Dine, Wine & Stein Autumn 2018

Page 1

Autumn Issue -

Explore Virginia’s Haunted Vineyard If You Dare! • The View of VA Wine • Celebrate Cider Week • In Search of Donuts

FREE 2018


Volume 152 BlueMont Media Group P.O. Box 814 Nellysford, VA 22958 Phone: 757-630-3352 www.DineWineAndStein.com

Publisher Dave Renfro

A

utumn in Virginia is a special time. Nights become cooler. Days shorten. And the glorious colors of fall explode into full display. Virginians are picking apples, enjoying hot cider and thinking of Halloween and Thanksgiving. Many Virginia historic sites are said to be haunted. This Fall, we bring you two. One is now a popular winery and the other is a pub with a fantastic Rueben sandwich, local beer and VA wine. Visit these locations…”if you dare”… To celebrate Fall, DW&S has added a few new features that we hope you will appreciate. First, we welcome Virago Spirts in Richmond. Each issue, Virago will share one of their favorite signature cocktail recipes. You can find the Fall’s cocktail recipe on page 47. When you are ready to stop and drink a cup of coffee, check out DW&S’ Coffee Break feature on page 61 where we celebrate new openings, product launches and generally, anything we think is cool in Virginia food and beverage. Brought to you by…. Shenandoah Joe Coffee Roasters. And DW&S has finally gone to the dogs. On page 54, we feature some of our best friends doing what we do best…visiting Virginia wineries, breweries, and tasting rooms. Tag your photos with #DWSdogs and show us your best friend!

Cheers, Dave

In this issue...

2

Jenny Shannon

Content Director Kim Chappell

Contributing Writers Kim Chappell Shawn Gatesman John Hagarty Phyllis Hunter James Putbrese Dave Renfro Jennifer Waldera

Regional Reps

Virginia’s Haunted Vineyard......................................................................... 4 The Haunted Cracked Pillar........................................................................... 8 Virginia Wine Month..................................................................................... 13 Behind the Taste: Hudson Henry Granola................................................. 16 Vintage Pie...................................................................................................... 20 The Spice Diva - The Secret to Taste.......................................................... 22 Picking Cheese 101 ........................................................................................ 25 DW&S Adventures: The View of Virginia Wine Lovers.......................... 32 DW&S Excursion: Four Nights in the Adirondacks................................. 36 Join the Hard Cider Revival!....................................................................... 40 Homebrewing 104 - Going All Grain.......................................................... 44 Fall Spirits - brought to you by Virago...................................................... 47 Effingham Manor Showcases History and Wine...................................... 48 Unique Bites - The Cider Donut Trail......................................................... 52 Tap into Local Flavor.................................................................................... 55 In The News: Your Coffee Break.................................................................. 61

Cover Photo: Lisa Damico

Executive Editor & Art Director

DW&S is a proud partner of the Virginia Wineries Association

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018

Northern Virginia Victoria L. Zarbo victoria@dinewineandstein.com Central Virginia Shannon Lampert shannon@dinewineandstein.com Charlottesville and Piedmont Bianca J. Johnson bianca@dinewineandstein.com Shenandoah Valley Brent W. Eberly brent@dinewineandstein.com Roanoke/Lynchburg Dave Renfro dave@dinewineandstein.com

Dine, Wine & Stein is published four times per year and is available, free of charge, in Virginia and West Virginia. All creative material and text in this publication are the property of BlueMont Media Group and are intended for reference use only. Reproduction without written permission of the publisher is forbidden. © 2018, BlueMont Media Group



Virginia’s

Haunted

Vineyard

by Jennifer Waldera

Certainly no shortage exists of Halloween-style haunted spots to experience in Virginia as the warmth of early fall dwindles and the crispness of the latter part of autumn descends. However, the Winery at Bull Run offers a unique opportunity to explore the spookier side of the season, hauntingly blending history, ghosts, and wine on their limited run tours in the fall.

T

he working farm vineyard, dedicated to both the preservation of the historic land as well as the production of award-winning wine, produces dozens of wines using exclusively Virginia grapes. Established in 2012 by the Hickox family, the farm in Centreville is the largest that is operating in Fairfax County, with 225 acres, but the family also owns and utilizes another 115 acres in scenic Little Washington, Virginia. The harvests of the combined vines yield dozens of reds and whites including Virginia favorites like norton, cabernet franc, and viognier and standards such as cabernet sauvignon, merlot, chardonnay, vidal blanc, pinot gris, and rose. Blends, sweeter whites, and even a dry sparkling white

4

Dine Wine & Stein

also adorn their long list alongside a few fruitier options like peach, strawberry, and raspberry. The winery invites guests to visit the tasting room with hours that extend later than many wineries, open until 7 pm Sunday through Wednesday, 8 pm on Thursday, and 10 pm on Fridays and Saturdays. They also regularly run tours and tastings on their property that boasts an authentic historical setting replete with the salvaged stone foundation of the Hillwood Mansion, which was nearly lost entirely to a fire approximately 30 years ago, as well as two historic barns - one a smaller 1800’s era barn and the other a larger 1920’s style dairy barn. They also host a number of events

I

AUTUMN 2018


including live music year-round on weekends (often with food trucks), wine-pairing dinners, and sip and paint classes. However, in the spirit of the season and, perhaps more importantly, in homage to the history of land, The Winery at Bull Run also annually hosts their wildly popular Haunted Wine Tours which explore Civil War history by lantern-light on an hour-long walking tour of their historical grounds. Engaging guides share vivid Civil War stories, often related to the supernatural, while storytellers and reenactors dramatically relay true historical accounts and interesting information about the property’s paranormal activity. Throughout the tour, seven different wines are available for sampling. Flanked by an equestrian farm and the over 5,000 acres occupied by Manassas National Battlefield Park, the winery’s setting is idyllic not only for its view but for its historical relevance. The expansive park is the site of the first major battle of the Civil War, the First Battle of Bull Run in July of 1861, as well as the Second Battle of Bull Run in August of 1862. While both incurred a large number of casualties, the first was particularly bloody.

The winery’s site states that, “Considering more than 22,000 casualties occurred on the Manassas Battlefield during the American Civil War, it should come as no surprise that tales of shadowy apparitions, orbs, and unexplained cannon fire abound.” Indeed, for those that believe in the possibility of the paranormal, the location appears perfect for both its existence and exploration. While a number of books have been published specific to the supernatural in this area, employing even the quickest internet searches related to Manassas Battlefield and Civil War ghosts returns pages of results with news stories, websites, YouTube videos, and social media threads detailing accounts and anecdotes of haunting activity in the area that engages nearly all of the senses. From seeing lights and images of distinctively uniformed soldiers to smelling gunpowder, hearing suspicious noises, and feeling unusual and unexpected temperature changes, there are numerous reports of unexplainable and eerie encounters and experiences. Meanwhile, The Winery at Bull Run shares on their site an anecdote from one of the owner’s personal late-night encounters, and a photographic capture,

When some of our staff members started reporting spooky and strange things happening to them, we thought what could be better than to add ghost stories to the history and wine...

Continued on page 6

www.DineWineAndStein.com

5


Continued from page 5

of an apparition on the property. Haunted videos on the winery’s site show powerful evidence of orbs in the tasting room, provided through investigation by “a volunteer, non-profit research group that specializes in scientific research of unknown spiritual activity or dangerous nonhuman entity infestations”, the East Coast Hauntings Organization (ECHO). The same organization reported signs of abundant activity on the majority of the property, including the barn, the lawn, and the offices. While the winery had long offered historical tours and tastings, it was reports of that type of activity that acted as the impetus to offer haunted tours. “When some of our staff members started reporting spooky and strange things happening to them, we thought what could be better than to add ghost stories to the history and wine,” shared Lisa Damico, Director of Marketing for The Winery at Bull Run.

6

Dine Wine & Stein

Damico also shared that last year’s tours included a variety of interesting tales, from stories of Lincoln’s ghost in the White House to reports from paranormal investigators about what “goes bump in the night” at the winery. The tour spans an hour during which guests enjoy the history-rich tour from their guide while being led through the vineyard. However, it’s when the tour stops for each of the seven tastings that actors in character as Civil War soldiers, doctors, winery employees, and more begin to recount stories of the supernatural. It’s important to note that the Haunted Wine Tour at The Winery at Bull Run is not a “reach out and grab you” experience like what may be experienced on a typical haunted house style tour. Instead, it is led by professional, trained guides with historical knowledge. The actors are also well-trained, auditioned professionals, who rehearse to provide an authentic experience. “Last year’s cast included Civil War reenactors,

I

AUTUMN 2018


Winery at Bull Run employees with acting or public speaking experience, and local theater performers - we even had several extras from House of Cards. We expect this year’s cast to have a similar background.” Damico says. The Winery at Bull Run first offered the Haunted Wine Tours in 2016 and in short time they have gained quick popularity with last year’s tours selling out within hours of the release of tickets to the public. Reviewers of the event consistently rave about the ambiance, history, costumes, and performers with many exclamations of wanting to return to enjoy the experience again. “In last year’s post-tour survey, 9 out of 10 guests said they would recommend the Haunted Wine Tours to a friend,” Damico said. An added bonus, especially for those unable to garner tickets, is that while the winery would typically close earlier in the evening on Thursdays, on tour dates it will remain open to the public until 10 pm. There are only fourteen tour dates with four tour times on each day. Tours begin on September 20 and conclude on November 9, running each Thursday and Friday at 7, 8, 9, and 10 pm. Tickets are $45 each, or $850 for a full private tour for 16 people. Due to high demand for tickets, potential buyers must visit the winery’s website to sign up for the mailing list to receive an access code to buy tickets which will be offered for purchase to wine club members and the public on specific dates. n Visit the The Winery at Bull Run for details at: www.wineryatbullrun.com.

URANT SO GO ESTA OD R A

Kathy’S SH E

IT! N PUT H O E ER NAM

Voted best breakfast in the Shenandoah Valley! Hours:

Sunday - Thursday 7am to 8pm Friday & Saturday 7am to 9pm

540 885 4331 705 Greenville Ave. Staunton If you enjoyed your Gourmet Pancakes at Kathy’s, then you too can purchase “Kathy’s Pancake Mix” that has been specially milled to Kathy’s very own secret formula.

www.DineWineAndStein.com

7


by Dave Renfro

The Haunted Cracked Pillar

Cranberry’s in Staunton -- a unique and healthy spot in the Shenandoah

Historic Hometown Haunted Hospitality Never Tasted So Good Glasses break. Doors slam shut. Footsteps echo down the upstairs hall. All are a part of a day’s work at Bridgewater’s haunted Cracked Pillar Pub.

W

hen Patti, Tim, and Kristin Landes first saw the historic Barbee House located on Bridgewater, Virginia’s North Main Street, they knew this was the place for them. “We had been looking for a place to bring a pub to the area, it had a great location, and more importantly….the place picked us as much as we picked it,” said Patti. “From the moment we walked thru the front door, we could see past the walls that needed to be knocked down and the changes that had to be made… we knew that this was the place.”

A Door Slams “One of the first encounters with the spirit happened

8

Dine Wine & Stein

right after we purchased the property in late in 2015,” said Patti. “We weren’t on site but had a contractor working up on the roof. When we returned he quickly scampered down the ladder and asked us if we had been in the house. I said no we weren’t here. He said, ‘well somebody is in there because doors are slamming and there are footsteps and all kinds of noise in there.’ To put this into perspective, the contractor, who was quite shaken, was an MMA wrestler and a two times state wrestling champion from a local high school. MMA wrestlers don’t get scared easily..and this guy was really spooked.” Patti went on to talk about a tour of the property she

I

AUTUMN 2018


was giving to one of the people who helped her get the business going. “We toured downstairs with no incidents. Then when we went upstairs in the far back corner which is now dry storage, my friend suddenly out of the blue said, ‘a lot has happened here.’ Well, I didn’t really know what to say. Then she said, ‘this room has a lot to say.’ And at that point, I said well perhaps that is our ghost or our spirit. My friend commented, ‘she is happy now.’ “ “That particular area seems to be a hot spot. One of my servers insists that she heard a baby crying in that room and many of the employees don’t like to go upstairs by themselves. Nothing bad has happened up there it’s just an odd feeling. “ The Cracked Pillar was built between 1818 and 1838, the exact date is unknown as the records were destroyed by fire during the Civil War. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as The Barbee House. Initially, The Barbee House was named after Civil War Colonel and State Senator Gabriel Barbee, and today is one of the oldest structures at the North end of Bridgewater. It in its early history, The Barbee House was an inn and tavern, and reportedly hosted

Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson. After the Civil War, it became a girl’s boarding and finishing school – the room numbers are still on the upstairs doors. For the past 100 years, the property has been a private residence with the same family.

4,544 Warhammer Rueben Sandwiches Today, The Cracked Pillar offers a wide variety of simply good pub food. Since September of 2017, they have served more than 4,544 Warhammer Rueben sandwiches followed closely by their Classic Bacon Cheeseburgers. The Cracked Pillar’s menu offers the perfect blend of comfort pub food including fried pickles appetizers, mushy peas, salads, and some beautiful desserts. Of course, the Cracked Pillar pairs their menu with some of the most popular Virginia Wines from Prince Michel, Veritas, and Bluestone Vineyards as well as a whole bevy of rotating Virginia Craft Brews. So if you are looking for a great place in Bridgewater for excellent comfort pub food, a whole lot of history and a spooky door slamming ghost, then The Cracked Pillar should be your next stop. n

www.DineWineAndStein.com

9


10

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


Edible flowers?

Consider an edible estate Stay in touch with love

Best Winery Restaurants in America “.. the best wines of their vineyards, excellent cuisine, and idyllic settings”

(540) 832 - 7848

AN ESTATE OF WINE AN ESTATE OF WINE

bbvwine.com


DW&S is a proud partner of the Virginia Wineries Association

12

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


Virginia Wine Month The State of Virginia Wine by John Hagarty October is Virginia Wine Month. To celebrate, we reached out to wine blogger John Hagarty and asked about the State of Wine in the Commonwealth of Virginia. John replied with a history of winemaking in the Commonwealth and outlook for the next five years. As you enjoy a glass of Virginia wine this Fall, cheer the Commonwealth for producing over half a million cases of wine this year!

Reflecting on the future of the Old Dominion’s vinous fortunes

T

he year was 1607 and hopes were high as the intrepid band of colonists landed and founded a colony named after their king. They endured frightful weather crossing the Atlantic and encountered an initial hostile welcome from Native Americans until they eventually landed on a small, quiet peninsula. They called it Jamestown. The Virginia Company sponsored the party chartered by King James whose objective was to established a new, revenue-producing colony. As the hearty band approached the shores of the New World, they noted the scent of delicate grapes as they drifted over the ocean breezes. Wine! Surely this new land would reward with copious amounts of wine so beloved by the English. Thus began a long, painful and ultimately disappointing saga of winemaking in America. The wine made from native grapes tasted awful. And while the colonists repeatedly tried to make palatable wine from their European cuttings, all efforts ended in failure. It is analogous to frame the delicate Vitis vinifera grape species---it makes 99 percent of all wine worldwide---as vulnerable as the natives were to English diseases. Some 10 million Indians would perish as their defenseless bodies fell before the onslaught of smallpox, measles, influenza, malaria and other dreaded diseases. The European grapes were similarity taken to slaughter by insects, humidity, heat, and cold. Virginia went on to have an anemic wine culture until the mid-1970s. Today, over 300 wineries dot the state’s landscape making it the fifth largest wine producing state in the

Nation with approximately 3,500 acres of grapes generating over half a million cases of wine annually. Science and skill have been brought to bear to make quality wine. Virginians couldn’t be happier. Let’s gain the perspective of four Virginia wine professionals on what the next five years might hold for the Commonwealth.

Annette Boyd Based in Richmond, Annette Boyd is the director of the Virginia Wine Board Marketing Office. The Board handles education and marketing efforts on behalf of all Virginia wineries. “I think we’ll see some consolidation in the industry over the next few years,” said Boyd. She believes there are a number of smaller wineries whose owners are nearing retirement and their children do not want to pursue a career in wine. This may lead to the closing of unprofitable businesses. “Moreover, sales of wine are currently outpacing supply so there will be a big push to grow more grapes. If weather impacts this year’s harvest, the shortage issue will continue, further squeezing the little guys,” Boyd said. The consolidation trend may already have begun. Over the last three years, the previously explosive growth of wineries has slowed to a trickle. From 2000 to 2015 some 210 wineries---an average of 14 a year--opened tasting rooms. The recent number has fallen to four to five annually. “We’ll still see people entering the market, but those

www.DineWineAndStein.com

13


people will be better financed,” said Boyd. She explains that it will be harder for smaller entrants to have access to fruit and expensive equipment. In the past, bootstrapping paid dividends but into today’s market, it’s going to require more capitalization. This may be a sign the industry is maturing. There will be fewer small wineries instead of larger, better-financed ones. It may also bode well for the quality issue. Historically, Virginia wines have not had a consistent quality profile. Many are producing excellent wines, but marginal performers undermine the state’s reputation. Boyd takes some exception to the charge stating, “Every wine region has it underperformers. “I think the market tends to make its corrections. If someone is not making good wine, people are not going to buy it. The market takes care of that problem,” Boyd said.

John Delmare John Delmare is the owner of Rappahannock Cellars in Huntly. He earned his wine bona fides in California as owner and winemaker of a small winery in the Santa Cruz Mountains. He saw what was unfolding in Virginia and moved his family here in the late 1990s and opened his winery in 2000. “In the last two to three years, a lot of capital that might have flowed into the wine industry went into the craft beer and the craft distilling craze. I think that sucked a lot of energy from our sails. The industry kinda stopped growing,” Delmare said. In response to the trend, he opened his distillery last year. Nonetheless, he thinks the market is in the middle of a change with the industry continuing to grow by not by new wineries coming online but by the growth of existing companies. His initial output 18 years ago was 2,000 cases a year. Today he produces over 15,000 cases. In some instances that growth has been significant. “We’ve found ourselves growing 12 to 16 percent annually over the last six years,” Delmare said. “Not

14

Dine Wine & Stein

everyone has seen that rate. It’s the wineries who are doing something unique and doing it right.” In Delmare’s case, it’s his wine club. When he opened his business 18 years ago to his knowledge not one winery in Virginia had a wine club. He launched his and today it’s one of the largest in the state. It’s not a quarterly shipment either but two bottles per month. Some 80 percent of the winery’s revenue is now generated directly from the club. “It’s been our lifeblood,” he stated. He feels like some investment is now coming back into the wine industry with beer sales slowing down. On the negative side, his crop was hit during the spring bloom season with heavy rains, and he lost some grapes, as did other wineries, so the existing grape shortage will likely continue. “Overall I think we are entering a period we were are going to have a shakeout, but I think it will be a healthy shakeout,” he said.

Stephen Barnard Stephen Barnard originally hails from Capetown, South Africa but is now a U.S. citizen. He is emblematic of the young, talented winemakers from outside the state who are finding a fruitful home in Virginia. He is winemaker and vineyard manager at Keswick Vineyards in Keswick. “Quality is on the upswing. People are planting better grapes on better sites and learning how to deal with the weather issues; rain, humidity and a short growing season. “The best fruit makes the best wine, so the emphasis on the right sites, rootstock, and clones has helped,” he said. He also believes the sharing of knowledge among winemakers is critical to further success. “The only way to challenge ourselves is to share information and collectively grow. The ensuing changes are subtle, not massive.” Barnard said He cites groups in his region such as the Winemakers Research Exchange,

I

AUTUMN 2018


numerous winemaker roundtables and the Governors’ Cup tastings as examples of the collaborative efforts. He agrees breweries and distilleries have taken some business away, but the world of wine is not going anywhere. “This is a bump in the road. People are going to be coming back,” he states. His vision for the future of Virginia wine is to move beyond our borders and ship wine nationwide. “We need to be making more wine, more quality wine and making something authentically Virginia. I don’t know if we know what that is yet, but I don’t think its Viognier,” he opines. The popular white wine is notoriously hard to grow and in chronic short supply.

Tom Kelly Tom Kelly is past president of the Virginia Vineyards Association and director of operations at Brown Bear Vineyards in Woodstock. “I see an attrition of older folks who are trying to find a way out. There will be culling out of wineries. Many folks are starting to age and may not have a succession plan in place. That’s not all bad,” said Kelly. He compares the process to pruning a vine by cutting back the weak branches.

He also sees a growing influx of talent from beyond Virginia. “These young people are graduating from UC Davis and Fresno State with wine degrees and looking to make a name for themselves in Virginia; the big fish in a small pond scenario,” Kelly said. “As we gain more experience and figure more things out” quality will advance even further. Technology also helps. We are trending on the upside of quality,” Kelly said.

Summary Reflecting on the future of Virginia wine “past is prologue” will be an enduring theme. The success of the last four decades are portents for the future. The critical issues to be addressed in the next five years is further improving quality, increasing quantity, attracting talent, solving the chronic grape shortage, and convincing wine lovers outside of Virginia it deserves its place among the best wine regions in the Nation. In the words of the immortal Abraham Lincoln, “The best way to predict your future is to create it.” Indeed. n For wine tales and more visit Hagarty-onwine.com

www.DineWineAndStein.com

15


BEHIND THE TASTE:

by Kim Chappell

Hudson Henry Granola Do Your Best—Be Kind—Dream Big Fall in Virginia means hikes on mountain trails, apple picking, picnics, farm markets and warm apple pie. All of those things remind me of Hudson Henry Granola. An award-winning granola pairs perfectly with crisp apples, tops homemade pie, and makes the perfect snack for any Fall adventure.

H

udson Henry Granola, crafted by Hudson Henry Baking Company, will satisfy your granola craving. To go behind the scenes of this popular Virginia brand, I contacted Hope Lawrence. I like going behind the scenes with the founders of popular Virginia brands. I am an entrepreneur at heart, and I want to hear their story. Hudson Henry Granola was first sold at the Charlottesville Farmers Market in 2012. The granola burst with flavor and with sales. “In a Virginia county that only has one stoplight, a business wins the prestigious sofi Award” Created in the small community of Palmyra, VA, the Hudson Henry Baking Company recently won two sofi Awards. The sofi Awards are like the Oscars of the food industry. Hudson Henry recently won a Gold sofi for their Maple, Pecan and Coconut Granola and they won a Silver sofi for their Cashews & Coconut variety. In a Virginia county that only has one stoplight, a business is creating granola that is being awarded the prestigious sofi Award.

16

Dine Wine & Stein

What’s The Secret? A family-founded business that went from the Charlottesville Farmers Market to the Today Show in less than five years caught my attention. What’s their secret? What’s Behind the Taste of Hudson Henry Granola? To find out, I reached out to Hope, co-founder of the baking company. Kim: Hope, first tell me about the business name, Hudson Henry. What’s the story behind the name? Hope: Short story – it was named after my two sons – Hudson and Henry. Long story – I went around and around trying to pick the “perfect name.” There was so much stress and all of the business articles make it out to be such a big deal to find the perfect name. At the end of the day, I went with my gut and my “placeholder” name – “Henry Hudson Granola.” My designer suggested we switch it to “Hudson Henry Granola” which suits Hudson just fine (first born, first mention!). Kim: In five years, Hudson Henry granola escalated

I

AUTUMN 2018


from weekend sales at the Charlottesville Farmer’s Market to national exposure and sales. Can you tell us one aspect of your business that you feel pushed Hudson Henry onto the national market? Can you share with us just one family secret to entrepreneurial success? Hope: Hands down, getting the granola on The Today Show with Kathie Lee and Hoda was life changing. And such a funny story – we had no clue we were going to be on the show. I pitched the producer in May and then the granola was on KL’s desk in September. We received a call that morning from someone who had stayed at our then B&B (now closed) and said “I think your granola is sitting on Kathie Lee’s desk!!” Orders came pouring in and it was the most exciting day. As far as entrepreneurial success, I think for me it is having just one great (somewhat unique) product (and only a few flavors). We keep it simple and use great ingredients like olive oil and coconut oil and nice big pecans, etc. So our ingredients and our texture is a bit unique – the granola is very light and crisp. When I talk with soon-to-be entrepreneurs, I always say “why would Kathie Lee hold up your product on air? What makes it different?” Kim: While researching Hudson Henry Baking Company, I read about Small + Mighty. It is your way to give back to the community. Please, tell the DW&S readers about Small + Mighty and how they can get involved. Hope: I had been wanting to donate to charity for years through Hudson Henry but always felt like what I could give was “too small.” Finally I said – let’s just do it. Every bit counts! So we give 1% of revenue to charities each month. Simple math, simple to do. The boys get involved with picking charities and customers can give suggestions. I love the feeling of doing something to help others…rather than just feeling overwhelmed by the world’s problems and feeling helpless. Kim: I think that it is impossible to pick just one favorite Hudson Henry Granola flavor. Cashews & Coconut, Maple Pecans & Coconut, Pistachios Almonds & Coconut, Pecans & Chocolate or is it Maple & Walnut. Do you have a favorite?

The Ultimate Apple Pie Kim: Fall reminds me of my grandmother’s apple pie. I can just imagine the pie topped with Hudson Henry Granola. If you were going to create a special Thanksgiving recipe, including Hudson Henry Granola, what would it be? Hope: I have ground up the granola and used it in the crust of a pie, which was delicious. Or I love an apple or rhubarb crumble with the granola in the topping. We also love the granola mixed into the topping of the sweet potato casserole! Kim: Ok, I am going to create an updated version of my family apple pie recipe and include Hudson Henry Granola.

Find Hudson Henry Granola From the Charlottesville Farmer’s Market to Amazon sales, this small-town granola has crossed the United States.

“ ” In a Virginia county that only has one stoplight, a business wins the prestigious sofi Award

Hope: It’s tough. I would say the Maple, Pecans and Coconut is my favorite, but the addition of the dark chocolate chips in the Pecans & Chocolate takes it up a notch. Although now and then I will have a handful of the Cashews & Coconut and think “oh my gosh, this is good.” Tough to pick just one!! Continued on page 18

www.DineWineAndStein.com

17


Continued from page 17

“” This is like granola from heaven

—Rachel, March 3, 2017 Amazon Review Kim: I was first introduced to Hudson Henry Granola at Sugar & Salt bakery in Palmyra, Virginia. I shared the granola with family and friends. Everyone loved the granola and the bag was quickly enjoyed. Where can Virginians find their own bag of Hudson Henry Granola? Hope: We are in a wide number of shops throughout Virginia. From Feast! in Charlottesville to Libbie’s in Richmond, Taste in the Norfolk/VA Beach area, and Homestead Creamery near SML. We are also in Whole Foods and

18

Wegmans. You can find a full list on our website. Kim: Last question. What’s in the future for the Hudson Henry Baking Company? Can you give the DW&S readers a sneak peek into a future granola flavor? Hope: We really need to do a nut-free version and are working on it. And we made a savory Rosemary batch that made everyone swoon. I am hoping we can get both of those out in 2019 (if not before). You never know when you are going to bump into a new Virginia flavor. I stopped by Sugar & Salt Bakery to pick up some of their famous Cannonballs. I left with Cannonballs and a bag of Hudson Henry Granola. One Virginia entrepreneur introduced me to another entrepreneur and a new Virginia flavor. A win-win visit to Palmyra, Virginia. On a special note, Sugar & Salt has created a collaboration Cannonball with Hudson Henry Granola. It is the Happy Camper Cannonball, and we can not wait to try it! n

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


TELL

THEM

SENT

YOU

WE LOVE + SUPPORT

Local Farmers River Jordan Farm | Byrd Mill

Heritage Farms | Bright Farms Spring House Farm | Miller Farms Hartland Farm and Orchard Kirby Farm | Adama Farm C&E Farms | Cole Berry Farms Yohanan Farms | Ayrshire Farms Daily Chef Specials Using Ingredients From Our Local Purveyors

Make Your Reservations

Regions117.com | 540.699.3234

www.DineWineAndStein.com

19


Vintage Pie Blue Ridge Apple Pie 2018 9-Inch Unbaked Pie Shell (or your favorite pie shell recipe) ¼ Cup Chopped Pecans 6 Cups Peeled & Sliced Apples 1 Cup Sugar 2 Teaspoons Flour ½ Teaspoon Cinnamon ¼ Teaspoon Nutmeg Sprinkle chopped pecans in bottom of pie shell Combine apples, sugar, flour, cinnamon and nutmeg Pour into pie shell Top with Hudson Henry Granola Topping after baking the pie for 30 minutes. Continue baking for an additional 10-15 minutes (Instructions to Follow for Hudson Henry topping) Bake in oven at 425 for a total of 40-45 minutes or until apples are tender

Henry Hudson Granola Pie Topping 1 Bag of your favorite flavor of Henry Hudson Granola A hammer 8 Tablespoons of real butter Without opening the bag, use the hammer to break the granola into small pieces Mix 8 Tablespoons of melted butter with all of the Hudson Henry Granola Top your pie and continue to bake

Nothing says Fall in Virginia apple country like an apple pie. My family is from the heart of Nelson County, VA apple country. My grandmother grew up in a farm house in Old Roseland. That family home washed away in Hurricane Camille, but many of the family recipes remain. They were passed down from memory, re-created onto typed pages.

F

ast forward to 2018 and I need an apple pie recipe to pair with Hudson Henry Granola. My Mom has an old family wooden icebox, full of family recipes that span decades. The recipe for the Apple Pecan Pie was first created in Nelson County in the 1940’s and then typed and stored by my Mom in the late 1960’s. (with a few “modern” modifications, such as a pre-made pie shell and 1960’s Oleo) I asked my Mom for help in creating the 2018 version of this family favorite. We are going to use Hudson Henry Granola as the topping—replacing the spiced pecan topping. Nelson County was rural when this recipe was

20

Dine Wine & Stein

created. Where did my grandmother find pecans in rural Nelson County? Once asked, she responded that pecans were only available in November and in limited supply. One had to crack and shell them to make this pie. A Thanksgiving pie that was a labor of love. Below is our recipe for the 2018 Apple Pecan Pie— Hudson Henry Style. If you would like to make the original recipe, it is included in the photo. Of course, you will want to swap out the 1960’s Oleo for real butter. We hope you enjoy our re-mix of this vintage Virginia pie recipe. n Happy Thanksgiving!

I

AUTUMN 2018


DW&S first saw Hudson Henry Granola while visiting Sugar & Salt in Palmyra, Virginia. So, it is fitting that we include the secret recipe for the popular Sugar & Salt Yummy Banana Bread…topped with Hudson Henry Granola. “Enjoy”…from the bakers at Sugar & Salt!

Yummy Banana Bread Recipe 2-3 Bananas (The riper, the better) 1.5 Cups of Sugar (We use 1 Cup granulated white & .05 cup brown) .05 Cup Vegetable oil or Applesauce 1.75 Cups Flour 0.25 Cup plus 1 Tblsp Yogurt (We use Greek) or Buttermilk 0.5 Tsp Salt 1 Tsp Vanilla 1 Tsp Baking Soda 1 Tsp Cinnamon 2 Eggs Hudson Henry Granola (For Topping) Optional: 1 Cup of blueberries or chopped nuts or pineapple chunks or whatever strikes your fancy (Use only two bananas if adding another fruit) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine dry ingredients, then add wet ingredients and mix together. Pour into buttered or well-sprayed pan. Top with Hudson Henry Granola Time: For a full-sized loaf, give it about 75 minutes, but start checking it at 60 minutes. For mini loaves, given them 25 minutes but start checking at 20 minutes. Ready when the knife or tester comes out clean.

www.DineWineAndStein.com

21


The Spice Diva Rammelkamp Foto

by Phyllis Hunter

The Secret to Taste One of the most revelatory experiences of my spice life has been becoming acquainted with various forms of herb combinations around the world. The same herbs may be mixed in different concentrations for completely diverse results. One additional spice and some salt may be thrown in to perk up an herb mix and change your taste, or even your life. You may have heard of some of these, but not all, I’ll bet. We carry all of them at The Spice Diva Emporium, in case you were wondering.

Bouquet Garni

3 TB olive oil 1 TB water 1/2 tsp vinegar 1/2 tsp lemon juice

B

ouquet Garni is just the thing to add to soups and stews, this combination of Basil, Savory, Tarragon, Dill Weed, Parsley, Oregano, Rosemary, Marjoram, and Thyme. It is usually made up of sprigs of these herbs tied with string or placed into a muslin bag to enhance the following: • Boeuf Bourguignon • Blanquette de Veau • Bouillabaisse • Brown Windsor soup • Carbonnade flamande • Cassoulet • Coq au vin • Court-bouillon • French onion soup • Lapin chasseur (huntsman’s rabbit) • Ossobuco • Pot au feu • Poule au pot

Chimichurri

C

himichurri - a little bit spicy herb mixture developed initially in Argentina which was used initially on steaks as a sauce, but we find great to use as a marinade or even a rub. Its ingredients are Parsley, Garlic, Onion, Red Chili, Black Pepper, Oregano, Cilantro, Sea Salt, Cumin. Recipe: A couple of hours before serving, mix together the following: 3 TB Chimichurri Dry Spice Mix,

22

Dine Wine & Stein

Fines Herbes

F

ines Herbes is a blend of dried or fresh Parsley, Chives, Chervil, and Tarragon. Other ingredients are sometimes added such as Watercress, Marjoram or Oregano. This is considered a more delicate herb mixture and is an ingredient in the preparation of eggs and salads.

Herbes de Provence

H

erbes de Provence is notable for the addition of Fennel Seed and Lavender. One of my favorite recipes is Chicken Provençal from The New York Times a few years back. One day, about 10 people came in asking for the combination. As I do, I asked what they were cooking and found a new edition of the repertoire in the process. It’s easy and is finished in the oven. https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1017327-roastedchicken-provencal (Note: You may have to at least temporarily join to get the full recipe. www.Food52 may have it as well.) We mix ours fresh at The Spice Diva Emporium.

Greek Seasoning

G

I

reek Seasoning was a favorite of the shop since the first day it was delivered. It is notable for

AUTUMN 2018


the addition of spearmint. We use it on Greek salads, lamb, potatoes or tzatziki (just add yogurt!). The ingredients are Garlic, Onion, Marjoram, Spearmint, Oregano, Thyme, Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Black Pepper.

Italian Seasoning

I

talian Seasoning, which we mix at The Spice Diva Emporium, is a “must have” for marinara or any Italian dish which is not spicy. Tarragon, Crushed Sage, Basil, Marjoram, Savory, Rosemary, Thyme meld together to enhance sauces, bread, pasta or just for dipping your bread in olive oil. Use your imagination!

Za’atar

Z

a’atar is a relatively new friend from the Middle East. It is one of the most requested combinations in The Spice Diva Emporium. We became acquainted with it during our exploration of the Yottam Ottolenghi cookbooks as it is a staple in Middle Eastern cuisine where several versions of it are sold. Its origins are biblical in that the Hyssop of The Bible is the Za’atar herb of today. Most commonly, we find it in a combination which imitates the original flavor but is much easier to reproduce. A few years ago, we were unable to get Za’atar because the fields in which it was grown in Israel had to lie fallow for a time every seven years. (that’s biblical!) When the price rose sharply, we decided to make our own from the following ingredients: Oregano, Thyme, Marjoram, Toasted Sesame Seeds, Sumac and Sea Salt. We now use it in yogurt sauces, hummus, all sorts of grain dishes. It is a comforting and warm flavor, even if it is new to you. Attribution to rammelkampfoto. com, wikipedia.com, www.culinaryhill.com, www.cooking.nytimes.com, and www.thespicediva.com. n

Rammelkamp Foto

The freshest spices, organic teas, beans, grains, oils and vinegars and Neuhaus Chocolates

410 West Main Street Charlottesville, VA 22903 www.thespicediva.com 434-218-DIVA (3482) Rammelkamp Foto

www.DineWineAndStein.com

23


24

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


Picking Cheese 101 by Jim Putbrese What’s that you say? Cheese shops intimidate you? It is understandable. I find it genuinely overwhelming to peer into a case lined with hundreds of cheeses in various shapes, sizes, color, labels and in many instances, difficult to pronounce names. Where does one even began when it comes to picking cheese? Which are mild, which are sharp, which are stinky and are they made from cow, goat or sheep milk. While I am still intimated, I have gained the courage to ask the cheesemonger for advice and samples.

I

thought perhaps a brief description of several kinds of cheese might help us the next time we go to our favorite cheese store. Here is a listing of several sorts of cheese by the United States Department of Agriculture.

Cheddar—Cheddar was first made in England, but today it seems to be very much the all American cheese.

Bel Paese—The name means “beautiful country,” and it is the trade-name of one of Italy’s best-known and most popular table cheese.

Edam—Originating in the Netherlands, It has a pleasingly mild, sometimes salty flavor and a firm and crumbly body. In the United States Edam is covered with a red paraffin coating.

Bleu—This is the French name for the group of blueveined cheeses made in the Roquefort area in southeastern France. The cheese tends to be sharp and salty and may be formed from Cow’s, sheep’s or goat’s milk. Blue—This is the American and Canadian designation for the French bleu cheese. Brick—This is original American cheese. It is a mild but somewhat pungent cheese, with a sweet flavor between Cheddar and Limburger. Brie—Although Brie, like many kinds of cheese, has been made for centuries, it’s only in the past recent years that it has become popular in the United States. It is a soft, sweet, surface ripened cheese often sold in wheels and best served at room temperature. Camembert—It is a soft surface-ripened cheese. The interior is yellow, waxy, and creamy. Similar to Brie but a different flavor.

Colby—This is another good American cheese. It is much like Cheddar but has a softer body and more open texture. It does not keep as well as Cheddar.

Gorgonzola—This is the principal blue-green veined cheese of Italy. Gouda—This is an Argentine cheese similar to the Italian Asiago. It has a pungent aroma Gruyere—This famous Swiss cheese is named after that village in Switzerland. Gruyere has smaller eyes and a sharper flavor than Swiss and makes a great grilled cheese sandwich. Limburger—This is a German cheese and is a semi-soft, surface-ripen cheese with a characteristic robust flavor and aroma. Our alphabetical listing of cheeses will continue in another issue. So explore, taste, sample and ask questions from you cheesemonger. n

www.DineWineAndStein.com

25


Quick Picks NORTHERN VIRGINIA

Grocery

Restaurant 1

19

Region’s 117

CENTRAL VIRGINIA

Winery 2 3 4

Effingham Manor & Winery Magnolia Vineyards Narmada Winery

Restaurant 20 21 22 23 24 25

SHENANDOAH VALLEY Restaurant 5 6 8 9 10 11

Cracked Pillar Pub Aioli Mediterranean Tapas Kathy’s Valley Smokehouse Yelping Dog Dayton Tavern

Winery 12 13 14 15

Bluestone Vineyard Brix & Columns Vineyards Barren Ridge Vineyards Rockbridge Vineyard

Brewery 16

26

The Green Leaf Grille Cavalier Diner Scotto’s Italian Restaurant & Pizzeria Extreme Pizza Augustiner Hall & Garden Palladio Restaurant

Winery 26 Barboursville Vineyards

Brewery 27 Brewing Tree Beer Company 28 Wild Wolf Brewing

Distillery 29 Virago Spirits

Grocery 30 Spice Diva 31 Chiles Peach Orchard

Bakery

Friendly Fermenter

32

Café 18

Cranberry’s Grocery & Eatery

Sugar & Salt

Shenandoah Joe Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


Quick Picks

Northern Virginia

Shenandoah Valley

Central Virginia

The area’s only venue for lakeside dining, Region’s 117 uses locally-sourced ingredients, most from within 117 miles, crafting a menu that has something for everyone. Region’s 117’s twist on American comfort food is made fresh and flavorful in an atmosphere unlike any other in the Shenandoah Valley. Region’s 117 is open Wednesday - Saturday from 11:30am to 9:00pm and Sundays from 11:00am-3:00pm.

Regions117.com | 540-699-3234 180 Bald Eagle Drive, Lake Frederick, VA 22630

1

Effingham Manor & Winery is pleased to announce that our Historic Manor House is NOW OPEN for tastings, tours, & sales. Come mingle in the rich history that surrounds our beautifully restored properly located in Prince William County. Enjoy walking the grounds and viewing the old well No stress, no pressure, just house, magnificent wines. smoke house, tiered gardens, koi pond, and the new winery building. Open 11am to 7pm daily.

Escape the Madness!

EffinghamManor.com | 703-594-2300 14325 Trotters Ridge Place, Nokesville, VA 20181

2

Magnolia Vineyards is located in Amissville in Rappahannock County, VA and nicknamed “Winery 251”, we are a real Mom & Pop Vineyard and Winery, our cozy, classic farmhouse style tasting room is open to the public for tastings Saturdays & Sundays from 11:30 - 5:30.

Magnolia Vineyards & Winery is located in Amissville, Va, just off scenic Route 211 in Rappahannock County. Owned by Glenn and Tina Marchione, we are a familyrun boutique winery and vineyard, making small lots of mostly Bordeaux varietals. Quiet country peace, tranquility and great mountain views. Come relax in our cozy farmhouse tasting room or surrounding grounds. We offer our tastings paired with cheeses and chocolate. The Tasting Room is open year-round (check our website or Facebook page for current hours).

MagnoliaVineyards.com | 703-785-8190 200 Viewtown Road, Amissville, VA

3

200 Viewtown Rd., Amissville,VA • 703.785.8190 • magnoliavineyards.com

Narmada Winery is a boutique winery situated in the heart of Rappahannock County just to the west of Warrenton. Established in 2009, Narmada Winery has earned over 40 gold medals in national and international competitions. Run by Pandit and Sudha Patil, the winery produces the best in the combination of art and science. Sudha’s knowledge of complex spices acquired during her childhood in India has enabled her to coax latent flavors from her grapes that would be perhaps overlooked by others. Open Friday - Sunday 11am to 5pm. NarmadaWinery.com | 540-937-8215 43 Narmada Lane, Amissville, VA 20106

4

Historic hometown hospitality never tasted so good. Located on Bridgewater’s main street in the famous Bridgewater Barbee House, The Cracked Pillar offers a fantastic menu of delectable pub food including their renowned “War Hammer Ruben Sandwich”. Combined with over 20 rotating taps, live music, and lots of Virginia wine, The Cracked Pillar is sure to be your pub of choice! Monday-Wednesday: 11am-10pm; Thursday-Sunday: 11am-12am. TheCrackedPillar.com | 540-237-4563 403 North Main Street, Bridgewater VA 22812

5

Yelping Dog is a wine store and wine bar that offers 1200 bottles of wine from over 200 vineyards. Yelping dog serves a variety of ciders, gourmet grilled cheese sandwiches, cheese plates, soups, appetizers, and desserts. Buy cheese by the pound, Greek olive oils, and wine and cheese related products and gifts. Each week, Yelping dog offers 10-12 wines by the glass to help introduce customers to unique varietals and tried and true favorites. On “Wine Wednesday”, the shop offers wine tasting from 5-7pm and Friday’s Yelping Dog hosts “Yelping Hour” from 5-7pm offering specials. Open Tuesday - Thursday 11am-9pm, Friday & Saturday 11am-10pm, and Sunday 12-6pm. YelpingDogWine.com | 540-885-2275. 9 East Beverley Street, Staunton, VA 24401

www.DineWineAndStein.com

10

27


Quick Picks

Northern Virginia

Shenandoah Valley

Central Virginia

Shenandoah Joe Coffee Roasters & Espresso Bar is dedicated to the craft of roasting coffee by hand in their 25 lb “San Franciscan” batch roaster. Shenandoah Joe uses only the finest Arabica coffee from all over the world. Shenandoah Joe serves Charlottesville with three locations and now with their new location in Harrisonburg.

ShenandoahJoe.com | FaceBook.com/ShenJoe | FaceBook.com/CornerJoe

18 Aioli Mediterranean Tapas has been receiving consistently outstanding reviews since renowned European Chef, Said Rhafiri, opened the restaurant. The menu is a combination of inventive small plates, called Tapas, and an excellent selection of entrees, all artfully presented. The interior of the restaurant is tasteful and comfortable with a space in the back for private parties. Aioli is open for dinner Tuesday - Saturday. The Bella Inn, located on the second floor of Aioli offers two suites for overnight guest or extended stay. Both suites are large and fully equipped.

AioliStaunton.com | 540-885-1414 29 N Augusta Street, Staunton, VA 24401

6

Located on the Higgs family’s former apple orchard, Barren Ridge Vineyards is now home to Augusta County’s premier winery. John and Shelby Higgs converted the 1890’s barn into a state-of-the-art winery, and offers 14 different varietals of wine, many of them award winning. Open seven days a week.

BarrenRidgeVineyardsVA.com | 540-248-3300 984 Barren Ridge Road, Fisherville, VA 22939

14

Valley Smokehouse BBQ-N-Brew, warm inviting atmosphere wide selection of BBQ and sides including smokehouse beef brisket, pork and chicken BBQ, wraps, clubs sandwich along with great appetizers and desserts. Catering, private parties and meeting room. Kids Menu (12& under). Live entertainment. Visit them on Facebook. Open Thursday, Friday and Saturday 4pm - 9pm.

ValleySmokehouseVa.com | 540-885-4800 2310 West Beverley Street, Staunton, VA 22801

9

Bluestone Vineyard is family owned and operated, and committed to crafting small-bach wines. The beautiful new event building, “The meeting House” is available for weddings, receptions, reunions, and much more.

BluestoneVineyard.com | 540-828-0099 4828 Spring Creek Road Bridgewater, VA 22812

12

Surrounded by both the Blue Ridge and Massanutten Mountains at Brix and Columns Vineyards you can enjoy one of our delicious wines while sitting on our porch or cozied up to one of our fireplaces. We are a winery that combines the best of farming, wine and relaxation. We look forward to seeing you here! Open seven days a week.

BrixAndColumns.com | 540-421-0339 1501 Dave Berry Road, McGaheysville, VA 22840

13

28

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


Quick Picks

Northern Virginia

Shenandoah Valley

Central Virginia

Cranberry’s Grocery & Eatery, a natural & organic store/cafe serving coffee, wraps, sandwiches, salads, and soups. Open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner and serving gluten free and vegan entrees as requested. The store offers groceries, apothecary, natural products, and body care. Catering available.

GoCranberrys.com | 540-885-4755 7 South New Street, Staunton, VA 24401

19 Residing in a basement space adjacent to the heart of downtown Harrisonburg, The Friendly Fermenter is a cozy spot to unwind with one of their taproom exclusive handcrafted beers, while visiting with friends, playing games, or checking out their fully stocked home brewing retail shop. TFF also offers instructed “brew on site” experiences, where customers can come in and make their own 5 gallon batch of beer. Brew on site sessions can either be public, allowing for 1-2 people, or a private session where your group of 6-8 gets the brewing space to themselves, Reservations are required and can be made online or by calling us.

FriendlyFermenter.com | 540-217-2614 20 South Mason Street, Suite B10 (basement), Harrisonburg, VA 22801

16

Kathy’s Restaurant is located in Staunton and recently received the Virginia Living magazine’s Best Breakfast in the Shenandoah Valley Award. The restaurant has served locals and tourists for 26 years in the same location and is known for their home style cooking and their famous pancakes. Open seven days a week.

Kathys-Resturant.com | 540-885-4331 705 Greenville Avenue, Staunton, VA 24401

8 Rockbridge Vineyard is one of the oldest wineries and producers of fine award winning Virginia wines. The owner and winemaker, Shepherd Rouse, a native resident, received a Masters in Enology from the University of California. The winery produces a full spectrum of wines, many with names of local interest. An excellent fun wine is “Jeremiah’s” (named after the famous bullfrog). The wine is slightly sweet with a fruity bouquet and a wonderful label. It is a perfect wine to enjoy on the patio with friends. Enjoy their newly expanded tasting room.

RockbridgeVineyard.com | 888-511-9463 35 Hill View Lane, Raphine, VA 24472

15

Dayton Tavern is located in a renovated turn of the century building. We have the best steaks around and a great selection of fresh seafood. We have an outstanding Sunday Brunch! Swing by the Dayton Tavern for a taste of what the whole town is talking about.

DaytonTavern.com | 540-879-1189 45 Main Street, Dayton, VA 22821

11 When you are looking for something different on Virginia Route 151 check out Nelson County’s new edition – The Brewing Tree. Mark Thompson (founder of Starr Hill Brewery) and his wife Gina return and are pleased to offer a unique collaboration of core brews and hand selected guest taps. And don’t forget to choose your “Pints with Purpose” charity. For each beer sold, The Brewing Tree gives 10% to one of the four rotating local charities. The Brewing Tree Beer Company is the place for your holiday party or event on their spacious 5-acre facility. Lots of parking and Dog friendly. Open Tuesday-Thursday 3pm - 8pm, Friday & Saturday 11am - 10pm, and Sunday 11am - 6pm.

BrewingTreeBC@gmail.com | 540-381-0990 9278 Rockfish Valley Highway, Afton, VA 22920

www.DineWineAndStein.com

27

29


Quick Picks

Northern Virginia

Shenandoah Valley

Central Virginia

An 18th century estate centered around the historic landmark ruins of the house Thomas Jefferson designed for Governor James Barbour, Barboursville Vineyards was founded in 1976 by one of the pre-eminent wine growers of our time, Gianni Zonin. As a winemaker for over 20 years, Luca Paschina has set the standard for wines from Virginia. The tasting room is open daily for current vintage tastings and museum presentations of Virginia wine history.

BarboursvilleWine.net | 540-832-7848 17655 Winery Road, Barboursville, VA 22923

26

The Green Leaf Grill features a diverse menu, including authentic seafood gumbo, New Orleans craw-fish étouffée, and creative vegetarian dishes, as well as specialty pizzas and panini sandwiches. The Owner and Chef, Chris, showcases his expertise in Creole cooking with formal training at the famous 5-Star Commander’s Palace in New Orleans. Enjoy an excellent selection of wines as well as craft and domestic beer. Live music every Friday and Saturday night, as well as a Jazz Brunch on Sundays from 12:00pm-2:00pm.

TheGreenLeafGrill.com| 540-949-4416 415 W Main Street, Waynesboro, VA 22980

20

When you are looking for Charlottesville’s best breakfast, served at all hours, and the finest and most authentic Greek cuisine you must go to the Cavalier Diner. Since 2009, the Cavalier Diner has been Charlottesville’s choice for breakfast, traditional diner fair, and Greek and Italian favorites. Monday-Thursday 6:30am-2:30pm, Friday 6:30am-9:00pm, Saturday 7:00am-9:00pm, and Sunday 7:00am-9:00pm.

TheCavalierDiner.com | 434-977-1619 1403 Emmet Street North Charlottesville, VA 22903

21

Scotto’s Italian Restaurant has been making Italy accessible to Valley residents for over 20 years. Owner and Chef, Tommy Scotto, was inspired by his passion for his Italian culture when first opening his restaurant in 1989. Tommy goes to great lengths to ensure authenticity and quality in every dish. Wine is an important part of Italian culture. Scotto’s Italian Restaurant offers an extensive wine selection that is available for dine-in, carryout, or delivery. Open for lunch and dinner 7 days a week.

Scottos.net | 540-942-8715 1412 W Broad Street, Waynesboro, VA 22980

22

Spice Diva offers the finest and most flavorful spices, salt and pepper, herbs. teas in bulk, and exquisite extracts. Inquire about their cooking classes in their twelve-seat kitchen.

TheSpiceDiva.com | 434-218-3482 Main Street Market, Charlottesville, VA 22903

30 Located in Nelson County, Wild Wolf Brewing Co. is a made from scratch restaurant and brewery featuring local ingredients with vegetarian and gluten free options. Our specialties - hickory smoked meats and award winning beer! Bring the kids and your canine companions to Wild Wolf to experience the many unique features that makes this brewery a must-see destination. Our biergarten, shaded by Elm trees, features a gazebo, waterfalls, and a large koi pond. At Wild Wolf Brewing Co. we pride ourselves on providing exquisite food, award winning beer, and a memorable experience. Visit our website for current specials and events.

WildWolfBeer.com | 434-361-0088 2461 Rockfish Valley Highway, Nellysford, VA 22958

30

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018

28


Quick Picks

Northern Virginia

Shenandoah Valley

Central Virginia

Fuel your next extreme adventure with a pizza from Extreme Pizza. With the freshest ingredients, and tastiest combinations, Extreme Pizza takes pizza to a whole new level. Stop by or order some today!

CHARLOTTESVILLE

35 Merchant Walk Square Suite 200 5th Street Station Pkwy 335 Merchant

434-234-3239

ExtremePizza.com | 434-234-3239 Walk Square, 5th Street Station Parkway, Charlottesville, VA 22904

SIGNATURE PIZZAS . SLICES . MONSTER SUBS . WINGS . FRESH SALADS . CALZONES . BEER/WINE

ce Michel wine

rd cider • Prin

Bold Rock ha wn peaches •

VA

horchaRd.com 583

23

Since 1912, the Chiles Family has been tending its orchards and selling their fruit to neighbors and folks passing through. The orchards have grown to become community favorites and destinations for visitors far and wide. Pick Your Own offerings now include strawberries, sweet cherries, apples, and pumpkins. In addition to our famous peaches, we added an ice cream parlor and stocked farm market. Chiles Peach Orchards is also proud to partner with Bold Rock Hard Cider and Prince Michel Winery.

ChilesFamilyOrchards.com | 434-823-1583 1351 Greenwood Road, Crozet VA 22932

31

Follow us on social media for picking availability

Augustiner Hall and Garden is an authentic German beer garden in Historic Downtown Charlottesville. Occupying just over 3200 sq feet of renovated warehouse space, Augustiner offers in-house-made soups, grass-fed beef burgers, and authentic German cuisine. Have a seat in the 24 table beer garden, and chose from 4 imported German beers on tap, or a great selection of both German and local Craft beers.

AugustinerCville.com | 434-202-7044 313 2nd Street SE. Charlottesville, VA 22902

24

Craving something sweet? Whatever you’re looking for - decadent chocolate goodies, old-school candy, or a handmade brownie or cinnamon roll - you’ll find it at Sugar & Salt! Stop by and try our signature treat, the cannonball, for a fudgy, truffley, chocolatey moment of pure delight. Want some coffee with that? We have hot coffee, nitro cold brew on tap, and bags of locally roasted java goodness. All this and more, just a few scenic miles down Route 53 from Monticello! Open Tuesday to Saturday.

SugarAndSaltSweets.com | 888-273-0169 265 Turkeysag Trail, Suite #112, Palmyra, VA 22963

32

Located in Richmond’s up and coming Scott’s Addition, Virago Spirits is a craft distillery specializing in classically inspired and creatively interpreted rums, gins, brandies, and herbal liqueurs. Virago operates one of few Charentais-style alembic stills in the United States, and when combined with a time-honored, traditional production technique and slow distilling process Virago produces some of the most excellent spirits in Virginia. Our products are currently available at select ABC stores, through Special Order at VA ABC and at our distillery store. Visit our website for seasonal tasting hours. www.viragospirits.com.

ViragoSpirits.com | 804-355-8746 11727 Rhoadmiller Street, Richmond, Virginia 23220

29

This restaurant’s name is no accident, given Andrea Palladio’s influence on the Jeffersonian mansion here, and the presence of his masterpieces throughout the Veneto, home to Gianni and Silvanna Zonin, founders of this vineyard estate. Northern Italian in inspiration, yet creatively indebted to the most seasonal and local resources of the earth and sea, Palladio offers the handsomest gastronomic redemption there can be of the promise only the finest food and wine can extend – recalling one, recurrently, to the beauty of this world.

BarboursvilleWine.net | 540-832-7848 17655 Winery Road, Barboursville, VA 22923

www.DineWineAndStein.com

25

31


DW&S ADVENTURES:

The View of Virginia Wine Lovers by Kim Chappell and Jennifer Waldera We asked Virginia Wine Lovers to tell us about their favorite Fall experience in the Commonwealth. The results? Virginia Wine Lovers adore the Blue Ridge Mountains. Scenic drives, dramatic mountain views, favorite trails and the relaxed pace of a mountain weekend. Special accolades for a winery with a view and outdoor seating. DW&S Magazine is distributed at over 450 locations in Virginia. Readership spans the length of the Blue Ridge Mountains. From reader response, we picked three locations and three unique Fall experiences. If you are a wine lover searching for the perfect Fall experience, perhaps you will find it here.

Dramatic Mountain Views

I

magine sipping a Virginia wine while gazing at dramatic mountain views.

“One View—Many Wines” –The Moss Vineyards Web Site Poll wine lovers and ask for a great Virginia mountain view and the popular response is Moss Vineyards in Nortonsville, Virginia. At Moss Vineyards, you will find a tasting room and an outdoor space facing a picture-perfect view. Relax and soak in the vibrant colors of a Virginia Fall afternoon. You may come for

32

Dine Wine & Stein

the view, but we know that you will stay for the wine. Moss Vineyards is less than a thirty- minute drive from Charlottesville, Virginia. The drive will transport you from an urban setting through the Virginia countryside of Albemarle County. Continue into Nelson County, on RT 151 and you will reach Valley Road Vineyards. Valley Road Vineyards, established just two years ago, is quickly becoming known for its wine and for the visitor’s experience. The wine, a curated calendar of local food

I

AUTUMN 2018


scene, we reached out to Pete Eshelan, Director of the Roanoke Outside Foundation. Pete knows Roanoke’s trails and is a fan of the local craft beverage scene. He even suggests a few craft breweries to add to your list. Kim: The outdoor scene in Roanoke has acquired national exposure. If I am planning a Fall weekend visit to Roanoke, what hiking trail should I add to my bucket list?

Enjoy a day of exploring the mountains of Nelson County and then sit by the fire at Valley Road Vineyard

trucks, live music and the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountain view. Stop here for a Nelson County Fall afternoon. From Valley Road Vineyards, it is an easy drive to the Blue Ridge Parkway and many hiking trails. Pack a picnic and toast a beautiful sunset at Ravens Roost Overlook at milepost 10.7 on the BRP.

Trails and Wine in Roanoke, VA Roanoke boasts an eclectic metro scene paired with over 1,000 miles of trails for biking, hiking and paddling. This Virginia city is exploding onto the outdoor adventure scene. To learn about the Roanoke outdoor

Pete: No trip to Roanoke is complete without a hike along the Appalachian Trail (A.T.). Roanoke is best known for The Triple Crown of the A.T. which are hikes to three iconic spots along the A.T. – Dragon’s Tooth, McAfee Knob, and Tinker Cliffs. A two-day backpack trip will take you to all three, or you can pick and choose to hike each one individually; Dragon’s Tooth is a five-mile hike that takes you to the “tooth”, a 35 foot Tuscarora quartzite spire; McAfee Knob, the most photographed point along the entire A.T., is an eight-mile hike; and Tinker Cliffs is a strenuous seven- mile hike. (Pair with Parkway Brewing, Ober Brewing Company) The Triple Crown hikes are very popular on the weekends, and can get crowed. We recommend starting very early in the morning to avoid crowds. If crowds aren’t your thing and you want to find the “trail less traveled” then we highly recommend a hike to Roaring Run or Bottom Creek Gorge Trail

Plan an adventure that includes hiking and biking near Roanoke, VA.

Continued on page 34

www.DineWineAndStein.com

33


Continued from page 33

Kim: Mention Virginia Mountain Biking and you usually hear about Carvins Cove. The trails of Carvins Cove are only 10 miles from downtown Roanoke. Pete, please give us some tips for enjoying Carvins Cove. Pete: Well, we are the Mountain Bike Capital of the East, and the best way to pack as much riding into a single trip is by riding at Carvins Cove Nature Reserve, or as the locals call it, simply Carvins. With 50+ miles of single track trail there is something for every type of mountain biker, whether it’s big jumps, flow trails, technical downhills, rock gardens, or beautiful cross country riding. The one thing any visitor should know is that the locals who ride at Carvins are very proud of the quality of riding and are eager to share it with others. So don’t be afraid to reach out to someone in the parking lot and let them know it’s your first time riding at Carvins…most likely you’ll get a personal tour guide out of it…at a minimum you’ll get beta on which trails to ride. Most mountain bikers start and end their rides from the Bennett Springs parking lot, with the exception of those who like big jumps, they use the Timberview parking lot.

34

Dine Wine & Stein

You can find a wealth of information about all the trails mentioned at www.RoanokeOutside.com And follow the Dine Wine & Stein Facebook page for updates from the Roanoke area. Thanks to Roanoke Outside for sharing some beautiful photos by Sam Dean Photography. After you hit the Roanoke trails, you will want to relax with a glass of wine at Valhalla Vineyards. This is another camera-worthy Virginia winery. Sit at an elevation of 2000 feet and overlook the Roanoke valley.

I

AUTUMN 2018


Valhalla has been producing wine in Roanoke, Virginia since 1998. The outdoor space includes a mountain top deck and a timber frame patio. Valhalla is the perfect place to relax after a weekend hike or bike ride.

Fall Foliage, a View & a Farm Brunch (and Cider Donuts, a Pumpkin Festival and Beer)

For our last stop, we head north to Loudon County and beautiful Fall valley views. These are the views that relieve stress and make for a relaxing weekend experience. We go to Northern Virginia in search of a view, a wine tasting and farm-to-table food. DW&S writer Jennifer Waldera visits Bluemont Vineyard and tells us about her visit… The mere mention of Northern Virginia can conjure up jarring mental images of brake lights and stalled traffic which is, admittedly, no way to enjoy the foliage that fall has to offer. However, there are also expansive areas that offer a peaceful respite from congestion and crowds, like the 100 acres on which Bluemont Vineyard sits with its sweeping views of the Loudoun Valley. A true farm experience, with a view, at Bluemont. At 951 feet above sea level, Bluemont Vineyard’s tasting room offers two tasting options of six of their wine tasting, there are nearly as many ways to enjoy wines all with a bird’s eye view of the ever-changing autumn at Bluemont as there are shades of fall foliage. colors of fall. In early autumn, visitors can relax at outDW&S writer, Jennifer Waldra, snapped the view photo door tables or on the lawn while the brisker days of late and we thank Bluemont Vineyard for the wine and fall can be spent sipping fireside. The tasting room also food photos. Check out their Facebook page for upserves a seasonal, farm-to-table menu each day of the dates throughout the season. n week and a brunch menu on Sundays from 11 am - 2 pm. In addition to wine tasting with a view, visitors can How will you enjoy a beautiful Virginia Fall weekend? also stop by the family’s adjacent property, Great CounPerhaps a mountain bike ride on trails near Roanoke try Farm. The farm offers seasonal pick your own fruits followed by wine with a view. Or will it be brunch with and and vegetables. For the entire month of September, a Pumpkin Festival…or just relaxing at a winery near Great Country Farm hosts their Apple Gala and Cider Charlottesville or in Nelson County? Virginia Wine Fest with cider making demonstrations, apple picking, a Lovers adore a great view. corn maze, and the opportunity to snack on some cider donuts. In October, the farm will host the Fall Pumpkin Harvest Festival featuring pick your own pumpkins and Excellenc apples and a corn maze as well as the opportunity to Virginia W 86 Gold Medals wo shoot pumpkins from a cannon and to pick the pig to win Excellence in their Oinkintucky Derby Pig Races. Virginia Wine Those who prefer to swill some suds can stop by the 86 Gold Medals won since 2009 Excellence Excellence in Excellence in in family’s other adjacent property, Dirt Farm Brewing. Excellence in narmadawinery.com Virginia Excellence ininin Virginia Wine Excellence Virginia Wine Wine in Excellence The brewery boasts an impressive list of beers on VirginiaExcellence Wine 8686 Gold since 2009 Gold Medals won since 2009 86 Gold Medals won since 2009 Medals won since 2009 Virginia Wine Virginia Wine Virginia Wine Virginia Wine rotation and serves snacks as well. Visitors can sip Medals won since 2009 86Gold Gold Medals won since 2009 8686Gold Medals won since 2009 86Gold Medals won since 2009 Excellence in indoors, but even in crisp fall weather it’s easy to get Virginia Wine cozy next to the outdoor fireplaces. 86 Gold Medals won since 2009 With all of the options from picking pumpkins to Excellence in sampling brews fireside, or taking in a vast view while Open for winetasting year round! See our website for seasonal hours.

narmadawinery

narmadawinery.com

Open for winetasting year round! See ou

Narmada Winery | 43 Narmada Lane | Rt. 211W | Amissville, VA

narmadawinery.com narmadawinery.com narmadawinery.com narmadawinery.com

narmadawinery.com narmadawinery.com narmadawinery.com narmadawinery.com

Excellence in Virginia Wine

Open for winetasting year round! See our website for seasonal hours.

Narmada Winery | 43 Narmada Lane | Rt. 211W | Amissville, VA 20106 | 540.937.8215 | info

narmadawinery.com

Virginia Wine

Open forfor winetasting year round! See our website for seasonal hours. Open for winetasting year round! See our website for hours. Open for winetasting ourour website forseasonal seasonal hours. Open winetasting year round! See website for seasonal hours.

Narmada Winery Narmada Lane Rt. 211W Amissville, VA20106 20106 540.937.8215 info@narmadawinery.com Narmada Winery |||43 Lane ||Rt. ||Amissville, VA |||540.937.8215 |||info@narmadawinery.com Narmada Winery 43 Narmada Lane 20106 540.937.8215 info@narmadawinery.com Narmada Winery |43Narmada 43 Narmada Lane | 211W Rt. 211W | Amissville, VA 20106 | 540.937.8215 | info@narmadawinery.com

Narmada Open Winery | 43 Narmada Lane | Rt. |forAmissville, for winetasting yearyear round! See See our website for seasonal hours. Open for winetasting round! our 211W website seasonal hours.VA 20106 | 540.937.8215 | info@narmadawinery.com

Open for winetasting round! website seasonal hours. Open for winetasting yearyear round! SeeSee ourour website for for seasonal hours. Narmada Winery | 43|Narmada LaneLane | Rt.|211W | Amissville, VA 20106 | 540.937.8215 | info@narmadawinery.com Narmada Winery 43 Narmada Rt. 211W | Amissville, VA 20106 | 540.937.8215 | info@narmadawinery.com Narmada Winery 43 Narmada Lane Rt. 211W | Amissville, 20106 | 540.937.8215 | info@narmadawinery.com Narmada Winery | 43|Narmada Lane | Rt.| 211W | Amissville, VA VA 20106 | 540.937.8215 | info@narmadawinery.com

86 Gold Medals won since 2009

86 Gold Medals won since 2009 www.DineWineAndStein.com narmadawinery.com

Open for winetasting year round! See our website for seasonal hours. Narmada Winery | 43 Narmada Lane | Rt. 211W | Amissville, VA 20106 | 540.937.8215 | info@narmadawinery.com

narmadawinery.com

35


DW&S EXCURSION:

A Taste Road Trip

Four Nights in the Adirondacks

by Kim Chappell Mention “The Adirondacks” to a travel-lover and they imagine sitting in an iconic Adirondack chair, next to a deep blue lake. They envision a mountain view of vivid Fall foliage and a glass of wine in their hand.

Well, it is exactly like that, and you need to go.

P

ack your favorite sweater, some hiking shoes and definitely your camera. Get ready for mountain and lake adventure but also a very unique craft beverage experience. The growing season is short. The air is crisp and the wine is complex. And New York’s Farm-to-Glass program is the cornerstone to a unique tasting room experience. It’s an experience that we can not quite replicate in Virginia.

36

Dine Wine & Stein

We drove our motorhome to NY and wandered the backroads and tasting rooms for a month. You can fly into Albany, rent a car, and explore the Adirondacks over a long Fall weekend. Keep reading, and I will map out a fantastic four-day mini escape. We drove into the lower Hudson Valley and stopped at the Applewood Winery in Warwick, NY. The Applewood Winery is also the home to the Naked Flock brand of Hard Cider and Meads. They also distill

I

AUTUMN 2018


spirits including vodka and gin from local apples. Order a pizza and pair it with a cocktail. Perhaps your cocktail will be a wine blended with a vodka or even made with the hard cider. It was here that I learned about New York’s Farm-toGlass program. If your beverage is part of the program, you can also serve the beverages of other participants in your tasting room. Craft beer, wine, cider and spirits can all be found on the same tasting menu. The cocktails and pairings are only limited by your imagination. I am a fan of wine or cider blended cocktails. My favorite from this NY adventure was found in the Hudson Valley. A blackberry infused Merlot, a shot of small-batch bourbon, muddled blood oranges and Morello cherries with a splash of sparkling water over crushed ice. I decided early in the trip that I would take this signature NY cocktail home, to Virginia. It would be a Hat Tip to the NY Farm-to-Glass Movement.

Four Nights in the Adirondacks If you are short on time, cut the drive time from Virginia and fly into Albany, NY. Rent a car and you will quickly be on the edge of the Adirondacks. I have picked four towns and an array of experiences that all provide a peek into the Adirondacks.

Night One: Saratoga Springs Saratoga Springs is considered, and marketed as, the gateway to the Adirondacks. It boasts a quaint historic district with boutique shopping, cafes, museums and coffee shops. We enjoyed the restored Victorian houses in this eclectic town center. I visited the Saratoga Winery, Artisanal Brew Works and the High Rock Distillery, all a quick drive from the center of Saratoga Springs. The Saratoga Winery offered a multi- tasting experience that fits nicely into a four-day adventure. At the winery, you can taste spirits from the High Rock Distillery and local craft beer. Or, pair their wine collection with local chocolate or cheese. Be sure to check their live music calendar. You may want to wind down your day on their patio while listening to some local music. Determined to re-create my favorite NY cocktail, I purchased The Saratoga Winery’s Blackberry Reserve— Fortified Melomel Wine. The Blackberry Reserve is “fresh blackberries pressed and blended with honey. Aged two years in a bourbon barrel and fortified with distilled melomel.” It is going to make a great cocktail for my DW&S friends back in Virginia.

Night 2: Lake George Village There are faster ways to arrive, but we drove to Lake George Village on scenic Route 9. The route is dotted with dark red barns, fields, cabins, lakes and waving American flags. “The Village” is a mix of 1960’s diners, B&Bs, retro motels and a few chain hotels. Drive along the lake on RT 9N and stay in one of the many private cabin rentals. Lake George is a 36- mile natural lake with Lake George Village at one end and Ticonderoga at the other end. You can rent a boat in the village and explore the lake or, I suggest going on a Lake George Steamboat Cruise. Take the cruise and then follow it with dinner at one of the many restaurants with lake-side seating. If you enjoy kayaking, stop by Rogers Rock State Park. With a day-pass and a kayak rental, you will be treated to a true Adirondack experience. In this park, you can also sit at a picnic table, next to the lake, and enjoy a view of vibrant Fall foliage. It was the perfect place to enjoy a picnic lunch. For my Lake George tasting experience, I visited the Adirondack Winery, Lake George Distilling Company and Oscar’s Adirondack Mountain Smokehouse. Continued on page 38

www.DineWineAndStein.com

37


Continued from page 37

Oscar’s has been showcased on the Food Network and in the Rachel Ray Magazine. We stocked up on Summer Sausage, smoked cheese and their famous More Than Mustard. All were paired with a Merlot from the Adirondack Winery. At the Lake George Distilling Company, I picked up some Bull Head Bourbon. It is the second ingredient to re-create my favorite NY cocktail.

Night 2: Lake George Village “Bring your hiking shoes and your camera and get ready for non-stop views” Today, you will drive 1.5 hours from Lake George Village to Wilmington, NY. You may want to stop along the way in the town of Keene, NY for a coffee, a hike or a souvenir of your visit. Famous shops that carry Adirondack goods can be found near Keene including Dartbrook Rustic Goods, Dartbrook South and Owls Head Mountain Rustic Furniture. Wilmington is eight miles east of Lake Placid and only one mile west of Whiteface Mountain. Here, the tasting experience is the natural beauty and a local restaurant with an amazing view. Bring your hiking shoes and your camera and get ready for non-stop views. Around every corner, I was shouting, “Stop the car…I need to take a photo”. In Wilmington, you are surrounded by the stunning beauty of the Adirondacks. You will find hundreds of miles of hiking trails beside cold mountain rivers, multiple lakes and high mountain peaks. A hiking experience that is adapted for all ability levels is found at High Falls Gorge ($). There is a one-mile Nature Trail and also an “Easy Path” without stairs. The Waterfall Walk will provide ample opportunity for stunning photos. Consider staying at the Hungry Trout Resort. This resort caught my attention with the amazing mountain and river view directly off their patio dining area. This resort has dining to fit every palate, from fine dining at The Hungry Trout to casual dining at McDougals Pub. Of course, trout is on the menu. Also for trout, the resort offers day fishing trips and a fishing school.

Day Four: Lake Placid Fall is brisk but the town is warm and vibrant. Tall

38

Dine Wine & Stein

northern pines and log cabins reflect in the dark blue lake. Main Street is bustling with coffee shops, stores and local restaurants. After hiking and then shopping, you may crave a beer. Stop by the Lake Placid Pub & Brewery. Enjoy lakeside decks and a tour of the brewery. Currently, brewery tours are on Saturday afternoons at 4:30PM. Lake Placid Pub & Brewery has been crafting ales and lagers for more than 21 years. Over the years, they have crafted almost 150 different styles of beer. They brew almost 350,000 pints of beer annually. They always have six house beers on tap. You will want to try their popular Ubu Ale, once enjoyed by President Bill Clinton in the White House. As you drive around Lake Placid, you may remember the 1980 Winter Olympics. That was the year that the USA Men’s Ice Hockey Team beat Team Russia. Just for fun, Google and watch the video while visiting Lake Placid. Lake Placid has hosted two Olympic competitions, in 1932 and in 1980. The town still proudly displays its Olympic heritage. Personally, my jaw dropped as we drove past the ski high jump. As you wrap up your visit to Lake Placid, keep in mind that your journey back to the Albany airport is approximately 2 hours and 10 minutes. And you need to return that rental car.

A DW&S Tip Is four days enough time in the Adirondacks? No. But it is enough time to get a taste of this beautiful region. It is also enough time to enjoy local craft beverages. My first tip is to fly into the Albany Airport and rent a car. My second tip is to consider taking a craft beverage tour. The Hoppy Trails Brew Bus is my second tip. Hoppy Trails, hoppytrailsbrewbus.com, has tours that start in Saratoga Springs and Lake George. Perhaps you prefer to book lodging in one town and leave the driving to someone else. I am heading back to Virginia with the ingredients to re-create my favorite NY cocktail. I will enjoy it with family and friends—the best souvenir of all. n We explored the Adirondacks in our Winnebago Motorhome. If you would like a list of campsites and reviews, send an email to kim@dinewineandstein.com

I

AUTUMN 2018



Join the Hard Cider Revival!

Find your favorite hard cider at Cider Week Virginia. It’s a week of cider events across Virginia. Mark your calendar for November 9-18, 2018.

I

t is a week full of unique events across the Commonwealth. From Cider Festivals in Richmond and Alexandria, VA to special tastings at cidery locations, Cider Week Virginia has the atmosphere for every cider lover. To learn more about the week, DW&S contacted Kevin Clay of Cider Week Virginia. Kevin is a wealth

of information about cider production in Virginia and put us in touch with some of the region’s cider masters. We asked one question of each. The responses are as varied as the styles of Virginia cider. Keep reading for the reactions and stay tuned to the DW&S Facebook page for additional insights from VA Cider Masters.

DW&S Asks… Virginia hard cider styles are as unique as the variety of apples grown. To spotlight the diverse brands, DW&S asked cider makers one question… DW&S: Virginia cider lovers can enjoy a wide variety of both cider styles and a tap room experience. Tell us about your unique style. When we visit during Cider Week Virginia, what can we expect?

Albemarle Ciderworks Responds… “Albemarle CiderWorks focuses on the apple. We currently make fifteen different ciders. Seven of those are dry, single-varietal ciders that showcase the uniqueness of each apple variety. Our tasting room is set in southern Albemarle County and features orchard views and music on the weekends.”

Bold Rock Hard Cider Responds… “We take great pride in both educating and extending unmatched hospitality at our Cidery & Tap Room in Nellysford, VA. Guests can expect a warm greeting as soon as they enter followed by instruction on where to find tours, tastings, pints, flights, food, seating and other important items during the visit. The “Chapel of Apple” as we refer to our Cidery is perched on a ridge overlooking a beautiful meadow and the Rockfish River. It is agritourism at its finest, and we invite all to ‘drink in the scenery’ while they enjoy a cold and refreshing Bold Rock or tasty sandwich or platter from our Feed Room. The area is second to none in natural beauty

40

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


during late October/early November and our tap room is open daily. We also feature remote locations at Carter Mountain Orchard (Charlottesville, VA) and Chiles Peach Orchard (Crozet, VA) where you can both pick fresh fruit and enjoy all of our cider selections on tap. The visits will not be duplicative, and each location presents a unique and enjoyable experience, so we invite you to visit all three of our Central VA tap rooms when passing through the area! More information at https://boldrock.com/visit/.”

Potter’s Craft Cider Responds… “Potter’s Craft Cider is in the heart of apple country at the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. All of our ciders start with locally-grown fruit, cultivated with care and harvested at peak flavor from nearby orchards and family farms. We press fresh heirloom and traditional cider apples such as the Albemarle Pippin and Virginia Winesap, as well as modern cider apples like the Gold Rush, to create a cider that would make our forbearers proud. After the apples are pressed, we carefully ferment the fresh juice at cold temperatures. Our cider is crisp, tart, and refreshing with a pronounced fruit aroma and a dry finish. Although our production cidery is only open to the public on special occasions, our cider can be enjoyed every weekend at the Potter’s Cider Garden, which is located inside The Bridge Progressive Arts Initiative in the Belmont neighborhood of Charlottesville. Our shared space in The Bridge transforms monthly, allowing patrons to enjoy a wide range of arts and events when they visit. Outside of the gallery are tropical plants and a relaxing patio fit for indulging in the most delicious of ciders. There are always 8 different ciders on tap, guaranteeing a wide variety of flavors. We offer fruited, hopped, and sour ciders, along with our newest releases and small batch experiments. Flights, glasses, bottles, cans, and growlers of cider can be purchased at the Cider Garden. There are restaurants nearby, along with the occasional food truck, making for a perfect afternoon in Charlottesville VA. For more information about events happening at the Cider Garden during Virginia Cider Week, follow our Facebook and Instagram pages!”

Buskey Cider Responds… Buskey Cider offers a full range of clean fermentation ciders, from drier and classic styles to modern and creative. Buskey boasts using 100% Virginia apples and having no added sugars to their ciders. Located in an architecturally-unique, old Richmond train car-loading building in Richmond’s own craft alcohol neighborhood of Scott’s Addition, Buskey Cider’s industrial building provides an urban environment for their fans to try out 16 rotating offerings in pints and flights.

Castle Hill Hard Cider Responds… Tradition and technology work hand in hand as we produce our array of award-winning ciders. Castle Hill Cider endeavors to be a self-sustaining orchard and has planted thousands of cider apple trees on its property, following both traditional and modern growing techniques. Our cider makers are invested in identifying the apple varieties that are best suited to the local climate and terroir so that Castle Hill continues to create cider that brings out the finest qualities of the land. We press apples on an Americanmade press and ferment apple juice in modern tanks from Germany and in buried traditional terra-cotta vessels crafted in the Republic of Georgia. Continued on page 42

www.DineWineAndStein.com

41


Blue Toad Hard Cider Responds… Blue Toad Hard Cider is nestled in at the base of the Blue Ridge Mountains and Wintergreen Resort. Blue Toad is a multi-international awardwinning local hard cider company that emphasizes the ability to create an amazing beverage from a variety of “dessert” apples, apples you would find in your grocery store. Our property sits on the South Fork of the Rockfish River which creates a beautiful setting here in the Rockfish Valley. A sprawling 27 acres allow guests to roam, play on the playgrounds, have a picnic, enjoy a private setting, and just relax while soaking in the 360* mountain views while the river rushes by. The tap room is made from a historic 1880’s apple packing shed, and usually boasts 9 ciders on tap stretching from semi-dry to semi-sweet ciders. We like to think we have something for everyone to enjoy, from children to grandparents.

Winchester Ciderworks Responds… Located on our fifth-generation family apple orchard, Winchester Ciderworks crafts English style, off-dry ciders. Produced traditionally with an emphasis on aging, we find it takes a minimum of nine months to produce the proper balance and complexity of flavors. Certain ciders undergo further barrel aging to add even more depth. We invite you to explore our tasting room, in a converted apple cold storage building dating back to 1900. Relax at our bar, or enjoy one of our many distinct ciders while perusing the photos and artifacts that chronicle the history of apple growing in Frederick County.

Wild Hare Cider Responds… At Wild Hare Cider, we subscribe to the “less is more” philosophy of cider. Most of our ciders are dry to very dry, only a few are in the off-dry range. When we craft a flavored cider, it is first and foremost a cider, and the apple comes through. We offer simple, dry ciders that are only about the apple, others that are infused with hops or ginger or spices, and yet others that are definitely in the fruit cider category, with cherries, berries, peaches, etc. Some of the fruit ciders are off-dry, but not sweet. Most folks enjoy our ciders at our Log Cabin Cider House (circa 1840) in Historic Leesburg, where we offer flights, glasses, and bottled ciders, along with our own barbeque and entertainment on most weekends. We usually offer 3-4 of our popular / flagship ciders and another 2-3 seasonal or single batch ciders on any given day. During cider week, we plan to mix things up even more, as our cider master will have a few other goodies to try, including some wild ferments that he’s been working on. We will also come up with a special BBQ offering (maybe a pork belly street taco or pulled pork slider or smoked orange wings) and entertainment on our porch.

Old Hill Cider Responds… What makes Old Hill Cider exceptional is our diligent care for the apples and liquid from the moment it begins as a blossom until it is bottled and placed on the shelf for consumers. Our portfolio of ciders is broad and aimed to offer a cider for anyone’s palate, without artificially creating a product. Our ciders are made with flavor profiles established by the apples Shannon Showalter grows and chooses, thoughtfully.

42

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


Bryant’s Cider Responds… Bryant’s is dedicated to creating modern dry ciders with traditional methods. We want to let people experience all-natural ciders paired with creative flavor profiles that will encourage everyone to rethink what cider is to them. We feel the tasting room captures the same spirit. We’ve converted an 1800’s sheep barn into the tasting room, keeping the barn as original as possible. We feel many people come to the country but never get to experience what it’s like being on an old working farm. We want to offer the rustic feel of our farm with some modern flair.

Courthouse Creek Cider Responds… We are the only cidery in Virginia that adheres to natural production techniques (what we call the rustic method). We ferment and/or age everything in barrels and foeders. We don’t sulfite our ciders. We don’t filter or fine them. We don’t add chemicals to manipulate acid levels, color, or flavor. Our methods, we feel, results in complex and nuanced ciders that pair exquisitely with food. Our over-arching philosophy is one we describe as cul-terra or cul-terros. At its core, it embodies the philosophy that understanding, interacting, and interpreting one’s community, and the landit inhabits, enriches the foundation of both. From our relationships and partnerships with area nonprofits, membership in the Richmond West Beverage Trail, personal belief system, and dedication to family (a term we use in the broadest sense)—we believe that the overall health of a community is inextricably tied to the land, and vice-versa. We have two locations in the greater Richmond area. Come out to our farm and cidery facility for a taste of the country! Our 10-acre orchard is a nice setting for a relaxing tasting experience. Head to our downtown tasting room in Scott’s Addition, and enjoy proximity to stellar restaurants and other craft beverage businesses. Each location is unique, yet both express our dedication to the rustic method and cul-terra. There’s an event, every day of Cider Week Virginia. Start with the Richmond Cider Celebration on November 10th and end with the Alexandria Cider Festival on November 17th. How does a Virginia Cider Lover track all of the details of this action-packed week? Visit www.CiderWeekVA.com to find the entire schedule and buy tickets to individual events. Because Virginia is Michel wine cider • Prince for CIDER lovers! n rd ha ck Ro ld peaches • Bo Pick-your-own Special thanks to Cider Week Virginia and Keven Clay for their assistance with this article. DW&S is looking forward to Cider Week Virginia 2018!

Crozet, VA

haRd.com chilespeachorc 434 •823•1583

Follow us on social media for picking availability

www.DineWineAndStein.com

43


by Shawn Gatesman, The Friendly Fermenter

Homebrewing 104 Going All Grain

For my 4th article on homebrewing, it seemed only logical that it was time to talk about “all grain” brewing (AG Brewing). This means creating your wort by mashing grains, instead of using concentrated wort extract. Now if I have already lost you, go back to the DW&S site and check out my previous articles, particularly #1 – Homebrewing 101.

T

his issue’s article focuses on the process of AG brewing, while not going into details about various kinds of grains and adjuncts one might use in brewing. However, before we get going on all grain, my first recommendation usually is NOT to do all grain UNTIL you have created at least a few good, cleanly fermented beers with extract brewing. I say this because, as I noted in my 3rd article on fermentation, good clean fermentation is far more critical to good beer, than how the wort is created in the first place! If you have not dialed in your processes, cleaning, and fermentation; going to all grain will just be a way to take more time and money to make sub-par beer. I suspect no one wants to do that! While an extract brew day maybe 2-3 hours, AG brewing can take 4-6 hours, depending on a great deal on techniques used and batch size. So, if you feel good about your extract beers so far, let’s move on to all grain! As I noted the primary difference when doing AG is that you will mash malted grains to convert their starches to fermentable sugars, as well as extract color, flavor, and possibly other characteristics of the beer, depending on the grains/adjusts you use. Again, if you have little or no idea what mashing is, then go back and do some reading of my articles, or other homework, before you move on. Moving to AG brewing can be a significant investment and will be more time consuming, so just like homebrewing initially, go into it educated and having an idea of what you are about to do. So why would anyone bother doing AG you say? Well, that is a good question, as you can make some pretty good beer with extracts. But, extract beer does

44

Dine Wine & Stein

limit what one can do, how much you can tweak a recipe, and how well the wort will ferment out. By doing all grain, assuming techniques and recipe are sound, a brewer can make many more customizations or tweaks to a beer in the brewing process. Also, typically, AG wort will ferment out a bit more reliably than extract – but there are a lot of factors at play beyond how the wort was created, to say the least. If for no other reason, AG brewing does give one the option to make a beer more from scratch. For homebrewers who enjoy the process and equipment about as much as the finished product, this can be all the reward they need for their added investment in equipment and time. Finally, often the ingredients for an AG recipe will cost a bit less than the comparable extract version. So, in time going AG can help pay for itself, but that could take quite a few batches to pay for the added equipment costs.

Additional Equipment: When going to AG brewing, you will be adding in a mash tun (MT) or at least a large mesh bag for BIAB, more on this in a bit. The mash tun is where the mash occurs, and the grains are “steeped” or mashed to convert those starches into the sugars we want. Typically, these grains are then rinsed with hot water (sparged) after the mash is over, this helps get the most sugars out of the grains and into your wort. This water is typically around 168-170 degs F and is heated in a kettle referred to as the hot liquor tank (HLT). So often going AG involves adding a mash tun AND another kettle for an HLT. Most often, but there can always be exceptions, AG

I

AUTUMN 2018


brewing means doing a full volume boil (boiling all the wort to be fermented), so an 8 – 10-gallon boil kettle becomes necessary (assuming 5 gal batches). Along with some way to cool such a volume efficiently; like an immersion chiller or plate chiller (heat exchanger). Though there are a lot of options for cooling wort, quicker is typically considered better when it comes to cooling. So, your ice bath that worked in the kitchen will be far less effective when you are trying to cool 6 gallons of wort. Immersion chillers are often copper or stainless steel tubing coil that goes down into the wort to cool it from the inside. This occurs by passing cold water through the tubing, where it gathers heat from the wort and carries it away as it leaves the coil. As you can guess, immersion chillers should be kept clean as not to infect your wort. Plate chillers are far more complicated to care for and work by passing the hot wort through one side of the chiller and cold water through the other. The heat is then transferred from the wort to the water as they both pass through the plates of the chiller, in opposite directions. Typically plate chillers are the fastest method for cooling. They can be gravity fed, but are most effective when used with a pump, so plate chilling can get into some serious investments, and take significant care to assure they do not become a place for infections in your wort! Either of these does NOT require the cooling water to be clean, assuming there are no leaks in the equipment.

Here is a summary of some of these techniques, from most accessible to more complex… Partial Mash – this is mashing smaller amounts of grains to get some of your sugars, while a good portion of them still come from extract additions in the boil. This technique is often done using a steep bag or another mesh vessel to mash a relatively small amount of grains (1-5 lbs or so). Brew in a bag (BIAB) – this is mashing grains in a larger mesh bag designed for holding a full AG grain grist if desired. When the mash is complete, the bag is simply lifted from the now wort and drained. Plus or minus rinsing (sparging). This allows one to use 1 kettle as your mash tun and boil kettle. However, a mash tun for complete all grain is often 50% larger than the boil kettle so there can be limits to this method depending on how big your boil kettle is. With BIAB you can do an entire all grain batch if your kettle is large enough and/or the target original gravity of your wort is low enough. Many BIAB batches are sort of a partial mash, where some extract may be added to the wort, after the mash, to get the original gravity up to the desired level. This method allows for far less equipment and cleanup, while still doing all grain. It is difficult to get clear wort with BIAB, but some question how important that really is in many beer styles anyway. No Sparge Method – on our way to full blown all grain brewing is a method for which the name kind of says it all. Basically, this method leaves out an HLT vessel, and the mash is drained (or removed) without rinsing. This method cuts back on time and equipment but will lead to more sugars being Continued on page 46

Ways to All Grain Brew: Much like all of brewing, there is no one way to approach all grain brewing. There are several “levels” one can try between extract brewing and full-blown, 3 vessel, all grain brewing.

www.DineWineAndStein.com

45


Continued from page 45

left behind in the grains, and not in your wort. (ie. Lower mash efficiency) Less sugars = less alcohol, just sayin’…. 3 Vessel All Grain brewing – At the end of the brewing spectrum is what one would call full all grain brewing. Using 3 vessels, a mash tun (MT), hot liquor tank (HLT) and boil kettle (BT). With this more classic setup, the mash tun has a “false bottom” in it. This is a mesh or perforated bottom that sits above the actual bottom of the kettle. This allows the sweet wort to be collected while leaving the grains behind. The mash tun can be a kettle, but many homebrewers also use coolers – particularly the cylinder drink coolers. These have the added benefit of holding temperatures better, while not being able to be directly heated like a kettle. Of course, one should decide where you stand on the real hot liquids in plastic containers thing – I can not speak to that myself, but many a homebrew has and still does use plastic coolers as mash tuns.

• Mashing for 30-90 mins, depending on the style of beer and personal preferences. Mash temps are typically held between 145-155 degs., but can vary a good bit with various techniques. • Draining wort from MT until it runs clear, then pouring the collected wort back over grains (vorlauf) • Collecting wort from the MT into the boil kettle (lautering), while rinsing grains from above with hot water (sparge) • Once all the wort is collected into the boil kettle, the process from here is no different than extract brewing really. Except for the added cleanup! So, if you are considering moving your homebrewing in the AG direction, I certainly encourage you to do so. But, as I noted, be sure to do some homework (beyond this brief article), so you can be sure of how you might want to approach things before you make further investments in your hobby. But when you are ready, we’d be happy to set you up at The Friendly Fermenter ;o) Prost, SG n

The basic process of 3 vessel AG brewing involves: • Mashing (stirring) in milled grains into initial hot water (strike water)

CHARLOTTESVILLE

35 Merchant Walk Square Suite 200 5th Street Station Pkwy

434-234-3239 SIGNATURE PIZZAS . SLICES . MONSTER SUBS . WINGS . FRESH SALADS . CALZONES . BEER/WINE 46

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


Fall Spirits...

brought to you by

Virago Four-Port Rum: Rum Old-Fashioned 2 oz Virago Four-Port Rum 1/4 oz Demerara Simple Syrup (1:1) 3 dashes Angostura Bitters Garnish: Orange Peel Combined ingredients in a mixing glass filled with ice. Stir to combine and chill. Add large ice cube to double Old Fashioned glass and strain cocktail into it. Garnish with orange peel expressed in and around the rim of the glass.

www.DineWineAndStein.com

47


Effingham Manor Showcases History and Wine by John Hagarty

Mansion’s rebirth builds on a 241-year-old legacy On March 23, 2018, one of the most historic properties in Prince William County began writing a new chapter to its storied past when it opened as an estate winery.

B

uilt between 1765 and 1767 on a portion of the 30,000-acre land grant known as the Brent Town Tract, Effingham Manor is steeped in Colonial, Civil War, and modern-day history. Its rebirth parallels and builds on the four-century-old Virginia wine industry. The Nokesville mansion is a three-story, five bay, 18th century Tidewater-style home set on a raised basement. It is surrounded by several original outbuildings including a blacksmith shop, former slave quarters, smokehouse and a three-tiered English garden. Today the manor house main floor has a full-size tasting bar. Two adjoining rooms provide a more intimate tasting experience. The five bedrooms on the second floor are furnished for small group get-togethers. Each room is named for its former use such the Princess Room where a young yesteryear resident slept. There is also the Library and Game rooms among others. Numerous artifacts have been discovered on the property and are on display in the tasting rooms. The

48

Dine Wine & Stein

effect is to create a living museum within the setting of a modern wine tasting venue. The home itself was one of several large plantations constructed in the latter part of the 18th century in southern Prince William County. Long established vintner and entrepreneur Chris Pearmund is managing partner behind the historical venture, one of 18 wineries he has helped develop over his three-decade wine career. “At the time Effingham Manor was the 16th winery I’d been associated with. I called it my ‘sweet 16’ project,” Pearmund said.

Provenance Effingham Manor was built by William Alexander, great-grandson of John Alexander for whom the city of Alexandria was named. At the age of 21, William married Sigismunda Mary Massie in 1765. Massie had previously turned down a marriage proposal from the teenaged George Washington thinking the lad too young to wed.

I

AUTUMN 2018


William and Sigismunda went on to spend their entire lives on the plantation raising 16 children, 10 of which lived to adulthood. Alexander was a gentleman farmer and civic leader in Prince William County and a member of the Prince William County Committee of Safety. When war broke out with England, he was made captain in the Prince William militia. He went on to become a lieutenant colonel in the army and later appointed county justice after the conflict. By all accounts, he led a long and fruitful life. At the time of his death, he owned extensive land holdings that he bequeathed to four of his sons. He died at the age of 70 and is buried on the property. During the Civil War troops were encamped on the property and blood spilled in conflict. Bullet casings, coins, and other war-related memorabilia are on display in the home. In 1955, the late Dr. O. Anderson Engh and his wife Sara purchased the home and undertook a major refurbishing of the buildings and grounds. While used as a summer home, the restoration efforts contributed to saving the historical property from decay.

Outbuildings In the 18th century, plantations were built to provide

virtually everything needed to survive and thrive in an otherwise wilderness-like setting. One unique feature of Effingham are the outbuildings integral to the operation of the estate. Several are still standing and in generally sound condition. With a glass of wine in hand, let’s stroll the grounds of the 16-acre property and reflect on the lives of the Alexander family. Blacksmith Shop: Functioning as a modern-day hardware store, the shop produced horseshoes, plows, keys, hoes, nails, clamps and more. Pots and kettles would also be repaired by the blacksmith. Due to intense heat produced in the building, it was constructed on a sandstone and brick foundation. Virtually all original iron implements came from the shop. Slave Quarters: Records indicate Alexander owned over 30 slaves who played a critical role in the success of the plantation. Only one of three buildings used to quarter the slaves remains standing. The three-tied garden at the back of the home was undoubtedly created by backbreaking enforced labor. Respect for this history is reflected in Pearmund’s commitment to showcasing the dwelling as a reminder of the contribution and sacrifice of those enslaved people.

www.DineWineAndStein.com

Continued on page 50

49


Continued from page 49

Smokehouse: Like the blacksmith shop, the smokehouse is built on a brick foundation to withstand continuous heat. To gaze at the charred timbers and original meat hooks is to be transported back in time. Without refrigeration, smoking provided a steady source of meat for the farm’s residents. Further along, one comes upon a beautifully landscaped Koi pond with dozens of the energic fish flashing in the sunlight. The pond was one of the first concrete pools in Virginia. It was installed by a previous owner in the 1930s and repurposing it saved another historical artifact of the property. Three other fascinating elements of the plantation is a well house, the three-tiered English garden, and a 214-year-old Western Red Cedar tree. The well is 57 feet deep. It was hand dug and lined with large stones in a 3-foot by 4-foot square pattern. As one enters the well house, its dark setting is highlighted by a string of small lights cascading down the well offering a dramatic view of the over two-century-old stone craftsmanship. Viewed from the back porch of the manor home the tiered garden falls away in waterfall fashion to an expansive view of bottomland and distant forest. The garden’s style is considered the oldest in Virginia. In addition to enhancing the beauty of the estate, the garden served as a natural deterrent to cattle from grazing into the yard of the home while precluding the need for a scene-stealing fence. Today the garden is a grassy expanse, but future plans call for the reestablishment of the formal plantings. The cedar tree in the front of the property comes with a fascinating story linked to an essential part of our Nation’s history. The Western Red Cedar was one of two saplings brought back by Lewis and Clark from their renown expedition. It was gifted to the Alexander family reinforcing the importance of the family’s connections. Reach out and touch the bark of this living legend and experience a direct connection with the two famous explorers. In a nod to modernity, Pearmund built an 8,800 square foot winery and event center on the property. The building’s architecture reflects the style of the original home is providing a seamless look between old and new. The overall restoration project respected the property’s celebrated past while providing guests with a museum-like venue for tasting Virginia wines. Given

50

Dine Wine & Stein

the numerous historical elements of the site and its rare artifacts, Pearmund established an adults only-no dogs visitation policy. While off-putting for some, the intent is to preserve the quiet and peaceful atmosphere of the estate and reduce potential damages to any of rare antiques and buildings. Pearmund emphasizes Effingham Manor offers guests the opportunity to both enjoy and become part of the mansion’s history. “This home has a long past. I want people to come out and make their own history here by hosting weddings, anniversaries and other life celebrations. n “Everyone is invited. Not only wine lovers but anyone interested in history,” said Pearmund. Effingham Manor is opened seven days a week 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and is located at 14325 Trotters Ridge Place, Nokesville. 703.594.2300. For more information visit http://effinghammanor.com/

I

AUTUMN 2018


SEVENTY

FOURTH

WATERFORD FAIR

Made by Hand.

October 5, 6, & 7, 2018 10am – 5pm CHEF’S TASTING MUSIC&Wine beer in the meadow

100s of juried arts & crafts! local ART

KIDS activities

waterfordfairva.org

Historic Homes

Waterford, Virginia

A DAY OF FALL FUN! - OCTOBER 6, 2018 Produced by:

Beer • Wine • Food Live Music CRAFT BEER & CORNHOLE

Sat. October 6: Noon - 11 PM

RESTON PUMPKIN 5K & KIDS’ PUMPKIN DASH

Sunday, October 7 5K Start time: 8:15 AM Kids’ Pumpkin Dash: 9:15 AM

Register online at www.RestonFlavors.com

FREE EVENT!

Buy Your Food and Drink Tickets Tickets Online!

www.RestonFlavors.com

www.DineWineAndStein.com

51


Unique Bites by Kim Chappell

The Cider Donut Trail As soon as Labor Day is in the rearview mirror, Southerners begin their quest for all things pumpkin-spice. Not our family. We are from Virginia apple country, and we search for the perfect Apple Cider Donut. Ride along with us, through the Blue Ridge, as we sample traditional apple cider donuts.

Mamma Crockets Cider Donuts

W

e first saw the funky blue vintage travel trailer as we drove around “The Circle” in the town of Amherst, Virginia. In this historic town, everything revolves around this circle—literally. It is early in the morning, we round the circle…and there it sits. The blue Mamma Crocket’s Cider Donut travel trailer. Although it is early, there is already a line forming. We quickly park and jump into line. Worth it! That day, Mamma Crockets becomes a family favorite. Where is Mamma Crockets parked this week? You can follow these popular donut makers here: www.MamaCrocketts.com

Pure Eats in Lexington, VA

W

e drove through the mountains and ended up in Lexington, VA. (RT 60) I had heard rumors about the donuts at Pure Eats and wanted to see for myself. Pure Eats did not disappoint. Expect to find a collection of hand-crafted doughnuts at this stop as their menu expands beyond cider donuts. In addition to the beloved cider donuts, you will find traditional flavors and some custom Pure Eats creations. The day we stopped at Pure Eats, we sampled a cider donut with a hint of Bold Rock Hard Cider.

52

Dine Wine & Stein

Pure Eats, in Lexington, VA, offers fresh-made donuts everyday. Their popular Cider Donut is just one of the many crafted-donuts that appear at this local eatery.

I

AUTUMN 2018


Yum! But that’s not all…each day, Pure Eats makes four or five custom donut creations. Bakers come in early to ensure that the works-of-art are ready for fans. We left with a box of our favorites. Follow along on the Pure Eats Facebook page. Browse in the morning and decide which donuts to put in your take-home box! As a side note, we enjoyed some fantastic burgers for lunch. But that will be a future story. The food created in this renovated gas station is worth a second visit.

Blue Ridge Cider Doughnuts

F

rom Lexington, we traveled to Staunton, VA to visit the town’s weekly Farm Market. We browsed the farm-to-market displays looking for Blue Ridge Cider Doughnuts. It’s a known fact that we love cider donuts, and a friend sent me a Facebook link to Blue Ridge Cider Doughnuts.

“We found the donuts!” You will want to stroll the historic streets of Staunton while snacking on a Walk-Around Cone of these beautiful donuts. It is a Virginia Fall Experience, wrapped in a paper cone. We have to admit that our favorite way to enjoy Blue Ridge Cider Doughnuts is to dip them in their fresh, local apple cider. But there was more… Blue Ridge Cider Doughnuts was also found at the Downtown Orange Street Festival. In addition to cider doughnuts, they also crafted fresh Red Velvet Doughnuts with a Cream Cheese dipping sauce. Be on the lookout for Blue Ridge Cider Doughnuts. Follow them on Facebook.

Chiles Peach Orchard in Crozet, VA and Carter Mountain have been making Cider Donuts for decades. In the Summer, visitors enjoy Peach Cider Donuts. Their special Apple Cider Donuts bring visitors from across the Commonwealth.

pumpkins, apples, Fall decorations, pies, wine, and hard cider. And donuts. During the Summer, the donuts at Chiles are peach cider donuts. In Fall, the donut kitchen makes hundreds of apple cider donuts a day. We purchased a dozen still-warm donuts for our ride back to Amherst, VA. And an extra-large pumpkin, an apple pie, a bottle of wine and a sixpack of hard cider. I also want to mention that you can find the same donuts at Carter Mountain, near Charlottesville, VA. The Chiles family has owned both locations for generations. Their family recipe for cider donuts is a wellguarded secret. At Carter Mountain, you can munch on warm cider donuts as you pick your own apples or visit the pumpkin patch. Then, watch the sunset across the Blue Ridge. During October weekends, thousands visit this mountain in search of the famous cider donut.

Chiles Peach Orchard Donuts

You can learn about both Chiles Peach Orchard and Carter Mountain by visiting their website: www.chilesfamilyorchards.com

e finished our Donut Tour at Chiles Peach Orchard in Crozet, Virginia. Don’t let the name fool you. As Summer melts into Fall, Chiles Peach Orchard is the market for

Our Cider Donut Tour ended. We drove back to Amherst along RT 151 in Nelson County. We passed apple orchards that have been packing apples for well over a hundred years. We came full-circle back to the town of Amherst and the circle in the road. A fitting end to our love fest for a round cake donut. n

W

www.DineWineAndStein.com

53


#DWSdogs Does your dog have a favorite Virginia winery, brewery or tasting room? Post a photo, with #DWSdogs, of fido at their favorite location. They may just show up in a future edition of DW&S Magazine. Cheers to DW&S Fans and their dogs!

54

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


Tap into Local Flavor Craft Beer is Alive & Well in Virginia by Kim Chappell

I travel full time for Dine Wine & Stein. I travel across the Commonwealth of Virginia and the East Coast visiting breweries, vineyards and all types of craft beverage tasting rooms. Recently, a friend asked me, “With so many options, how do you pick your favorites? What makes a good story?”

I

t’s the experience. It’s the welcoming tasting room team, the lively conversation, the story behind the taste, the local food expertly paired and the overall vibe. It is more than just the liquid in the pint glass. Later, when I taste the beer or craft beverage, a memory of the visit floods back to me. Keep reading, and I will tie this into a recent conversation with Virginia Craft Brewers Guild. During the week before the annual Virginia Craft Beer Festival, I had an afternoon call with Brett Vassey, President, and CEO of the Virginia Craft Brewers Guild. I had a few questions about

the upcoming festival and the marketplace. I learned a lot, and I want to share with you. The Virginia Craft Brewers Guild was founded in 2010 with only eleven members. In 2017, the roster held 232 members. In the early years, the Virginia craft beer industry grew at a staggering annual rate of up to 17%. In 2018, the projected growth is in the 5% range. An entrepreneur, in any market, still smiles over a 5% growth rate. The Virginia Continued on page 56

www.DineWineAndStein.com

55


Continued from page 55

craft beer industry is alive and well. For the past few years, beer lovers across the Commonwealth have been captivated with stories with a national reach. Which national brand is establishing a brewery in our fine state? Which city wins the honor? Who is buying who? Are they still even a craft beer? I skipped those subjects and asked Brett about his vision for the next five years. And I was thrilled to hear his response. Brett predicts that the next trend in Virginia Craft Beer will be the hyper-local brand experience. Visitors to the taproom will be introduced to a selection of beer styled to the neighborhood. Brew Masters will tell their story. Local food will be expertly paired to tasting flights. We will all enjoy our favorite musicians and artists while ordering a pint. Some may even play games or watch a movie on the brewery’s lawn. Not all of the beer will make it into distribution beyond the tap room. And that’s okay. We will be back to this tap room and this brewery. As we push our grocery cart through the stores, we will spy a can or bottle of that beer. The memory of

56

Dine Wine & Stein

that fun time at the tap room will flood back to us, and we will put a six-pack into our cart. Welcome to the age of the Nano-Brand-Fan. The age of the Virginia Beer Experience. The age of the well-curated experience that tells the brand’s story. (See, I told you that I would tie my call with Brett to my travel adventures) I promised Brett that in 2019, I will write a story about the Virginia Nano-Brand-Fan. n

I

AUTUMN 2018


Escape the Madness! No stress, no pressure, just magnificent wines.

Magnolia Vineyards & Winery is located in Amissville, Va, just off scenic Route 211 in Rappahannock County. Owned by Glenn and Tina Marchione, we are a familyrun boutique winery and vineyard, making small lots of mostly Bordeaux varietals. Quiet country peace, tranquility and great mountain views. Come relax in our cozy farmhouse tasting room or surrounding grounds. We offer our tastings paired with cheeses and chocolate. The Tasting Room is open year-round (check our website or Facebook page for current hours). 200 Viewtown Rd., Amissville,VA • 703.785.8190 • magnoliavineyards.com

www.DineWineAndStein.com

57


58

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


Celebrate Fall with Follow DW&S on Facebook and Instagram Track Virginia Events and Festivals. Plus, Enter to Win Tickets Read bonus Fall stories on our website www.DineWineAndStein.com “Have Fun DW&S Fans!”

www.DineWineAndStein.com

59


TELL

THEM

SENT

YOU

60

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018


IN THE NEWS:

Your Coffee Break

We source the best green coffee. We roast to bring out the best qualities. We train to prepare the best coffee and espresso beverages.

SHENANDOAH JOE

A Quick Cup of the Latest News…

The DW&S team brings you the latest tastes, the grand openings and the new experiences across Virginia.

North American Sake Brewery Opens in Charlottesville Virginia’s first producer of sake has opened at the IX Art Park in downtown Charlottesville. Sake is on tap, and the brewery also has a restaurant attached. The restaurant boasts an Asian-inspired menu and is open for both lunch and dinner. Enjoy the art at IX, taste the Sake and stay for dinner.

Virago Distillery Opens in Richmond We welcome the Virago Spirits to the growing craft distillery market in the Richmond region. Virago was founded by the Haneberg family, and they are passionate about distilling spirits. The distillery’s first offering is the Four Port Rum. We can’t wait to create some cocktails with this family and their first rum.

HARRISONBURG location now open! 64 South Mason

Charlottesville, Virginia 945 Preston Avenue 2214 Ivy Road - Townside Shopping Center UVA Corner - behind Corner Grocery

434.295.4563 • SHENANDOAHJOE.COM

Brewing Tree Opens in Nelson County Starr Hill founder Mark Thompson’s retirement is over! Thompson has opened Brewing Tree Beer Company on RT 151 in Nelson County. He promises to keep this craft brewery small and with a local focus. Recent weekends have been filled with tasting flights, great food and live, local music.

Bryant’s Cider Opens Tasting Room in Nelson County Just off of RT 151 in the Bryant region of Nelson County, Bryant’s Cider opened their tasting room in a renovated goat barn. Enjoy small batch cider creations while soaking up the beautiful Nelson County scenery. It’s an authentic Blue Ridge Mountain experience!

Get noticed with DW&S. Send your news to events@dinewineandstein.com www.DineWineAndStein.com

61


CONTRIBUTORS... John Hagarty

is a former Federal executive who

created a retirement career in Virginia wine. In addition to working at a Virginia winery he writes on the subject of wine and a number of other interests. His leisure activities include golf, hiking, backpacking, skiing and community volunteerism. For wine tales and more visit him at Hagarty-on-wine.com.

Jennifer Waldera

is a freelance food, drink,

and travel writer. When not feeding her hunger for exploring, she can be found scoping out new novels to add to her overfilled bookshelves or binge-watching food shows on Netflix. You can follow her adventures through Virginia and beyond on Instagram at @jlwriter.

Kim Chappell

is an author and freelance writer.

You can find Kim traveling in her mobile office, a Winnebago RV named “Ruby”. She enjoys interviewing entrepreneurs, chefs and craft beverage makers. Kim travels the backroads, looking for the new and untold story. You can follow along on Facebook at Experience Back Roads.

James Putbrese

is a former radio broadcaster

and was managing partner of 10 radio stations over a of a 48-year period. Upon retirement in 2004, Mr. Putbrese realized if he continued to hang around the house that 40 years of married bliss would come to a grinding halt. He decided to turn a love of all things Virginia into a second career with the publication of the magazine “The Shenandoah Valley Guide” and later the publication “Dine, Wine & Stein.” Realizing it was time to start spending time with his wife and three grandchildren a decision was made to sell the magazines. In 2016 the Shenandoah Valley Guide was sold, and in 2017 Dine, Wine & Stein was sold to BlueMont Media Group. Mr. Putbrese still enjoys involvement with the magazine and its owner Dave Renfro and continues to write stories for the publication.

62

Dine Wine & Stein

I

AUTUMN 2018

Sponsors List: Aioli Mediterranean Tapas.............. 24 Augustiner Hall & Garden................39 Barboursville Vineyards....................11 Barren Ridge Vineyard...................... 24 Bluestone Vineyard.............................. 3 Brewing Tree Beer Company.............57 Brix & Columns Vineyards................15 Carmello’s ............................................10 Cavalier Diner.....................................19 Chiles Peach Orchard.........................43 Cracked Pillar Pub................................9 Cranberry’s Grocery & Eatery..........34 Dayton Tavern.....................................34 Effingham Manor & Winery.............49 Extreme Pizza......................................46 Friendly Fermenter..............................45 Green Leaf.............................................58 Harrisonburg Farmers Market.........10 Kathy’s................................................... 7 Loudoun Wine Awards.......................57 Magnolia Vineyards...........................57 Mt. Crawford Creamery.....................10 Narmada Winery.................................35 Palladio Restaurant...........................11 Region’s 117..........................................19 Reston Flavors of Fall........................51 Rockbridge Vineyard..........................60 Schenck Foods Co................................57 Scotto’s Italian Restaurant & Pizza .... 58 Shenandoah Antiques Expo..............51 Shenandoah Joe’s ................................61 Spice Diva.............................................23 Staunton Farmers Market.................10 Sugar & Salt.........................................21 Valley Smokehouse.............................19 Virago Spirits.......................................47 Virginia Fly Fishing............................63 Waterford Fair.....................................51 Wild Wolf Brewing Co...................... 64 Yelping Dog...........................................60 Find DW&S at over 450 of the finest wineries, breweries, cideries, distilleries and dining establishments.


F I S H PA R T N E R® ANGLING TOURS WWW.FISHPARTNER.COM



Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.