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Shiplock Brewing Opens in Richmond Food Trucks with a View

February 2019 Edition

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Tiny Bubbles

Behind the Menu DEVILS BACKBONE BASECAMP BREWPUB & MEADOWS


Volume 154 BlueMont Media Group P.O. Box 814 Nellysford, VA 22958 Phone: 757-630-3352 www.DineWineAndStein.com

Publisher Dave Renfro

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t’s all part of the experience. When you visit a Virginia brewery, you expect great beer. With expectations on the rise, visitors now expect an experience that includes local food. In this edition of Dine Wine & Stein, we travel across Virginia with stops at Devils Backbone Basecamp Brewpub & Meadows, Bald Top Brewing Company and the new Shiplock Brewing in Richmond. Of course, we enjoyed pints and tasting flights, but we pair the beer with some impressive food. If you are planning a special event, birthday, wedding or even a “date night”, you need to add some Tiny Bubbles. In this edition, we go behind the scenes at Rappahannock Cellars. Read about Virginia-made Tiny Bubbles and find out how easy it is to add them to any occasion. And we visit the Hostess City— Savannah, Georgia. We walk through this historical city and enjoy southern-made craft beverages and food. Plus, go back to the 1920’s with a stroll through the Prohibition Museum. As Spring arrives in Virginia, you will see the next edition of DW&S Magazine in April. We are celebrating, with Tiny Bubbles, our expanded calendar and reach. Cheers to DW&S Fans!

In this issue... Behind the Taste: Devils Backbone Basecamp & Meadows Nelson County, Virginia..................... 4 Getting into the Spirit.................................................................. 8 At the End of the Day.................................................................... 8 Black in Thyme............................................................................. 11 Shiplock Brewing..........................................................................14 A Food Truck… and a Cold Beer.................................................18 Baked Brie..................................................................................... 21 Tiny Bubbles................................................................................. 22 Book Review: Prohibition.......................................................... 28 DW&S Adventures: Savannah................................................... 32 The Spice Diva.............................................................................. 36

Creative Director Jenny Shannon

Executive Editor Kim Chappell

Contributing Writers Kim Chappell Shawn Gatesman John Hagarty Phyllis Hunter James Putbrese Dave Renfro Paula Thomasson Jennifer Waldera

Regional Reps Northern Virginia Victoria L. Zarbo victoria@dinewineandstein.com Central Virginia/Richmond Dave Renfro dave@dinewineandstein.com Charlottesville and Piedmont Bianca J. Johnson bianca@dinewineandstein.com Shenandoah Valley Brent W. Eberly brent@dinewineandstein.com

In The News: Your Coffee Break................................................ 45

Cover photography, DW&S Staff photo of Head Chef Frank Debons

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DW&S is a proud partner of the Virginia Wineries Association

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Dine, Wine & Stein is published six times per year and is available, free of charge, in Virginia and West Virginia. All creative material and text in this publication are the property of BlueMont Media Group and are intended for reference use only. Reproduction without written permission of the publisher is forbidden. © 2019, BlueMont Media Group


BEHIND THE TASTE: …AND THE MENU

by Kim Chappell

Devils Backbone Basecamp & Meadows Nelson County, Virginia

Photo Credit: Devils Backbone Marketing

The Basescamp Brewpub is the heart of the brand. It is also the heart of the community.

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hen Devils Backbone opened in 2008, I was a local to the small Blue Ridge community of Beech Grove, Virginia. My family has been “locals” since the 1700s. My great-grandfather walked back to his log cabin after the battle of Gettysburg. During the Depression, my grandfather was paid ten cents a day to tend and mend the dirt road that is now

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Beech Grove Road (RT 664), running beside Devils Backbone Basecamp Brewpub & Meadows. I bet both of them would have enjoyed a cold Devils Backbone beer. I would have liked to share a plate of the crafted dry rub wings and smoked deviled eggs with them. I often wonder what they would think of today’s Nelson County, RT 151 and Beech Grove.

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The mountains of Virginia’s Blue Ridge are thick with heritage cuisine. Smoked meats, cornbread, and deviled eggs have long been on the table. Including my family’s mountain table. So have greens, herbs, beets and sweet potatoes from the valley gardens. This mountain culture is alive within the Devils Backbone menu—along with a few chef- inspired spins on vintage recipes.


“ ” Everyone knows about the award-winning beer. I want to tell you about the food...

Photo Credit: Devils Backbone Marketing

Photo Credit: Dave Renfro

I recently sat down with family and friends around a large wooden table, next to a stacked stone fireplace in the brewpub. We ordered an array of smoked meats, including ribs, sausages and pulled pork. We added plates of the chef’s popular dry-rubbed Mountain Wings and those delicious deviled eggs. The seasonal salad was tossed with red beets grown in the on-site hoop houses, and we passed around a side of french fries. A farm table of food paired with pints and a few tasting flights. In 2019, Virginia craft beverage makers are striving to provide a “total experience” to brewpub visitors. And a paired menu of food is the cornerstone to that visitor experience. Let’s go Behind the Taste at Devils Backbone Brewpub & Meadows. Everyone knows about the award-winning beer. I want to tell you about the food. For this Behind the Taste, I want to tell you about the Farm-To-Food Menu at the Devils Backbone Basecamp in Nelson County. Agricultural farming has been the fabric of the community for generations. Devils Backbone’s Basecamp Brewpub’s menu is a hat-tip to this community. As you enter Basecamp, from crossroads of Rt 664 and Rt. 151, you first see the hoop houses and gardens. That is just a glimpse into the fresh food menu. To really learn about the creation of the Devils Backbone Basecamp Brewpub’s menu, I reached out to Heidi Crandall

(Co-Founder), Antonio Jorge (Director of Hospitality) and Frank Debons (Head Chef). The menu is a blend of local favorites, seasonings, and Devils Backbone’s own beer. You visit the Devils Backbone Basecamp to enjoy the vibrant beer collection, and then you fall in love with the whole experience.

To go Behind the Taste, I ask Devils Backbone a few questions… DW&S/Kim: Your menu changes with the seasons and is a reflection of local southern favorites, Devils Backbone beer and farm ingredients. The menu has a rhythm and a Virginia vibe. Tell us about the inspiration that the Devils Backbone beer brings to your recipe collection. Devils Backbone/Heidi: Beer is first and foremost. It is the compass of Basecamp Brewpub & Meadows . Everything else surrounds the beer in a partnership. The entire brewpub team works together with the agricultural tourism manager from the brewers, distillers, and the kitchen to implement the finest fresh and local ingredients into beer, spirits, and foods. In addition, we source local farmers for product from bread, eggs, greens, and meats based on the seasonality of their products.

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Photo Credit: Devils Backbone Marketing

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Devils Backbone/Frank: It is a lot of fun working with Devils Backbone beers, to cook with them and combine food pairings. Beer and BBQ go hand in hand, but sometimes, it is nice to go into a bit more creative direction and create innovative dishes that are inspired by classical southern food like tomato pie. I created a savory tomato cheesecake using our hoop house tomatoes (summer) and paired it with one of our newest beers, Hibiscus Hard Lemonade. DW&S/Kim: You are smoking your BBQ on-site in Beech Grove. I imagine a pit-master tending the smoker as the sun sets behind Three Ridges… and still tending the smoker as the sun comes back up over the East ridge. On an average week, how much pork, chicken, and beef are you smoking in your custom wood smoker?

dry rub. We enjoy it on your Mountain Wings… on fries… Are there any future plans for the rub? Perhaps, A new menu item that includes the rub? Devils Backbone/Heidi: The Mountain Dry Rubber wings, Dry Rub French Fries and our house made Chickaronnes. A little dash here and there in other recipes is always a must! While we can’t tell you exactly what is in the crafted dry rub, we are soon packaging it to sell in our Devils Backbone Shop. The consumer has been purchasing this crafted dry rub for years and it time we put it in a shaker spice bottle with a label. DW&S/Kim: Your Agritourism Manager and team grow produce and herbs used in your kitchen. Tell us about what is grown on-site.

Devils Backbone/Frank: Can I say tons and tons. We have the art of smoking down to a science with the smoking of our meats. With enough team members, we are not smoking into the wee hours as we have multiple smokers. With our house made BBQ sauce, we also mopped the meat to perfection!

Devils Backbone/Heidi: Being active in the community is important to us here at Devils Backbone, as it is taking care of the land and resources we sit on. We use local ingredients and source as much as we can from local farms in the Blue Ridge that we do not have the capacity to grow ourselves to keep up with the demands of the restaurant operation we have.

DW&S/Kim: Your dry rub has been the subject of many family discussions. We are passionate about that

In addition, Jessica Carter, our Agritourism Manager grows herbs and different botanicals like juniper and

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lemongrass for our brewery and distillery along with various foods used in the restaurant. The gardens provide fresh flowers for our tables. DW&S/Kim: What other menu items are locally sourced? Devils Backbone/Tony: grains from flour to grits, additional supplemental fresh produce to supply our demand in the brewpub, local beef from Rive Oak Farms for our burgers along with grass-fed chickens, and local eggs when available. DW&S/Kim: That’s impressive. Not only are some kitchen items grown on-site, but many are also gathered from local farms across the mountains and valleys of the Blue Ridge. “The Basecamp Brewpub is the heart of the brand.” Last year, I first wrote that when discussing the craft beer industry in Virginia. The same can be said for the atmosphere at Devils Backbone Basecamp & Meadows. This brewpub is the heart of the Devils Backbone brand. Walk through the Devils Backbone Basecamp & Meadows, and you feel the heartbeat. The outdoor fire kettle and seating, The Outdoor Bar, The Shanty, the new Devils Backbone Distillery, the Summit serving breakfast and local coffee, the original brewpub, and the Oak Grill. The Basecamp & Meadows open at 11:30AM, seven days a week. It is a team effort to provide the branded experience. Give us a peek behind the scenes. How many local employees work at the Basecamp Brewpub & Meadows? Devils Backbone/Heidi: It depends on what you mean by “local.” You would have to be born in Nelson County to be considered a local. Otherwise, you are a “come here.” Currently being rural as we are, hiring can prove to be difficult when filling positions. We extend our reach to meet our recruitment. We have a few local employees, but most of our staff lives nearby in Amherst, Lynchburg, Waynesboro, Stuarts Draft, Staunton, Charlottesville, and Crozet. With a rare benefits package provided for hospitality and our culture, we have a terrific workforce. If I owned a time machine, I would share a Devils Backbone dinner and a beer with my Nelson County ancestors---especially a plate of those Mountain Dry Rubbed Wings! Instead, our family meets at the new Devils Backbone Camp with primitive camping & RV sites, and we enjoy a weekend with amazing views, breakfast at The Summit, a dinner in the brewpub and the day in The Meadows. n

If you would like to visit the Devils Backbone Basecamp & Meadows, read about the experience at www.dbbrewingcompany.com or book a weekend at the new campground, www.devilsbackbonecamp.com

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At the End of the Day by John Hagarty

The Storied Past of Virginia’s Inns, Taverns & Ordinaries Photo Credit: Dave Renfro at Michie Tavern

As he traveled through Williamsburg in 1765, J.F.D. Smyth made this frank assessment, “There is no distinction here between inns, taverns, ordinaries, and public houses… they are all in one. They are all very indifferent indeed compared to the inns in England.” Well… excuse me. ut consider Mr. Smyth was travelling on horseback over 250 years ago through a rough and tumble pre-Virginia landscape. The Commonwealth wouldn’t be founded for another 23 years. The mere availability of a night’s lodging was much preferred to tossing a cape on the cold ground for a restless---and potentially dangerous---night in the open. England sought commercial success in its colonies and established court-ordered requirements that public houses be established in every community. The cost of such lodging was under the strict guardianship of the government. Moreover, the British needed to generate revenue and manpower from their colony to fund ongoing military and high seas ventures. But it was difficult to get unpaid

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citizen volunteers to drop their plows and axes and show up for regular militia training. The secret to producing fighters? Provide free ale if they agreed to appear at designated public houses for maneuvers. Soon enough well-trained soldiers were at the King’s disposal not to mention a growing cadre of experienced brewers. Unfortunately, a few decades into the future the Crown’s trained men would become its bitter enemies as the American revolution took hold. But as either travelers or men under arms, a warm and hospitable place to meet, drink, dine, and sleep was pivotal to the economic growth of the nascent Nation. As a further control on travel and trade, early on only two licenses per town were permitted by the Brits for an

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establishment providing lodging and food for the general public. Decades later hundreds of such places dotted the colonies’ post roads. Licenses were typically awarded to the wealthy and influential. Think yesteryear’s Conrad Hilton and friends. Warm and comfy or… Taverns in Virginia closely mirrored the ordinaries of mother England. The proximity to the frontier, however, dictated the establishments be used for multiple purposes such as trading posts for families headed over the mountains. The earliest dwellings were often a story and a half log cabin. The ground floor was for public use and the upper level for bedrooms. It was not uncommon for two or more strangers to be compelled to sleep in the same bed. And fresh sheets? Not often. As the decades advanced, the quality of the “hotels” improved. Upscale taverns had a lounge area with a large fireplace, a bar, benches and chairs, and several dining tables. The very best houses had a separate parlor for ladies, a friendly landlord, good food and soft, roomy beds with fireplaces in all the rooms. Even warming pans were slipped under the covers as guests prepared for bed. But the further one ventured from larger towns and villages such amenities quickly faded. On the edge of civilization, the inns were little more than dirty hovels crawling with vermin. Still preferable to spending a cold and frightening night camped in the wilderness. Since permits were required to open taverns and ordinaries, much like today, the locals did not always support such applications. In 1751, a clergyman’s thoughts were published in the Virginia Gazette on pending requests from a certain part of town. In part, it read, “…that ordinaries are now, in great measure, perverted from their original intention…and become the common Receptacle and Rendezvous of the very Dreggs of the People.” Warming to his subject, the man of the cloth went on to claim activities, “…such as without intermission; namely Cards, Dice, Horse-racing, and Cock-fighting… Drunkenness, Swearing, Cursing, Perjury, Blasphemy, Cheating, Lying and Fighting are not only tolerated but permitted with impunity.” My, my. There must have been some hopppin’ joints in the colonial era. Even unusual capitalization was employed to underscore the sins of our fathers. As one traveled further north into a bit more civilized country, the positive critiques could still be spotty. In 1789, General George Washington passed the evening at the Perkins Tavern in Connecticut because local custom discouraged traveling on Sunday. Continued on page 10

Escape the Madness! No stress, no pressure, just magnificent wines.

Magnolia Vineyards & Winery is located in Amissville, Va, just off scenic Route 211 in Rappahannock County. Owned by Glenn and Tina Marchione, we are a familyrun boutique winery and vineyard, making small lots of mostly Bordeaux varietals. Quiet country peace, tranquility and great mountain views. Come relax in our cozy farmhouse tasting room or surrounding grounds. We offer our tastings paired with cheeses and chocolate. The Tasting Room is open year-round (check our website or Facebook page for current hours). 200 Viewtown Rd., Amissville,VA • 703.785.8190 • magnoliavineyards.com

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He later recorded his pre-Trip Advisor thoughts on the tavern, “…which, by the way, is not a good one.” George rarely complained so one can only imagine what the place was like. Nonetheless, in addition to providing comfort to weary travelers, inns and ordinaries were important to local residents. They were a place to gossip, exchange news with guests, transact business such as land sales, and livestock auctions, pick up mail and talk politics. One could make a case that some of the most consequential discussions on the revolution and constitution occurred in taverns. John Adams claimed the City Tavern in Philadelphia was “the most genteel tavern in America.” It was a favorite watering hole of the Founding Fathers and the First Continental Congress. In Alexandria, Gadsby’s Tavern often played host to men like John Adams, Alexandria Hamilton, George Washington, and other notables. Thomas Jefferson was honored there with a banquet in 1801, the year he became president. George Washington’s two favorite dishes at Gadsby’s was grilled duck breast with scalloped potatoes and port wine orange glaze and “Gentleman’s Pye,” a lamb and beef red wine stew in a pastry crust.

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Today, Gadsby’s Tavern is opened as both a museum and a restaurant.

Virginia’s four oldest The vast majority of yesterday’s lodging accommodations have been lost to the exorable march of time. But a few have survived and continued to thrive. Here are four Methuselahs of the Commonwealth’s lodging past:

Hanover Tavern Located in Hanover, the tavern dates from 1733 and was constructed in five stages. It covers 12,000 square feet over three floors. The almost 300-year-old structure has been graced by luminaries no less important than George Washington, Lord Cornwallis, the Marquis de Lafayette, and Marquis de Chastellux. Several slaves from the tavern participated in the Great Slave Rebellion of 1800. Both Union and Confederate soldiers took refuge under its roof. It is still an operating tavern serving soups, salads, sandwiches, and full dinners. www.hanovertavern.org

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Black in Thyme brought to you by

2 oz Virago Four-Port Rum 1 oz lime juice 1/2 oz simple syrup 3 blackberries 4 sprigs thyme Muddle all ingredients together. Add ice and shake. Double strain into a coupe glass. Spear a sprig of thyme through a blackberry and use as garnish.

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Michie Tavern

The Tavern

Corporal William Michie, who served at Valley Forge, started construction of the tavern in 1784. It was a popular and well-kept lodge with the upstairs assembly room hosting dances, church services, and theatrical performances. In 1927, a local businesswoman purchased the building, which had been turned into a private residence. She had the structure carefully disassembled and moved 17 miles down the road to its current location and reopened again as a tavern. Today, it serves traditional American cuisine by period dressed servers. Specialty items include Southern fried chicken, pulled pork barbecue, mashed potatoes, cornbread, and biscuits. www.michietavern.com

The Tavern is the oldest building in Abingdon and one of the oldest taverns in the state. Built in 1799, it has operated as a tavern from its earliest days. It has housed such historical rock stars such as Henry Clay, King Louis Phillippe of France, President Andrew Jackson and Washington D.C. designer Pierre Charles L’Enfant. The inn once served dual duty as the local post office, and the mail slot still exists in its original location. Tavern favorites are the black & bleu medallions, New York strip, New Zealand rack of lamb and scallops au Gratin. www.abingdontavern.com Today, the story of the inns and taverns of the past is told in the numerous bed & breakfasts scattered across the Virginia landscape. While many of these establishments share a link to our state’s history, many others are simply wonderful places to slip away to for a day or two of stress relieve and sightseeing. n

The Red Fox Inn & Tavern This is the oldest tavern in Virginia and the oldest inn in the United States. It opened its doors in 1728 and has a storied history, including its bar that was used as a surgeon’s operating table during the Civil war. It is currently owned by the Reuter family who still serves its famed peanut soup, a recipe dating to the early days of the inn’s existence. Specialties include their crab cakes, surf & turf, fried chicken and crispy half duck. www.redfox.com

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To replicate the experiences of our forefather travelers ---without the downside of questionable lodging--unlock the door to your next getaway here: www.virginia.org /listings/PlacesToStay/BedBreakfastAssociationofVirginia/

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sat down to talk to one of the owners of District 5 and Southern Railway Taphouse on their newest endeavor, Shiplock Brewing. Shiplock Brewing is located in Shockoe Bottom, an eclectic neighborhood in downtown Richmond. Shockoe Bottom sits just East of the city center and along the James River. It’s one of the city’s oldest neighborhoods and has seen a revival in the last twenty years. It’s the perfect location for a brewery. Shiplock Brewery just opened in December 2018, and it is already getting rave reviews on social media.

by Paula Thomasson

“I loved their IPA… with a Bavarian pretzel” —Matt L on Facebook.

Shiplock Brewing Pairing Richmond Beer with a Unique Food Experience 115 N. 15th St.

Paula: What was your inspiration for Shiplock Brewery?

Photo Credit: Headway

The February Edition of Dine Wine & Stein Magazine is about pairing food with beer and wine at Virginia’s breweries and wineries. As soon as I heard about this edition’s theme, I thought of Shiplock Brewery. Richmond has many unique neighborhoods and a vibrant craft beverage market. I believe that Shiplock Brewery has just the twist on this theme.

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I walked into Shiplock Brewery and immediately noticed that the beautiful space is full of modern textures and materials. It’s inviting and bright. Huge industrial windows will open to the outside, in warmer temperatures. The area also includes a surprise for visitors. A food truck is parked inside the building, adding something fun and a different twist. We all love a creative food truck menu. Well, you can enjoy this food truck during any season—on any day that the brewery is open. The truck serves lunch and dinner with a full menu of delicious options. You don’t always find a food truck parked as a permanent kitchen in a brewing company, but this fits the neighborhood and the Richmond beer vibe.

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Shiplock Brewery: We have been talking about starting a brewery ever since opening Southern Railway Taphouse. We got really interested in all the different breweries and the different types of beers that are being produced in Richmond. We just happened to get lucky when space became available that had all of its brewery equipment.


Paula: Are there any particular things that set Shiplock Brewery apart from your other endeavors? Shiplock Brewery: Our brewer, James McGraw, is very passionate about brewing German-inspired beers while also offering other styles of Richmond favorites such as IPAs and porters. We have tried to offer a little something for everyone here. We have a full ABC license for those who don’t care for beer. McGraw also brews sodas for kids or adults searching for a non-alcohol option. Shiplock offers both an orange soda and a root beer. Both sodas can be served as floats too. The brewery offers a family-friendly experience, including a varied menu of food options. Paula: Virginia is seeing a trend of including food in the brewery experience. Tell us about your Food Truck menu. Shiplock Brewery: Anybody that visits should be able to find something that they like and enjoy. Shiplock offers a variety of appetizers, salads, sandwiches, and fresh pizza. We also have vegetarian options and even have a gluten-free pizza crust made with cauliflower that is really good. Paula: What made you decide to put a food truck inside the building? Shiplock Brewery: We tried to do a humorous take on the Richmond beer scene. Many of the Richmond breweries bring food trucks in on certain days to feed their customers. Most breweries in Richmond do not offer food from their own truck. We thought it would be funny. Paula: We agree! As soon as Dine Wine & Stein heard that you are introducing a food truck to your indoor environment, we knew that we needed to write a story. Your menu sealed the idea. It indeed has something for every visitor. Continued on page 16

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Photo Credit: Paula Thomasson

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Paula: Is there anything else you would like to share with people about Shiplock Brewery? Shiplock Brewery: We would like for people to come and check us out, see the space, try our beers and hopefully enjoy themselves.

Do not miss the opportunity to try this Richmond brewery. The fun vibe is contagious. Both the team and space are inviting. Richmond is full of wonderful places and neighborhoods. I suggest a visit to Shockoe Bottom and Shiplock Brewery this weekend. n

While visiting, I was able to sample several of their menu options. My favorite was the Fried Green Tomatoes with house-made Pimento Cheese. I paired this Southern favorite with the Belgian Triple. The brewery also pours several IPA’s and a Winter Ale---all pair nicely with a food truck pizza. And their pizza is fantastic. It’s a combination of the toppings and the wood-fire oven. The menu also includes burgers, tacos, wings. Just about anything that you desire while enjoying a cold brew.

This Richmond family knows food so; I have one last question… Paula: Can you tell me about The Annex? Shiplock Brewery: We are opening a new restaurant in the Fan district in early 2019. It’s a quaint Tex-Mex spot with a broad range of Tequilas and homey atmosphere. Photo Credit: Headway

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A Food Truck… and a Cold Beer by Jennifer Waldera

Central Virginia is home to a vast number of breweries and wineries that are destination points for locals and visitors alike. However, while most offer an array of refrigerated sweet and savory accompaniments, the majority lack an in-house offering for lining the belly before and during imbibing. A more popular option, recently, is to invite food trucks to park on- location.

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hat’s it like to plan a food truck calendar as a brewery? Between the interviews, the scheduling, the taste-testing, and the social media posts, it is apparent to be a process. To find out, I traveled to Madison County, Virginia. One of the most popular destinations for food trucks is Madison County’s Bald Top Brewing Company, a scenic destination for music, food, and brews. We had the opportunity

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to get the inside view from both Bald Top and a couple of their favorite food trucks on what makes the partnerships work and why food trucks are a viable alternative to standard brick and mortar kitchen.

Bald Top Brewing on Food Trucks

Bald Top: We work with roughly 20 food trucks that offer a variety of food styles, including grilled meats and vegetables in baskets, sandwich and sliders, cheesesteaks, pizza, and all types of seafood, southwestern, Mexican and BBQ style dishes. Side dishes and desserts are offered by most.

J: What food trucks do you invite on the premises?

J: What is the frequency of the food trucks’ visits?

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Bald Top: We strive to have a food truck at our venue each day we are open - Thursdays through Fridays and on holidays. Food trucks average 2 or 3 visits per month. We mix up their days each as we have a different variety of customers each day. J: What has made you decide on the trucks you’ve chosen? Bald Top: We ask new trucks to come and do a “soft opening” on a Thursday or Sunday to allow us and our staff to evaluate the food offerings and service. We also advertise these soft openings to receive customer input. Ultimately, it is our customers’ input that determines which trucks continue with us. J: What are some best-selling food items? Bald Top: All of the above food types sell quite well. Our trucks are equipped to provide 125 - 170 servings in an evening or day and they frequently sell out. J: Are there any purposeful food pairings? Do you collaborate at all with any of the food trucks? Bald Top: Several of the food trucks have used our beer in unique offerings. One specializes in “booze-infused food” which is quite unique and popular. J: Tell me about the advantages of having a food truck over offering in-house prepared food. Variety. Bald Top: The customers really enjoy the different food styles that we bring in. We are continually seeking out new food trucks - I’d say we identify 2-3 new trucks every 4 months to try out. Being in a rural setting, it can be challenging to attract trucks. That said, we have trucks coming from as far away as Warrenton, Fredericksburg, Crozet, Charlottesville, as well as from the Culpeper, Madison, Orange and Greene county areas. We are not equipped with a kitchen as our key focus is our beer offerings and assuring that every customer has a memorable experience at our farm and tap barn area.

From the Food Truck Owners A Po‘Crabby & SpiceSea Gourmet (Owner: Whitney Matthews) J: How long have you been serving at Bald Top? SpiceSea: I’ve been serving at Bald Top for 2 years. J: What foods do you typically serve at the brewery? Do they differ from what you might serve elsewhere? SpiceSea: SpiceSea Gourmet is a seafood truck. I serve Crab Cake Salad, Shrimp Po’boy, Po’Crabby, Cod Po’boy, Chicken Salad Sandwich (for my non-seafood eaters), and Sweet Potato Fries. The most popular items at Bald Top is the Po’Crabby and the Sweet Potato Fries. My menu stays mainly the same although I try to do soups in the winter Continued on page 20

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and some specials during the summer like the Soft-Shell Crab Po’boy. J: Why do you enjoy working with Bald Top? SpiceSea: I enjoy working with Bald Top because everyone is so friendly. The customers are wonderful and loyal. I have many people who tell me that they have come just for my truck. It’s a nice atmosphere with live music and a beautiful setting. Additionally, Bald Top isn’t too far from where I grew up – Flint Hill in Rappahannock County – so people from back home will come and visit the truck. For me, it’s always nice to have that connection close to home. J: Where else do you typically serve? SpiceSea: SpiceSea travels all over the place. I am frequently at the local vineyards on weekends, but during the week I do more corporate lunches like Plow & Hearth, Custom Ink, and other local businesses. I also cater parties and weddings. J: What made you decide to start a food truck? SpiceSea: A food truck has a lower operating cost than opening a restaurant. When I started in this business 6.5 years ago, it was still a very new concept. I liked the idea of

moving around every day. A chance to serve new customers and be in a new place – a change of scenery. When you work in restaurants, you don’t really get to see the outdoors. You are in a kitchen with no windows. I enjoy traveling around and seeing the changes in the scenery. I also enjoy interacting with my different customers. J: How did you get started? SpiceSea: I decided to go into business for myself after working for others. A friend of mine mentioned how

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popular food trucks were becoming in California. I started to do research into owning a food truck. To be honest, it seemed like an entirely new adventure, and that was exciting to me. So, I went for it and opened a food truck.

Turn to this edition’s SpiceDiva page to learn more about the SpiceSea Gourmet Food Truck and owner Whitney Mathews. J: How long have you been serving at Bald Top Brewing? 106 Grilled: As a company, between both 106 Grilled & 106 Street Food we have been serving at Bald Top for 2 years. J: What foods do you typically serve at the brewery? Do they differ from what you might serve elsewhere? 106 Grilled: Our truck typically serves paninis from around the world. We also have our sides that are a staple on both trucks which include a white cheddar mac & cheese and fries. Our menus usually don’t change from venue to venue. We do change them up seasonally though.

from James Putbrese

106 Grilled: I would say there are multiple reasons that we like Bald Top Brewing. The first being their beers are in my opinion some of the best in the state. Their venue is absolutely beautiful, and last would be the people of Madison are very welcoming to us. J: Where else do you typically serve?

106 Grilled (Owner: Marcus Hoyt)

Baked Brie

J: Why do you enjoy working with Bald Top?

106 Grilled: We usually stick to the greater Charlottesville area. A lot of breweries, wineries, and cideries. J: What made you decide to start a food truck? 106 Grilled: I always wanted to open a restaurant, but the initial start-up cost is so high that it just wasn’t feasible at the time. A food truck is about a quarter of the cost. Plus just like most people that start up a business, I got tired of working for other people. The next time you visit a Virginia craft beverage destination, you may see a food truck parked on-site. Enjoy the opportunity to pair your favorite beverage with a varied menu and some local charm. n

As you may have guessed, the DW&S Team loves to entertain. We also enjoy sharing our tips and recipes. Here is writer James Putbrese’s failproof recipe for making the perfect Baked Brie. He even shares some wine pairing tips at the end. Enjoy! (If you have not already, visit our website, www.DineWineandStein.com and sign up for our Supper Party Guide)

INGREDIENTS: Package of puff pastry 18 oz. brie cheese round 1 egg 1 tbsp water Heat oven to 400 degrees Place the puff pastry on a lightly floured baking pan. Place brie in the center and fold pastry to cover the brie. Cut off the excess pastry and save the excess to form a design on the pastry. Beat the egg and water in small bowl, and brush the seams of the pastry with the egg mixture. Place the brie seam-side down on a baking sheet. Decorate with the excess pastry and brush with the egg mixture to achieve a golden-brown pastry. My wife decorates with a mouse nibbling on a wedge of cheese. Not being artistically bent, I usually just shape the excess pastry in the shape of cheese wedges. Bake for 25 minutes or until pastry is golden brown. If you like, prior to putting the brie on the pastry, you may place baked almonds or preserves underneath the brie before folding over the pastry. Serves 6 I like paring a Chardonnay, a fruity red such as a Pinot Noir or even a Merlot if it is a mature brie.

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Tiny Bubbles by John Hagarty

Rappahannock Cellars expands sparkling wine production Weddings, graduations and anniversaries are the quintessential time to lift a flute of sparkling wine and toast the celebrants. But special occasions are fading as the leading occasion to enjoy a bubbly.

T

oday, sparkling wines are the fastest growing segment in the U.S. wine industry. In 2017, 312 million bottles of champagne or sparkling wine were sold in the United States, a steady increase in sales dating from 2000 that shows no signs of abating. Wine bubbles are increasingly consumed as an everyday libation simply because they are delicious. Prosecco from Italy and Cava from Spain have helped popularize sparklers, and domestic production is drafting behind the accelerating trend. A pulled cork of fizzy wine leaves the bottle at 25 mph and contains 49 million bubbles. And the real fun hasn’t even started. Here in Virginia, winemaker Claude Thibaut is the most respected sparkling vintner in the state. He is co-owner of Thibaut-Janisson Winery in Charlottesville. The winery is a joint venture with Manuel Janisson, a French champagne producer. The winery produces some 4,000 cases of sparklers a year. Patricia Kluge was among the first to make sparkling wine in Virginia starting in 1999 at her Kluge Estate Winery.

Donald Trump purchased the winery at a foreclosure sale in 2011. It still is the largest sparkler producer in the Old Dominion at more than 10,000 cases annually. It is estimated there are now 25 wineries in the Commonwealth producing sparkling wine. Most bottle between 500 to 2,000 cases a year. Among the fastest growing is Rappahannock Cellars in Huntly with a 3,000-case production. “The reason we got into sparkling wine is twofold. First, we like it ourselves, and we think everybody should like it,” said owner John Delmare. “Secondly, it’s becoming more recognized as not just a celebratory drink. And it pairs well with lots of different foods.” Delmare can spot a trend when he sees one. He opened his winery in 2000 after moving from California where he had a winery in the Santa Cruz Mountains. He pulled the 60th farm winery permit in Virginia. Today, over 300 wineries dot the Old Dominion’s winescape. His overall wine output has gone from an original 2,000 cases to 15,000 annually.

Continued on page 25

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Continued from page 22

Production commitment Among the formidable challenges a winery faces when considering adding sparkling wine to its lineup is: space, equipment, and skill. It is relatively easy to produce a carbonated wine. Many wineries do. The production involves taking a still wine and injecting it with CO2. It produces a pleasant effervescent wine. But it’s not a true sparkler; a palate comparison between two would quickly reveal the difference. Delmare has produced such a wine for several years dubbing it his “Fizzy Lizzy,” a carbonated rosé that is a tasting room favorite. But the bubbles in the wine struck a chord with him and his winemaker, Theo Smith. Why not make the real thing? And the real deal, like so many things in life, comes with a highsounding name called méthode champenoise, or the traditional champagne method of France. The process involves taking a still wine and bottling it with the addition of some yeast and sugar and sealing it with a beer cap. Immediately the yeast knows sugar has become its best friend and the two work in tandem to ignite a re-fermentation, trapping the gases inside the bottle. The process is similar to what many homebrewers use in making beer. The wine is then aged for 9 to 12 months to make certain all the sugar has been consumed by the yeast. Since the bottles have been stored upside down, the dead yeast cells accumulate in the neck and are disgorged when the cap is popped off. Immediately, a “dosage,” or the small amount of sugar & wine, is often added back to the bottle to provide a bit of sweetness to the final product. It is then corked, and a wire basket placed over the cork to prevent it from exploding during its final aging process.

Continued on page 26

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Much heavier bottles are used in producing champagne and sparkling wine to prevent “grenade” bottles from being a safety hazard in the wine cellar and for the consumer. In the original production of such wines two centuries ago, winemakers would be terrorized by shattering bottles ricocheting around their cellars. Experience dictated much heavier bottles be used to bring the wine safely to market. Rappahannock Cellars produces three sparkling wines: Rosé, Blanc de Blanc and Prestige. Prices range from $34 for the first two and $40 for its Prestige, a blend of different blocks of Chardonnay wines. Delmare underscores that the price point for the wines reflects the high production costs and more expensive corks and bottles employed.

Charmat method This past December, Delmare took possession of a $40,000 stainless steel tank for Charmat styled sparklers. The new equipment will enable him to accelerate the amount of bubbly he produces and the time it which it takes to bring it to market. The process uses a large pressurized tank that retains the carbon dioxide created by the refermenting wine. The process replicates the traditional method except that it occurs inside a 1,300-gallon fermentation tank, not a 25-ounce wine bottle. The new equipment will enable the winery to boost production beyond 3,000 cases annually. If sparkling sales continue to grow as expected, production could top out at 5,000 cases or more.

Theo Smith A winemaker is the beat in the heart of every winery. As the talent and skills of the man or woman crafting the wine goes, so goes the fortunes of the winery. It’s emblematic of the success of Rappahannock Cellars that it has one of the largest wine clubs in the state. And it’s not just a quarterly club like most, but two bottles-permonth year-round. That success is driven in large part by Theo Smith. If customers don’t like your wines, they will not sign up as a club member. Over 80 percent of Rappahannock’s wines today are sold to club members. The numbers reinforce Smith’s talent and hard work. Smith got his first taste of the wine trade working part-time at a vineyard in the Ohio Valley while attending Franciscan University in Steubenville. After graduating in 2008 with a degree in biochemistry, he worked for two years at a cancer research firm before realizing he was not cut out for laboring in a lab. The vineyard was calling. Through a mutual contact, he reached out to Delmare seeking employment. “John encouraged me to go back to

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school for a wine degree since I already had the science prerequisites. “He played a large role in returning to school and getting my viniculture and enology certifications from Brock University,” said Smith. Smith, 36, represents a growing number of young Virginia winemakers who have scored their educational wine bona fides and go on to make a mark in Virginia. It’s sometimes referred to as seeking to be a “big fish in a small pond” rather than laboring in Calif. or elsewhere in competition with a legion of other winemakers. The bet paid off for both him and Rappahannock Cellars. Today, his skill set has been demonstrated repeatedly with a string of exceptional still and sparkling wines produced since being named head winemaker and vineyard manager in 2013. Claude Thibaut provided mentoring when Delmare brought him on board as a consultant to get his sparkler program up and running. In that position, he quickly observed that Smith was “…a very sharp young guy. He is eager to learn and not just learn but to implement. He wants to make the best sparklers he can.” John Delmare echoes those sentiments. “Theo has mastered the process very quickly. There’s a lot of nuances in making sparkling wine. It’s a whole different process from making still wine. I give him incredible credit. “Theo sent me an email recently after we disgorged our first Prestige wine that said, ‘This is the most favorite wine I’ve made at Rappahannock Cellars.’ He loves making sparkling wine, and he’s doing a great job.” Delmare’s expectation for the future of his sparkling wine program is upbeat, observing, “At our recent annual soup events, I asked our members, ‘how many of you drink sparkling wine.’ About half the room raised their hands. “We have a good base and room for growth.” The same can be said for a unique wine that is increasingly being produced and appreciated across the Commonwealth. Look for a bubbly coming to a winery near you. n

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Rappahannock Cellars Bottles Sparkling Wine

CHARLOTTESVILLE

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434-234-3239 SIGNATURE PIZZAS . SLICES . MONSTER SUBS . WINGS . FRESH SALADS . CALZONES . BEER/WINE www.DineWineAndStein.com

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BOOK REVIEW:

by Kim Chappell

Prohibition by Edward Behr

“On January 16, 1920, America Went Dry”

Mention Prohibition and one has a mental image of a smoky speakeasy that’s down a back alley. Or you think of a list of cocktails that have been forever labeled as “Prohibition Cocktails.” Even today, craft beverage makers are marketing their own version of historical Prohibition Parties.

B

ut Prohibition was a thirteen- year period that changed America. Edward Behr’s award-winning book provides a vivid glimpse into this period in American history. I picked up a softcopy of the book at the Prohibition Museum in Savannah, Georgia. I spent a few hours browsing the museum and tasting cocktails in their replica speakeasy. The visit only whets my appetite to learn more about both Prohibition and the 1920s. I found Prohibition, Thirteen Years that Changed America in the gift shop. (You can find it on Amazon) Edward Behr’s book is not just for history buffs. It is for anyone curious about this period. It is for those that question, “How did Prohibition happen?” and “Could such a movement happen within today’s politics?” Before visiting the Prohibition Museum and reading Behr’s book, my vision of Prohibition included those of the

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speakeasy, my favorite cocktail, gangsters, and revenuers. What I learned is that American ingenuity also prevailed. Some of today’s leading businesses and products were established during Prohibition. Entrepreneurs that could not produce spirits found alternative business ventures. Housewives even became proficient in building their own basement stills. Many claims that Prohibition gave birth to today’s Nascar. Here are a few examples of alternative business plans during Prohibition: Bevo, by Anheuser-Busch, was the most popular non-alcoholic beverage during Prohibition Did Prohibition make Walgreens Drugstore? The company started with a single drug store in 1901. In 1919 the company had 20 stores in Chicago. By the end of Prohibition, Walgreens had over 500 stores, nationwide.

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HARRISONBURG’S ONLY IRISH PUB GREAT FOOD & GREAT CHEERS LIVE MUSIC ON THURSDAYS & FRIDAYS

CorgansPublickHouse.com 865 PORT REPUBLIC ROAD HARRISONBURG, VA 22801

Walgreens had a legal prescription whiskey business. You will read about the rampant growth of the prescription alcohol business in the book, Prohibition. From Behr’s Book: “On January 16, 1920, America Went Dry… for the next thirteen years the Eighteenth Amendment prohibited the making, selling or transportation of intoxicating liquors, heralding a new era of crime and corruption on all levels of society… Formerly law-abiding citizens brewed moonshine, became rumrunners and frequented speakeasies.” I especially enjoyed Behr’s description of the weeks leading up to January 16, 1920. Americans had a pre-notice to the start of Prohibition. One could store those intoxicating liquors in one’s home for personal use. Anti-Prohibitionist hoarded alcohol and transported alcohol in any means possible. I tried to imagine what I would be doing in the first two weeks of January 1920…. Prohibition is about the tumultuous days. It’s about the flappers, and it’s about the gangsters. You will read Continued on page 30

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Continued from page 29

about Pretty Boy Floyd, Lucky Luciano, and Al Capone. You will also learn about the story behind the famous St. Valentines Day Massacre. You will imagine the jazz music and the flapper clothes. But you will also realize the ties to the Commonwealth of Virginia. Not all of the stories are from Chicago or New York City. Some of the most exciting tales are from the mountains of Virginia. Revenuers chased cars laden with moonshine down mountain roads. Some Virginia moonshiners established a national footprint for their shine and even had a known brand. They transported their moonshine to big cities, including Chicago. And crime followed the trail back to Virginia. While walking through the museum, I found a display showcasing Virginia’s Franklin County and the Bondurant brothers. America was legally dry, but

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Franklin County became known as the wettest county in America during Prohibition. (Actually, the claim to be the wettest in the world) As you are scrolling through social media, you will probably land on an invitation to a Prohibition Party or maybe a recipe for Sidecar, a Rickey, or a Southside cocktail. If you are curious about Prohibition, read the book by Edward Behr. It is a vivid description of the days of Prohibition. Could a movement of this magnitude happen again? Well, some say that history repeats itself… In future editions of Dine Wine & Stein, I will explore the books and movies about this time in Virginia history. I will even visit the new Bondurant Brothers Distillery in Chase City, Virginia. Perhaps, they have the secret family recipe? Stay tuned…. n

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DW&S ADVENTURES:

by Kim Chappell

Savannah Savannah, Georgia… The “Hostess City”. The city greets you with a cold, tall glass of sweet tea, a dollop of pimento cheese and a plastic cup for your cocktail. (More on the plastic cup later in this story) Photo Credit: Kim Chappell

B

efore arriving in this iconic city, I watched two movies. I just wanted to get into the Southern hospitality mood. Forest Gump and Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. Both watched on a rainy Virginia afternoon. They stirred the desire to walk under moss laden trees, to drink vintage cocktails and to sit on a park bench in a city square. Is Savannah really a quirky Southern town where everyone says “Y’all” and spreads whipped honey butter on thick slabs of cornbread? Well, yes it is. And so much more. If you are planning a visit to Savannah, I have three tips. Book a hotel in the heart of the historic district, and bring a great pair of walking shoes. Tip #3 is to bring a group of friends because this city is fun to share with a group. One of the best ways to enjoy Savannah is on foot. Pick up a map and wander. Another option is to book a ticket on one of the Hop On & Off Trolleys that circle

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the city center. Your guide will point out the location of Forest Gump’s bench in Chippewa Square and the Mercer House from the cult-favorite movie, Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. Plus, history drips from this city like moss from the Live Oak trees. You will want to experience it all. We enjoyed both sightseeing options. And we enjoyed both with a cocktail in a plastic cup. (Again, more on the plastic cups later) Maybe it is the famous Southern ghost stories, the food, the crafted drinks, the shopping or just the charm that will lure you to Savannah. We experienced it all, in only four days. I always strive to write a story with a few twists. So, I picked two restaurants, a brewery, a distillery and a unique museum to include in this four-day visit. Each site with its own twist on a Southern story.

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“Not Your Typical Dry Museum… Bringing the roaring twenties to life with our Intoxicating Exhibits & Authentic Speakeasy” Our first stop was at the Prohibition Museum. This is a museum with interactive displays, characters in costume, a movie and even its own Speakeasy with an active bar. (Note that the bar does not serve alcohol on Sundays) Learn some American history while enjoying a vintage cocktail. You can even join a cocktail class and learn to make two prohibition era cocktails—recipes included in the experience. The self-guided museum tour ends in a retail store where you can purchase glassware, books, bar towels and Savannah collectables. And this is where I learned the significance of the plastic cocktail cup. Visit any restaurant or bar in the city center, and you will see a stack of clear plastic cups by the exit. Want to finish your cocktail as you wander through the squares of Savannah? No problem. Just pour your cocktail into a plastic cup as you exit. Or you can order a cocktail, beer or glass of wine to go. A favorite to-go cup was a Savannah Peach Sangria, purchased at the City Market. Of course, no driving while enjoying your favorite to-go beverage. I am a fan of a strong Southern menu. With this visit to Savannah, I strived to find restaurants with that extra twist of the unexpected. I searched for restaurants that take a classic Southern dish and add a surprise. I found those menu items at The Ordinary Pub and The Pirate House. Continued on page 34

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Photo Credit: Kim Chappell

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As you stroll the streets of the city center, you will note that Shrimp and Grits can be found on most menus. It’s a staple, for breakfast, lunch or dinner. The Thai fusion version of this popular dish at The Ordinary Pub wins my award for the most unique plate. Imagine this version of Shrimp and Grits: “Vegetable Pad Thai tossed in almond butter sauce, red pepper honey mustard sauce, sweet Sriracha syrup, stone ground Gouda cheese grits…topped with sautéed shrimp and Asian noodles” . Other menu items enjoyed include Steak-Egg & Grits, a Chicken & Waffle Gyro and the Brunner Bowl (shell pasta with Gouda cheese sauce, Andouille sausage, green and red bell peppers, bacon and a sunny side up egg). How about fried chicken and pimento cheese? Yes, please! Our group found both of these favorites at The Pirate House. Imagine fried chicken smothered in a honey pecan sauce. Or, how about a row of fried green tomatoes on a bed of homemade pimento cheese. As a bonus, this restaurant experience comes with a side of Savannah history. The restaurant is in a preserved seaman’s tavern that was allegedly built in 1794. It is said that the ghost of Captain Flint still haunts this house. We did not see a ghost, but we did see a pirate. At Service Brewing Company, you can enjoy a crafted beer that’s Veteran Brewed and the company is Veteran Owned. Order a flight or a pint of this American-made beer. The brewery, and beer, is dedicated to honoring those that have put their lives at risk and their country and community first. During our visit, we enjoyed outdoor seating and live bluegrass music. We enjoyed the beer… and the vibe. Add this brewery to your list. I ended my visit to Savannah at the Ghost Coast Distillery. I started my tour at the Prohibition Museum, and it is only fitting to end my visit at Ghost Coast Distillery—“Savannah’s First Operational Distillery Since Prohibition”. The tours are free and they showcase the city’s history with alcohol. When first arriving in the city, I saw an ad for The Cocktail Room, located within the distillery. The Cocktail Room showcases cocktails created by Sidney Lance, nationally renowned mixologist. Sample some mini cocktails in a flight or watch the Ghost Coast team craft your cocktail from an impressive menu. I enjoyed a Fig Old Fashioned, and I highly recommend it. If you are looking for a four-day escape from Virginia during late Winter or early Spring, consider a drive down to Savannah. The weather is a little warmer and the hospitality is devine. Enjoy! n Photo Credit: Diamond Photography

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The Spice Diva

by Phyllis Hunter

Please Don’t Ask for a Burger! Adventures in a Seafood Truck

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hitney Matthews and I sat down to find out what it is really like to own a food truck. Her route to becoming chef/owner of Spices Gourmet food truck was circuitous. She is a graduate of Virginia Military Institute, Class of 2007, and holds Bachelor’s Degrees in History and German, with a minor in English. She graduated from the Culinary Institute of America, in

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Hyde Park, New York, Class of September 2009. Whitney opened the SpiceSea Gourmet Food Truck while living in San Antonio, TX, because there were no seafood trucks among the burgers and tacos. She received acclaim and recognition for her food, including being named one of San Antonio’s rising stars as a “Sharp Chefs”, Best Food Truck in San Antonio (2014), Best Seafood in San

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Antonio (2015). Her food truck was featured on the Cooking Channel’s TV show, “Eat Street” in 2015. Whitney picked seafood as the focus of her food truck because her grandfather was a Chesapeake Bay waterman. Her heritage is reflected in the design and colors of her truck. She remains dedicated to serving the finest seafood with fresh greens, sauces and bread. Her sandwiches are uniquely flavored


with garnishes of her own invention. She serves Po’ Boys, crabcakes, lobster rolls and many other seasonal seafoods. They are all very special. No shredded iceberg lettuce here! There are unique issues to be solved when designing the interior of a truck converted from a Snap-On Tool truck. It’s actually more of a boat than a truck! When many of the plumbing joints gave way during the trip from Texas to Virginia, her dad, a boat owner, helped her to adapt the systems of the inside of her truck to accommodate the movement, vibration and special needs of a cooking vehicle. Flexible caulking, leveling, tight corners, propane, electrical and water, air conditioning and heat adequate to the seasons are only a few of the issues unique to a truck She does all of the preparation and cooking on her own, many of the repairs, cleanup and maintenance. Whitney particularly enjoys serving at various vineyards and festivals in the Centra Virginia region, although the hours and seasonal discomforts can take their toll on the truck and the chef. She has participated in events surround-

ing the Staunton Food Truck Battle, Keswick Vineyard, Grace Estates, Chisholm Vineyards and Chiles Peach Orchard seasonal festivities. Whitney meets challenges of owning a food truck which are heat during the summer and cold during the winter, truck maintenance, food costs, and personnel, with a heritage of toughness and tenacity! She is a dedicated professional who loves cooking her wonderful food for her customers. Look at her facebook page between seasons for Baby Spice who travels with her and gets a seat at the table in some pretty great restaurants. Find her daily location by looking at her website www.spiceseagourmet.com. n

The freshest spices, organic teas, beans, grains, oils and vinegars and Neuhaus Chocolates

410 West Main Street Charlottesville, VA 22903 www.thespicediva.com 434-218-DIVA (3482) Rammelkamp Foto

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231

Alexandria Dale City

234 PRINCE WILLIAM

28

15

229

LA

6

NE

123

Warrenton

211

20

EMA

7

Manassas

522

ER

Waynesboro

EE

267

Reston FA I R FA X Centreville Arlington

66

13

N

CU

ALB

29

231 D IS O

29

GR

2

RIDGE

A

25 24 20

6

Buena Vista

M

LOUDOUN

50

ER

3 15 Bridgewater 23 26 19 AU 27 28 9 G U 42 ST 250 A 340

522

E

UI

PAG E

K

UQ

R A P PA HANNOCK

Harrisonburg

17 29 21 5

G2

81

ROCKINGHAM 42

Staunton 18

Front Royal

340

R

LA

FA

Woodstock SHENANDOAH

15

9

Leesburg

14 277

Strasburg

J

1

7

Winchester 55

I

G1

522

F2

H

I

VIRGINIA BEACH

5

J

F3 F2 29

F3 17

Yelping Wine ----------------------------25 Dog F2 Ciro's Italian Eatery 26 Corgans' Publick House F2 Regions 117 ----------------------------------------27 Mt Crawford Creamery F3 Ice Cream F3 The Wine28MillSmiley's ------------------------------------29 Yelping Dog Wine F2 Magnolia Vineyards ------------------------------F2

Kathy’s ----------------------------------------------

F3 18

Sugar & Salt ----------------------------------------

G3 1

Barren Ridge Vineyards ---------------------------

F3 21

Palladio Restaurant at Barboursville -----------

G3 8

F3 6 F3 7

Virago Spirits ---------------------------------------

www.DineWineAndStein.com

F2 F2 F2 14 G1 F3 G2 13

G1 12

H4 11

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Food

Beverage Guide

Shenandoah Joe Coffee Roasters & Espresso Bar is dedicated to the craft of roasting coffee by hand in their 25 lb “San Franciscan” batch roaster. Shenandoah Joe uses only the finest Arabica coffee from all over the world. Shenandoah Joe serves Charlottesville with three locations and now with their new location in Harrisonburg.

ShenandoahJoe.com | FaceBook.com/ShenJoe | FaceBook.com/CornerJoe

F2

Founded in the heart of the Shenandoah Valley, Greens & Grains loves using what we have around us to make our restaurant great! We source our bread, milk, eggs, and more - FRESH from local farms. Try our monthly HOUSE produced specials. Come taste the difference fresh makes at Greens & Grains Café.

GreensAndGrainsVa.com | 540-433-1702 865 Port Republic Road, Harrisonburg, VA 22801

F2

Bluestone Vineyard is family owned and operated, and committed to crafting small-batch wines. The beautiful new event building, “The meeting House” is available for weddings, receptions, reunions, and much more.

BluestoneVineyard.com | 540-828-0099 4828 Spring Creek Road Bridgewater, VA 22812

F2

Surrounded by both the Blue Ridge and Massanutten Mountains at Brix and Columns Vineyards you can enjoy one of our delicious wines while sitting on our porch or cozied up to one of our fireplaces. We are a winery that combines the best of farming, wine and relaxation. We look forward to seeing you here! Open seven days a week.

BrixAndColumns.com | 540-421-0339 1501 Dave Berry Road, McGaheysville, VA 22840

F2

Dayton Tavern is located in a renovated turn of the century building. We have the best steaks around and a great selection of fresh seafood. We have an outstanding Sunday Brunch! Swing by the Dayton Tavern for a taste of what the whole town is talking about.

DaytonTavern.com | 540-879-1189 45 Main Street, Dayton, VA 22821

F2 PROUDLY SERVING BLUE ELK COFFEE!

VISIT OUR FACEBOOK PAGE!

FROM MEXICO, RIGHT TO THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY!

From Mexico right to the Valley, allow us to introduce you to a colorful cantina with real Mexican food - El Paso Mexican Grille. Lunch and drink specials offered daily and the Grande Margarita event every Thursday is a real crowd pleaser. Located between Massanutten Resort and Skyline Drive and open Tuesday thru Sunday. Eat Fresh! Eat Good! Bienvenidos and Enjoy! From Napoli to You! Open 7 Days a Week.

101 Downey Knolls Drive, Elkton, VA 22827

(540) 298 -1205

ElPasoMexicanGrille.com | 540-298-8861 45 South Stuart Avenue, Elkton, VA 22827

F2

cirositalianeatery.com

245 S. STUART AVENUE, ELKTON, VA 22827 40 540.298.8861

ELPASOMEXICANGRILLE.COM

PROUDLY SERVING BLUE ELK COFFEE!

Dine Wine & Stein

Visit Our Facebook Page!

I

FEBRUARY 2019


Food

Beverage Guide

From Napoli to you! Located on Hwy 33 between Massanutten Resort and Skyline Drive, Ciro’s Italian Eatery has been a Valley favorite for more than 35 years. Our menu offerings include all things Italian from the perfect Neapolitan pizza to delicious pasta topped with our homemade sauces, featuring seafood and chicken. Our full bar and expansive wine list are a great accompaniment to whatever you choose. Rooms available for private parties and meetings.

CirosItalianEatery.com | 540-298-1205 101 Downey Knolls Drive, Elkton, VA 22827

F2

Located in the heart of the Shenandoah Valley, Corgans’ Publick House is an Irish-American pub specializing in Irish specialty dishes. Corgans’ was established in 2012 and has been a cozy, welcoming, Open 7 Days a Week. lively, pub for locals and travelers. We are committed to serving high-quality food to our guests. Try our famous Reuben, Fish n’ Chips, Cottage Pie, Corned Beef and Cabbage, Lamb Shank, Welsh Rarebit, 101 Downey Knolls Drive, Elkton, VA 22827 burgers, fresh salads, and on weekends – Brunch! We offer a diverse beer selection, wine, and (540) 298 -1205 Po’Boy, a full bar. Our pub features live music on Thursday and Friday evenings, as well as a traditional Irish cirositalianeatery.com session on Sunday mornings. Bring your family to dine at Harrisonburg’s only Irish pub! Cheers! Slainte!

From Napoli to You!

HARRISONBURG’S ONLY IRISH PUB GREAT FOOD & GREAT CHEERS Visit Our PROUDLY SERVING LIVE MUSIC ON THURSDAYS & FRIDAYS

CorgansPublickHouse.com | 540-564-2674 865 Port Republic Road, Harrisonburg, VA 22801

F2

Facebook Page! Mt. Crawford Creamery is a small family owned dairy farm and creamery. Mt. Crawford Creamery offers farm fresh milk and other dairy products made on-site. Our on-farm store offers 865 PORT REPUBLIC ROAD many other local products, such as eggs, coffee, and jams. Mt. Crawford Creamery is open to the HARRISONBURG, VA 22801 public six days a week and our products can be found in many local retails.

BLUE ELK COFFEE!

CorgansPublickHouse.com

MtCrawfordCreamery.com | 540-828-3590 795 Old Bridgewater Road, Mt. Crawford, VA 22841

F2 Smiley’s Ice Cream is where farm-fresh milk and cream, from Mt. Crawford Creamery, are turned into premium homemade ice cream. We pride our business on using local, fresh, and highest quality ingredients to make the best tasting, smoothest, ice cream possible. Our daily menu features 12 ice cream flavors and 4 sorbet flavors. We sell by the scoop, in bulk, as well as sundaes, milkshakes, splits, and floats. SmileysIceCream.com | 540-271-2805 797 Old Bridgewater Road, Mt. Crawford, VA 22841

F2

Historic hometown hospitality never tasted so good. Located on Bridgewater’s main street in the famous Bridgewater Barbee House, The Cracked Pillar offers a fantastic menu of delectable pub food including their renowned “War Hammer Ruben Sandwich”. Combined with over 20 rotating taps, live music, and lots of Virginia wine, The Cracked Pillar is sure to be your pub of choice! Monday-Wednesday: 11am-10pm; Thursday-Sunday: 11am-12am. TheCrackedPillar.com | 540-237-4563 403 North Main Street, Bridgewater VA 22812

F2

Located in Nelson County, Wild Wolf Brewing Co. is a made from scratch restaurant and brewery featuring local ingredients with vegetarian and gluten free options. Our specialties - hickory smoked meats and award winning beer! Bring the kids and your canine companions to Wild Wolf to experience the many unique features that makes this brewery a must-see destination. Our biergarten, shaded by Elm trees, features a gazebo, waterfalls, and a large koi pond. At Wild Wolf Brewing Co. we pride ourselves on providing exquisite food, award winning beer, and a memorable experience. Visit our website for current specials and events.

WildWolfBeer.com | 434-361-0088 2461 Rockfish Valley Highway, Nellysford, VA 22958

www.DineWineAndStein.com

F3

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Food

Beverage Guide

Spice Diva offers the finest and most flavorful spices, salt and pepper, herbs. teas in bulk, and exquisite extracts. Inquire about their cooking classes in their twelve-seat kitchen.

TheSpiceDiva.com | 434-218-3482 Main Street Market, Charlottesville, VA 22903

F3 Scotto’s Italian Restaurant has been making Italy accessible to Valley residents for over 20 years. Owner and Chef, Tommy Scotto, was inspired by his passion for his Italian culture when first opening his restaurant in 1989. Tommy goes to great lengths to ensure authenticity and quality in every dish. Wine is an important part of Italian culture. Scotto’s Italian Restaurant offers an extensive wine selection that is available for dine-in, carryout, or delivery. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days a week.

Scottos.net | 540-942-8715 1412 West Broad Street, Waynesboro, VA 22980

F3

The Green Leaf Grill features a diverse menu, including authentic seafood gumbo, New Orleans craw-fish étouffée, and creative vegetarian dishes, as well as specialty pizzas and panini sandwiches. The Owner and Chef, Chris, showcases his expertise in Creole cooking with formal training at the famous 5-Star Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. Enjoy an excellent selection of wines as well as craft and domestic beer. Live music every Friday and Saturday night, as well as a Jazz Brunch on Sundays from 12:00pm-2:00pm.

TheGreenLeafGrill.com| 540-949-4416 415 West Main Street, Waynesboro, VA 22980

F3

Fuel your next extreme adventure with a pizza from Extreme Pizza. With the freshest ingredients, and tastiest combinations, Extreme Pizza takes pizza to a whole new level. Stop by or order some today!

CHARLOTTESVILLE

35 Merchant Walk Square Suite 200 5th Street Station Pkwy 335 Merchant

434-234-3239

ExtremePizza.com | 434-234-3239 Walk Square, 5th Street Station Parkway, Charlottesville, VA 22904

F3

SIGNATURE PIZZAS . SLICES . MONSTER SUBS . WINGS . FRESH SALADS . CALZONES . BEER/WINE

Aioli Mediterranean Tapas has been receiving consistently outstanding reviews since renowned European Chef, Said Rhafiri, opened the restaurant. The menu is a combination of inventive small plates, called Tapas, and an excellent selection of entrees, all artfully presented. The interior of the restaurant is tasteful and comfortable with a space in the back for private parties. Aioli is open for dinner Tuesday - Saturday. The Bella Inn, located on the second floor of Aioli offers two suites for overnight guest or extended stay. Both suites are large and fully equipped.

AioliStaunton.com | 540-885-1414 29 N Augusta Street, Staunton, VA 24401

F3

Kathy’s Restaurant is located in Staunton and recently received the Virginia Living magazine’s Best Breakfast in the Shenandoah Valley Award. The restaurant has served locals and tourists for 26 years in the same location and is known for their home style cooking and their famous pancakes. Open seven days a week.

Kathys-Resturant.com | 540-885-4331 705 Greenville Avenue, Staunton, VA 24401

F3

42

Dine Wine & Stein

I

FEBRUARY 2019


Food

Beverage Guide

Located on the Higgs family’s former apple orchard, Barren Ridge Vineyards is now home to Augusta County’s premier winery. John and Shelby Higgs converted the 1890’s barn into a state-of-the-art winery, and offers 14 different varietals of wine, many of them award winning. Open seven days a week.

BarrenRidgeVineyardsVA.com | 540-248-3300 984 Barren Ridge Road, Fisherville, VA 22939

F3 Yelping Dog is a wine store and wine bar that offers 1200 bottles of wine from over 200 vineyards. Yelping dog serves a variety of ciders, gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches, cheese plates, soups, appetizers, and desserts. Cheese is available to purchase by the pound as well as Greek olive oils, and wine and cheese related products and gifts. Each week, Yelping dog offers 10-12 wines by the glass to help introduce customers to unique varietals as well as those customers know and love. On “Wine Wednesday”, the shop offers wine tastings from 5-7pm and Friday’s we host “Yelping Hour” from 5-7 pm offering specials. Open Tuesday - Thursday 11am-9pm, Friday & Saturday 11am-10pm, and Sunday 12-6pm. YelpingDogWine.com | 540-885-2275 F3 9 East Beverley Street, Staunton, VA 24401 The area’s only venue for lakeside dining, Region’s 117 uses locally-sourced ingredients, most from within 117 miles, crafting a menu that has something for everyone. Region’s 117’s twist on American comfort food is made fresh and flavorful in an atmosphere unlike any other in the Shenandoah Valley. Region’s 117 is open Wednesday - Saturday from 11:30am to 9:00pm and Sundays from 11:00am-3:00pm.

Regions117.com | 540-699-3234 180 Bald Eagle Drive, Lake Frederick, VA 22630

G1

Best wines, best price – without the pretentiousness. Experience the newest wine experience at the Wine Mill in Winchester. Free daily tastings with the best wines sourced at every price point. Teacher Tuesday’s – 10% off. First Responders – 10% off. Active military and veterans – 10% off. No stress, no pressure, just And magnificent one ofwines. the nicest event spaces for your next tasting, event, or private gathering.

Escape the Madness!

WineMillWinchester.com | 540-450-5881 135 Featherbed Lane, Winchester, VA 22601

G1

Magnolia Vineyards is located in Amissville in Rappahannock County, VA and nicknamed “Winery 251”, we are a real Mom & Pop Vineyard and Winery, our cozy, classic farmhouse style tasting room is open to the public for tastings Saturdays & Sundays from 11:30 - 5:30.

Magnolia Vineyards & Winery is located in Amissville, Va, just off scenic Route 211 in Rappahannock County. Owned by Glenn and Tina Marchione, we are a familyrun boutique winery and vineyard, making small lots of mostly Bordeaux varietals. Quiet country peace, tranquility and great mountain views. Come relax in our cozy farmhouse tasting room or surrounding grounds. We offer our tastings paired with cheeses and chocolate. The Tasting Room is open year-round (check our website or Facebook page for current hours).

MagnoliaVineyards.com | 703-785-8190 200 Viewtown Road, Amissville, VA

G2

200 Viewtown Rd., Amissville,VA • 703.785.8190 • magnoliavineyards.com

Craving something sweet? Whatever you’re looking for - decadent chocolate goodies, old-school candy, or a handmade brownie or cinnamon roll - you’ll find it at Sugar & Salt! Stop by and try our signature treat, the cannonball, for a fudgy, truffley, chocolatey moment of pure delight. Want some coffee with that? We have hot coffee, nitro cold brew on tap, and bags of locally roasted java goodness. All this and more, just a few scenic miles down Route 53 from Monticello! Open Tuesday to Saturday.

SugarAndSaltSweets.com | 888-273-0169 265 Turkeysag Trail, Suite #112, Palmyra, VA 22963

www.DineWineAndStein.com

G3

43


Food

Beverage Guide

This restaurant’s name is no accident, given Andrea Palladio’s influence on the Jeffersonian mansion here, and the presence of his masterpieces throughout the Veneto, home to Gianni and Silvanna Zonin, founders of this vineyard estate. Northern Italian in inspiration, yet creatively indebted to the most seasonal and local resources of the earth and sea, Palladio offers the handsomest gastronomic redemption there can be of the promise only the finest food and wine can extend – recalling one, recurrently, to the beauty of this world.

BarboursvilleWine.net | 540-832-7848 17655 Winery Road, Barboursville, VA 22923

G3

Located in Richmond’s up and coming Scott’s Addition, Virago Spirits is a craft distillery specializing in classically inspired and creatively interpreted rums, gins, brandies, and herbal liqueurs. Virago operates one of few Charentais-style alembic stills in the United States, and when combined with a time-honored, traditional production technique and slow distilling process Virago produces some of the most excellent spirits in Virginia. Our products are currently available at select ABC stores, through Special Order at VA ABC and at our distillery store. Visit our website for seasonal tasting hours. www.viragospirits.com.

ViragoSpirits.com | 804-355-8746 11727 Rhoadmiller Street, Richmond, Virginia 23220

Food

44

Beverage Guide

Dine Wine & Stein

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FEBRUARY 2019

H4


IN THE NEWS:

Your Coffee Break

We source the best green coffee. We roast to bring out the best qualities. We train to prepare the best coffee and espresso beverages.

SHENANDOAH JOE

A Quick Cup of the Latest News… The owners of RVA’s popular Lunch-Supper just opened Brunch Restaurant in Richmond’s Fan District. Enjoy scratch-made Biscuits & Gravy, cheesy grits, salads with house-made dressings and much more. Open seven days a week in The Fan. In January, Chefscape opened in Leesburg, Virginia. Imagine commercial kitchen space, an events center, a chef-inspired food hall with gourmet menus and crafted cocktails—and its all under one roof. It is a go-to location for all food lovers in Virginia. Castle Glen Estates Winery has opened a new tasting room in Doswell, Virginia. They are a small, boutique winery specializing in Cabernet Sauvignon, grown in Virginia. Wine lovers should add this tasting room to their Virginia Wine bucket list.

Coming Soon in Virginia… Staunton will welcome Skipping Rock Beer Company on March 15, 2019. The new brewery’s motto: “Worry Less… Live More”. Sounds good to us. Follow along on Facebook for updates on the grand opening. Hope to see you there! In March, 2019 EatLoCo will open an in-door farmer’s market at Chefscape in Leesburg, Virginia. Visit this farm market and shop like a chef. The market will showcase local vegetables, fruits and herbs. Follow EatLoCo on Facebook for opening updates. (PS: They often post excellent recipes and home menu ideas too).

HARRISONBURG location now open! 64 South Mason

Charlottesville, Virginia 945 Preston Avenue 2214 Ivy Road - Townside Shopping Center UVA Corner - behind Corner Grocery

434.295.4563 • SHENANDOAHJOE.COM

And Stay Tuned… The next edition of Dine Wine & Stein will have you enjoying brunch with family and friends! Dine in a Virginia restaurant or prepare brunch at home… we will even toast with some bubbles. See you in April, DW&S Fans!

Get noticed with DW&S. Send your news to events@dinewineandstein.com

www.DineWineAndStein.com

45


CONTRIBUTORS...

Aioli Mediterranean Tapas............ 24

John Hagarty

is a former Federal executive who created a retirement career in Virginia wine. In addition to working at a Virginia winery he writes on the subject of wine and a number of other interests. His leisure activities include golf, hiking, backpacking, skiing and community volunteerism. For wine tales and more visit him at Hagarty-on-wine.com.

Jennifer Waldera Kim Chappell

is an author, freelance writer and the Content Director for Dine Wine & Stein Magazine. You can find Kim traveling in her mobile office, a Winnebago RV named “Ruby”. She enjoys interviewing entrepreneurs, chefs and craft beverage makers. Kim travels the backroads, looking for the new and untold story. As a former marketing and business development executive, she strives to promote Virginia products and tourism.

Paula Thomasson

Barren Ridge Vineyard..................... 7 Bluestone Vineyard......................... 31 Brix & Columns Vineyards............ 33 Carmello’s ........................................ 20 Corgans’ Publick House................. 29 Cracked Pillar Pub.......................... 15 Dayton Tavern................................... 9 El Paso Mexican Grille................... 35 Effingham Manor & Winery.......... 24 Extreme Pizza.................................. 27 Green Leaf......................................... 17 Greens and Grains Café................. 19 Kathy’s.............................................. 15 Magnolia Vineyards......................... 9 Mt. Crawford Creamery................. 23

is a freelance writer and Richmond, Virginia native. She can’t imagine living anywhere else and loves sharing all the nature and delights found in the Richmond area. You can find Paula walking through Maymont Park or the trails along the James River, enjoying a beer in Scotts Addition or dining in the surrounding neighborhoods. She looks forward to covering the food and craft beverage vibe in Richmond for DW&S Magazine.

James Putbrese

is a former radio broadcaster and was managing partner of 10 radio stations over a of a 48-year period. Upon retirement in 2004, Mr. Putbrese realized if he continued to hang around the house that 40 years of married bliss would come to a grinding halt. He decided to turn a love of all things Virginia into a second career with the publication of the magazine “The Shenandoah Valley Guide” and later the publication “Dine, Wine & Stein.” Realizing it was time to start spending time with his wife and three grandchildren a decision was made to sell the magazines. In 2016 the Shenandoah Valley Guide was sold, and in 2017 Dine, Wine & Stein was sold to BlueMont Media Group. Mr. Putbrese still enjoys involvement with the magazine and its owner Dave Renfro and continues to write stories for the publication.

Dine Wine & Stein

Barboursville Vineyards................ 47

Ciro’s Italian Eatery....................... 35

is a freelance food, drink, and travel writer. When not feeding her hunger for exploring, she can be found scoping out new novels to add to her overfilled bookshelves or binge-watching food shows on Netflix. You can follow her adventures through Virginia and beyond on Instagram at @jlwriter.

46

Sponsors List:

I

FEBRUARY 2019

Palladio Restaurant....................... 47 The Perfect Pita............................... 25 Region’s 117...................................... 11 Sarek................................................. 44 Scotto’s Italian Restaurant & Pizza ..............................................17 Shenandoah Joe’s ............................ 45 Smiley’s Ice Cream.......................... 23 Spice Diva......................................... 37 Virago Spirits................................... 12 Virginia Wine Expo........................... 3 Wild Wolf Brewing Co.................. 48 Yelping Dog....................................... 25 Find DW&S at over 450 of the finest wineries, breweries, cideries, distilleries and dining establishments.


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Best Winery Restaurants in America “.. the best wines of their vineyards, excellent cuisine, and idyllic settings”

(540) 832 - 7848

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t a E &

HANDDCRAFTED BEER PAIRS WELL WITH FRESH FOOD Wild Wolf Bewing Company is situated in the heart of the Brew Ridge Trail and features a wide seleccon of hand-craaed beers as well as the freshest local foods in Central Virginia. Wild Wolf Brewing Company is a made from scratch restaurant and brewery featuring vegetarian and gluten free oppons. Our specialles - hickory smoked meats and award winning beer! Live music every Friday. Visit our website for current specials and events.

2461 ROCKFISH VALLEY HWY • NELLYSFORD, VA WILDWOLFBEER.COM

Profile for Dine, Wine, and Stein

Dine, Wine & Stein Magazine - February 2019  

It’s all part of the experience. When you visit a Virginia brewery, you expect great beer. With expectations on the rise, visitors now expec...

Dine, Wine & Stein Magazine - February 2019  

It’s all part of the experience. When you visit a Virginia brewery, you expect great beer. With expectations on the rise, visitors now expec...