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A special greeting to express to you our sincere appreciation for your confidence & loyalty. We are deeply thankful & extend to you our best wishes for a Happy Thanksgiving!

Eliana Ashkar, Joel Bacque, Teresa Hamilton, Sharon Henderson, Jason Louviere, Kimberly Lafleur

337.267.4048  www.TeresaHamilton.com  teresa@teresahamilton.com

2000 Kaliste Saloom, #101, Lafayette, LA 70508  Licensed in Louisiana

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Get To Know Us

There’s very little we love more around 337 than music. Doesn’t it just tell you a bit about a person and their mood? So, we posed the question to our team: If you had to pick a song to sing for karaoke, what would it be? We’ve poked a bit a fun at their answers!

OWNERS/PUBLISHERS:

“Despacito” because it’s so fun to sing in Spanish and to Latin dance.

Joan Broussard, Sevie Zeller, Jason Roy Publishing Assistant: Laura Domingue Editor: Sevie Zeller Lead Writer: Heather Salsman Graphic Designer: Jason Roy Advertising/Marketing Director: Joan Broussard Senior Account Executives: Holly Addison Williams, Blair Blanchard Suire Fashion Editor: Michelle Judice Ad Design: Kevin Pontiff, Bobbijo Vittorio Web Design: Laura Domingue, Heather Salsman

337 CORRESPONDENTS

“Thunder Road” or “Born to Run” by Bruce Springsteen.

Brandon Alleman, Sylvia Broussard, Cheré Coen, Brandon Comeaux, Hannah Comeaux, Stacey Daley, Sonia Desormeaux, Angie Dumas, James Eckoff, Emily Gaudet, Curt Guillory, Lisa Hanchey, Michelle Judice, Mandie Kiddy, Sandra McKinney, Garrett Ohlymeyer, Justin Price, Theresa Russell, Tiffany Wyatt

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Chris Deville, Carlie Faulk, Terri Fensel

“Easy (Like Sunday Morning)”

“The Lazy Song” by Bruno Mars or anything by Outkast.

“Saturday in the Park” by Chicago is snapshot Americana.

CONTACT US

Serving our Community Since 1960

Lafayette Rayne New Iberia Ville Platte Breaux Bridge Covington www.dougashy.com 2

“I will survive”!

337 magazine 340 Kaliste Saloom Road, Suite E Lafayette, LA 70508 www.337magazine.com Editorial: editor@337magazine.com Advertising: advertise@337magazine.com Contests: contest@337magazine.com

How much did you say I would have to drink first?

All pages within 337 magazine are the property of 337 magazine. No portion of the materials on the pages may be reprinted or republished in any form without the express written permission of 337 magazine ©2017. The content of 337 magazine has been checked for accuracy, but the publishers cannot be held liable for any update or change made by advertisers and/or contributors to the magazine. Blue-eyed Promotions, LLC is not responsible for injuries sustained by the reader while pursuing activities described or illustrated herein, nor failure of equipment depicted or illustrated herein. No liability is, or will be, assumed by 337 magazine, Blue-eyed Promotions or any of its owners, administration, writers or photographers for the magazine or for any of the information contained within the magazine. All rights reserved.

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CONTENTS LOCALISM

4 8 10 11 12

Cajun Nation: Jennings Local Limelight Launch Landmark Nonprofit Spotlight

HOME + STYLE

14 15 16 18 21

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Outdoor Plants Indoor Decor Hers Fashion His Fashion M Collectives

FOOD + DRINK

23 24 27 29

Nutrition Chef’s Plate Dining Destination Cajun Food Tours

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HEALTH + FITNESS 31 PTSD 32 Body Factory 33 Meal Prep

DATING + MARRIAGE 34 Mr. & Mrs. 35 Holiday Stress

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KIDS + PETS

36 37 38 39 41

T’Frere’s House Safari Spots Traveling with Children Teen Scene No-kill Shelter

SPORTS + ADVENTURE 42 43 44 46 49

Player and Coach ULL Football McNeese Football LSU Football Venues

Photo by Terri Fensel

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ON OUR COVER

Turducken Napoleon with cranberry sauce and pickled blueberries Created by chef Colt Patin with assistance from chefs Michael Ciuffetti, Erica Meche and Ciara Finley at Louisiana Culinary Institute V OL U M E 3 IS S U E 5

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L O C A L I S M

CAJUN NATION

J E N N I N G S :

T H E

C R A D L E

O F

L O U I S I A N A

Jennings

Gotta Taste It

Sugar and spice and everything nice exists not far from Jennings off Interstate 10. Louisiana Spirits Distillery, which opened in Lacassine in 2011, distills several varieties of rum from the region’s sugarcane. Not only can visitors tour the facility between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays, but they can sample the rums afterward at the rum bar. For more information, visit the distillery’s Facebook page at facebook.com/ bayourum.

O I L

Mayor Henry Guinn

Roadside Attraction At Exit 64 off Interstate 10 is the Jefferson Davis Parish Tourist Commission at the Louisiana Oil & Gas Park. Here visitors can learn about area attractions but also visit the Gator Chateau to view alligators on display and hold baby gators in their hands. There’s also an oil derrick honoring the state’s first oil well.

Claim to Fame P O P U L AT I O N Population per the U.S. Census Bureau

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The state’s first oil well was dug in September 1901, which is why Jennings is known as the “Cradle of Louisiana Oil.” In its heyday (pun intended), W. Scott Heywood and his Jennings Oil Company pumped 7,000 barrels of oil each day. Today, the city is home to several museums, antique shops and restaurants, and the region boasts of crawfish and rice fields and outdoor recreation. 3 3 7 M A GA ZIN E.C OM

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~

By Cheré Coen

~

Don’t Miss

The Historic Strand Theatre at 432 N. Main Street is a 1939-era movie house on the National Register of Historic Places that has been restored and is now used for live performances and special events.

LITTLE KNOWN FACT Jennings is home to a Carnegie Library, the oldest established library in Louisiana. Visitors will enjoy the historic architecture, genealogy collection and the library’s basement filled with the unique collection of Jennings resident Lucius Lyman Morse, who traveled the world and brought back artifacts and souvenirs.

Get Outside

Lake Arthur, an enormous fresh water lake, lies south of Jennings about 20 minutes away. It’s a great road trip to enjoy lunch or dinner at the Regatta LA Seafood & Steakhouse on the water’s edge. Further south and west is the Lacassine Pool, a national wildlife refuge, and birders will love the Flyway Byway, a 55-mile driving trail throughout the Parish.

MUSEUMS

The Zigler Art Museum contains several works by John James Audubon and William Tolliver, along with Helen Turner’s Impressionist painting, “Morning.” The W.H. Tupper General Merchandise Museum on Main Street, with its thousands of items, offers a glimpse into what a general store from the turn of the century looked like. V OL U M E 3 IS S U E 5

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SpECIalty MEatS

I E M R’S R O C

509 Allison St. • Jennings, LA 337-616-8242

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One of a Kind Gifts • Vintage Toys • Louisiana Souvenirs Retro Candy • Art Work by Local Artists Located in the W.H. Tupper General Merchandise Museum

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For more info please call

337-821-5532

jenningslafestivassn@gmail.com 7


L O C A L I S M

LOCAL LIMELIGHT

MATT

Romero of

YOUNGSVILLE

Sales Rep., City Councilman By Heather Salsman 337: What do you do when you’re on the clock? Romero: Dealer Sales Rep. for CUAC. I’m also a City Councilman for Youngsville. 337: What do you love about your jobs? Romero: Helping people get the best deal, solving problems for my dealers, working for the public in general, and representing our great city. 337: Who would you be if you were a celebrity? Romero: Chris Pratt; he’s is incredibly funny and an awesome actor. 337: What do you do when you’re off the clock? Romero: I enjoy working in my yard, relaxing with my friends and family, and watching football. 337: What is the last picture you took with your phone? Romero: A selfie with my wife and kids at the Ragin’ Cajuns home opener. 8

337: What is your favorite word? Least favorite? Romero: Good times; No. 337: What is your favorite kind of music? Romero: Country. 337: Do you dance crazy when no one is looking? Romero: Yes, and even crazier when they are. 337: Do you have a strange talent? Romero: I do a mean Chewbacca impression. 337: Is there a specific nonprofit or community effort that you find yourself drawn to? Romero: Yes, I serve as vice president of the Youngsville Lions Club. I also coach softball and baseball for my kids and like to help with fundraising events that benefit children.

ELIZABETH “EB”

BRooks of Executive Director of Lafayette Central Park

LAFAYETTE

By Heather Salsman 337: Where is your favorite place to visit in the 337? Brooks: Lake Martin has a special place in my heart. It has such a serene atmosphere, and it’s amazing that it’s close enough to home to be able to see all the birds and alligators and go kayaking. 337: Who would you be if you were a celebrity? Brooks: I love David Attenborough, the voice over of nature videos. That would be an amazing job to me! 337: What do you do for a living? Brooks: As executive director, I work with the board of directors, consultants and designers to move forward with the park’s construction. I also manage the consultants and oversee fundraising efforts. Serving the community with the resources they want is also a big part of my focus. 337: What do you do for fun? Brooks: Lots of stuff! I love cities but also love nature. I love being downtown and going to all the festivals and activities we have

around here, as well as in New Orleans and what they have to offer. I enjoy being in the middle of nowhere for hiking and paddle trips. 337: Do you have a talent few people know of? Brooks: I am a singer, and I’m also a decent painter. 337: What is your favorite book? Brooks: My favorite book is “Ishmael.” It totally changed my life and influenced where I am today. 337: Do you volunteer locally? Brooks: I sit on a bunch of different boards, I’m involved in my neighborhoods coterie, and I love dedicating time to make the community a better place. I’ve always loved volunteering from way back in the day when we started the efforts of saving the horse farm. 337: What do you think would be one of the best steps we could take to end world poverty? Brooks: I’m well served in sustainability, and I know we could do better if we consumed less red meat. 337: If you could save one animal species on earth, which would it be? Brooks: Save the bees!

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

HOMETOWN HERO

WHEN GREATNESS ATTRACTS GREATNESS Local artist lands deal with Bed Bath and Beyond By Heather Salsman Talented since anyone can remember, local artist Tony Bernard has become a successful painter and inspiring designer. Bernard gained credibility in 1983 when he took first place in a national art contest and was recognized in a nationwide magazine. Later, he began working with visual arts and became close with the late world-renowned artist George Rodrigue who was a mentor and close friend to him. Over the years, Bernard has produced original artwork for more than 30 posters for local festivals such as Festival International and Festival Acadien et Créoles. His name

TONY

has become synonymous with bon temps. Portrait work landed Bernard the job to paint the official portraits of Bobby Jindal in the Governor’s Mansion, portrait of first lady Supriya Jindal, and country singer Hunter Hayes to name a few, He also produced art for professional athletic teams, NASCAR, Southeastern Conference and Sun Belt sporting events as well as wildlife pieces that won him the Louisiana Duck Stamp in 200708 and 2014-15. Through his incredible talent and pieces of work, Tony Bernard was recently sought by Stacey Lancaster of Lancaster House to work with Bed Bath & Beyond. BBB will be using Tony’s artwork on various products including tumblers, garden flags, glass cutting boards and more. This opportunity has opened the door for his art to be used in unique and different ways. The exclusive line will be available in the BBB Louisiana and Texas markets and then considered for distribution on a national scale. If you’d like to see more of his work, visit Bernard Studios (2823 Johnston Street, Lafayette) or the Bernard Gallery (Maryview Farm Road, Lafayette) where he paints in the company of his wife, Roxie. Be on the lookout for his line at Bed Bath and Beyond, which is conveniently arriving just in time for holiday gift giving!

Bernard

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Mouton DAVID

David Mouton, graduated from Carencro High in 1990 and lives in the rural area of Carencro. He loves the country life and was appointed in January 2017 as the Fire Chief of the Carencro Fire Department (CFD). Mouton remains captain at Lafayette Fire Department (LFD) where he has worked for 25 years. He also helped manage his parent’s grocery business, Mouton’s Food Mart, in Carencro for 28 years. As a former student in Criminal Justice and aspiring Louisiana Sate Trooper, Mouton began his career in 1992 when he was hired on at the LFD. “My intentions were to continue my schooling, but I loved firefighting too much and never went back,” said Mouton. He says that being in the fire service is like a brotherhood, as they are always together. Not

Fire Chief of the Carencro Fire Department By Heather Salsman

only does the crew spend their time responding and training; but shopping, cooking and exercising together as well. Between the LFD and CFD, Mouton can experience the “blue collar” side of fighting as well as handling his administrative roles like applying for grants, attending meetings and insuring that all proper documents are in order. The CFD is a combination department; there are six full-time and three part-time firefighters as well 15-20 very dedicated volunteer firefighters. “One thing I want to stress is that I am very proud to be a part of the Carencro Fire Department and proud of the men and women who work and volunteer for this department. With having a full-time job and family obligations these guys still find time to volunteer for their community.”

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L O C A L I S M

LAUNCH

SIL VOUS PLAIT S

il Vous Plait is an innovative concept in Acadiana similar to a personal assistant service. Clients email or text requests, and within a day or two the project has begun or is completed! Services are offered by the hour, monthly or bundled (hourly packages) to suit anyone’s needs. Sil Vous Plait gets a lot of requests and has assisted clients with everything from spreadsheet work and appointment setting to grocery shopping (they make runs to Trader Joe’s in Baton Rouge) and holiday decorating! Another wonderful feature of Sil Vous Plait is the area that they can service; wherever their clients need! Clients using the services have relocated or purchased

The service that says “Oui!” no matter the request By Stacey Daley new homes as far West as California and as far East as New York City. The possibilities are endless with Sil Vous Plait! Natalie DeJean, the founder and owner of Sil Vous Plait, created her business out of a lifelong passion to help others. She loves being able to make other people’s lives less stressful! Through Sil Vous Plait, DeJean is able to have fun while maintaining a flexible schedule. She loves that there is never a dull moment and no job is ever alike. According to DeJean, no request is too big or too small and the rates are reasonable so don’t hesitate to reach out! Like Sil Vous Plait on Facebook or Instagram (@silvousplaitconcierge) to see their complete offerings!

Badgley Mischka red jacket

Derek Lam plaid top

h i g h - e n d wo m e n’s c o n s i g n m e nt

From casual to holiday, be the runway!

Free People black dress

Love the clothes! Love the prices! Lafayette’s destination for high-end designer clothing for a fraction of the original cost. Consign your loved items and receive more than on-the-spot buying.

Now accepting fall and winter clothing.

337-984-4141

117 Arnould Blvd. • Lafayette, LA 70506 Black Chanel handbag

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ClothingLoft_337_vol3no5.indd 1

Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. • Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. On The Boulevard (next to Caroline & Co.) Like us on Facebook @ Clothing Loft-Lafayette

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Debbie Desormeaux welcomes a new resident with a hospitality basket

LANDMARK

ACADIANA’S WELCOME WAGON Hospitality Basket is a business that grows other business By Mandie Kiddy

A

lthough she is an Acadiana native herself, Debbie Desormeaux is no stranger to new places. Her family moved around frequently when she was young. This experience gave her an insight into how difficult it can be to settle into a new place. Her business, Hospitality Basket, serves to help ease new residents into the community with a friendly face and helpful information. Debbie arrives to greet new

residents with her ‘hospitality basket’ in hand. It is filled with wonderful information about the area including local restaurants, medical offices and lawn care… anything that can help newcomers find products and services to make their move easier. The various information provided by her sponsors include a gift or an offer to welcome and introduce their products and services to the new area arrivals. The way

Hospitality Basket brings local businesses and people together is truly unique in its approach and success. Her sponsors not only receive a personal endorsement during her visits, they also gain a larger social media presence through exposure on Hospitality Basket’s Facebook page. The page is a great resource for weekly offers, special deals and sales available from all sponsors that are a part of the Hospitality Basket. In November, she and her business will celebrate 15 years of growing community businesses and hospitality. For more information visit hospitalitybasketllc.com, and be sure to follow them at facebook. com/hospitalitybskt.

Acadiana Women’s Health Group welcomes

Mario Cardinale, MD Dr. Cardinale is a graduate of the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He received his medical degree from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center at Shreveport, where he also completed his residency in obstetrics and gynecology.

Acadiana Women’s Health Group specializes in women’s health, providing obstetrical and gynecological care.

Delivering excellence in health care for women V OL U M E 3 IS S U E 5

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4640 Ambassador Caffery Parkway, Lafayette 337-984-1050 acadianawomens.com 11


L O C A L I S M

NONPROFIT SPOTLIGHT

Seeds for Success A local nonprofit focuses on getting Louisiana children up and running By Mandie Kiddy

T

he Louisiana Association of Sports, Outdoor Adventure and Recreation (LASOAR) is a nonprofit organization based out of Cecilia and Lafayette, Louisiana. Their mission is to reconnect children to the natural world and promote the power of play to improve child and family health and well-being. Recent data compiled by the Annie E. Casey Foundation on Child and Family Health shows Louisiana ranking 49 out of 50, making us one of the unhealthiest states in the nation. LASOAR set the goals of creating programs and initiatives to encourage families to get out and get active. They also collaborate with other organizations having a similar mission to combine efforts and accomplish more together. Their vision to improve Louisiana communities includes safer city parks, more organized programs utilizing green spaces, and trail systems linking neighborhoods and playgrounds with multiple access points. Another goal places emphasis on sport and recreational activities that are all-inclusive and focus on teamwork, social development and kinesthetic learning where children can discover their talents and foster a passion for fitness and sports.

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LASOAR would like to see community gardening projects that educate children about soil, native plants and growing their own food to promote healthy eating and environmental consciousness. Ultimately, they want children to grow up active and environmentally conscious. This amazing local organization is providing more opportunities for Louisiana children to hike through the woods, explore Louisiana waterways, play in the dirt, and join others in becoming stewards of the environment. LASOAR employs Louisiana certified teachers, and all educational programs are aligned with Louisiana health and physical education content standards. Furthermore, adventure guides are highly experienced and have received appropriate certifications in their field.   They offer multiple activities and leagues to get not only children but the whole community involved in outdoor activities. Families can sign up to play soccer, kickball, volleyball or even go for a group hike or paddle down the Bayou Teche. There is always an array of activities to choose from year-round. Find out how to get involved, donate or even volunteer by visiting lasoar.org.

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RIBBON CUTTINGS

Acadiana Pain and Performance Rehab

Blaze Pizza

Caring Transitions

Roxy’s Garden

Carpe Diem Gelato Espresso Bar

Trahan Real Estate Group

Courtesy Value Center

Milton Elementary

Home 2 Suites Parc Lafayette V OL U M E 3 IS S U E 5

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H O M E

S T Y L E

OUTDOOR

Toad Lily

FALL BLOOMERS Adding late season interest By Justin Price, EcoscapesLafayette.com

S

The Right Mortgage Starts Here It’s a good time to buy a home. Let our experienced lending professionals help you find the perfect mortgage– one that meets your financial needs and goals.

Brittany Broussard

Jim Jeanmard

315 Settlers Trace Blvd | Lafayette (337) 354-8903

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NMLS #131438

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When you want to turn a house into your home, you need someone you can trust.

Mortgages are subject to approval. This is not a commitment to lend or rate guarantee. Rates subject to change without notice. © 2017 BancorpSouth. All rights reserved. 14

pring takes most of the glory as showy gardens go, but fall has its own special character. Many plants save their floral display for late in the growing season. Ornamental grasses, such as various Pennisetum types and our native pink muhly grass, are a must for fall landscape interest. Their delicate sprays of flowers look especially nice when backlit by the sun. A favorite autumn showstopper is Cassia, which includes several varieties that all have the characteristic golden yellow flowering. From popcorn cassia to the aptly named candlestick tree, these plants make interesting focal points in the fall garden. As our hummingbird and butterfly friends reach peak populations in fall, provide them with nectar while beautifying your garden. Salvias, which come in a dizzying variety of species and colors, are indispensable to the wildlife gardener. By fall, salvias are covered in blooms that make splendid masses of color. Mexican bush sage is a particularly interesting type with purple/white flowering. Joe Pye Weed is a lesser-known beauty

and a butterfly magnet. Firespike, which prefers a shady spot, makes brilliant spikes of red tubular flowers that are irresistible to hummingbirds. The blooms sit atop bold clumps of tropical foliage, and they keep on

Candlestick tree

coming throughout the fall. Chinese Lantern (aka Flowering Maple) is a heavy fall bloomer attractive to hummingbirds. For a low perennial in shade, the diminutive toad lily is a surprising beauty. Having rather nondescript foliage, toad lily bursts with intricate, orchid-like flowers in the fall. This is a plant that beckons one to look closer. There are many other fall bloomers suitable for our area, including native goldenrods and asters for a more naturalistic setting. Plant some fall bloomers for a glorious denouement to the growing season! 3 3 7 M A GA ZIN E.C OM

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H O M E

S T Y L E

INDOOR DECOR

Bring Out Your Inner Child

Designs and decorating done by Emily Gaudet

Decorating your children’s rooms By Emily Gaudet, innovativeinteriorsbyemily.com

D

ecorating a child’s room can be a challenge, especially when trying to add taste to their imaginative ideas. A child’s room is their sanctuary - a place where they feel most comfortable because it reflects their personality and style. Emily Gaudet loves creating spaces that express a child’s uniqueness in a fun, colorful way. She is ready to share a few tips to anyone considering giving a child’s room a redo. A simple and personal way to give a child a sense of ownership in their space is to use their own artwork as a focal point. An art collage is an easy and inexpensive way to fill a large wall space. If you aren’t sure where to begin, a child’s choice of color and subject matter in their art can sometimes provide a direction. Displaying their artwork can build a child’s confidence and allow

them to be proud of what they have accomplished. “I love to celebrate a child’s creativity,” Emily said. Another good way to transform the space is with bold colors. Children are not as afraid of bold wall colors as we are as adults, and it is easy to change when the time comes. Keep in mind that a bold color doesn’t have to cover the whole room. You can use bold color in moderation by painting an accent wall, then tie it in with artwork and other creative elements. For example, Ally’s favorite colors are royal blue and orange. The existing walls were white, so it was easy to make the room pop just by adding a strong color to a single wall. Instead of adding more artwork, Emily painted a tree in the same bold blue and orange to tie all the elements together. The final piece of advice in decorating a child’s room is to think

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outside the box when it comes to form and function. The focal point of Emma’s room is a large heavily textured rug in her favorite colors. Instead of using it on the floor, it hangs from ceiling to floor behind her headboard. Emily’s favorite thing about doing a girl’s room is playing with whimsy and converting it into patterns and textures. Don’t suppress your child’s whimsical spirit, just guide it. If your child loves a certain piece but it doesn’t seem to fit within the usual function for that item, try to find a unique way to tie it in, whether it be as decoration or storage. A little creativity, with the mind of a child, can go a long way! Hopefully these tips help inspire you to look at your child’s room with a fresh perspective and some inspiration to create and provide a retreat that feels their very own.

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H O M E

S T Y L E

FASHION

RURAL HOLIDAY Glamorous gowns fit for the festive season

Wild at Heart Scallop shaped embellishment adds interest to an otherwise simple style gown LEMON DROP BOUTIQUE 1209 Albertson Pkwy, Broussard 337-332-5546 Model: Lauren Leslie

Fashion editor: Michelle Judice Photographer: Carlie Faulk Location: Five Star Stables, New Iberia Hair & Makeup: Annie Bonaventure 16

Ornate Beauty Strapless gown in a mermaid shape instantly feels old-Hollywood glam MONROE’S BOUTIQUE 136 E. Bridge Street, Breaux Bridge 337-332-5546 Model: Sarah Boudreaux

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Clean Lines & Cutouts Add a little edge to your evening look with sky high slits and side cutouts LEMON DROP BOUTIQUE 1209 Albertson Pkwy, Broussard 337-332-5546 Model: Lauren Leslie

Emerald Dreams Find a hue that speaks volumes, and you will surely be noticed MONROE’S BOUTIQUE 136 E. Bridge Street, Breaux Bridge 337-332-5546 Model: Sarah Boudreaux

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Feeling Royal

Amp up the drama with a full skirt and train combo LEMON DROP BOUTIQUE 1209 Albertson Pkwy, Broussard 337-332-5546 Model: Sarah Boudreaux

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H O M E

S T Y L E

FALL IN STYLE Update your wardrobe with the essentials of the season

Layer up

From vests to sweaters, layer it on for an easy but sophisticated look Brother’s on the Boulevard 101 Arnold Blvd., Lafayette 337-984-7749 Model: Clint Walters

Vested Interest

Show off your shirt game while keeping warm with a sweater vest in a coordinating hue F Camalo 416 Heymann Blvd., Lafayette 337-233-4984 Model: Joey Mouton Fashion editor: Michelle Judice Photographer: Carlie Faulk Location: Five Star Stables, New Iberia 18

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Got the Blues

Pair bright blue hues with the subtler french and add pops of pattern for interest Brother’s on the Boulevard 101 Arnold Blvd., Lafayette 337-984-7749 Model: Clint Walters

Stripes on Stripes Sharpen your suit game with pin striped suiting + coordinating accessories F Camalo 416 Heymann Blvd, Lafayette 337-233-4984 Model: Joey Mouton

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H O M E

S T Y L E

FASHION

LAFAYETTE

Holiday Style Made Simple Three tips to gorgeous

337-806-9997 1931 Kaliste Saloom Rd.

NEW ORLEANS 504-608-6227 3933 Magazine St. info@LeJourCouture.com

LeJourCouture.com @LeJourBridal

By Michelle Judice

H

ow does the holiday season always seem to creep up on us? If the hosting, gifting and traveling aren’t enough to worry about, you also have to find the time to put great outfits together for all of the festivities. And with an early Mardi Gras season this year, you may also have those parties to worry about. Yikes. Whether you prefer to work with what you have or mix in a few of-the-moment pieces, below are some tips to help you maintain sanity and look fantastic for any occasion. THE NEW FALLBACK Everyone should have a little black dress, but why not have a go-to that is all your own? It could be a skirt-top combo you always seem to get compliments on or an ultra-flattering jumpsuit. Whether you want to try something new or stick with a tried-and-true piece, just remember to mix up the accessories each time you wear to add new life!

you like to keep your outfit simple but still want to make a statement, pop on a berry lip for instant va-voom. FRESHEN IT UP Add in one or two on-trend pieces will instantly update your holiday wardrobe. For example, velvet is big this season: pair a velvet tee with a pleated skirt if you’re on the more adventurous side. Or, find a velvet clutch or pump in a neutral hue if you’re not as big of a style risk-taker. This simple styling trick is one you can utilize with any new trend.

Everyone should have a little black dress, but why not have a go-to that is all your own? You can stay true to yourself while stepping a bit outside the box. Have fun with your attire this holiday and Mardi Gras season. You’ll be glad you did. Judice is a personal stylist in Lafayette with experience working with men and women of all body types, ages and lifestyles.

ADD YOUR FLAIR Almost any outfit can be instantly changed with the right accessories. This is the area to have fun with - mix bold colors, embroidery or other embellishments to add interest to an otherwise basic look. If 20

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M Collectives Handmade designs inspired by Louisiana living By Stacey Daley

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ia Sapienza, designer and owner of M Collectives, a handmade jewelry line in Lafayette, LA, began searching for her passion at just 10 years old. As a young teenager, she discovered she was most interested in fashion. Practicing with different mediums from canvas to constructing clothing, Sapienza decided to give jewelry making a try. Taking a completely fearless approach, she began designing and crafting by hand without any previous knowledge or know-how. Mistakes were made, however, and Sapienza credits the trial and error process she initially experienced with giving her a whole new appreciation and perspective toward every finished piece. The designs in M Collectives cater to the most fashionable regardless of age. Every season, bold colors inspired by everyday life such as art, nature or a pedestrian’s attire are mixed in a variety of styles to create eyecatching collections. Designs are inspired by customers and out of personal necessity because if she needs

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it, chances are someone else probably does too! The people of Louisiana have had the greatest influence on Sapienza’s style and brand. The outspoken nature of Louisianans offering up suggestions, compliments and words of encouragement push her to work harder. The close culture of Louisiana is what drives Sapienza. Her collections achieve the perfect balance between keeping herself in her work and keeping customers happy and excited! Doing so has allowed Sapienza to make many connections and friendships. Friends and family have been incredibly supportive from the beginning, never allowing Sapienza to be modest about her business. Whenever someone compliments a piece of jewelry she is wearing, her sister encourages her to hand them a business card. Through support of family and friends, word-of-mouth, talent and creativity, M Collectives by Sapienza has grown from one woman’s accessory necessity to a booming business! 21


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NUTRITION

Meal Prep: Snack Edition

Getting littles involved in their wellness By Sonia Marie Desormeaux, Sonia-marie.com

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ere we are again, the middle of a bustling school year. One of my favorite things to do with my son is meal prep on the weekends. He enjoys making his food, and it’s a sneaky way to get some quality one-on-one time. I’ve included one of my favorite snack recipes that you can try with your littles. The best part is they can mix it up with different toppings to make it their own! It’s important to involve children in their own health and wellness, and cooking together as a family is an important start! Enjoy! Apple Cakes

Optional Toppings:

1 apple, sliced horizontally 2 tablespoons almond butter, peanut butter or yogurt Toppings (suggestions below)

• shredded coconut • chocolate chips • chopped almonds • chopped pecans • chopped walnuts • blueberries • strawberries • mango • crushed graham crackers

Slice apples horizontally, and spread almond butter, peanut butter or yogurt over one side. Then, let your little one get creative with the toppings. The possibilities are endless! V OL U M E 3 IS S U E 5

101 East Second Street Broussard, La. 70518 337-839-9333 www.nashsrestaurant.com 23

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CHEF’S PLATE

The Many Parts of a Whole Chef Colt Patin: A popular seasoning takes off, a new cookbook launches, training the culinary future and it’s not even lunchtime By Sevie Zeller Photos by Terri Fensel

MAISPALM BY CAJUN CULINARY ROOTS Cajun Culinary Roots is a company created by chef Colt Patin that promotes Louisiana’s rich culinary heritage through unique seasonings, cooking products and cookbooks. The flagship seasoning blend created is Cajun Maispalm Seasoning. Its slogan couldn’t be more accurate: an Explosion of Flavor. After working on the formula for over five years, Patin finally has this outstanding product rolling off the production line. With lower sodium than most seasonings, it has a good balance of spices with a burst of bold flavors. Worcestershire powder is one of the unique ingredients that makes this shaker jump out from the rest in your spice cabinet. Flavors lovers can rejoice in the other products made to compliment this seasoning. The ever-popular jambalaya mix, dark roux, cornbread mix, couche couche mix, lemon pepper fish fry and CCR coffee BBQ rub are a few favorites that make great gifts for the holiday season or for out of town friends (they ship!).

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Cajun Culinary Roots is also producing a self-titled cookbook. Chef Colt has created many delicious recipes over time and decided to fill this first edition with his favorites. The release date is scheduled for the end of February! Find Cajun Culinary Roots online at CajunCulinaryRoots.com and at local farmers markets, cooking demonstrations and different fairs/ festivals in our great state of Louisiana. ​

residential kitchen, and a media center. LCI’s purpose is to educate its students to become highly trained professionals in food service operations. It provides its students with the appropriate knowledge and skills in professional cooking techniques, sanitation, nutrition and dayto-day business operations to successfully operate and manage a food service facility. Find out more at lci.edu.

ABOUT CHEF COLT PATIN Chef Colt Patin is a graduate of Louisiana Culinary Institute, a certified executive chef and certified chef instructor through the American Culinary Federation and Food Service Culinary Professional through the National Restaurant Association. A native of Breaux Bridge, Patin is currently a chef instructor at Louisiana Culinary Institute in Baton Rouge; LCI is the primer culinary school in Louisiana. He is also a huge supporter of the ProStart High School Culinary Program.  With more layers than an onion, Patin is also a founding member of Heartstrings and Angel Wings, a nonprofit organization that provides micropreemie clothing and other items to the local NICUs. He is also an active supporter for the March of Dimes. Patin has won many awards including Louisiana Cookin’ Magazine 2011 Chefs to Watch, ACF New Orleans 2016 Best Chefs of Louisiana, 2016 Louisiana Restaurant Association Chef of the Year, various Gold/Silver/Bronze Medals in ACF Culinary Classics. This talented chef had the opportunity to work for various restaurants in Acadiana. He also had the privilege of cooking for several noteworthy food critics, including Anthony Bourdain and Andrew Zimmerman, as well as the entire cast and crew of Swamp People on a season finale. He garnered national attention for his whole, stuffed alligator prepared on a Cajun Microwave.   LOUISIANA CULINARY INSTITUTE Louisiana Culinary Institute is the premier culinary school of the south offering associate degrees in Advanced Culinary Arts, Advanced Baking and Pastry, and Hospitality and Culinary Management. Located at 10550 Airline Highway in Baton Rouge, LCI is a state-ofthe-art, approximately 40,000-square-foot facility. It consists of upto-date classrooms, including three 3 demonstration labs, 3 general education classrooms, a bakery demonstration lab, 2 baking labs, a full-service restaurant, 2 project kitchens, an amphitheater with a

LCI FOUNDATION The mission of the LCI Foundation is to provide scholarship grants and other financial awards and assistance to deserving students attending the Louisiana Culinary Institute. It also provides food for distribution to one or more charitable feeding organizations whose primary purpose is feeding the homeless, poor or needy by supplying food products or preparing food.

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LEISURE CLASSES Whether your tastes run savory or sweet, LCI has a leisure class for you. Their corporate solutions spur creativity and comradery, and for your group of friends, it is an afternoon of fulfilling fun and laughter. Check out these cool classes: • German-style cooking • Artisan breads and rolls • Stews, soups and sauces • Holiday cupcake party (Dec. 9) • Ladies tapas night (Dec.9) BIRTHDAY PARTIES Looking for a unique experience and setting for your next special occasion? The LCI facility is available. They provide culinaryinspired activities plus all the traditional accouterments you would expect.   TURDUCKEN NAPOLEON When presented with the idea of creating a turducken napoleon, chef Colt Patin didn’t blink. He immediately went to work with his amazing team, which included Michael Ciuffetti, Erica Meche and Ciara Finley. The result exceeded all our expectations. Want to try your hand at creating this contemporary version of a Cajun classic? Patin and his team have generously shared this eye-catching recipe and more with our readers at 337magazine. com. Bon appétit!

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Your local, neighborhood Italian Bistro. COURET FARMS

505 West Pont Des Mouton, Suite 100 Lafayette LA, 70507 337.706.7574

SUGAR MILL POND

220 Prescott Blvd. Suite 100 Youngsville LA, 70592 337.451.6198

RIVER RANCH

115 Stonemont Road Lafayette LA, 70508 337.988.9790

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DINING DESTINATION

DUPUY’S SEAFOOD & STEAK

Historic Restaurant offering Quality Food By Angie Dumas, Da’Stylish Foodie

The combo appetizer with fried fish, shrimp, oysters and green beans served with three dipping sauces: Dupuy’s housemade sauce, tartar sauce and cocktail sauce.

Destination Location: Abbeville, LA Behind the name: Joseph Dupuy established Dupuy’s in 1869. He harvested his own oysters and sold them for five cents a dozen, starting a tradition that would continue through three generations. Dupuy’s has enjoyed over 146 years of success in its original location. World-renowned for their oysters on the half shell and outstanding seafood, Dupuy’s owners Jody and Tonya Hebert will continue the stellar-seafood tradition for many years to come. Little known fact: The original hallway was the restaurant where Dupuy’s first opened. The restaurant then added the dining room, later purchasing the post office next door, which was renovated and now is the bar area.

The 3 on 3 oyster sampler consist of three oysters Rockefeller and three oysters de ville. The oysters Rockefeller is an oyster on a half shell topped with homemade spinach cream sauce and mozzarella cheese and grilled to perfection. The oysters de ville is fresh, delicate oysters on a half shell, char-grilled in garlic butter herb sauce and finished with fresh Parmesan and Romano cheeses. Menu favorites: Ever popular are the crab cakes, which are made with real Louisiana lump crabmeat, and the eggplant Abbeville, which is a pasta dish loaded with seafood.

Concept of the restaurant: A seafood and steakhouse that offers delicious Cajun cuisine.

For the health conscience: Looking for a healthier option? The seafood salad is loaded with delicious seafood,

NO GOOD SONS BBQ & BOIL Serving barbecue in Acadiana since 2014, No Good Sons BBQ and Boil broke new grounds in Broussard at 1000 Albertsons Pkwy. The locally owned barbecue catering service has grown into a full-time restaurant that serves brisket, ribs and pulled pork that are cut per order on the “carving board.” Having a holiday or football party? No Good Sons can help with dat too!

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337 Insider Tip: The oysters are purchased from a different area than most restaurants acquire their oysters. Dupuy’s offer a fresher, cleaner and saltier oyster (which is absolutely accurate because Dupuy’s oysters were delicious!).

Romantic space: If a romantic spot is what you are aiming for, set the mood by requesting the table near the fireplace.

NEW

The chef’s special with stuffed fried shrimp over angel hair pasta topped with Louisiana jumbo lump crabmeat, white wine, diced tomatoes and capers in a cream sauce.

shrimp, crawfish and crabmeat on a bed of fresh iceberg and romaine lettuce with slivers of carrots, purple cabbage, red onions, sliced tomatoes, cucumbers, boiled eggs and housemade croutons. Manly menu: The steaks are hand-cut in the restaurant. Go for a size that’s not on the menu by ordering the 16-ounce Chairman’s Reserve ribeye. Honorable mentions: The oyster Rockefeller soup, which is an offmenu item that isn’t served every day, has become a crowd favorite.

TRENDING

MAGNOLIA MOON COLLECTIVE Magnolia Moon is serving Lafayette with their unique organic and wild crafted tea creations. Their tea blends are made with the medicinal properties in mind while also growing and sourcing local ingredients. You can find them each Saturday with their seasonal frozen drinks topped with beautiful edible flowers at Lafayette’s Farmers market at the Horse Farm. They also have blends available at Reve Coffee Roasters, Bread & Circus Provisions, Reve Coffee Lab, and Tribe Collective. 27


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8212 Maurice Ave. • Maurice, LA 337-893-5062 Mon-Sat 7 am-6:30 pm, Sunday 7 am-noon

6422 Ambassador Caffery Pkwy. Broussard, LA 337-706-7676 Mon-Sat 7 am-6 pm, Sundays closed

Special orders taken for all occasions. Gift certificates, shirts and koozies available.

For all your shipping needs, visit www.hebertsmaurice.com.

STUFFED with $100 CHICKEN purchase Valid Jan.-March 2018 • Not valid for shipping

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plates! From the first stop your palette will be praising Comeaux for creating Cajun Food Tours. While the locations vary from tour to tour the quality of cuisine does not. Each place visited is known to have a dish deemed a “favorite” or “best of” by Comeaux who researched by eating her way through the area ensure a perfect the experience. Plan ahead tip: wear stretchy pants! Finding success with Cajun Food Tours has enabled Comeaux to expand her tour offerings. The brand-new Around the World Taste Tour is a similar style and format but with a whole new itinerary. The international cuisine scene is growing in South Louisiana and Comeaux once again knows exactly where to bring passengers seeking multicultural cuisine. Included in the Around the World Taste Tour is a variety of Asian, Latin, Mediterranean and European tastings. It’s an appetizing way to explore the flavors of multiple countries without the jet lag!

CAJUN FOOD TOURS Ride, Eat, Repeat By Stacey Daley

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op on the Cajun Food Tours bus and get ready for a ride you will never forget! Whether you’re a foodie or just curious about Cajun cuisine, this is the ultimate three-hour tour. Sit back and relax while driver, tour guide and owner Marie Ducote-Comeaux delivers the dish Louisiana style. Comeaux, a former Louisiana history teacher for 15 years, realized she was ready to expand upon her passion: being a proud Cajun. Through her personal travels and prayer, she discovered food tours, and the rest is history. Comeaux bought a bus and soon began hosting locals and visitors from all over the world. Passengers on The Cajun Food Tour will experience why Lafayette is truly “The Tastiest Town in the South.” The tour is uniquely designed to highlight South Louisiana favorites such as alligator,

boudin, smoked sausage, gumbo, oysters, catfish, cracklin and king cake. It makes six stops that serve up samples of the southern delicacies. The travel time between stops is not wasted either. Comeaux has truly taken her classroom to the streets! She continues to educate groups of riders on Cajun culture and the history of the cuisine as she cruises from one location to the next. As you arrive at each stop Comeaux gives signals to exit the bus in the most authentically Cajun French way by saying, “Allons manger” (Let’s go eat!). Once off the bus and in the restaurant, you are greeted by the staff from each establishment anxious to serve you their delightful dish. The best part is you don’t have to wait long to take a bite out of Louisiana because the tour is perfectly timed to ensure minimal waits and sizzling hot

TRENDING

NEW COFFEE AND CARBS:

KÖSTLICH! Zuhause is a new German bakery and coffee house in Lafayette. Many anticipated what the newly built facility would serve to the community, and their German-inspired menu is exactly what the 337 desires. The elegant and modern atmosphere of the shop provides for a cozy, Louisiana hospitality feel where you can enjoy a slowpressed cup of coffee or pick up a loaf of bread to bring home. V OL U M E 3 IS S U E 5

From Cajun staples to worldwide cultural samplings, Comeaux’s food tours are fun and filling! Reserve your spot for a truly one of a kind experience. Whether familiar or foreign, the food tour experience is a delightfully delicious drive around town. Visit Cajunfoodtours.com for more information and to book a tour.

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WHAT JAMAICAN? Da Jerk Stop is serving up authentic Jamaican cuisine in Youngsville. This restaurant prides themselves in being the only place for authentic Jamaican food in Acadiana. Their menu items like the curried goat and fried plantains are made fresh every morning with natural ingredients and spices directly from Jamaica. It’s great for an office party and can also be delivered on Waitr. 29


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F I T N E S S

TRIGGERING IMAGES Bringing awareness to PTSD By James Eckhoff, MS, NCC, LPC, LAC NOT LIMITED TO WAR

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a trauma- and stressorrelated disorder following exposure to a traumatic event. In the past, PTSD was referred to as Shell Shock or Battle Fatigue Syndrome as it was historically associated with war-based mental health disturbances. Because of this, though, it seems as if the idea of experiencing Post-Traumatic Stress is typically limited to veterans of war in the minds of most people. However, any trauma-based situation could potentially result in a PTSD reaction, whether it be a one-time event such as a car accident or an

ongoing event such as chronic abuse or long-term recovery from flooding. THE TRAUMA OF OTHERS

As has unfortunately been made apparent for people in the Acadiana area over that past 18 months, simply witnessing or learning about trauma that others have been exposed to can have negative impacts on our own mental health. The images on the news of flood victims and the devastation of hurricanes by themselves have the potential to trigger PostTraumatic Stress Disorder in individuals, even if not directly

impacted by flooding or storm damage. This is by no means a selfish or self-centered reaction, but instead an empathetic response of caring for the well-being of others and the fearfulness of being in such a

situation yourself. Regardless of whether you personally experienced the traumatic event or indirectly through someone else, there is help available to help you process through your trauma.

337 Insider Tip: James Eckhoff is a licensed

professional counselor in Lafayette. When not counseling, teaching or writing articles, he can be found on his weekly podcast about psychology at soundcloud.com/podcastnos

Save the Date

Holiday Open House December 6, 5pm-8pm Join us for prizes, gift bags, food and beverages don’t miss out on our event-only pricing!

Text the word “BEAUTY” to 337.660.2807 to RSVP We Offer a Variety of Services Botox • Fillers • Microneedling • Facials • Laser Treatments Chemical Peels • Microdermabrasion • Skin Care Products

We Also Treat Acne • Rosacea • Eczema • Psoriasis • Dermatitis • Warts Moles • Skin Cancer • And More!

BOARD CERTIFIED DERmATOlOgIsTs

1245 South College Road, Bldg. 5, Lafayette, LA 70503

337–235–6886

www.DermCenterOfAcadiana.com V OL U M E 3 IS S U E 5

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SWEAT ONCE A DAY Body Factory in Lafayette is changing the way you move By Heather Salsman

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ith so many new gyms and types of workouts, it can be difficult for some individuals to decide which one is the best one for them. If you’re looking for a great sweat, group-motivated environment and exercises that are easy on your body, Body Factory is the whole package and more. Body Factory is a local fitness boutique, owned by Vince Purpera. It offers two unique services that can’t be found anywhere else in Lafayette. LAGREE FITNESS

Lagree Fitness is a fullbody conditioning fitness

method that is practiced on the Megaformer M3S. This method is intense on the muscles to strengthen the body, tone and elongate the muscles, improve endurance, jump-start the metabolism, burn fat and increase flexibility. The 45-minute Lagree class is done as a group and everyone is able to move at their body’s own pace and comfort. CLIMB CLASS

The CLIMB class is a 30-minute group routine on the VersaClimber. It gives the body a full cardio workout and tones all the major muscles of the arms, chest, shoulders, back, hips, butt and legs

in one fluid motion. This type of exercise is lowimpact meaning there is no pounding of knees, joints or hips, lowering the risk of bodily stress and injury that is sometimes seen in other group-based training. If you really want to challenge yourself, sign up for the combo

class, which is 30 minutes of Lagree and 15 minutes of CLIMB. Body Factory offers different price packages, private sessions and is conveniently located next to Rachael’s Café. Find out more information on bodyfactorylft.com and get your body moving!

Your Health, Our Mission.

Acadiana Rehabilitation, A Division of Iberia Rehabilitation Hospital 314 Youngsville Highway | Lafayette, LA 70508

337-330-2051 phone 337-330-2809 fax

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H E A LT H

EATING FOR YOUR WINTER COAT GOOD EATS KITCHEN IN CENTRAL LAFAYETTE

*Youngsville location opening in November “GEK” located in the Oil Center is owned and operated by Boyer Derise, Trey Dykes and Jacob Hamilton. These guys are on a mission to serve not only convenience but healthy meals that taste good! The recipes are chef inspired, and the ingredients come from a variety of sustainable farms. All items, from the grass-fed beef to the wild caught fish, are uniquely paired with fresh vegetables and cooked every day. Their services offer in-store pick up, online orders and delivery, pick up from other local businesses, and Waitr delivery. The online orders are prepped every Sunday and are ready for pick up/delivery Monday, which gives your food a five-day shelf life. While the meals are focused on high quality ingredients and flavors, you can also find symbols for special dieters on their boxes that represent: gluten-free, sodium conscious, carb conscious, Paleo and high protein.

337’s pick of the prep: Green chili chicken enchiladas with avocado crema

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FITBLENDZ IN YOUNGSVILLE

Fitblendz’s focus is on their “fast-fit-food” that gives people the opportunity to grab something on the go, without the guilt. Their flavors are aimed toward everyone from the average Joe and special dieters to bodybuilders and cross-fitters. All items can be made to order in the store. The prepped meals are made daily as well and some are frozen right away to ensure a three-month shelf life. Customers may order customized meal prep from the Fitblendz website, which are ready for pickup on Sundays and start as low as $6 per meal!

337’s pick of the prep: The tortilla for their chicken wrap that is made locally with coconut oil (no hydrogenated oils) and stuffed with “spicy” sauce, brown rice, spinach and shredded pepper jack

F I T N E S S

Meal prep spots to prepare for your holiday indulgences By Heather Salsman

RACHAEL’S CAFÉ IN SOUTH LAFAYETTE

Rachael’s Café offers meal prep that is completely customizable. Customers can choose one protein and two vegetables per meal that is served on the spot and can be taken to-go or eaten in the restaurant. Their services are also extended to those who are on a gluten-free or Whole 30 diet. Every meal that you order is prepped that day and stocked in containers, allowing for a five-to-six-day shelf life. Meals are available Monday-Friday and can also be delivered or ordered through Waitr. If you visit the restaurant with someone not on a diet, they also serve daily plate lunches. It’s the best of both worlds!

337’s pick of the prep: Chicken, smothered cabbage and coconut sweet potatoes

XTREME EATS IN NEW IBERIA

Xtreme Eats offers not only prepped meals, supplements and smoothies, but they have a drive-thru! They pride themselves in being at a convenient lunch spot for busy workers, giving them the opportunity to choose healthier options on the go. Everything is made from scratch and prepped meals are cooked to order on the same day, which gives a fiveto-six-day shelf life and an always-stocked cooler! If you order ahead, you can receive a discount. Customers can now order meals online and pick them up whenever convenient.

337’s pick of the prep: Chimichurri steak meal with green onion-lime brown rice, bell peppers and zucchini

SENSIBLE PORTIONS

Originally from Mandeville, Sensible Portions has grown rapidly and ships all over the state. Their focus is in their name; ideal sized portions with healthy ingredients for people who want to lose weight. Their meals can be shipped to your door or can sometimes be picked up at a few retail stores in Lafayette.

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MR. & MRS.

DESTINY REALIZED Luquettes embrace Cajun tradition By Lisa Hanchey • Photos by Chris Deville

GENE ANGELLE (TOUCHETTE) LUQUETTE 25 7th grade teacher at JH Williams Middle School From Kaplan, Louisiana

CAMERON O’DELL LUQUETTE 26 Real estate agent for Keller Williams From Kaplan, Louisiana GRADE SCHOOL SWEETHEARTS Gene and Cameron met in elementary school. In second grade, Cameron’s family moved away. But, even at that young age, the couple were destined to be together. THAT BUTTERFLY FEELING Every summer, Cameron returned to Kaplan for Catechism. Just seeing him, Gene got “butterflies in [her] stomach.” During their eighth-grade year, Cameron came to the middle school social with a friend. He approached Gene and asked what her plans were after the dance. She rejected him, saying that she had plans. “That was when I first had my eye on her,” he confessed. Gene silently harbored a crush on him as well. Wedding date: July 15, 2017

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THE ONE WHO (ALMOST) GOT AWAY During the summer of Gene’s freshman year, Cameron and Gene started “talking” after she ended her previous relationship. This time, they both knew it was special. “I was waiting to swoop in,” he confided. Gene added, “And I’m so glad he did!” It only took a short time for Cameron to restore Gene’s confidence in love. “After two months, we had said the words, ‘I love you,’” Gene admitted. “We both realized that there was a reason we had a thing for each other since middle school; we were meant to be.” SEALING THE DEAL Seven years later, the couple tied the knot. “We couldn’t be happier!” Gene said. “We truly are each other’s best friend. We have so many of the same interests. But we are still different, which allows us to be a perfect balance.” THE CAJUN CEREMONY The couple wanted to start their marriage on a strong foundation. “We planned for almost two years and chose Vermilionville because it was so personal and embodied rustic, Cajun accents that reflect us as a couple,” Gene revealed. When the doors of the rural chapel opened, Gene’s heart filled with joy. “We had such a good turnout, and the room was filled with people we loved. However, once the doors opened, the only person I saw was Cameron,” she recalled. THE ROMANTIC TEXAS HONEYMOON After the wedding, the couple embarked on a Texas tour where they enjoyed an Astros game and sampled breweries in Houston, visited the historic (and haunted) Alamo and River Walk in San Antonio, and discovered hidden places in Austin. Sounds like the perfect start to a beautiful marriage! 3 3 7 M A GA ZIN E.C OM

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ROMANCE

‘TIS THE SEASON Tips for reducing holiday stress By Hannah Comeaux, M.A., LPC, LMFT

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he holidays are around the corner! Although it’s an exciting time to connect with family and friends to share some cheer, holiday stressors can steal the joy from the season. Here are a few tips for reducing holiday stress.

MAKE PLANS!

The two biggest holiday stressors are time and money. Collaborate with your spouse or significant other on what days you’ll spend with whom, whether you should draw names, or set spending limits on gifts. Knowing what

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to expect intercepts tension. Coming into agreement now will keep arguments down later. JUST BREATHE!

Take time early on to set goals, and block out time for shopping, holiday meal preparation and special events like office parties. Don’t sweat it when everything doesn’t go perfectly! Most importantly, take a little time out for self-care. Set the pace for your day by starting it with at least a few minutes of quiet time or something enjoyable. Small regiments in your day that are

uplifting and refreshing will keep you at a productive pace. PRIORITIZE!

Decide what’s really important for each day, each week and longterm. Make shopping and to-do lists on your phone or snapshot written ones so they are always with you. Don’t hesitate to ask for help from your spouse or other family members. After all, ‘tis the season for sharing! Last and foremost, remember

the reason for the season. What are you really going to remember about the holidays? The food? The gifts? Make memories that will last a lifetime and start or carry on traditions that will leave a family legacy! Hannah Comeaux is a licensed professional counselor and marriage and family therapist. Her passion is helping others cultivate more meaningful relationships.

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PLACES AND SPACES

Southern Slumber Party Tradition with a new “modern” twist By Sylvia and Joan Broussard

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y mom and her cousins had a sweet spirited southern tradition. Every year they would meet at T’frere’s Bed & Breakfast and have a slumber party. Sylvia and I had the pleasure of meeting them in the morning for the famous homecooked breakfast, stories from their past and lots of laughs. Carrying on the tradition, we decided to have Sylvia’s birthday slumber party at T’frere’s. Known for a ghostly presence, we knew we would be scared and need to sleep together and did not know if they could accommodate all of us in the same room. To our surprise, the bed-and-breakfast has been renovated with a modern twist. The back of the house is now a 2-bedroom suite that includes a living room, kitchen, Wi-Fi and a big screen TV. The big house is still open to all guests with a home-cooked breakfast in the morning with seating on the glass enclosed porch or you can mingle with the other guests in the kitchen. The 4 o’clock happy hour that consists of juleps or tea and an appetizer is a fun treat to your stay as well. We did not see a ghost, but we did have a weekend that was good for the soul and met people from all over the world. Being true Cajuns, we loved giving the out of town guests’ recommendations on where to eat and things they must see and do. T’freres is a unique boutique bed-and-breakfast for a gettogether or getaway, or you can even reserve it for an event.

Sylvia and Faye Broussard T’Frere’s House: A Boutique Bed & Breakfast 1905 Verot School Road Lafayette, LA 337-984-9347 tfrereshouse.com Dollface Salon and Beauty Bar 232 E. M.L.K. Drive Grand Coteau, LA 337-662-5192 Dollfacesalonandbeautybar.com

WHAT DID WE DO DURING THE DAY? Grand Coteau is great for Southern belles. Dollface Salon and Beauty Bar is amazing. The girls made their own lip gloss and perfume at the beauty bar. You can have a whole day of beauty at Dollface including makeup, massage, hair and unique gifts. Located in a quaint row of antique shops and restaurants, Dollface is the perfect place to take girls of any age.

Critters Spa Daycare & Boarding

Professional dog grooming, spa packages, doggie daycare and boarding Free teeth cleaning when you mention 337.

917 Cayret Street • Scott, LA 70583 • 337-233-3636 • Mon-Fri. 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. www.crittersSDB.com • facebook.com/critterssdb 36

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K I D S

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ADVENTURE

HOW DOES YOUR FAMILY 337? There are so many great people, places and things to enjoy in our area. How is your family enjoying the best of 337?

Educational fun at these Louisiana Safari playgrounds

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By Heather Salsman GLOBAL WILDLIFE CENTER Giraffes, zebras, kangaroos and camels in Louisiana? Experience the African environment at the Global Wildlife Center in Folsom, LA. Tours around the free-roaming wildlife preserve allow visitors to see over 4,000 exotic, endangered and threatened animals from all over the world. Children can feed the giraffes from their hand and climb a rock wall. Global Wildlife is open seven days a week for tours, field trips and private events like birthday parties inside tree houses! Visit globalwildlife.com for more information. GONE WILD SAFARI Gone Wild Safari started their grassroots movement with saving abused, injured and unwanted animals. Since 2010, the facility in Pineville, LA has grown

into an exotic animal sanctuary as well. Children can watch the many animals graze, play and exercise around the land and learn about the habitats of each. Other amenities include a petting zoo, concessions, playground, parakeet enclosure and more. Book a birthday party or holiday event or visit any of the _____ seven days a week! Visit gonewildsafari.com for more information. ACADIANA ZOO: SAFARI OF LIGHTS Zoosiana in Lafayette, LA will be open during the evenings from Nov. 25 – Dec. 30, schedule permitting, to host a special event: Safari of Lights. The Zoo will shine bright and beautifully with lights as guests stroll through the facility with friends and family. Have the children take a picture with Santa Claus and enjoy a cup of hot cocoa from the Elves’ Eatery! Learn more about Zoosiana’s Safari of Lights at zoosiana.com, under the events section.

Joel and Marisa Duhon enjoying copius amounts watermelon, tubing and fishing at their camp at False River.

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ADVICE

ARE WE THERE YET? Tips for traveling with children

he holidays are the busiest travel days of the year. Besides the hustle and bustle of packing, the patience of parents and children gets stretched when making those long trips to be with family or friends. Here are a few ideas to make holiday travel a little less stressful. Involve the kids in the preparation process. When they know what to expect, they’ll be more excited about what’s ahead. Let them plan a family activity or pack some favorite things to bring along. Assigning age-appropriate tasks and responsibilities helps them take ownership during the process. Plan around their natural schedules. Traveling before dawn, just before nap time or late evening will usually give you a couple of hours of sleep time. Scheduling frequent breaks especially after meals will keep bathroom emergencies to a minimum. Confinement in small spaces is difficult for children, so allowing breaks to stretch their legs for 15 or 20 minutes will help burn excess energy. Pack carry-ons. A small cooler with drinks and finger foods such as fruit wedges, pepperoni, string cheese, etc. will save money and time. Remember to pack a surprise bag filled with new toys, movies and books they’ve never seen and some of their go-to favorites such as tablets or other electronics. Plan games like Track the Trip. Plan a countdown by using landmarks or towns when you are a quarter, halfway or on the home stretch. Road games such as Eye Spy or Name that Plate and singing, reading or telling stories will make the difference between a great memory and family nightmare! Hannah Comeaux is a licensed professional counselor and marriage and family therapist. Her passion is helping others cultivate more meaningful relationships.

By Hannah Comeaux, M.A., LPC, LMFT

Critters Spa Daycare & Boarding

917 Cayret Street • Scott, LA 70583 337-233-3636 • Mon-Fri. 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

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TEEN SCENE

DESTINED TO BE QUEEN Years of practice pays off for local teen By Sandra McKinney

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ou do not have to grow up in England to be queen; little girls in Acadiana just have to wish upon a Mardi Gras star.  Take Anne-Marie Alexander for instance. This fourteen-year-old freshman at St. Thomas Moore has lived in the world of Mardi Gras since the age of three.  As an only child, spending time with her cousins was very important. They belonged to the Krewe of Versailles, and thus her years of participation began. The Krewe of Versailles is recognized as one of the longest running children’s krewes in this area. With five children’s krewes in Lafayette alone, competition to win a place on the court is tight.  Anne-Marie never gave up though. Encouraged by her Meme, she made up her mind to one day be Queen. This upcoming February her dream comes to life. As Queen, she will reign over her court with a dress

designed by Angie Vincent and sewn by Melanie Coker. This year’s theme is New Orleans, and though she has never been there for Mardi Gras, she is very excited to participate in the parade.  A queen’s duties include attending the ball, meetings and socials and helping the next queen with her flags. Anne-Marie takes this honor very seriously.  Meanwhile, she is enjoying art in school and out, taking private lessons with Harriet Hebert. Her friends are like family, and she spends as much time with them as she can.  When questioned about her future, she wishes to attend LSU to become a dentist. Being married and having a family like her parents do is a goal of hers also. One thing is for certain, this queen will be the belle of the ball.

CARTER AND Acadiana youth has a serious swing By Sandra McKinney

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arter Bourque, a brown-eyed bundle of energy, knows his sport. Whether he is telling you about practicing his golf swing or showing off videos of his latest golf trick, he knows the ins and outs of the game.  This six-year-old began the game at two, putting around with his father whom he calls his “Caddy Daddy.” Now he is instructed by Cortney Shrout at Le Triomphe every Tuesday.  His lessons are obviously paying off. To qualify for his division, a golfer must shoot a 48 or better. He also must participate in four out of the eight Acadiana Tournaments located around Louisiana.  Before a tournament, he challenged himself to hit a golf ball every day 65 days before the tournament. The practice time was worth it. Carter came out in first place. All of this led him to be named the 68th World Champion in the U.S. Kids Golf League.  Carter likes to show off his talents with a trick he has perfected. Stacking two golf balls on top of each other, he hits the bottom ball. When the top ball flies into the air, he catches it with his hat. It is something to see! Carter is certainly well-rounded though. Besides playing with his older sister, he enjoys soccer, go-carts, watching television and taking care of all the strays that arrive at his home.  From ducks to dogs, his caring spirit is evident in his language and attitude. V OL U M E 3 IS S U E 5

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HIS CLUBS When asked who his favorite golfer is, he quickly answered that it was Jordan Spieth. And while he may be young, he is already certain his dream is to play professionally one day. With his drive, literally and figuratively, there is no doubt he will make it. 39


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PET PAGES

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NO-KILL, NO WORRIES

Does your four-legged friend have a funny tale to tell? Share it with 337 at contest@337magazine.com. Include your pet’s name, breed and funny trait along with your name and contact information for a chance to win a $50 gift certificate from Spoiled Pet Spa & Boutique

Lafayette animal shelter transforms to no-kill policy By Heather Salsman

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Mayor-President Robideaux recently s a community we seem to be very signed an ordinance with Lafayette Cityinvolved with helping others find their Parish Council into law that lowered pets, but what happens when they’re found adoption fees and implements a feline first by the animal shelter? Fear no more, Trap, Neuter and Return (TNR) program. as Lafayette is setting a regional example The adoption fees have been reduced to $35 by transforming its animal shelter into a for dogs and $25 for cats. “no-kill” facility! Seniors and military Shortly after Joel Robideaux veterans are waived of the took office as Lafayette Mayorfees and all fees include President, he spoke about his Located in Southwestern neutering/spaying, intentions to transform the Louisiana? LAPAW Lafayette Animal Control vaccinations, heartworm Rescue in Lake Charles testing and microchipping Shelter into a “no-kill” facility by is a no-kill animal shelter for Calcasieu Parish which usually adds up to 2020. His plan includes lowering animals to have a second $200-$500. the kill rates of animals that chance at being adopted. If you would like to adopt arrive to shelters and making Visit lapaw.org for more a pet and impact the noit easier for citizens in the information. kill transformation of the community to adopt these pets. community, the Lafayette Lafayette suffers from having Animal Shelter & Care to euthanize animals because Center is located at 613 W. Pont Des the facility that was built 25 years ago is Mouton Road and is open from 1 p.m. until only 6,000 square feet. This is simply not enough space to provide temporary homes 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. for all the animals that are found. With LASCC has also started a campaign Robideaux’s interaction, LCG is planning called The Second Chance Saturday, to rebuild the facility and increase its size which offers convenient hours to visit to an extraordinary 20,000 square foot the shelter and adopt. Your next pet is shelter. waiting for you! V OL U M E 3 IS S U E 5

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Bella Breed: Siberian Husky Owner’s name: Alyssa Leger

This is Bella. Her owner, Alyssa Leger, left the bathroom door open and didn’t realize that her pup went in there. Later, she noticed Bella was in her kennel chewing on something, and it turned out that it was an exfoliating glove. This picture was taken after being fussed at, and she’s acting like she has no idea what’s going on…or what’s on top of her head!

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PLAYER & COACH

A Special Bond How consistency leads to great leadership

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he relationship between coaches and their players is a unique connection. It’s a special bond forged through countless hours on and off the practice field. It goes well beyond the stadium and the beloved gamedays. By Brandon Comeaux If you look at successful football programs, consistency in leadership is usually one of its hallmarks. Most importantly, it’s the consistency in the message being sent from coaches to their players that remains the cornerstone of success for the team. Coach Lance Guidry is in his second season as head coach of the McNeese Cowboys, but he’s played and coached in the McNeese program multiple times over the last three decades. Being a part of championship teams since the 1990s, Coach Guidry knows it takes a coach being consistent with his players to get the most out of them. “You have to be yourself,” said Coach Guidry. “If you’re passionate, be passionate. If you’re more laid back, be laid back,” said Coach Guidry. He also pointed out that being even keel with a steady hand of discipline is something that players want and need for building character on and off the field. Discipline was something Blaise Breaux, a senior player born and raised in Loreauville, was quick to point out when talking about his coach, Rhett Peltier. “He’s taught me how to focus and stay disciplined,” said Breaux, who credits his coaches for helping improve his study habits and work ethic. Breaux, who currently maintains a 3.8 GPA, wants to major in mass communications either at UL-Lafayette or LSU after he gets his high school diploma. But Breaux also talked about consistency in behavior

Park Center welcomes

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LANCE GUIDRY School: McNeese State University Years coaching: Since 1994 as a graduate assistant at McNeese Position: Head Coach/Defensive Coordinator/Cornerbacks Message to parents: “God blesses a child with abilities. The correct guidance plus ability equals success.”

BLAISE BREAUX School: Loreauville High School Class: Senior Position: Middle Linebacker, Offensive Tackle What football has taught him: “Just like in football, life is about staying persistent in achieving my goals.”

and attitude. He spoke about not just offering criticism, but being an encouragement to others. As a passionate person, Coach Guidry makes it a point to be more passionate with his players when they do something right, focusing on their strengths. “Coaching is about developing kids mentally to do the right thing,” said Coach Guidry, adding, “To have them mentally ready to fight the hardships of life.”

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COLLEGE SPORTS

Ragin Cajuns Bringing home a bowl? By Garrett Ohlmeyer The Ragin’ Cajuns football team is looking to rebound from last season’s mediocre 6-7 record that included a New Orleans Bowl loss to Southern Mississippi. Here is an overview of how the Cajuns are projected to look this season on both sides of the ball.

Offense

This is the first season since 2014, when Terrance Broadway was at the helm, that the Cajuns knew who their starting quarterback would be well before the season began. Jordan Davis has been competing for the starting job for a couple of years, and is now getting his chance to be the clear-cut starter. Although Davis will start the season off in charge, Sophomore quarterback Dion Ray may still see some action from time to time. While the quarterback position seems set in stone, the main question mark on the Cajuns’ offense is finding out who will fill the shoes of now-NFL running back Elijah McGuire, who carried the ball over 100 times each of his four seasons with the Cajuns. It’s unseen if the Cajuns’ have someone on their roster with quiet the talent of McGuire, but they certainly aren’t lacking depth. Senior Darius Hoggins and Sophomore Raymond Calais should contribute as speedy backs and Trey Ragas could provide the team with some bulk, power and the ability to run between the tackles— something they have been lacking since Alonzo Harris left the team over two years. The receiving corp and offensive line will look much of the same and should also benefit from having more time to play and practice together as a unit. Al Riles was the only major receiver to have left the school last season and center Eddie Gordon is the only starter on the offensive line to leave.

Defense

Consistency should help the defense this year as defensive coordinator Mike Lucas has had an entire offseason to implement his defense. Last year, Melvin Smith started the season off at the head of the defense but was fired after a 45-10 loss at home in the season opener against Boise State. Lucas replaced him as the interim defensive coordinator for the team, but the interim tag was

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removed near the end of the regular season. The Cajuns are bringing back some key pieces on the defensive line in Taboris Lee and Joe Dillon. The two combined for 17.5 tackles for loss last year, and Dillon ended the year with seven sacks. Safeties Travis Crawford and Tracy Walker make up one of the most talented safety duo’s in the Sun Belt. The Cajuns have depth at the cornerback spot, and should benefit from having an extra year under Melvin Smith’s defense. The main unknown with the team’s defense comes at linebacker. T.J. Posey is the clear bright spot, but an injury to Ferrod Gardner has left some question marks at the position. Corey Turner previously played safety for the Cajuns, but recently moved to linebacker and should help to add depth.

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COLLEGE SPORTS

McNeese Cowboys

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very year when fans look at their favorite team’s schedule, one of the first games they look for are the rivalry games. These games have extra emphasis on them because of a certain level of competition that has arisen between the two schools over time. Rivalry games can be nasty and contentious, or cordial and respectful. LSU-Alabama, Michigan-Ohio State, Army-Navy: Those are three examples of great rivalries in college football. For the McNeese State Cowboys football program, there are three rivalries that have developed over the years. MCNEESE - LAMAR Every year, the Cowboys and the Cardinals meet in the “Battle of the Border.” Of the three rivalries listed, McNeese State has had the most success against this school (a 25-9-1 record). The two Southland Conference rivals - McNeese based in Lake Charles and Lamar based in Beaumont - are within close proximity of each other. The Cowboys hold a 2-game winning streak over the Cardinals, beating them 41-10 during the 2016 season to secure a 12th consecutive winning season.

Beating Your Rivals By Brandon Comeaux

MCNEESE - CENTRAL ARKANSAS This is the newest of the three rivalries for the Cowboys. And it’s been a very even matchup, with both programs holding five wins over the other. The Bears, based in Conway, Arkansas, joined the Southland Conference just over a decade ago. The two conference mates play for the Red Beans and Rice Bowl each season. The Cowboys lost to the Bears 35-0 during the 2016 season. MCNEESE - UL-LAFAYETTE Of the three rivalries, this one is the longest. Once Southland Conference foes, the Cowboys and the Cajuns have a rivalry that dates to 1951 and used to play for the Cajun Crown. The rivalry was renewed during the 2016 season when the Cowboys lost to the Cajuns 30-22 in Lafayette. Despite the loss, McNeese State still holds a 20-16-2 edge over UL. *Information obtained from mcneesesports.com, sbnation.com, and lamarcardinals.com.

Find out more at mcneesesports.com

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LSU Tigers COLLEGE SPORTS

TIGER HAPPENINGS

Landry to Join the Tiger Baseball Staff

By Curt Guillory

Photo By: LSU Athletics Creative Services

The Inaugural Tiger 10K Tour the campus while taking part in the first ever Tiger 10K: The Race Into Death Valley. The race will end on the 50-yard line of Death Valley, will benefit The Student Athlete Life Skills Program, and will feature 10K, 5K and kid’s mile races. The event is expected to fill its 10,000-participant cap, so lace up your running shoes and sign up; Dec. 3 will be here before you know it. Registration can be found at Tiger10k.com. See you at the finish line.

New Mike

Mike the VII officially begins his reign. The 18-month-old Siberian-Bengal was recently introduced into his new habitat. His day will consist of being released into the yard by 8 a.m. each day, and then retiring to his night house by 8 p.m. Ahhhh… the life of a Tiger (Mike that is).

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Leon Landry will be joining the LSU baseball staff for the 2018 season as an undergraduate assistant coach. Landry was part of the 2009 championship season Tigers team. He had 162 starts as an outfielder from 2008-2010 as a Tiger and was selected by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the third round of the MLB draft. He played eight years in the pro league for the Dodgers, Mariners, and Reds before retiring and returning to school. Leon is being well received. “Leon Landry will be a tremendous asset to our program as an undergraduate assistant coach, just as he was as a player here,” said LSU coach Paul Mainieri. Landry will draw on his experience as a Tiger, and in the majors to guide the next generation to Omaha and beyond. Good luck coach

LA Dairy Farmers is proud to sponsor LSU’s Dads and Daughters series. Several sporting events will play host in the series as the dads and daughters will be able to take part in special events at the games. Soccer, volleyball, women’s basketball, gymnastics and softball will be participating and will feature special pricing. A dad and a daughter can attend for $30. Additional daughters can attend for $15 more. The series is designed to encourage young ladies to learn why female Tiger athletes pursue their fields and sports by attending meet and greets at the events. Geaux girls! 3 3 7 M A GA ZIN E.C OM

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PRO SPORTS

New Orleans Saints By Brandon Comeaux

Legend Finally Honored Longtime Saint, Morten Andersen, inducted into Pro Football Hall Of Fame

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rowing up as a fan of the Black & Gold, there were certain players who I was a fan of more than others. Rickey Jackson, Bobby Hebert, Dalton Hilliard, Craig “Ironhead” Heyward and Willie Roaf - these were players who I couldn’t wait to see take the field each Sunday. They were players I either emulated while playing backyard football or talked about to anyone who would listen. And then there was Morten Andersen, the kicker from Denmark. I know kickers don’t often get much credit, but I know the pressure they are under when it comes down to their foot being the difference between the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat. And there was nobody more “automatic” than the man they called “The Great Dane.” From 1982-1994, “Mr. Automatic” was a difference maker for the Saints - game after game after game. After another 12 seasons in the NFL, Andersen retired as the NFL’s career-leader in points scored (2,544). It’s a record that still stands today. Andersen was inducted into the Pro Football

• NFL’s Career Leader in Points Scored - 2,544 • Most Career Field Goals Made - 565 • Most Career Games Played - 382 • Most Career Games Scoring - 379 • Most Career Game-Winning Field Goals - 103

There was nobody more “automatic” than the man they called “The Great Dane.”

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Notable Honors Given to Morten Andersen

Hall of Fame earlier this year. It was an honor that was overdue (he retired in 2007 after 25 seasons of play) and one I thought he might not get because, well, kickers don’t often get much credit. But, in a league that honors greatness, it’s only fitting that the greatest kicker in NFL history now resides in Canton, Ohio (site of Pro Football Hall of Fame).

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Notable Records Held by Morten Andersen

Morten Andersen is one of only two exclusive placekickers to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Fellow Scandinavian Jan Stenarud (Norway) was inducted in 1991.

• NFL 1980s All-Decade Team • NFL 1990s All-Decade Team • 7-time NFL Pro Bowl • 2-time Golden Toe Award Winner • New Orleans Saints Hall of Fame

Notable Saints Inducted into Pro Football Hall Of Fame 1. Morten Andersen Placekicker 2. Jim Finks - President and general manager 3. Rickey Jackson - Linebacker 4. Willie Roaf - Offensive tackle

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Delight employees, friends and/or family with a holiday party at these local venues. The hosts do the work for you, because a celebration is in order for your year of hard work!

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Maison de Tours is a historic special event facility that offers weddings, receptions, parties, showers and banquet services. Located across from St. Martin De Tours Church, Maison De Tours has been restored to its original 1855 historic splendor. It showcases exposed beams, long leaf pine

Maison de Tours floors, plaster, brick and cypress walls, marble and brick fireplaces, and wrought iron balconies. This venue offers a complete wedding and reception service designed to give you a beautiful, stress-free event. All you need are your guests and sign-in book. This location also features a beautiful wedding room for the bride and her bride’s maids to get ready in and a lovely French Quarter-style courtyard complete with cascading fountain, arbor, seating, music and umbrellas should you choose an on-site wedding. For your fabulous wedding, Maison de Tours is “Acadiana’s Destination Wedding Site.”

128 S. Main Street St. Martinville, LA 337-380-5677 Find us on maisondetours.com

Boutique The

BRIDAL

SHOW

SUNDAY, JANUARY 21, 2018 | 1-4 L E P AV I L L O N — P A R C L A F AY E T T E B OUTIQUEBRIDA LSHOW.C OM

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TICKETS $12 IN ADVANCE $15 AT THE DOOR DOORS OPEN – 1:00 STYLE SHOW – 3:00

ELEGA NT & INTIMATE

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The Boutique Bridal Show is elegant and intimate. Our focus is on vendors and brides and finding the best way to marry the two together. The Boutique Bridal Show partners with wedding vendors that share our classic and elegant aesthetic and commitment to quality. Every bride-to-be will receive a copy of MOTIF Magazine, a publication of The Boutique Bridal Show. Articles written in MOTIF Magazine are by local writers whose aim is to shift the focus back to the real celebration and purpose of a wedding: love, in all of its varying forms. And stay tuned— "The Bride Speaks” blog has more in store. Brides can stay informed about vendors, upcoming bridal events and learn more about the planning process from local brides planning their weddings.

INFO@BOUTIQUEBRIDALSHOW.COM

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Decorating a Large Space for Your Wedding Creative ways to transform a large reception space

DRAPE IT: Draping a room can make it feel completely different. It adds dimension to your space, allows you to section the room and can completely transform the feel of the space. Even just draping the ceiling can dramatically change the feel of the room.

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A large wedding venue can offer many opportunities to personalize the space and make it totally your own. Party Central can help you transform your reception space and create the perfect look. With their expert team and quality rentals, Party Central can help to create a wedding that reflects you.

2 MAKE A GOOD FIRST IMPRESSION: A welcoming first impression can have a lasting impact with your guests. From adorning the front door with a beautiful floral wreath, lanterns hanging from trees outdoors, accent lighting on table tops, or having an eyecatching arrangement as the focal point on your sign in table, these and other small details will create a warm and welcoming environment.

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OPT FOR TALL CENTERPIECES: Adding tall centerpieces to your tables will make the ceilings seem lower and break up the space to create a more intimate vibe.

5 3 BRING IT DOWN: Hanging lots of chandeliers at varying heights, cafĂŠ lights or floral pieces from above can change the atmosphere of a space from feeling empty to intimate - especially if your venue has lofty ceilings.

LIGHT UP THE ROOM: A great way to instantly make over a space is with gorgeous allover lighting. Using uplighting creates a warm glow that is inviting and can make even the simplest of rooms feel chic and stylish. Whether spotlighting certain areas, using uplighting, or hanging lights from the ceiling, lights will enhance your space and the possibilities are endless.

6 4 MIX IT UP: You can totally change the flow of your venue space by playing with the shape of your tables. Mixing round and rectangular tables can create an eclectic look and is a great way to fill up your seating area. Choosing all long banquet tables can create an intimate family feel. Playing with the shapes and layout of your tables will add variety to your large space and help you create a more unique and comfortable seating plan. Another great option is including a lounge space with couches and ottomans where guests can mingle in a more intimate fashion and comfortably enjoy the festivities.

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337-261-3378 www.partycentralweb.com

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E V E N T S

Local Playgrounds Houmas House

Leave the stress of the holidays behind with a getaway to Houmas House. The historic home named the “Crown Jewel of the River Road” features two renown restaurants, quaint bed and breakfast accommodations and the mansion decorated in historic holiday style. We recommend enjoying an Old Fashion in the Turtle Bar, touring the big house by night, then an overnight stay followed by a plantation breakfast of grits and grillades and strolls through the landscaped gardens. It’s so relaxing you may not want to leave. For information, visit houmashouse.com.

Golden Nugget Grammy-winner Lee Greenwood brings his Holiday Show to Golden Nugget Lake Charles at 8 p.m. Dec. 23 in the Grand Event Center. Guests will enjoy Greenwood’s hits from more than 30 albums as well as festive holiday songs. Tickets are available online at ticketmaster. com or by phone at 1-800745-3000. Tickets can also be purchased at the Golden Nugget Box Office. For a complete list of upcoming performances and to book a stay at the casino resort, visit goldennuggetlc.com.

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Holiday Trail of Lights The Louisiana Holiday Trail of Lights, now in its 25th year, kicks on Nov. 18 with the lighting of the more than 300,000 bulbs and 100 river bank displays in Natchitoches. The eight towns and cities across central and north Louisiana continue the fun through early January and include holidays lights and parades, live music, theater performances, visits from Santa, fun in the Alexandria Zoo and much more. For information on the cities and events, visit holidaytrailoflights.com.

Vernon Parish Cabins Enjoy cabin life in beautiful Vernon Parish. The Lakeview Lodge Landing features cabins, fishing, a fishing pier, boat launch, bait shop, and makes a great burger. Bring the entire family out to the “Big House” with 9 beds. Outdoor life doesn’t have to be sacrificed during cold weather. Visit their website for more information at lakeviewlodgela.com. 3 3 7 M A GA ZIN E.C OM

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Out ‘N’ About Things to do in southwest LA By Heather Salsman GOLDEN NUGGET CASINO RESORT NOVEMBER’S FEATURED ARTISTS:

The Commodores 11/10 Darren Knight’s Comedy Tour 11/11 Pam Tillis, Suzy Bogguss and Terri Clark 11/17 GLADYS KNIGHT 11/18

Jamey Johnson 11/24 Jerry Jeff Walker 11/25

MISTLETOE AND MOSS HOLIDAY MARKET: LAKE CHARLES

Junior League of Lake Charles will be hosting their 25th annual Mistletoe & Moss Holiday Market Nov. 15-18 at the Lake Charles Civic Center. Over 80 vendors will display apparel, jewelry, seasonal decorations and more. Additional information about special events like Ladies Night: Sip and Shop or Cookies with Santa can be found on www.jllc.net. FARMERS MARKET AND SWAP: SULPHUR

Local vendors from the area can showcase their goods like produce, jellies and jams, eggs, breads, sweet, honey, handmade wood items and more! The market will be open from 8 a.m.–noon in the Tractor Supply parking lot (340 West Cal Boulevard) Nov. 11 and Dec. 9.

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CAJUN DANCE LESSONS: LAKE CHARLES

Occurring the third Thursday of every month, visit the Cajun French Music Association building to learn the Two-Step, Cajun Waltz and more! Admission is FREE and lessons begin at 7 p.m. Upcoming lessons are Nov. 17 and Dec. 21. KCS HOLIDAY EXPRESS: DERIDDER, LA

In its 17th annual trip across Kansas City Southern’s (KCS) U.S. rail network, the Holiday Express train is planning to stop in DeRidder (200 S. Jefferson Street) at 4 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28. The sixcar train will bring Santa Claus for a visit with children and offer visual displays inside and out for young and old alike. This event is free and open to the public. Additionally, at each stop, KCS will make a donation to the local Salvation Army. HOLIDAY HOUSE: SULPHUR, LA

Visit the Holiday House hosted by Brimstone Museum in Sulphur, LA. The house at 1211 Ruth St. in The Grove at Holiday Square will be open for viewing from Nov. 30 to Dec. 2. The preview party Nov. 30 will be from 6:30-9:30 p.m. with food, music and a holiday market for $35 a ticket. Visit www.brimstonemuseum.org for more details. 57


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“WINTER COATS” By ISABELLE BERTHELOT

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337 Magazine  
337 Magazine  

Vol.3, Issue 5