, Further Education has been hit by government cuts. The cuts will affect colleges, staff and learners in several ways. The cuts to Educational Maintenance Awards (EMAs) have received some media attention. Students from families on low incomes have depended on EMAs to keep young people in college so that they can further their education and widen their career choices. The Government has promised some funding for disadvantaged students but will not be unrolling their plans fully until after the end of the consultation period. This makes it difficult for colleges to plan and put application processes into place. This has implications for recruitment and retention. There will be many students and prospective students who will be forced financially to take low-paid, possibly parttime jobs instead of accessing education. Colleges are facing yet another round of re-organisation and redundancies. Even those colleges whose budgets are still fairly healthy are having to face large-scale funding cuts over the next three years. This will have a great impact on colleges and involve them in tackling some tough questions. What staffing cuts are necessary? What courses are not financially viable? Will students be able to access certain courses in certain geographical areas?

Hidden gems of Lincolnshire:

PHOTOGRAPH: WILL HARRISON

St Mary the Virgin, Frampton

The Revd Susan Walker is chaplain to John Leggott College in Scunthorpe. development of the inner life, and the attribution of meaning to experience. Moral development means exploring and recognising shared values as well as developing the ethical framework that underpins these values. Social development involves learners having a political and socio-economic context which enables them to work effectively together and participate successfully in the community as a whole. Cultural development generally refers to the understanding of one’s own culture and of other cultures locally, regionally, nationally and globally. At present these important developmental goals are delivered through a wide variety of activities, such as tutorials, citizenship and enrichment programmes, whole institution events, pastoral support, counselling and volunteering. Funding for this important area has been cut and colleges are being forced to make difficult decisions about what is essential for the wellbeing of the learner. At a time when mental health problems are on the increase among young people, this important strand of education, development and support is vital, and should not be squeezed out. The development of emotional intelligence, life and people skills, a sense of responsibility and respect for others are not just essential for the wellbeing of the individual but are important for vocational progress and the world of work. Ten years ago there was a strong chaplaincy presence in all our colleges, but over the years funding from both colleges and the churches has resulted in severe reductions. Yet colleges are even more aware today of the need for chaplaincy to support colleges and to help deliver the SMSC

agenda. Good education challenges, changes and develops the whole person and students, whether aged 16-19 or adult returners, need plenty of support and encouragement as they engage with the challenges of life.

This impressive Grade I church is located off the A16, between Algarkirk and Boston at the far end of the village. The building has elements of c12, c13, c14, c18 work, a restoration in 1890 by Hodgson Fowler and a fine c13 broach spire which stands proud across the fields. Of particular note are the medieval floor tiles, the effigy thought to be that of Johanna de Huntingford - a patron of the church in 1275, the mensa or stone top of a medieval altar now used as a base of an altar table, all in the south transept and the c15 screen. The pulpit is from Bourne Abbey and dates from the mid 17th century. Access is via a keyholder, details thereof in the church porch. St John the Baptist, Lincoln

Good education challenges, changes and develops the whole person, and students, whether aged 16-19 or adult returners, need plenty of support and encouragement.

Lincolnshire Chaplaincy Services is developing teams of volunteer chaplains to help support colleges, staff and students. Three new very part time chaplains have just begun to work at Grantham College. At Leggott in Scunthorpe two Chinese volunteers from the local Methodist church are running a Christian Union in Cantonese for International Students from Hong Kong. There are clergy and lay Christian governors in several colleges. There are many opportunities for voluntary work in Further Education Colleges, and Lincolnshire Chaplaincy Services are developing a training and support system for new volunteers, and would like to hear from anyone who is  interested in this work.

The church of St John the Baptist does not nestle in one of the gentle folds of the Lincolnshire Wolds; it is not to be seen against the huge skies of the Fens; and it doesn’t shoulder the weight of hundreds of years of history. But it is one of the most remarkable churches in the Diocese of Lincoln. Consecrated in 1963 and situated on the Ermine housing estate in uphill Lincoln, this Sam Scorer-designed church could easily be overlooked, but most certainly shouldn’t be. From the outside it is the distinctly shaped roof that captures the attention; but upon entering the church the eyes are drawn wide by a combination of form, light and colour. The ceiling follows the hyperbolic paraboloid shape of the roof, giving the visitor the impression of being sheltered by an enormous upturned boat; daylight floods in from the west through clear glass; and at the east end is the burst of colour that is Keith New’s extraordinary window. A key for access to St John the Baptist, Lincoln is available from Fr Stephen Hoy (see notice on the church door for details) or Ermine House, located opposite the church.


21

crosslincs

Advertise your event in the Deanery Diary for free Visit www.lincoln.anglican.org/yourevent

Deanery Diary

See details of more events including a busy season of flower festivals at www.lincoln.anglican.org

9 September 2011 New Orleans Heat live at All Saints’ Church, Winterton, Light supper and wine included. 7.30pm. Tickets £10.50 from Jean Key, 01724 732684.

27-28 August 2011 Fotherby Open Gardens & Illustrated Talk on British Orchids and their Habitats: Saturday 28 August: A talk by Gwen and Phil Phillips. Tickets, £5, inclusive of cheese and wine. Sun 28 August: Fotherby Gardens will be open to visitors. The event is in aid of St Andrew’s Hospice and entry is £3.50, children free. Follow signs to parking area in Peppin Lane, close to the first garden to receive a map of gardens and to pay entrance. Teas available. Barbara on 01507 605016

15-17 July 2011 The Marshchapel Arts Exhibition - St Mary’s Church, Marshchapel, 11am - 5.30pm. Exhibition of fine art. Exhibitors (invitation only) drawn from Lincolnshire and E. Yorkshire. Refreshments, other interest stalls all day in marquee. Entry by catalogue, £1.50 on door. For more information see www.marshchapelarts.co.uk Scunthorpe

16-17 July 2011

Grimsby

Art & Craft Exhibition St Mary’s Church, Manby, nr Louth. The exhibition and sale of work of local artists. Crafts will include jewellery, wood carving, spinning, alpaca wool display & competition of childrens art. String quartet and organ music, Refreshments & a BBQ 12 to 2. Entrance £2 under 16 free. Details from Chris or Brenda 01507 327634 or email jimanby327-church@yahoo.co.uk

23-24 July 2011 Gainsborough

Market Rasen

A celebration of Arts and Crafts St James Church, Spilsby, July 23, 10am - 6pm, July 24 10.30am-5pm. Celebrating St James Day with a display of a variety of local Arts and Crafts to enjoy or purchase. Food served all weekend. Free admission. For More information, call 01790 753802

Louth

5 August 2011 Dave Bussey from Radio Lincolnshire St Clement of Rome Church, Fiskerton, 7.30pm. The talk will include Dave’s 30 years as a BBC radio presenter - how programmes are put together and the personalities he has met. He will also reflect on his time as a sub-mariner in the Royal Navy. To book please call 01522 752117 - £5 cost includes light-bites.

Lincoln Horncastle Skegness

22 September Grosseteste’s Legacy: Lecture by Dr Philippa Hoskin (Lincoln University) ‘Grosseteste’s Legacy: Pastoral Care and Politics in Lincoln Diocese in the later 13th century’. Bishop Grosseteste is famous as a theologian and scientist, and first Chancellor of Oxford University. But what was Bishop Grosseteste like as Bishop of Lincoln? For tickets, which are £6 per head, contact Carol Bennett educationofficer@lincolncathedral.com, 01522 561618

Sleaford

Boston

18 September 2011 400th Anniversary Celebration of the KJV: St Helen’s, Brant Broughton. 10.30am: a traditional Prayer Book Sung Eucharist, using the 1611 Bible; 11.30am-5pm Bible Exhibition. Further information from rector.leadenham@btopenworld.com

Grantham

17 July 2011 Galaxy Jazz Band will play at the Parish Church of St Peter & St Paul, Kirton in Holland, Nr Boston from 2.30pm-5pm. A six piece jazz band playing a mixture of traditional and middle of the road jazz, tickets £6 on the door. Refreshments. Proceeds to church funds.

Spalding

15 July Stamford

The Lincs Effect present ‘The Sacred and the Profane’ at St Mary Whaplode, 7.30pm. Born out of a love of choral diversity, and a commitment to taking a high standard of music into the community, The Lincs Effect have appeared widely both within their home county of Lincolnshire and further afield. They have made numerous appearances on television and radio including BBC Radio 3. Contact Cyril Hearn for tickets on 01406 371848

10 September 2011 Lunchtime Woodwind Recital Sleaford Parish Church (St Denys), NG34 7SH. We welcome you to another Saturday lunchtime recital at Sleaford Parish Church. A freewill offering is taken.

Advertise your event in Crosslincs. Visit www.lincoln.anglican.org/yourevent


22

crosslincs

Church school’s lasting impression Phyllis Maiden

From an orphanage to a Church of England school: Nettleham resident Phyllis Maiden reflects gratefully on happy memories of a poor childhood.

was in trouble again and late for school with my friends. Doubtless I was clutching a crumpled bunch of catkins, a broken feather or part of a bird’s nest.  Mrs Sally Jones was the teacher at my village school and she was very strict about children running across the churchyard opposite the school. When I was five years old I had been taken from my orphanage  and fostered with a family who lived in Nash, near to Clee Hill in Shropshire.  I was insecure and unhappy, but the little Church of England school, nestled deep in

I

Phyllis Maiden went to live in Nash, Shropshire after being fostered out of an orphanage. She is pictured, above, with the rest of her class and teacher Mrs Jones at Nash school. the countryside was my lifeline and helped me to realise that there was kindness and respect in the world. The building was Victorian – the first school on the site had been built as early as the mid-1800s. And built in that style the

Nash Church, Shropshire

windows were high so that we could not see outside and be distracted. There were only 24 of us in the school, mostly farm children and poor.  Post War times were hard and money was scarce in rural areas. It was a long walk to school through a honeycomb of lanes with high hedges.  I loved the different seasons of fruit and flowers, starting with primroses, violets and cowslips and ending with nuts and blackberries. Journeys to school were punctuated with finds and often we arrived with fingers and faces stained with blackberry juice and hands covered with nettle stings.  We were all taught  in one room and ranged in ages from five to 11.  Mrs Jones made sure we knew many Bible stories and hymns.  Every morning she played the

piano for us as we stood in a circle around her.  We sang lustily;  All Things Bright and Beautiful or Immortal, Invisible followed by reciting the Lord’s Prayer with our hands together and eyes tightly closed.  I was convinced that God had painted all the birds and flowers individually and placed them in the hedges and trees. Splodges appeared on birds’  eggs because God did not have time to paint perfect shapes. I imagined that one day I would feed thousands of people with a few loaves and fishes or rescue a fallen person in the style of the good Samaritan. I was lonely and had a vivid imagination. We rarely went to the sea. If we did I used to wonder if I could part it when I waved my hand. Nash Church, medieval with a wooden steeple, was decorated by us at Harvest Festival with piles of vegetables and fruit off the farms.  This lovely autumn bounty was taken to Tenbury  Wells Hospital for the patients. We also collected pennies during Lent and these were sent to Doctor Barnardo’s. We used to pick posies of primroses in the Spring and Mrs Jones sent them by train to Great Ormond Street Hospital for sick children. Christmas time meant The Holly and the Ivy and Away in a Manger standing by a Christmas tree. Mrs Jones would not tolerate bullying or rudeness. She knew my past and was very patient with a sweet smile. Every afternoon she would recite a prayer as we stood quietly before running home. The local vicar used to visit us and ask us questions about the parables. We had to treat him with great respect and stand up when he walked into the room.  I kept in touch with Mrs Jones until she died at the age of 92. I thanked her for her kindness and she said ‘I loved you all like my own’.  A wonderful  legacy  from an  amazing Christian teacher.

I believe in God Mark Hocknull Head of Ministry Training, Head of the Lincoln School of Theology and Chancellor of Lincoln

Mark continues his exploration of the Apostle’s Creed: The third day He rose again from the dead. he Resurrection of Jesus is the historical launching point of Christianity. The events of Easter mark the starting point for faith in Christ. It is also the foundation upon which the Christian Faith stands. No Resurrection, no Christianity, no Saviour, just an interesting man who said some interesting and challenging things and was killed for agitation he stirred up. The Resurrection is God’s

T

endorsement of all that Jesus said and did in his lifetime, the ultimate repetition of the affirmation given at Jesus’ baptism and repeated in the Transfiguration narrative, ‘this is my Son, listen to him.’ On the one hand The Resurrection is bound up with the past as the vindication of Jesus’ earthly life, on the other it points to the future and the transformation awaiting all after death. The Resurrection is an utterly unique event. No one else in the history of the world has experienced it. It is true that Scripture contains accounts of people who died and whom Jesus brought back to life, and before that Elijah and Elisha also brought the dead back to life. This is not Resurrection however. The widow’s son, the synagogue leader’s daughter, Lazarus, all of these were revived from death but not resurrected. They were the same ‘normal’ human beings after their revival as they were before it. In the end, all of these people died. Resurrection is very different from this. It goes beyond the mere revival of a corpse. It is the transfor-

mation of the whole person. As St Paul puts it “what is sown a physical body is raised a spiritual body” (1Corinthians 15:44). The Resurrection is not a return to life as we know it; it is a transformation into a totally new life. Many have argued over the exact meaning of Paul’s term ‘spiritual body.’ He does not mean that life after death is as a disembodied spirit, but rather that the spiritual body is a living being which, instead of being separated from God as its origin, as we are in our present existence, is united to God as its origin and source. Because it is connected to God, permanently, it can no longer suffer death. This is the future that awaits us, and it is decisively demonstrated by the fate of Jesus. Christianity stands or falls on the question of whether Jesus really was raised from the dead at a particular time in history. We do not have direct access to Jesus to ask him what happened to him. All we can do is rely on the historical evidence: the empty tomb, the eyewitnesses to the risen Jesus, the persistent faith of the early

Christians in the face of death, the persistence of the community of the Christian faith from that time. If, from the beginning, we work with the belief that the dead do not rise, then all of this will count for nothing. If however we remain open minded on this question, then the evidence can speak to us in clearer ways and attests to the fact that something in history occurred which triggered these accounts and founded the Christian faith. Set aside the prejudice that the dead do not rise and the step of faith to say that something was the Resurrection of the crucified Jesus is a reasonable step to take. Once taken, the step of faith opens up whole new vistas of understanding, for now we see with the eyes of faith and can see God at work in the world. We cannot transmute the Resurrection into a spiritual event. We need to listen to the Resurrection narrative and let it tell us of the empty grave, and the new life beyond death which has been made visible. In the Resurrection the future has broken into the present. 


23

crosslincs

Crosslincs 01522 504034 crosslincs@lincoln.anglican.org

Dropping in Markby

Nick Edmonds

here aren’t many in England, but the designs of a 17th century farmer on the valuable slate of Markby Church, near Alford, left it with the unique status as Lincolnshire’s only thatched church. Part of the Alford group of churches, St Peter’s is easy to spot when approaching from the A1111 Sutton Rd to the West. This is because, although diminutive in stature, the building sits on the edge of the small hamlet of Markby, home to around 50 residents. Who’s who? We met with Treasurer, Stuart Hodgkins, Churchwarden, Beryl Tommis, Secretary, Mary Johnson, Churchwarden, Kathleen Windsor, and Parish Priest, the Revd Charles Keay. Services Within the Alford Group of churches, St Peter’s enjoys especially close links St Andrew’s in the neighbouring village of Hannah, with whom a monthly schedule of two services per month is shared, as well as a PCC. These come in the form of Common Worship Morning Prayer on the first Sunday of every month, and Evening Prayer on the third. These alternate monthly between Markby and Hannah, with both services in a given month taking place in the same church. When there is a fifth Sunday, a joint Eucharist takes place at one of the churches in the group. “There’s a bit of a myth that Anglicans don’t travel too well,” said Stuart. “But that’s not true round here – this group is very supportive of all its churches.” Extra services at St Peter’s include occasional Eucharist led by Ordained Local Minister Wilma Horton, Harvest and flower festivals, and a well-attended carol service at Christmas. The Hymnal is Hymns Old & New. What’s going on? Despite the challenge presented by a lack of amenities such as toilets and running water, its straw summit and fascinating interior make St Peter’s an attractive visitor destination, with several even arriving while our visit was taking place. Well worth the trip, St Peter’s also boasts a vibrant parish life, with events such as coffee mornings and flower festivals taking place at the church, and larger events such as children’s parties and fetes hosted at a group “Church House,” which is opposite nearby Bilsby Church. The church

T

PHOTOGRAPH: NICK EDMONDS

Nick drops in to Markby, near Alford.

Straw hat: Kathleen, Beryl, Mary, Stuart and Charles at Markby. See more photos at www.facebook.com/dioceselincoln also commands a great deal of loyalty and support from Markby’s proud residents, some who have moved to the area recently, and others whose families have been resi-

dent for generations. This spirit was remarkably embodied last year when St Peter’s was able to raise £30,000 locally to have the church’s iconic roof re-thatched in tradition-

al Norfolk reed. As Charles puts it, with no pubs or shops, the church is both an important community centre and a sacramental sign of God’s presence in Markby.

Deaths

Contact Information

Gazette Appointments The Revd Moira Astin, Vicar of Southlake, St James (Diocese of Oxford) has become Priest in Charge of the parish of St Lawrence, Frodingham and Area Dean of the Isle of Axholme, Manlake and Yarborough. The Revd Martyn Taylor, Rector of the benefice of St George with St Paul, Stamford, has also become Priest in Charge of the parish of Christ Church Stamford. The Revd Jacqueline Morton, Non Stipendiary Minister in the parishes of Sibsey with Frithville has also become NSM in the Brothertoft group of parishes.

Resignations The Revd David Clune, Assistant Curate of St Mary and St Nicolas, with St Paul Spalding, to be Team Vicar in the Sutton (St James) and Wawne Team Ministry with responsibility for the parish of St James, Sutton-on-Hull (Diocese of York). The Revd Peter Tompkins, Priest in Charge of the Laceby group of parishes, will become Priest in Charge of Brough (St Michael) with Stainmore, Musgrave and Warcop and Deanery Network Youth Church Minister (Diocese of Carlisle) on 4 September 2011. The Revd Charles Keay, Priest in Charge of the Alford group of parishes, has become Team Vicar in the North End Portsmouth Team Ministry (Diocese of Portsmouth).

Retirement The Revd John Simeon Bishop, Diocesan Chaplain to the Deaf, retired on 3 June 2011.

The Very Revd Oliver TwisletonWykeham-Fiennes, former Dean of Lincoln, died on 8 June 2011, aged 85 years. See page four. The Revd Adrian Sullivan, deacon 1987, priest 1988, assistant curate of Holy Trinity, St James and St Michael Louth 1987-90, Priest in Charge, then Rector of the Marden Hill group 1990-2010, Priest in Charge of the Stickney Group 2007-2010, retired 2010 died on 28 April, aged 56 years. See page 16. The Revd Canon Dennis Askew, deacon 1958, priest 1959, Diocese of Ripon 1958-64, Vicar of Holland Fen 1964-69, Rector of Folkingham w Laughton, Vicar of Aswarby w Swarby, Rector of Osbournby w Scott Willoughby, Rector of Pickworth w Walcot and Vicar of Threckingham 1969-77, Priest in Charge Newton w Haceby and Aunsby w Dembleby 1972-77, Rector of South Lafford 1977-87, Rector of Ruskington 1987-96, Canon and Prebendary of Lincoln Cathedral 1986-2005, retired 1996 died on 14 March 2011, aged 81 years. The Revd Canon John Westland Hanson OBE, deacon 1943, priest 1944, Assistant Curate Louth w Welton-le-Wold Lincoln 1943-50, Chaplain and Lecturer RAF Flying College Manby and Rector of Grimoldby w Manby 1950-76, Rural Dean E Louthesk 1960-68, Chief Examiner Religious Studies Cambridge University 1966-82, Canon and Prebendary Lincoln Cathedral 1967-2002, Rural Dean Louthesk 1968-77, Vicar Woodhall Spa and Kirkstead and Priest in Charge Langton w Woodhall 1976-1988 retired 1988 died on 5 April 2011, aged 91 years.

The Bishop of Lincoln The Ven Christopher Lowson will be enthroned 72nd Bishop of Lincoln on 12 November 2011 in Lincoln Cathedral. The Bishop of Grimsby The Right Revd David Rossdale  01472 371715 8 bishop.grimsby@lincoln.anglican.org The Bishop of Grantham The Right Revd Dr Tim Ellis  01400 283344 8 bishop.grantham@lincoln.anglican.org The Archdeacon of Stow and Lindsey The Venerable Jane Sinclair  01673 849896 8 archdeacon.stowlindsey@lincoln.anglican.org The Archdeacon of Lincoln The Venerable Tim Barker  01529 304348 8 archdeacon.lincoln@lincoln.anglican.org Diocesan offices The Old Palace, Minster Yard, Lincoln LN2 1PU  01522 504050  01522 504051 8 reception@lincoln.anglican.org : www.lincoln.anglican.org The Chief Executive Mr Max Manin  01522 504030 8 chief.executive@lincoln.anglican.org


24

crosslincs

Smallest room for improvement Nick Edmonds church near Lincoln, hampered for centuries by an absence of running water, has celebrated the completion of a ground-breaking water-free eco-loo at a cost of £12,000. All Saints, Greetwell, parts of which date back to Norman times, had struggled with larger events, when expensive and unsightly portable toilets had to be hoisted in. But with the new toilet in place, planning is in the pipeline for a variety of events. Designed by Welsh engineering company NatSol, the toilet uses the Coandă effect, to draw off urine which soaks into the ground elsewhere, and clever airflow management to ensure no foul smells infiltrate the church’s brand new throne room. With the whole complex sitting above two large underground vaults, the toilet pedestal spends one year above each, during which time the contents of the other are left to degrade. When a year has passed, the dormant tank can be emptied for usage as compost, and the pedestal is again swapped. Councillor Irmgard

A

Flush with Pride: Councillor Irmgard Parrott and husband, Churchwarden Len show off Greetwell’s green facility. 1

2

3

9

4

5

6

7

8

10

Parrott, who has pushed the project forward, said it would be life-changing for both church and community. “Straight away, we can organise events where people will be at the church for much greater lengths of time,” she said. “It’s a popular church, and there’s a lot going on, so we have been desperate for it.” Irmgard, whose husband Len is churchwarden at All Saints, helped to land funding from Lincoln’s Cory Environmental Trust, who donate money to green projects from funds recouped through landfill tax. Any church wishing to apply for similar funding is encouraged to contact Cory Environmental Trust on 01522 533 488 or corytrust.lincoln@ntlworld.com

Prize crossword The first correct entry to crossword number 28 to be opened on 2 September 2011 will win £25. Send to: Crossword, Crosslincs, The Old Palace, Minster Yard, Lincoln LN2 1PU The editor’s decision is final. Photocopies acceptable. One entry per person

11

12

13

14

16

15

17

18

19

20

22

24

21

23

25

27

26

28

number 28

crosslincs

by Kettlebird

Scribble pad

is published by the Diocese of Lincoln.

The views of contributors do not necessarily reflect those held by the Diocese. Deadline for the next issue: 2 September 2011 Editor Will Harrison Reporter Nick Edmonds Printed by Mortons Print Ltd, Horncastle, Lincolnshire

Across 1 With sound arrangement may be balmy (5,4) 6 See 12 9 Large effort to restore thermal insulation (5) 10 No advance in RE account (8) 11 A tooth out of all recognition (3) 12, 4, 6a Choir just needs to say, sir, when rehearsing seasonal hymn (5,6,2,5,5) 14 Inventor of four stroke engine and fellow with no arms or back to the seat (7) 15 Owner-occupied property needs me to organise (7) 16 By which one slowly becomes erudite (7) 19 Thin country wine from South America. Not a warm one we hear (7) 22 Turning into a different key (11) 23 Got back from hill then decay set in (3) 24 Empty after 12,4 (9) 26 A spirited alternative to the Scotch (5) 27 Dragged before dogs and can be expensive (5) 28 Usually maintained but may be lowered on death (9)

Telephone: 01522 504034

crosslincs@lincoln.anglican.org

Down 1 Knight commander of company wind up from Africa (7) 2 Underillumination (7)

3 4 5 6 7 8 13 16 17 18 19 20 21 25

Polo necks worn by those attempting altitude? (4,7) See 12 DVD I see has been invented (7) Salt loved by all the nice girls (3) Air dies in confusion. Nocton swan song? (7) Yes, dynasty may lead to Chinese flower (7) Provides music on the wing (11) Hates to stop examinations (7) Entangle with large mix-up round very soft core (7) She’s too upset but calms eventually (7) Hybrid monster (7) Previously nobleman and I appear before monarch (7) Sticky grooves (7) His wife became NaCl (3) solution number 27

Congratulations to Edward Wenninger of Boston, the winner of crossword 27.

A F A B S T S H T R O U R C L E A H I N D I P R S O U N N P I K E U A C O R A K D

H Y S E T I N E N T S K A N A U A I T R E D M U L L E L F F R L Y A I R L I L R O N A H U M D E S N A A D L Y M E N A C M U D A S T A F F L I N O K F I D L E G L A N T I E R E E D

L T E N E T N E A K S E E D E R O N E S


Crosslincs 31