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Corporate Responsibility Report 2009

Gateway to solutions


CONTENTS

PAGE

INTRODUCTION

5

STATEMENT BY THE EXECUTIVE BOARD

7

1 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

PROFILE Core business Identity Key economic figures Legal structure Corporate responsibility at a glance

9 9 10 11 11 12

2. 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5

PHILOSOPHY AND STRATEGY Our view on corporate responsibility Added value of corporate responsibility to our business Corporate Responsibility Inside Our vision on the future of corporate responsibility Our future

15 15 16 20 21 23

3. 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4

POLICY From ambition to action Representation and Commitments Corporate responsibility in our strategy Working with dilemmas

25 25 26 27 32

4. 4.1 4.2 4.3

PERFORMANCE Awards and rankings Inside business and innovation Business with integrity

35 35 36 37

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DHV Group

4.4 4.5 4.6

People care Community care Caring operations

41 53 56

5 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5

REPORTING Scope of Report External assurance Data clarification table Glossary and definitions GRI index

63 63 64 68 70 71

6 6.1

COLOPHON Contact details / offices

81 81

DHV Group No part of these specifications/printed matter may be reproduced and/or published by print, photocopy, microfilm or by any other means, without the prior written permission of DHV Group; nor may they be used, without such permission, for any purposes other than that for which they were produced. The quality management system for policymaking and management of the DHV Group has been approved against ISO 9001. Š

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DHV Group

INTRODUCTION

Corporate Responsibility, contributing to the sustainable development of our living environment is one of the key ambitions of the DHV Group. We strive to practice this in our services to clients and in our own operations. It is an integral part of the responsibility that we have to our stakeholders for maintaining a sustainable enterprise. The Group began reporting annually from the perspective of Corporate Responsibility in 2006. We use GRI G3 guidelines and continue to learn about improving the accuracy and transparency of our reporting through practice and dialogue with others. This CR Report has been reviewed by external assurance provider PricewaterhouseCoopers Accountants N.V. (PwC). Please see section 5.1 Scope of Report for further information on the scope of this report. For those readers who would like a brief overview of our CR philosophy, policy and performance, there is a summary booklet, Taking Corporate Responsibility, Highlights 2009. This is available in print and digitally at www.dhvgroup.com/crreport. In addition to this CR Report, please see our Annual Report 2009. The sections “Developments in our Global Network” (pages 18-26) and “Projects, Connect & Deliver” (pages 27-37) illustrate how sustainability is integrated in the Group’s core business. We also make reference to sections of the Annual Report for more detailed company information.

Annual Report 2009

Corporate Responsibility Summary 2009

In recognition of the increased integration of CR and financial performance reporting, we intend to produce a combined report for 2010. We invite you to respond to this report and engage with us in dialogue about related activities, Marga Donehoo, Director Corporate Initiatives Tobias Stöcker, Corporate Responsibility Manager, the Netherlands Mail us at: cr@dhv.com

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DHV Group

STATEMENT BY THE EXECUTIVE BOARD

we do. This provides the base from which we can meaningfully engage with others.

There is a universal climate for change. The economic crisis and increasing impact of climate change have made it plain how intertwined and vulnerable our ecological and economic systems are. If we are to answer the ambitions of the majority of the world’s population for a better life and also address the uncertainties of those who have been more fortunate, then it is time to look for different solutions.

During this past year, the Group has been able to help make a difference through projects, by the individual efforts of our employees and through subscribing to larger movements. We have found ready partners in clients and with professional platforms. Further, we have decided to target a 25% reduction per employee of our CO2 footprint and contribute to wider reductions by compensating to a climate neutral position.

World leaders did not gather in Copenhagen to discuss whether change is necessary, but rather how and how much. Both adaptation and mitigation measures are needed; and economic considerations are a driving factor in the equation. Meanwhile, countries, provinces and cities are mobilizing, setting policies for aspects which they can influence. At a grass roots level, individuals are changing habits to decrease waste. This combination of top down and bottom up is the beginning of a time of real change.

For the future, we look forward to making step changes through technical innovation and especially in partnership with others. We are a company for people from people; our inspiration comes from being able to make a difference. We very much welcome your feedback and opportunities to combine efforts.

Businesses too are active players, through improvements in their operations, by undertaking cooperative initiatives, and by providing services that address negative impacts. Everyone can do something. It is clear that companies have unique opportunities to contribute through their knowledge and ability to move decisively in their spans of control and influence. This is the context in which the DHV Group operates. We believe in taking concrete steps for positive impact, within our own operations and together with others. Our philosophy is 'Corporate Responsibility inside', continuously seeking ways to imbed a positive and sustainable contribution in everything that

Bertrand van Ee (President)

Piet Besselink (Vice President)

Amersfoort, the Netherlands, 21 May 2010

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DHV Group

1

PROFILE

1.1

Core business

The DHV Group is a global provider of consultancy and engineering services in the following markets:     

Transportation Water Building and Industry Spatial Planning and Environment Aviation

The DHV Group is active worldwide through a network of local offices in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North America. Information on specific activities by region is contained on pages 23-26 of our Annual Report 2009. Our major clients are:   

Governments Public Sector and Semi-Government Industry, Commercial Services, Contractors, and Developers International Development Agencies

We offer expertise ranging from environmental impact assessments to full project design, implementation, maintenance, and asset management.

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1.2

Identity

We are an independent employee owned company. Starting in 1917 with our early roots in flood control, post war construction, and development aid, we have continuously worked in fields that touch the basic needs of people and well-being of communities. This heritage is reflected in our respect for people, local conditions, and the living environment. Our key values are integrity, respect, and freedom. These translate to a deep commitment to social responsibility, integrity and accountability. We promote empowerment, coupled with strong personal and professional responsibility. Different perspectives are welcome and we support freedom of thought and action. We believe in the positive impact of international frameworks and principles, and are signatory to the United Nations Global Compact (UN GC) and the Partnering Against Corruption Initiative (PACI) of the World Economic Forum. More details on our profile can be found on our corporate website and on pages 4-5 and 18-22 of our Annual Report 2009.

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DHV consultants received training in Cradle-to-Cradle methodology at EPEA.


DHV Group

1.3

Key economic figures

1.4

The following is an overview of our economic performance. More detailed information is available in our Annual Report 2009. Economic Value retained (€thousands) 2009

2008

2007

480,325

477,314

392,227

Operating costs

238,366

248,210

193,267

Employee wages and benefits

229,746

209,837

186,465

Payments to providers of capital

3,307

3,539

2,170

Payments to government

3,356

5,638

3,156

Community investments*

163

386

360

5,550

10,090

6,809

Staff in headcount

5,497

5,320

4,730

Average full-time equivalents

4,868

4,717

3,986

Legal structure

The legal structure of the DHV Group, including a listing of subsidiaries and joint ventures, is detailed in the Annual Report 2009 in the sections “Participating Interests” (page 66), “Shareholding Structure” (page 67) and our organization chart, “Structure and Management DHV Group” (page 70).

Direct economic value generated Revenues Economic value distributed

Economic value retained Personnel of DHV

* Since our community involvement is primarily organized on a local basis, these totals do not represent all activity. The 2009 figure represents out-ofpocket costs and cash donations. In addition, 3,700 hours of “in kind” support was provided in 2009. In previous years, our investments in kind (labor hours) from SSI had been included in the financial total. This has now been split out for clarity.

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1.5

Corporate responsibility at a glance

Key figures 2009 (2008)

Targets 2009

Accomplishments 2009

Targets 2010

Core business and innovation - Activity in R&D: €19.9 million ( €17.7 million)

Maintain investment in R&D. Increase number of patents. Continue technology transfer. Awards that recognize sustainability.

- 12 patents for existing innovations in new countries. 1 new patent requested for green power and fertilizer from wastewater. - International expertise meetings held for Water, Aviation, Rail, Transit & Transfer and Mining. - SAICE award for Engineering Excellence on Nereda® Gansbaai - Dutch SIKCup for most innovative and cost effective soil remediation management.

- Maintain partnering and own investment in R&D. Increase number of patents. - Continue technology transfer. - Awards that recognize sustainability.

Integrity - BIMS (Business Integrity Management System) cases: 4 (7) - two open

Roll-out Global Code of Business Principles. External audit of BIMS compliance. External whistle blower program

- Business Principles rolled out. - External audit of BIMS and compliance program - External whistle blower program contracted

- Update BIMS in line with audit recommendatio ns - Roll out SpeakUp, external whistle blower program.

Partnerships

Further strengthen account management. Continue CR stakeholder dialogue. Expand participation with select forums.

- Focus on key clients resulted in long term agreements and increased turnover. - Stakeholder dialogue in the Netherlands - Leaders For Nature, Copenhagen Communiqué, Dutch Building Brains, and Green Building Council

- Further strengthen account management. - CR stakeholder dialogue and roundtable discussions

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DHV Group

Key figures 2009 (2008)

Targets 2009

Accomplishments 2009

Targets 2010

Communities - Investment in community projects: • €163,000 (€386,000) • Hours community initiatives: 3,700 (5,770)

More accurate monitoring for our (financial) engagements and to stimulate the link between expertise and philanthropy. Encourage a greater emphasis on building futures and sustainability as appropriate to the local context.

- Education and community involvement adopted by multiple entities. SSI Saturday School in five South African cities. Mentoring and "Pet'je af" in the Netherlands. - "Plakkies" collaboration of South Africa and Netherlands.

- Expand investment, on education and capacity building to more operations.

People management - Jobs created: -16 (372) - Staff covered by career development programs: 67 % (64%) - Avg. training hours per FTE: 37 (39) - Female workforce: 28% (29 %) - LTI cases/200,00 0 hours: 0.4 (0.2)

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Improve retention of staff Use career planning and development to grow capabilities Establish HR network and Community of Practice.

- Cross assignments and internal projects mitigate lower workload in parts of the company. - Improved retention not achieved, ratio of outflow increased by 1% to 20% - Executive Development Program 3 conducted. - HR network and CoP established, HR manual of the DHV Group updated. - Talent to the Top program in Netherlands increased attention to % of women in leadership positions.

- Increase (international) cross assignments - Increase % of women in leadership positions. - Launch Management Development Program

Our operations - Green electricity: 41% (38 %) - Avg. CO2 footprint/FTE: 2,910 kg (3,115 kg) - Avg. paper/FTE: 31 kg (52 kg)

Establish target and plan for CO2 reduction. Continue revision of Dutch procurement policy. Share learning between locations.

- Policy and target set for 25% reduction per FTE versus 2008 by 2015. - Commitment to compensate to climate neutral - CR taken into Procurement discussions - New office in Portugal and renovations on HQ significantly improve environmental impact. - DHV, Intervistas, Delcan meet to develop greenhouse strategy.

- Translate reduction targets to business plans.

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Key figures 2009 (2008)

Targets 2009

Accomplishments 2009

Targets 2010

Reporting and Transparency - CR Report ranked #18 (16) of 183 (146) and #1 (#1) in the services sector by the transparency benchmark of the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs.

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- Improved coverage and accuracy of Planet data - CR program for projects and operations launched by SSI in South Africa. - External audit of CR reporting process at 2 largest entities, DHV Netherlands and SSI. - CR reporting discussed at Finance and Control annual meeting.

- Improve accur acy of CR reporting system. - Establish CR Committee at senior management level.

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Improve accuracy of CR reporting and provide more interim feedback to stimulate action.


DHV Group

2.

PHILOSOPHY AND STRATEGY

2.1

Our view on corporate responsibility

Our view on corporate responsibility is that we are part of the global living environment and have an obligation to make a positive contribution. The focus on sustainable development is central to our mission. We see this as a commitment to future generations, as well as to the stakeholders of today. “Our mission is to provide multidisciplinary services for the sustainable development of our living environment, in close relationship with clients, employees and partners, based on mutual loyalty, while providing a solid return to our shareholders.�

How we conduct our business, with fair process and integrity, also has a large impact on communities. Therefore, we pay special attention to Business Integrity in our behavior and supply chain of clients, contractors, partners and agencies. From an environmental perspective, we seek continuous improvement through our facilities, travel policies and arrangements, purchase of more sustainable products and by waste minimization. For our clients, we also strive to support their supply chain ambitions with sustainable solutions and transparent reporting. Showcase project

It has been our experience that taking a collaborative approach is a good path to sustainability. Integrating stakeholders early in the process and embracing local considerations often generates more practical and longer lasting solutions. This is reflected in our company business model, local delivery of world-class solutions . Our work has an impact on people and communities where our clients undertake their projects. For example, in addition to the direct users, work on infrastructure or water systems has enormous impact on people living close by. We work closely with our clients to appropriately engage stakeholders in the course of projects.

Corporate Responsibility in social housing SSI is supporting an emergency social housing program in the Eden district of the Southern Cape Province. The project involves the repair and renovation of 910 houses, under difficult conditions. At its own initiative and cost, SSI hired an advisory Environmental Control Officer (ECO) and social workers to prevent unnecessary damage to the environment and to maintain contact with the residents, who have either lost their homes or are waiting for repairs. In this way, SSI recognizes the feelings of individuals and takes on a responsibility for the wider success of this project.

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2.2

Added value of corporate responsibility to our business

A focus on corporate responsibility adds value to our business in several ways. The demand for sustainable solutions increases the market for our services and technologies. In addition, as more and varied companies commit to sustainability, this increases the opportunities to work together and innovate. We benefit from a focus on transparency and integrity, which provides a better internal and external business environment. Internally, our focus on sustainability strengthens the ability to retain talent, is a catalyst for creativity and generates cost savings through e.g. energy savings. Opportunities in the market The demand for sustainable solutions and the resolve of governments to provide a stimulus in this direction has continued to grow despite the world economic crisis. In developed western economies, we see a focus on optimization. Elsewhere, there is leapfrogging through embracing clean technology for new developments and in large scale projects. Further, the consequences of climate change are becoming harsher, with the heaviest impact often on the poorest communities. Finally, there is the strong trend towards urbanization and mega-cities. These factors create a number of different opportunities for the DHV Group. Mobility, climate change (especially involving water) and urban development are areas in which we have much to offer. The biggest impact we can make is through a combination of technology, infrastructure and social solutions. Examples of our multi-disciplinary solutions include mega eco-cities, multimodal transportation hubs, and asset management for cities and industrial parks.

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On the other hand, simple solutions, scaled to local capacity in a way that is repeatable, are also a success. This includes a program for 16 schools in Gauteng, South Africa and the World Bank’s Water and Sanitation program in Indonesia. Showcase project Innovative program to tackle sanitation crisis Barely 1% of the Indonesian population has access to sewerage. Many households discharge into open drains and waterways. The World Bank's Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) commissioned DHV and associates to work hand in hand with Government to develop an innovative strategy that enables local governments to develop their own action and implementation programs for solving the urban sanitation crisis. The multi-disciplinary DHV teams have been successfully supporting local governments in 12 towns and 3 provinces with facilitation, capacity building and needs assessment. In 2010 this ‘Urban Sanitation Development Project’ will be extended to develop sanitation strategies and manage studies, designs and construction supervision services for wastewater, urban drainage, and solid waste in 80 cities.


DHV Group

Stimulating innovation The drive for sustainability is stimulating more parties to work together and jointly share risks as well as opportunities. As an example, DHV’s innovative biological wastewater treatment technology, NeredaŽ is a fruitful cooperation with research foundation STOWA, six Water Boards in the Netherlands and Delft University of Technology. In addition, clients in South Africa and Portugal have supported demo facilities to test scale-up and operations in different environments. We believe that game changing innovation is taking place all over the world. Tomorrow is happening somewhere, today. Examples of applying different approaches to increase sustainability include nature driven design and the Cradle to Cradle philosophy.

Showcase project Nature driven design, building with nature: a new global answer to climate change Exploring the potential for natural solutions in two very different situations. Marshland creation, New Orleans, USA. Louisiana’s coastline is slowly disappearing into the Gulf of Mexico as salt water is flowing further inland, killing the plants that hold together the marshlands. In response, DHV and its partners have piloted a method for marshland creation in the Mississippi Delta, based on Dutch land reclamation techniques. Extreme aridity in Canghzou, China, t he threat of acute fresh water shortages and sea water intrusion has made water a critical concern in the region. Under DHV project management, an

Showcase project Reusable parking garage

integrated water management plan has been developed to achieve ecological balance,

A lack of temporary parking space can

retain rain water, restore groundwater balance, and protect the wetland, while

present a big problem - for example in urban renewal areas. DHV has developed for

sustaining economic activity in the area.

PARK4ALL Inc a demountable parking garage: it is a super-light construction with fiberglass-composite floors. This structural engineering innovation requires no foundation, so that the garages can be set up

As a company, we are challenged to innovate ourselves, but also to identify and partner with new front running innovators. This is an important point of attention, which we intend to pursue more actively in different regions.

literally anywhere. All the materials used are reusable, and since PARK4ALL takes back the garages after use, they are truly sustainable. The first demountable parking garage began operating in January in the Dutch city of Purmerend.

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Promotion of integrity Integrity issues have an enormous impact on the lives of people, the functioning of economies and also the environment. The nature of much of our work, civil projects with multiple stakeholders, often in the public arena, and frequently with direct environmental and social consequences makes it especially important to be vigilant. This is not only true for our employees, but also with clients, partners, agencies and other external stakeholders. It is a critical part of corporate responsibility in our supply chain. The DHV Group applies a zero tolerance policy that is assured through our Business Integrity Management System (BIMS) and supporting compliance programs. This has an impact on where and how we choose to operate. Even though the choices present dilemmas and possible loss of business, greater transparency leads to a more level playing field and reduces risks. We are seeing an increased support for this position and believe it strengthens the ability to be a reliable partner.

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DHV Group

Quest for talent Employee engagement is essential to excelling in the type of work that we do. This is particularly important given the shortage of resources and high turnover rate in a number of regions. Being able to contribute to communities and the environment is a strong motivator for many working at the DHV Group.

The DHV Group aspires to be an employer of choice, differentiating through an engaging work environment that offers ample opportunity for creativity, personal initiative and enterprise. Tracking our progress through CR measurements helps benchmark across the company and to keep attention on career development, retention, internal promotion, diversity, and training.

Young internationals from across the company gather to discuss strategy.

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2.3

Corporate Responsibility Inside

Our vision is to achieve “Corporate Responsibility inside”, embracing this as a natural and integrated part of everything that we do. We emphasize sustainable development in terms of people, planet and profit. This is put into practice in the following aspects of our business:    

Core business: the choices of what we do, where, with whom and how Specialized services: part of our core business, with specific expertise in environmental and sustainability services for our clients Operations: CR in our own operations Community: building futures through education and capacity building, and enhancing environmental sustainability.

How we approach these is explained in greater detail throughout this document, such as section 3.1 “From ambition to action”. In some areas we are well on our way, as illustrated in the show case projects featured in this report. Our employees are strong proponents of CR, as evidenced by direct statements from colleagues around the world and explained in section 3.3 “Corporate responsibility in our strategy, Impact of stakeholders on strategy”. We have a way to go in terms of quantification and structure, but see a positive trend in most scores that relate to our operations and are improving in coverage and accuracy. We will continue to work on improving these, staying close to our core business, soliciting advice from independent assessors, and making choices in order to invest effort where it brings most value. Shared expertise boosts specialized sustainability services.

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DHV Group

2.4 Our vision on the future of corporate responsibility We believe that the future will present a broad pallet of challenges. The focus on emissions will continue and sharpen. New facilities increasingly incorporate sustainability aspects and our clients face complex challenges in upgrading and better use of existing infrastructure. Mobility and alternatives to physical travel will look primarily to technical solutions, while other challenges lend themselves more to incorporating natural processes. Different aspects of sustainability, like millennium development goals regarding clean water, education, poverty reduction and health will become increasingly critical and where possible a part of project scope. Political and socio-economic considerations are becoming more explicit, and there is a greater expectation that all parties contribute to the improvement of living standards and sound environmental stewardship. The biggest global challenge which we foresee is around water. Whereas flooding is now making headlines, the progressive lack of clean water is a major concern. Current efforts to clean rivers, improve sanitation and advances in water treatment are a good start, but not enough. A multi-tiered commitment is needed. The paradox of water is that it is both plentiful and scarce. While it is there, people believe that it is a natural gift, which replenishes itself and should be free. When it is gone, there is no substitute. We believe that greater awareness and managing of the “water footprint” by stakeholders are essential. The consultancy and engineering sector has a unique opportunity to make positive contributions to the sustainable development of our living environment. This is increasingly being recognized and addressed not only

in individual company ambitions, but also as a sector. For example, NLingenieurs, the Dutch association of consulting engineers, addresses themes such as Climate Change and education, and the Dutch Water sector bundles its expertise for global issues. CESA, Consulting Engineers of South Africa, has a special focus on development of young talent in addition to engineering excellence. Working together with national governments and municipalities, we can make a substantial difference in finding and implementing new solutions. Showcase project Cradle to Cradle sanitation The Dutch city of Almere is becoming one of the fastest growing urban areas in Europe. To accommodate this development, Almere has formulated ambitious goals based on the Cradle to Cradle philosophy, with an emphasis on improving public health and the environment. The city and the Waterboard Zuiderzeeland asked DHV to apply Cradle to Cradle principles to develop a vision for the city’s future sustainable sanitation system – this vision will be translated into several concrete solutions. A good understanding of the Cradle to Cradle philosophy as well as an integrated approach were significant factors in selecting DHV.

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Risks At a macro level, climate crises and prolonged economic pressure pose a distinct risk to Corporate Responsibility. Governments , who are essential partners in creating the context for sustainability, are dealing with deficits and could become less able to support initiatives at home and in developing nations. In addition, resource shortages and overcrowding in cities can create political and social instability, which also impacts CR. Lastly, continued investment in Research and Development is required, which is also at risk due to immediate economic priorities. Fortunately, there seems to be an understanding and growing conviction at national levels that such investment is necessary. For specific projects, environmental and social considerations are often complex, with many different stakeholders and agendas. This impacts the start and progress of projects. Stakeholder dialogue, transparency and balancing expectations are essential to enabling sustainable development. This is even more difficult in a stressed situation that touches on basic needs. The above risks apply directly to the DHV Group and we must remain alert to changes and pressures on our stakeholders. In order to anticipate and mitigate such risks, we focus on our home countries where we better understand the context, and can work with communities. We do not enter into projects with high political uncertainty or low level of integrity. An evaluation of this is imbedded in our Tender Board procedure. We actively invest in innovation that is related to sustainability and apply our influence through related platforms.

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Showcase project Creative and cost-saving maintenance of soil remediation People living near the Griftpark in downtown Utrecht are happy with their park. Previously occupied by a gasworks, the site was a notorious source of soil contamination inherited from the last century. In 2003, an extensive soil remediation program was completed. To deal with the subsequent ‘ever-lasting maintenance’ the municipality of Utrecht selected DHV’s value added approach, where-in payment is based on sharing cost savings. The municipality, DHV, and contractor Mourik were awarded the SIK Cup 2009 for this maintenance project, as the best team with the most innovative and cost-saving approach to soil-remediation maintenance with benefits including annual energy-savings amounting to 250,000 euros. The jury took special note of the good cooperation between the team and the surrounding community.


DHV Group

2.5

Our future

The market outlook for the DHV Group remains positive, both in terms of market focus and regional presence. Major trends such as climate change, the further growth of mega-cities and the demand for natural resources provides opportunities in environment, urban planning, transportation, and water markets. We will continue to strengthen our expertise profiles in these areas and to contribute to global sustainability through innovation and by working with others. Our goals During 2009 we set a number of targets that support our philosophy of CR Inside. For the Group we set a target for 25% CO2 reduction per FTE versus 2008 by 2015. In the Netherlands we are targeting an increase to 20% by 2013 of women in leadership positions to support diversity and in South Africa we have set project targets for investment in Corporate Responsibility. As in previous years, we target for a top 25% placing in the Transparency Benchmark of the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs.

What is my personal passion in contributing to my living environment or in my work?

“The absolute necessity to reduce the environmental footprint of our transportation systems in order to allow my children's generation to enjoy traveling and meet with other cultures.�

Rik Krabbenda m, NACO, Direc tor* * In 2009 Rik served as technical advisor to the GRI working group for developing the airport sector supplement. NACO will design its first LEED certified airport in 2010, minimizing environmental impacts during the full cycle of construction, operation and re-use.

Our goals for the next years related to corporate responsibility are to continue and accelerate the initiatives that we have begun. We will place special emphasis on sustainable innovation in areas of Water and Transportation. The emphasis will be on local needs and initiatives within the overall company framework. Specific goals for 2010 are stated in 1.5 Corporate Responsibility at a glance.

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DHV Group

3. POLICY 3.1 From ambition to action To guide our efforts, the DHV Group has formulated ambitions, which we translate into policy, strategy and business development: Business: We partner with our clients and business partners, and take a leading role in sustainability issues within our industry. Our greatest contribution is achieved through our projects.  We invest in developing sustainability related technology and employee capabilities.  We apply a zero tolerance policy towards corruption.  We provide tools and training for our employees to support them in recognizing opportunities and threats for sustainable change.  We stimulate opportunities to combine sustainability and profitability. Dialogue: We are in dialogue with internal and external stakeholders and increasingly place CR on the agenda. We are positive towards requests for cooperation and membership in thirdparty initiatives that promote sustainability. Participation is assessed in terms of social and ecological merits and alignment with our core business. We accept the feedback from our stakeholders as an important input for our decision making, and incorporate their views in determining our strategy. We continuously seek to increase involvement inside and outside the company.

People: In the sphere of social and personal interaction, we emphasize our core values of respect, integrity and freedom.  We believe that personal attention, development opportunities and a climate for sustainable enterprise are key to our success.  We promote a culture of openness and teamwork.  We value and seek to increase diversity in our dialogue and decision making process.  Under no circumstances will the DHV Group use child or forced labor nor participate in projects in which other parties do. Operations: In our policies for our own operations such as business travel and offices we strive to decrease negative environmental impact and pursue continuous performance improvement.  We strive to achieve positive environmental impact and establish measurable targets.  We stimulate energy efficiency in our housing and mobility policies.  We seek opportunities for supply chain improvement. Communities: We strive to understand mutual dependencies and commit to making a positive impact on our communities and environment.  We do not act in ways that knowingly cause harm.  Non-profit activities concentrate on “Building Futures”, our engagement for educational and economic development.

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3.2

Representation and Commitments

The DHV Group participates at committee and advisory level in national and international industry organizations, consultation platforms, employers’ organizations, Chambers of Commerce, associations and knowledge institutes. In this way, we area able to maintain close ties between the company and the societal arena. This is extremely important to remaining abreast of issues facing the world and to identifying opportunities to act. A list of the memberships and appointments held by the members of the Executive Board and senior management is available on our corporate website. Numerous staff members, at all levels and in all divisions of the DHV Group, are similarly involved in such external activities. We consider a range of international frameworks and principles as important impulses for the positive development of the world’s economy, ecology and social and cultural structures. The list below contains those which we regard as having the greatest impact on the Group’s business: The UN Global Compact – The DHV Group is signatory to the UN Global Compact since 2008. We advocate the ten principles on Human Rights, Labor Standards, Environment and Anti-corruption as an important guideline for our business conduct. We undertake to integrate these principles, including a precautionary approach to environmental challenges, in our policy, strategy and business decisions. PACI Principles for Countering Bribery – Partnering Against Corruption Initiative (PACI) is a business driven effort to combat global corruption. The

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DHV Group is a PACI signatory, advocating a zero tolerance policy towards bribery and an effective program implementation. The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) – is a valuable international guideline to structure sustainability reporting in a way that helps to create a comparable and adequate reporting standard. We employ the third generation (G3) guidelines to our own CR report and are an organizational stakeholder of GRI. The guidelines for multinational enterprises of the OECD – we conform to the guidelines for business conduct in international operations. The Millennium Development Goals – the goals are an important target for the world society to achieve a sustainable future. Through our projects and business conduct, we contribute to the achievement of multiple goals, e.g. a sustainable environment, drinking water and a global partnership for development. The conventions of the International Labor Organization – amongst other objectives, we subscribe to the promotion of decent work for all, the freedom to collective bargaining and the ban on child and forced labor. Related initiatives - In addition to supporting the frameworks and principles listed above, we also selectively support related initiatives. In 2009, we signed the Copenhagen Communiqué and joined a small group of business leaders to call on the Dutch government to take real and substantive action to cut CO 2 emissions by investing in clean energy, cleaner transportation, sustainable buildings and new techniques such as carbon capture and storage.


DHV Group

3.3 Corporate responsibility in our strategy

In line with our philosophy of local delivery of world-class solutions, specific CR programs are established locally, within an overall company framework. The following elements are organized from a Group perspective:

Strategic intent – The internal Corporate Policy Paper (CPP) articulates the vision, mission and strategy of the DHV Group. Leadership in Corporate responsibility is named as one of the key objectives. Our long-term goal is to achieve “Corporate Responsibility Inside”, making CR an integral part of our regular business. The “tone is set at the top,” the implementation is through the business lines.

The Business Integrity Management System framework and the accompanying compliance program. Quantitative and qualitative reporting from the entities through the quarterly financial reporting process. The information that is requested is a selection of GRI criteria, and is centrally validated, evaluated and reported to management Overall education and dialogue related to corporate responsibility and sustainable development, e.g. through the Executive Development Program, the International Management Meeting and news bulletins Sharing of best practices, such as basic implementation tools and project examples.

We find that Corporate Responsibility and making the most meaningful contribution beyond good business hygiene is very much a local issue. For example, South Africa focuses on education and capacity building, the Netherlands emphasizes the environment and work life balance, China concentrates on tying sustainability to economic development, and our colleagues in India regularly create micro businesses while doing projects. We all learn from each other and have the freedom to concentrate on what is most valuable in a particular context.

- 27 -


Impact of stakeholders on strategy Our stakeholders include public and private sector clients, employees and business partners, (internal) investors, governments of countries in which we work, and society at large. The latter is often represented by nongovernmental organizations (NGO) in the areas of communities, transparency and the environment. Our stakeholders expect clarity, commitment and transparency as a basis, and seek added value from us through innovation and simplicity in implementation. In our work, we often engage clients’ stakeholders in the context of the projects we execute. Starting point for strategy on corporate responsibility Our formal approach to corporate responsibility was in response to a 2005 staff survey among Netherlands personnel. This indicated that many felt strongly about sustainability and recommended a formal program to in crease awareness. In 2007 we expanded the dialogue in our global operations. Since then, corporate responsibility has been clearly stated as one of the leading ambitions of the Group. It is discussed at each International Management Meeting. Larger operations such as DHV in the Netherlands and SSI in South Africa have established their respective programs. These are aligned with the overall corporate framework. The passion for CR and emphasis on a balance of people, planet, and profit was once again confirmed in 2009, through input from across the company as we developed the new DHV Group Strategy Paper, Vision 2015. This included members of the Young organizations, a new group of Executive Development Program participants and several business management teams. Vision 2015 will be issued in April 2010.

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Engaging our internal stakeholders The DHV Group is employee-owned, indirectly through the primary shareholder, the DHV Foundation, and directly through the DHV Group Employee Share Plan. Investment in the company is viewed as a long term commitment to a healthy operation, earned through activities consistent with the company’s mission. In addition to this economic voice, staff has a voice in policy development. Staff engages in direct dialogue with line management and CR management .

“As a human being, it is my profound conviction that we have to care for the world we are living in.”

Jerr i Wu, DHV Shang hai, Coast al Developme nt Unit Mana ger


DHV Group

External feedback We also incorporate external input into our corporate responsibility strategy. Cooperation with other parties in projects and participation in associations and networks helps keep us informed about expectations of the outside world. Staff members participate in numerous external organizations and thereby maintain ongoing dialogue with external networks. We are active in organizing platforms such as the Dutch National Sustainability Congress, now in its 10th year, and round table discussions on related topics. We participate in organizations such as the Dutch Green Building Council and Leaders for Nature. In 2008 we began conducting structured stakeholder dialogue in the Netherlands with clients, financial partners, universities, NGO’s and government. Results of the dialogue were shared with the management team. Our stakeholders were positive about the initiative to open explicit and transparent dialogue. To some we are known to be an active player in the CR field, mainly through the activities of our sustainability business units. We share a common concern for addressing emissions, energy and mobility issues, confirming to us that our climate strategy answers to the needs of our stakeholders.

Clients also tell us that our emphasis on integrity is valuable. Specific recommendations from stakeholders included the following, which we have taken to heart:  Make clear what your CR Vision is, including concrete objectives.  Hold on to CR in the tough times, it is for the long term  Discuss CR at high level  Integrate CR in your advisory business  Be open and transparent about your dilemmas  Make sure your own operations are okay  Report in an accessible and clear manner.

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Management approach The management of corporate responsibility is a part of the regular management structure within the DHV Group as described under the following heading Corporate governance. The structure of our management approach is illustrated below. The corporate strategy paper, known as the Corporate Policy Paper (CPP), sets the direction. The foundation is provided by our Mission, with the Business Framework and Business Principles respectively providing the hard and soft controls.

The CPP outlines the DHV Group strategic plans for the coming five years and is the responsibility of the Executive Board. The Executive Council is consulted in the preparation of the CPP and it is approved by the Supervisory Board. The CPP is presented and discussed during the annual International Management Meeting (IMM). The IMM consists of the top management of the DHV Group and is chaired by the EB. Corporate governance The Executive Board (EB) and Supervisory Board (SB) of DHV Holding B.V. are guided by the principles and best practice provisions of the Dutch corporate governance code. The management of the DHV Group is the responsibility of the EB. This includes responsibility for formulating and implementing corporate objectives and strategy, and for resulting policy and financial performance. Ongoing matters, strategy, goals and policy are further reviewed with the SB, which consists of external members. Major strategic and organizational issues are decided through shareholders meetings. The EB is selected on its ability to perform their responsibilities as outlined above. They are evaluated on their accomplishments, skills and expertise with which they lead the DHV Group. Their knowledge and involvement with corporate responsibility is part of this, as our CR policy and performance influences the Group’s ability to deliver sustainable solutions in a responsible way. The DHV Group has adopted a decentralized organizational structure in order to enhance its responsiveness to specific client needs. The Group is organized in four Business Groups and four Regions where we maintain a

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DHV Group

permanent presence. The Business Groups have a primary responsibility for developing and maintaining expertise positions, while the four Regions focus on relationships and local delivery. Profit and loss responsibility is at the Business Unit/Country level. This management approach is applied to all facets of the DHV Group operations, incorporating Corporate Responsibility on all levels. (See our corporate website for our organizational chart) The determination of product (service) requirements is a joint responsibility between the Business Groups and the Regions. The Business Groups have the primary responsibility for developing and maintaining these as appropriate to their expertise positions. The Regions advise on local adaptation and implementation. The Executive Council (EC) consists of the directors of the Business Groups and Regions as well as the staff directors of Finance and Control, and Corporate Initiatives. It is led by the EB and acts as an extension of the EB in formulating and implementing policy. All members of the Executive Board and Executive Council have Corporate Responsibility as a performance indicator in their personal appraisals. Organizational responsibility Organizational responsibility in all facets, Economic, Environmental, Labor, Human Rights, Society and Product Responsibility is through the hierarchy. The Executive Board makes appointments at the Executive Council (EC) level. The EC jointly determine managerial appointments at the subsequent, Unit Director, level. A particular focus is given to Management Development across Business Groups and Regions as well as to diversity. EC Committees, reporting to the EC and chaired by an EC member are

established to address specific Group wide topics. Technology, BIMS, and DHV University.

These include:

Managers of similar functions are encouraged to network in order to share best practices and harmonize approaches. In addition, taskforces are periodically established to further corporate initiatives such as a Global Knowledge Broker network to enhance knowledge sharing. Corporate Responsibility is a line responsibility, within the framework set at the Executive Council, and led by the Director of Corporate Initiatives. CR reporting is part of the financial reporting structure provided by the centralized Finance and Control organization. Business Group. Regional controllers are appointed by the Director of Finance and Control, to whom they report functionally and in a direct hierarchical line. The controllers provide operational support and reporting to the units that they serve. Monitoring Monitoring in all facets, Economic, Environmental, Labor, Human Rights, Society and Product Responsibility takes place along organizational lines, augmented by audits and management visits. Reporting of performance is on a quarterly basis, through the financial reporting cycle. As mentioned previously, both financial and CR reporting is prepared through the controller organization. Business Group and Region directors discuss quarterly reports with the Executive Board. The Executive Board submits and discusses the DHV Group’s quarterly report with the Supervisory Board. For additional information on corporate http://www.dhvgroup.com/corporategovernance.

governance

see

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3.4 Working with dilemmas Dilemmas are inherent to our business operations. For the DHV Group these dilemmas generally entail whether or not to participate in a project due to questions of integrity, negative impact to society or the environment, or (perceived) conflicts of interests. Cases are evaluated on an individual basis, within the framework of our BIMS framework and the Tender Board Procedure.

Perceived conflicts of interest can arise when we perform work in an advisory role, for example to governmental authorities and wish to later provide services or technology in the execution phase. We strive to be open and transparent in our involvement and future objectives. This requires dialogue, directly or through professional associations. In daily operations, conflicts of interest are also prevented by our observance of secrecy agreements, internally as well as externally. The following cases illustrate some recent dilemmas. 1.

When such conflicts are anticipated, management dialogue is triggered at the tendering phase through the Tender Board procedure. The dialogue is first raised at the business unit and regional level, and is escalated in line with the Authority Matrix. As a general rule, the DHV Group avoids operations in countries where integrity abuse exists to the extent that it precludes the successful completion of services, presents a danger to personnel, or where our work would result in negative consequences in terms of people and planet. When operating in countries where there is a known pattern of corruption or abuse, we are selective in the work that we take on and parties with whom we work, identifying niches where we believe we can contribute to greater sustainability and perform our work keeping to integrity standards defined in our Business Integrity Management System. For example, we are involved with water projects and urban planning in countries that may be considered repressive regimes. We believe that our activities in these can make a positive contribution to local communities and the environment. In situations such as these, we keep in close dialogue with our employees.

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The Netherlands Ministry of Public Works and Water Management has set a policy designed to avoid conflicts of interest in infrastructure projects. DHV developed an internal policy that is in line with this approach, essentially making the choice per project, whether to pursue a role as a member of the government (client) team or as part of a private consortium. For some projects, it would be possible to switch at the completion of a phase, e.g. after a planning study, if all documents were made open to the public. In such an event, DHV would still make a detailed plan, indicating who saw what and ensuring that appropriate confidentiality measures are in place. In general, this works well. However, sometimes the dividing line is not as clear, because the client wishes to exchange knowledge between projects. In one particular case, DHV was on the client’s team for a Design-BuildFinance-Maintain (DBFM) project, which was running ahead of a second project, in which DHV was part of a private consortium. The desire to share information between the projects was not known until a later stage. This created a problem for DHV. DHV alerted the client to the gap in the policy via the Dutch Association of


DHV Group

Engineers and the issue was eventually resolved with the client. However, the private contractor was not comfortable with this arrangement and terminated the association. If DHV had known about this earlier, it would have pursued a role with the client on the second project as well. 2.

NACO management was confronted with the dilemma to accept a project knowing that it required a short visit to the “war zone� in Afghanistan. From the staffing point of view, there was no real problem. Suitable candidates volunteered for this project. Two of the three candidates had been in the army in the past and realized the potential danger. The third candidate was a senior wellexperienced engineer with experience in similar situations. At first, the Management Team decided not to submit a proposal due to the potential personal risks for staff and substantial risk for the company in case of fatalities. In communicating this decision to the parties involved, a dialogue began in which the client assured NACO that the personal risk was minimal and indicated that the importance for NACO and the Netherlands was high. Options were subsequently explored to maximize the protection: reducing the duration of the stay in the critical region, means of travel, etc. This discussion re-opened the talks in the Management Team and additional personal insurance was also investigated. Analyzing the personal risks, the protection offered by client and Dutch government, a go-ahead was given. The eagerness and willingness of the NACO staff to travel to this area helped to take a positive

decision. The families of the NACO employees, NACO Legal and the NACO Works Council were involved in this decision process. After the go-ahead the proposal was accepted and the first phase positively concluded. The next phase of the project, without visit to the site, was also awarded to NACO. 3.

DHV was approached about a product which could be applied in its projects. The company offered DHV a share of the revenues resulting from the use of the product due to DHV's recommendation. The dilemma was whether this is contrary to our obligation to offer our clients independent advice. The DHV unit which had been approached explored various options in which it could be transparent about its role and the fact that it had an interest in recovering a fee. If the customer wanted the product on that basis, then there would be no conflict of interest. However, checking with other units in the company, it was determined that there could be issues in two respects: a.

There are other makers/users of the product with whom DHV would want to do business and exclusivity with the company would cause problems;

b.

Other units wanted to be able to recommend the products as independent advisor to clients and felt that clients would not understand that another DHV unit is acting as contractor or supplier of the product. DHV declined the relationship with the

- 33 -


product producer, as it seemed that transparency would not prevent negative external perception. In these examples we do not name external parties, however believe that through actions such as these and openness with those involved, we not only maintain our independent position, but also help improve the overall approach to dilemmas.

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DHV Group

4. 4.1

PERFORMANCE Awards and rankings

In 2009 we received several awards, which underscore our expertise positions and drive for sustainability. Among others:  SSI wins Consulting Engineering South Africa Award for Mentoring Company of the Year.  DHV and partners win urban planning award with their visionary “Turning Tide, “City of Water” entry, the Netherlands.  DHV wins design award for energy neutral industrial sites using biogas systems and solar panels.  DHV wins annual prize from the Dutch Amstel, Gooi and Vecht Water Board for “Sustaenergy- Green Gas” innovation.  NACO wins The Hague Entrepreneurship Award  SSI wins SAICE Award for the Gaansbaai Waste Water Treatment Works upgrade using Nereda® sewage treatment.  DSM Campus Beijing receives one of the first Gold LEED certificates in China, DHV’s first Gold LEED facility.  DHV wins Passive Building Award with a renovation project

A selection of related rankings and scores **: 2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

Top 200 International Design Firms

*

39

44

41

42

Top 150 Global Design Firms

*

55

56

58

61

The Swedish Association of Architects

*

21

22

19

28

24

24

26

22

29

*

67

73

45

51

*

9.0

8.0

8.2

6.0

Engineering News-Record

and Consulting Engineers (STD): The top 300 European Consulting Engineering and Architectural groups Dutch engineering weekly “Technisch weekblad”: Top Dutch companies' R&D investments Transparency Benchmark of the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs; for the CR Report. Score out of 100 points = 18th place of 183 participants Scenter research score out of 10 rd

points = shared 3 place out of 91 annual reports of Dutch companies reviewed for transparency of policy. * ranking not yet available ** For purposes of comparison, rankings in this table are shown in the year to which the company data relates versus the release dates or report titles of the issuer.

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4.2

Inside business and innovation Showcase project

Accomplishments and challenges 2009 As illustrated in our Annual Report, there are many examples of incorporating sustainability in our core business. Our challenge is to leverage the activities and learning from individual projects, and also to promote a consistent approach in assessing opportunities for sustainability and evaluating the implementation. To support our professionals, we have developed a methodology for evaluating the degree of sustainability in our projects. Three related training sessions were conducted in 2009. A supporting transparency tool, SDHV (Sustainable DHV), is available online. The tool functions as a guideline to strengthen attention to sustainability. Sustainable innovation Innovation is a key aspect of the DHV Group’s services, as evidenced by the type of contracts we perform as well as by the industry awards which we win. In 2009 all major operating brands won prestigious awards, examples can be found above in section 4 .1 “awards and rankings”. DHV Group companies are involved with technical Research and Development. In 2009, DHV requested 12 registrations of exiting patents in new countries, primarily for sustainability related innovations. In addition, we registered one new patent for technology to harvest green power and fertilizer from waste water. Our R&D activity increased from €17.7 million in 2008 to an estimated €19.9 million in 2009 (whereof €10.3 million in the Netherlands). DHV was ranked by the Dutch engineering weekly “Technisch Weekblad” at number 24 and second in the engineering sector in 2009 in the listing of Dutch R&D companies.

- 36 -

High Rate Algae Ponding (HRAP) In 2009, DHV and SSI concluded a CR project with the scientific institute EBRU, Rhodes University (Grahamstown SA). The collaboration brought together over 10 years of experience with cultivation of algae and expert knowledge of waste water treatment. It resulted in a robust, natural process for waste water treatment with several secondary benefits. The HRAP systems consist of a simple facultative pond and a sequence of algae ponds. Domestic and industrial waste water is converted to algal biomass that can serve as fertilizer, biogas source or for other applications. The effluent is directly fit for irrigation. Sustainability aspects include: low cost, low tech, low maintenance, no chemicals, good water, biomass production (algae) for fertilizer of biogas use, low-skilled employment creation = chance to implement in rural areas with supportive functions for e.g. community gardens. HRAP is ideal for locations with plenty of space and sun. The project started through cooperation between Aqua4all, UNEP WIO-Lap and DHV. The parties are now actively introducing HRAP into the SA market.


DHV Group

4.3

Business with integrity

Our overall policy for Labor, Human Rights, and Society is guided by principles established in the Corporate Policy Paper, Business Principles and the Business Integrity Management System (BIMS). Our management approach is best illustrated by the extract from our Business Principles, which explains our company values. The DHV Group applies a structured approach to integrity in business practices. Our business integrity policy covers a wide array of aspects from corruption, fraud and conflict of interest, to a whistleblower scheme for business integrity violations and discrimination. The application and management of our Business Integrity Management System (BIMS) is the concrete implementation of this sustainable economic and moral compass. All Group companies are required to apply BIMS. Appropriate implementation is determined at the country level, with regional oversight. DHV Business Groups and Regions report quarterly on integrity issues. All employees must adhere to those principles and line management is responsible for a proper implementation in business processes. Standard BIMS integrity clauses for partner contracts and the Project Integrity Risk Indicator have been developed to provide guidance. This process is overseen by the Compliance Officer who reports on this to the DHV Group President and has a direct line to the Supervisory Board. The Group Compliance Officer is assisted by the Compliance Team and maintains a network with local Compliance Officers who may be appointed to provide guidance and assurance at a local level. This network will be expanded internationally in 2010.

Our Key Values Our key values, Integrity, Respect and Freedom are at the heart of our business. Together they create an environment of which we can be proud and where people can enjoy their work. Integrity Integrity is the basis for trust from our clients and trust within the company. We strive to uphold the highest professional standards, provide sound solutions and avoid conflicts of interest. We respect the letter and spirit of applicable national and international legislation and regulations. The DHV Group has a zero tolerance policy toward corruption, bribery, collusion, extortion, fraud and other forms of improper actions for corporate or personal financial gain. This also applies to actions by our business partners. These integrity principles are made concrete through our Business Integrity Management System (BIMS) and the accompanying Compliance Program. Respect Respect is our basis for teamwork. We treat others as we wish to be treated and appreciate different perspectives. In our policies and relationships, we act with respect for the rights and dignity of individuals, as well as for the societies in which we live and work. Our company policy does not tolerate discrimination or violation of human rights and upholds the international conventions of labor standards, including those on child and forced labor. We act with respect for the environment and strive to make a positive impact though our projects and operations. Freedom Freedom forms the basis of our approach. The DHV Group is a wholly independent organization, without external shareholders. This independence enables us to shape our own direction and to carry responsibility for our legacy and future. The same is true for individuals. Our company policy promotes empowerment and accountability. We support freedom of association, speech, thought and action, while recognizing the business framework in which the Group operates. We value openness and choice, believing that this environment attracts and develops strong professionals who are able to provide clients with independent and creative solutions. Extract from Business Principles

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Looking back and forward We have achieved satisfactory progress with a number of objectives for 2009: The DHV Global Code of Business Principles was rolled out company wide and our Business Integrity Management System (BIMS) was updated. BIMS and the compliance process were externally audited. A new BIMC, Business Integrity Management Committee was installed in 2009, with representatives from each region and business line, as well as corporate staff. The BIMC updated BIMS material for Group use, including a Reference Book for employees. In the Netherlands, new employees are specifically educated about our Business Integrity Management System (BIMS) through introductory courses. One of the actions of the BIMC for 2010 is to establish Group wide training. In 2009, we engaged in an external audit of BIMS and the compliance program by AC ETHIC Intelligence at our operations in the Netherlands, South Africa, Poland, India and Indonesia. The assessment of the overall system was positive. BIM is clearly supported and communicated from the top. The main recommendations were to review and strengthen the process of agency appointment, make BIMS more visible and accessible globally, and to initiate more training. Action is being undertaken on all these items. In 2010, we will work further to anchor these in the company, establish training and update our process on agents and representatives. Seventy-six percent of all staff worldwide is covered by a formal process against discrimination. Topics include equal pay, sexual harassment and the accommodation of religious observance. This will be strengthened globally in 2010 with the external SpeakUp (whistle blower) program.

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SpeakUp will enable greater reach for employees, who can use the system in their own language and with full confidentiality. Paying taxes is a legal obligation which we strictly follow. As work in international contexts can sometimes be especially complex, policy mandates an advice by our external tax advisors for projects abroad. International tenders are presented to our own tender board that exerts extra control on integrity related risks. As a sign of commitment to our integrity policy, DHV is signatory to the Partnering Against Corruption Initiative (PACI) of the World Economic Forum.

“My personal passion is that I can contribute to a new world in which I can see my kids learn and grow and I help shape an even better world for their children!�

Sander Vorselman, DHV the Nethe rlands, membe r of the core team 'Sust aina ble Build ing'


DHV Group

Compliance A total of four alleged incidents were reported in 2009, three less than in the previous year. Two incidents were found not to be BIMS violations and subsequently closed; two are currently under investigation. Cases of violation of our business integrity policy and actions taken Region

# Cases 2009

# Cases 2008

The Netherlands

0

3

Europe (excl. the Netherlands)

2

3

Africa Asia

North America

Nature of cases 2009 and actions taken

1)

Dispute of IBM invoices in the framework of ICT outsourcing. No apparent BIMS violation, case closed.

2)

Incident reported regarding business dispute. No apparent BIMS violation, case closed.

1)

Engagement of a lobbyist without a written contract and who is reportedly also working as advisor to a client. DHV is in discussion with the management of the company, in which DHV has a minority interest.

2)

Distribution of New Year and Mid-autumn festival gifts which exceed BIMS thresholds. DHV is in discussion with management of the company, in which DHV has a minority interest.

1 2*

NA

0

NA

This applies to InterVISTAS. Delcan, in which the DHV Group has a 40%, interest has its own integrity system and is not included in this BIMS reporting.

* Although companies in which DHV has a minority interest are not in the scope of this report, these cases are mentioned consistent with our Annual Report 2009.

- 39 -


Quality Standard and customer satisfaction ISO 9001 coverage is a goal within our quality system. There was a decrease in 2009, notably in Europe due to the lapse of the ISO certificate for DHV Polska. This has regional management attention. FTEs covered by ISO9001 certification per region 2009

2008

100%

100%

Africa

95%

98%

Asia

90%

89%

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

75%

100%

0%

--

93%

98%

The Netherlands

North America

Worldwide

Customer satisfaction programs are organized on a decentralized level, tailored to the demands of local business units. Extrapolating the available data, 51% of our operations utilized a structured customer satisfaction program in 2009, meaning that those entities have documented procedures, implemented processes and procedures for measurement and analysis. Entities that have more informal programs are not included in this figure even though they do solicit information on customer satisfaction.

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“I am obsessed to enhance my skill and knowledge to involve in designing and implementing CR activities for our clients, especially in applying GRI 3 standard and/or ISO 26000.�

Adam Yazid , MLD Indone sia, Quali ty Management System/E nviro nment Dept.


DHV Group

4.4

People care

Our business model of “Local delivery of world-class solutions� emphasizes operating through national offices. We have selected nine home countries in which to establish local economic entities, run by local management and networked with the whole of the DHV Group. In this way our business creates steady economic value and contributes to sustainable development through job creation, the payment of local taxes; sourcing materials and services locally; and working on projects that enhance the local quality of life.

Showcase project Sustainable development in rural areas DHV India is committed to integrated and sustainable development of rural areas. As part of the Karnataka Watershed Development, DHV provided expertise for income-generating activities for women and below-

We pay market conform wages and provide secondary conditions which support health and well-being. In addition to employment, a number of DHV Group companies share their success with staff through profit sharing and the possibility to buy company shares. The DHV share plan was renewed in 2008 and gives wide opportunities for employees to participate. Shares have appreciated in value and paid out dividends for 2008 and 2009. We also strive to enhance economic development by contracting local communities and suppliers in the projects that we execute for our clients. In developing countries this often requires creating smaller contracting packages, conducting additional training and providing management coaching, but the capacity building and experience that is gained during the project builds community support and can leave a lasting legacy.

poverty-line households in the Tumkur and Haveri districts. Projects such as these contribute directly to improvements in living conditions, increase social equity, and provide better access to water and employment opportunities

Finally, we contribute to the well-being and development of local communities through donations, sponsoring and contributions in kind. This is primarily in support of communities where our operations are located, but is also stimulated as a part of our projects. Being a knowledge-based organization, we put a special emphasis on education.

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The DHV Group consists of a family of operations with deep roots in its home countries. Together with alliance partner Delcan, the DHV Group employs over 5,500 professional and support staff. Member companies are managed locally, but adhere to compatible core values and business principles, promoting diversity and personal development. We engage with employees in regular performance reviews, personal development trajectories, work/life balance and career planning. We strive to safeguard the safety and security of our work force, and are open to direct dialogue with staff and parties who collectively represent staff. Each DHV Group company implements HR policies suitable to local circumstances. In developing countries we implement a standard that is higher than local norms, for example in health care and office facilities.

In 2009 the percentage of staff based in the Netherlands remained at 43%. This includes the acquisition of NPC in the Netherlands and increased stake to 100% of Innova in North America. Heads per region* 2009

2008

The Netherlands

2,340

2,289

Africa

1,000

1,015

Asia

900

815

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

610

610

North America

650

591

5,500

5,320

Worldwide The DHV Group emphasizes the importance of international frameworks and conventions, amongst which the International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions to ban child and forced labor. As a consulting and engineering firm we do not run significant risk of involving either. Under no circumstances will the DHV Group use child or forced labor nor participate in projects in which other parties do. In order to strengthen alignment and the one-company concept, In 2009 Human Resource officers worked together to update the Group HR Manual, which sets out the global framework and lists relevant practices in the different country systems. This falls under the Business Framework, the foundation policy document of the DHV Group.

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* Headcount is presented in line with the annual report, in the same way as the financial information. Other ratios are calculated on the basis of actual CR data reports. See the data clarification table for more details. In 2009, new employment opportunities decreased by 16, compared with a growth of 375 in 2008. This is a reflection of the economic situation and restructuring of operations such as in Portugal. The greatest impact was on indirect, supporting positions. Growth in employment opportunity was achieved in Asia where we are expanding operations, and North America which has strong infrastructure opportunities. It is anticipated that 2010 will also be a challenge, never-the-less we are keen to retain our core and grow selectively.


DHV Group

As explained in the Annual Report, the DHV Group is implementing a home country strategy, concentrating operations on a limited number of countries in which we can achieve critical mass. For this reason, we have chosen to divest the small operation Panafcon Ltd. in Kenya. Employment creation (excluding acquisitions/divestments) 2009

2008

The Netherlands

-50

71

Africa

-34

159

25

100

-22

45

Asia Europe (ex. The Netherlands) North America

Incoming and outgoing staff turnover (headcount) 2009 Incoming

Outgoing

Incoming

Outgoing

The Netherlands

190

240

369

298

Africa

256

290

246

87

Asia

288

263

439

339

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

129

151

185

140

75

10

--

--

938

954

1,239

864

North America

65 Worldwide

Worldwide

2008

-16

375

The level of outflow remains a point of attention, balanced with actions which we need to take due to economic circumstances. The outflow ratio of 11% in the Netherlands is comparable to peers and at the low end of the sector average of 10-15%. However, in the quest for talent, we wish to further improve retention in all regions and are addressing this on a regional basis in our policy and by increased attention to career development despite the need to closely watch costs.

A combination of growth and outflow resulted in a decrease in the average number of years with the company in Asia. The other regions remained relatively stable.

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Average Employment duration in years 2009

2008

10

10

Africa

6

5

Asia

5

7

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

6

6

North America

6

--

Worldwide

8

8

The Netherlands

Professional and personal development Professional and personal development is critical in our line of business. Integration of knowledge, cooperation between divisions and staff exchange foster creativity. Professional training, career development programs, performance reviews, and also assistance for retiring and terminating staff are important factors to address. Career and performance reviews are applied on the basis of local policy. At this time approximately 67% of worldwide staff is reported to be receiving regular career and performance reviews. The trend is positive versus 64% in 2008 and 58% in 2007, but still needing attention although indications are that more performance reviews are conducted than reported, at a more informal level. Key Unit Performance Indicators that are being developed for implementation in 2010 will include Performance Appraisal coverage.

- 44 -

Training Training needs and programs in all facets, Economic, Environmental, Labor, Human Rights, Society and Product Responsibility are determined at a business group and local level, with the exception of management level training such as the Executive Development Program (EDP) and mandatory company wide training and awareness regarding the Business Integrity Management System. These are determined at EC level and managed through EC committees. A DHV University is in the process of being established as an umbrella organization for Group-wide people development such as EDP, a Management Development Program (MDP) and Project Management.


DHV Group

The Executive Development Program (EDP) was offered again in 2009. The next series will commence in 2011. A new Management Development Program is being developed and scheduled to start in 2010.

Training hours per FTE 2009

2008

The Netherlands

48

51

Africa

38

40

Asia

24

15

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

12

16

8

--

37

39

North America

Worldwide

Participants of the 2009 Executive Development Program.

Overall we maintained the same level of training hours as in 2008. In the Netherlands, all new employees receive a two-day training course for their introduction and units with low workload conducted additional training in line with anticipated market needs. This accounts for the substantial difference compared to other regions. In Asia we increased training at our Global Engineering Center in India.

Training and certification in project management was conducted in all regions, as well as a (limited) number of staff exchanges. The focus on project management reflects our greater attention to risk and business basics, as well as growth in the responsibility, size and complexity of the average projects that we are managing. A new DHV Group Project Management manual is being completed and will form the basis for training starting in 2010. Programs for retiring employees are part of the local HR strategies. Approximately 56% of the worldwide workforce is covered by a program to assist with retirement or termination. Those programs have different objectives and range from information on retirement schemes to monetary support and/or active job placement assistance. DHV in the Netherlands maintains its own pension schemes for staff.

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Young professionals within the DHV Group are connected through respective “Young� networks. During 2009, the network facilitated input from Young colleagues across the company for the DHV Group strategy plan, Vision 2015. A number of the ideas will be presented to senior management at the 2010 International Management Meeting, which will again include a parallel program for young colleagues. The study trip to the Netherlands planned for 2009 was not held in view of restructuring taking place in parts of the company. A number of Young colleagues were invited to participate in the International Expertise Meetings which were held in Poland, Canada and Africa in lieu of the 2009 International Management Meeting. Young DHV professionals in the Netherlands are active in the Young Leaders for Nature. In 2009, they initiated and led two initiatives for national Sustainability Day (9-9-9). These both involved young professionals from several companies and public figures. The first was a series of concurrent lectures at universities and high schools, the second was a brainstorming event for the rehabilitation of a neighborhood. Young professionals at SSI are personally involved in the Saturday Schools initiative.

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Young professionals led National Sustainability Day initiatives.


DHV Group

Diversity The DHV Group believes that a diverse workforce is an asset that adds great value to our business, because it promotes creativity, innovativeness and flexibility. We define diversity in terms of gender, age and background. We select new staff on professional and personal qualifications and do not tolerate discrimination. The Group emphasizes the importance of local recruitment and local management, combined with selective exchanges of staff and external or expatriate managers. The average age worldwide increased from 40 to 41 years of age. The workforce of the DHV Group is mostly male and aged between 30 and 50. The proportion of men older than fifty and younger than thirty indicates a need to focus on recruiting and retaining younger employees for future growth and professional capacity. Female staff overall decreased from 29% to 28%; this mostly reflects the decrease in indirect positions.

Workforce age structure 2009 Age group

Women

Men

<30

26%

18%

30-50

62%

56%

>50

12%

26%

Percentage of women in workforce 2009

2008

The Netherlands

26%

27%

Africa

32%

33%

Asia

20%

22%

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

39%

41%

North America

32%

--

Worldwide

28%

29%

2009

2008

The Netherlands

41

41

Africa

41

39

Asia

39

39

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

40

41

North America

40

Worldwide

41

Average age of the workforce

40

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Management origin Consistent with our policy of local delivery and management, ninety-nine (99%) percent of our management is local staff. This is complemented with a small number of expatriate and exchange personnel. Almost all management vacancies in 2009 were filled with local candidates. Three quarters of management vacancies were filled by internal candidates, reflecting an emphasis on management development.

Management development

The Netherlands Africa

The portion of females in our worldwide management was 17% in 2009, up from 16% in 2008. We aim to increase the percentage of women at a management and professional level. As a result of signing the Talent to the Top Charter in the Netherlands, there is greater attention to cultivating female talent in our company. We intend to use the learning from this initiative across regions and for other aspects of diversity. Extra attention is being given in appointments. Starting in 2010, candidates for senior management positions reviewed by the Executive Council must include women on the slate.

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% of management vacancies filled internally 2009

% of management vacancies filled internally 2008

88%

79%

0%

0%

25%

0%

100%

17%

North America

60%

--

Worldwide

76%

53 %

Asia Europe (ex. The Netherlands)


DHV Group

Diversity in governance bodies DHV features three bodies that have governance functions: the Supervisory Board, the Executive Board and the Executive Council (EC). The boards are relatively homogenous, as is typical for our industry. One of the five Supervisory Board members is female, as is one of the twelve members of the EC. Four nationalities and five distinct fields of professional background are represented on the EC. We have appreciated the different perspectives that this has brought and we will continue to pursue this agenda at all levels.

Bertrand van Ee

Piet Besselink

Arnold Galavazi

Chris Engelsman

Roel Overakker

Vic Prins

Eugene Gr端ter

Jim Kerr

For additional inspiration at the top, we are especially pleased to have three powerful advocates of diversity for the team. Mrs. Sybilla Dekker on our Supervisory Board, and Mrs. Melek Usta and Mr. Ad Veenman on the Board of the DHV Foundation, primary holder of our shares. Mrs. Dekker is a former Netherlands Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment. Among other leadership roles, she is the President of the Dutch taskforce Talent to the Top, which promotes increasing the percentage of women in top positions. Mrs. Usta is the Director of Colorful People, a leading company for diversity management with an emphasis on top positions. In addition to corporate activities including a number of boards, she lectures at the University of Amsterdam and Tilburg. Mr. Ad Veenman, former CEO of NS, the Dutch Railways, is Chairman of the Monitoring Commission of Talent to the Top. Under his leadership, NS won the VNONCW Diversity award in 2008 for its consistent and concrete diversity policy, which resulted in more women in the company and at top positions and well as attention to cultural diversity.

Piet van Helvoort

Marga Donehoo

Naren Bhojaram

Johan van Manen

The Executive Council of the DHV Group.

More information on the governance bodies of DHV is available in our Annual Report 2009 on pages 6-10, 68, 70.

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Employment conditions The quest for talent has been one of the main challenges of the past years. A shortage of qualified, technical professionals is evident on the labor markets around the world. The labor market for engineers in Africa is tight; and in fast growing economies such as China and India there is a special challenge to retain talent. One of the advantages that the DHV Group offers employees is freedom to develop. There are many opportunities within the Group, as well as a focus on improving the flow of knowledge and staff. Staff exchange, knowledge sharing and training play important roles in developing our individual and joint capabilities. In these tighter times, we have maintained our focus on training and stimulated cross assignment opportunities. Contractual employment conditions conform to local market conditions. In general, it is our policy to set fixed remuneration at market average and variable above average. In 2008 a Groupwide compensation policy was established, forming the basis of countryspecific implementation. We are moving to a more flexible, performance-based remuneration in Asia, South Africa, and the Netherlands. Profit sharing with staff in 2009 was € 4.9 million versus € 6.8 million in 2008. In order to offer greater opportunity for ownership, we launched a new Employee Share Plan. A total of 300 colleagues joined in the first two rounds and purchased 5% ownership in our Group.

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The depositary receipts for shares generated a 9% return in 2009, including a €0.40 per share dividend. The medium term targeted average rate of return is 15%. DHV Group companies tend to rely on individual and group dialogue between management and staff in their communication to gauge employee satisfaction. Staff meetings and regular performance reviews are examples of such opportunities. A more structured survey is under consideration for 2010. The structure of our workforce in terms of contract and employment types shows a decrease in the percentage of fixed-term contracts. This reflects the current economic situation, in terms of work load and policy. The first priority is staff and fluctuations are addressed through agency personnel and nonrenewal of limited contracts. We continue with strategic hires; these generally seek the commitment of a permanent contract. Regional differences are in line with local practices. Percentage of staff with fixed-time contract 2009

2008

The Netherlands

10%

12%

Africa

17%

22%

Asia

48%

57%

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

32%

35%

5%

--

21%

25%

North America

Worldwide


DHV Group

The proportion of part time employees in our workforce increased slightly in 2009, especially in the Netherlands, where working part-time is a social trend across all sectors. We anticipate that this will continue and in future years increase in other regions as economies recover and people seek greater work-life balance and flexibility.

sickness versus Lost Time Incidences. This will be more relevant to the nature of our business, where the predominance of our activity is in Consulting and Engineering services. Frequency and Severity of Lost Time Injuries 2009

Percentage of part-time employees

The Netherlands

2009

2008

cases per 200.000

36%

34%

Africa

0%

0%

Asia

0%

0%

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

7%

6%

North America

8%

--

Worldwide

19%

18%

Health and safety No fatalities occurred during the year 2009. Lost Time Injuries (LTI) per 200.000 working hours, (approximately 100 labor-years) increased from 0.2 to 0.4 cases. In the Netherland, the increase in cases is primarily minor injuries in the Netherlands due to slipping and the substantial increase in lost days is due to one long term absence. In South Africa there is now a sharper definition of what constitutes an LTI. Operations in Portugal continue to have the highest incident rate due to hands-on operations activity at one site. This contract was ended in 2009. In discussion with our external assurance provider, PwC, we have decided that as of 2010, we will be reporting on

2008 lost days per

cases per 200.000

working

200.000

working

200.000

hours

working

hours

working

hours

lost days per

hours

The Netherlands

0.3

15.2

0.0

0.0

Africa*

0.3

1.1

0.0

0.0

Asia*

0.0

0.0

0.0

0.0

Europe (ex. NL)

1.6

6.8

1.6

36.0

North America

0.0

0.0

--

--

Worldwide

0.4

7.8

0.2

5.2

* Note that 2008 data for Africa and Asia are based on 5% and 25% FTEcoverage respectively.

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Priorities and targets As in 2009, in 2010, we will concentrate on consolidating in terms of turnover and staff, and on implementing synergies with the (new) members of our Group. Overall, we approach the year soberly in view of the economic uncertainty. However we will continue to invest in our people and opportunities in Asia have our special attention. This will entail local capacity building and will also open opportunities for cross assignment. With the exception of strategic hires, we will concentrate on retention versus recruiting. In terms of development, programs for younger staff will be continued as well as the launch of a midlevel Management Development Program. As they were in 2009, training programs will be geared to direct business needs such as project management and industry specific opportunities such as sustainability and specifically Cradle 2 Cradle. Staff feedback indicates a desire for cross assignments. A framework policy for staff exchange was developed in 2009. In 2010 we will investigate and address specific roadblocks. Global cooperation between business units and HR departments will be essential to take advantage of opportunities and mitigate the negative impact of the economic downturn. This will include the sharing of people needs and availability lists and the facilitating of staff exchange. There were successful examples of this in 2009. In the Netherlands, the Business Groups maintained an online listing of available staff, which was used for placement. A listing of needs from Asia was circulated and received an extraordinary high level of response, answering both a need for expertise as well as the desire for cross assignments.

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DHV Group

4.5 Community care The people working at the DHV Group support many aspects of community care through personal initiatives as well as company sponsored activities. This involvement varies with personal interest and regional needs. Colleagues in the Netherlands are often involved in projects for developing countries and environmentally related projects. In South Africa, the Saturday schools continue to be taught by colleagues in their own time. In Asia, there is also a focus on education and community development in connection with projects. In North America, volunteerism that is linked to health and wellbeing is very active. As a Group, we are very proud of their engagement and take this opportunity to thank and congratulate all of them for their energy to make our world a better place.

"At home I try to instill a culture of caring and giving within my family to those in need, e.g. financial contributions to Hospice, Cansa Association and supporting church charities."

Showcase project Building futures DHV staff members, such as Mona Gustina (Indonesia) and Erik de Vries and Rob Krabbenborg (Netherlands), help underprivileged kids build a better future. On Saturdays, Mona Gustina gives lessons to homeless children under the Grogol bridge in Jakarta, while Erik de Vries – and a number of his colleagues in Eindhoven – contribute by coaching kids who need a little extra help to find their way. Like SSI’s Saturday school instructors, they contribute their own time to make a difference.

Pauli ne Makama, SSI, South Afric a Corpo rate Socia l Responsib ility Mana ger

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From a company perspective, we emphasize two distinct fields of community activities: The first is “Building futures” through education and economic development, which is a natural fit with our business. We are involved with universities and at primary and secondary education levels. DHV companies cooperate with universities in research and development, student placements and student research projects. We convey (technical) skills and knowledge that are related to our expertise and make them accessible to youth and entrepreneurs in developing nations. The second is the “Living Environment”, promoting sustainability in an environmental sense. We fill this in through active membership in platforms, programs and partnerships in which our business units engage. In order to create more transparency, several entities have established frameworks or policies around community activities and sponsoring. We favor community efforts close to our business, with the flexibility to address specific local needs. E.g. SSI views Health as an additional pillar of their CSI engagement.

“Building futures”  SSI has expanded its own “Saturday school”, staffed with SSI professionals that educate high-school aged youth from disadvantaged backgrounds in the fields of math and engineering. The fifth school opened in 2009. More than 150 students have benefited, scoring well on their national exams and some continuing on to university. SSI is providing additional support for this next step through scholarships and computers.  DHV Group employees invest their personal time to help young people, tutoring street children in Indonesia and mentoring youths in the Netherlands.  DHV in the Netherlands continued its cooperation with the innovative local weekend school of Pet’je af. We support the start-up of the school financially and through experts who hold classes in their field of expertise.

Our decentralized organization encourages fitting community engagement to local circumstances, resulting in many different types of activities as illustrated by the following selection:

SSI Saturday School Initiative .

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DHV Group

DHV partners in Brainport Eindhoven in the Netherlands. This is a unique cooperative network of businesses, governments and educational institutions open to new ideas. Several entities engage in student placements on, enabling students to research academic topics in business surroundings or allow them to experience our work first hand. DHV and SSI cooperate to support the Ubuntu “plakkies” enterprise for fashionable slippers from discarded tires. This project, started by Delft University students involved major companies and government to benefit a South African community suffering from poverty and aids.

“Living Environment”:  DHV the Netherlands participated in a number of initiatives that have environmental agendas: e.g. the Aqua-for-All foundation that focuses on safe drinking water, sanitation and sustainable water management in developing countries. We have continued to cooperate with the WWF in the Netherlands and the open source mobility platform c,mm,n.  DHV in the Netherlands, in cooperation with educational institutions and colleagues from the water sector, initiated a program where-in grammar school students are supported by water professionals in practical assignments that are related to the water sector. This initiative aims to interest more students to choose a career in the water sector.  Also in support of future water managers, the DHV Group, launching sponsor of the Henry Hudson 400 Foundation and H209 Water conference, also supported the New Generation competition. The competition winner was sponsored to participate at the conference in New York and received an internship at DHV.

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Overall Trend Financial contributions amounted to approximately €163,750 in 2009 (€386,000 in 2008). This decrease is primarily due to no longer including the expense of labor for community activities in Africa in this total. Contributions of (paid) staff time during work hours decreased from 5,770 to around 3,700 hours in 2009. This does not include individuals’ engagement outside working hours and also reflects a stricter policy of balancing company funded community time with personal time. The accuracy of our monitoring has not changed significantly as community involvement activities continue to be primarily local initiatives. Priorities and targets Our objectives are unchanged for 2010 and include increased accuracy of monitoring of our (financial) engagements. We will continue community involvement that is appropriate to the local context and will further encourage the emphasis on “Building Futures” and the “Living Environment”.

4.6 Caring operations We impact the planet in two primary ways: through the types of projects which we execute and through our own operations. Our greatest impact in the supply chain is through interaction with our clients. This has a strong link with CR due to the nature of our core business. The impact that our projects can have literally includes all environmental aspects such as water, air, soil, biodiversity, spatial functions and nonrenewable resources. We market services and technologies that contribute

- 56 -

to improvement of the environment and avoid participation in projects that do not consider their impact on the environment. In support of our customer’s supply chain requests, DHV in the Netherlands is preparing for ISO14001, the standard used by organizations for designing and implementing an effective environmental management system. In 2009, it qualified on the CO2 ladder of ProRail, the Dutch rail infra provider. This ties concrete pricing advantage to CO2 performance. DHV also performs consulting services in this for other companies. Supply chain choices in our core business are mostly about conscientiously selecting business partners for common values and business principles, rather than about product sourcing. In support of this, we have strengthened our contracts with integrity clauses. In addition, we work to find sustainable solutions with suppliers in our asset management and contract management projects. Although the DHV Group does not produce nor manufacture products and hence has no significant suppliers of parts or materials, we have suppliers for our facilities such as energy and other building related supplies. DHV in the Netherlands screens its procurement policies for improvements and participates in sector discussions where Procurement officers of different companies come together to share learning and ideas. Purchase of chlorine free or FSC-certified paper is in place. In 2009, providers of telephone services and lease cars were challenged to support us in our climate strategy / sustainability performance. In 2010 we will be looking at electric vehicles and working with our suppliers of ICT. Sustainability can also be found in small practices, for example in the main


DHV Group

Amersfoort office, an agreement was made with the catering company to increase the biological assortment and reduce waste by substituting monopackaging with dispensers. The catering and beverage machine assortment is now 23% bio/fair trade and we are targeting at least 40%, with reference to the Dutch governmental criteria for sustainable purchasing. Our choices in the supply chain are also linked with a desire for “smarter purchasing”. At this time, it is our experience that choosing green options is still often at a higher cost. We hope to find solutions that are at least a cost neutral by reducing waste, bundling, and through alternate payment mechanisms. Environmental challenge Our challenge in identifying the proper environmental issues was the diverse environments in which we operate. By analyzing other organizations’ approaches, the GRI guidelines and incorporating our own environmental expertise, we have identified the following to be most relevant to our own operations: Energy consumption of our offices Business travel Paper usage The CO2 footprint of the DHV Group derived from our energy consumption from buildings and travel. Water and material consumption are relevant to our operations, but on a much smaller scale. We are therefore give priority to improving and monitoring energy use.

Concrete measures include our policy for selecting offices. The new office in Portugal is a renovated industrial facility, energy and water efficient, and close to public transportation. The renovation of our head office in the Netherlands will take it to the highest energy label, from a “G” to an “A”, for which we received a “green finance declaration” from the Dutch Government, a premier for office building renovation. In addition to supporting travel by public transportation and increased use of telecommunications, we have sharpened policies on lease cars and facilitate car pooling.

Showcase project Sustainable renovation pays Upgrade and increase sustainability in existing office facilities? In an affordable manner? The 40 year old DHV head office, Amersfoort, the Netherlands, will go from an energy efficiency rating ‘G’ to ‘A’. Better use of natural light, automated shades and new utility installations will create substantial energy savings and lower life-cycle costs. Our ‘newest’ office in Portugal, a 50 year old building, applied the same principles to create a comfortable and sustainable work environment, implementing reuse of residual heat and water.

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Environmental performance We are satisfied with the progress of reporting in 2009. There has been improvement in environmental data coverage and accuracy. This will continue to receive attention. In 2009 we decided to target a 25% reduction of our CO 2 footprint per fulltime-employee (FTE) by 2015 versus a baseline of 2008. We have also made a strong commitment in our Annual Report to offset to a climate neutral position in the Netherlands as of 2009 and globally in 2010. At the writing of this report, DHV is still in the process of acquiring the certificates for the 7,830 tons to be compensated for CO2 emissions in The Netherlands, See the data clarification table for details on the basis for data coverage, conversion factors and exploration. The 2008 baseline is a restatement versus the CO2 emission figures contained in our 2008 CR report. The following changes were incorporated: 1.

2.

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As stated in the section 5.1 Scope of Report, Delcan and Planetek, entities in which we have minority ownership are now excluded from scope. 2008 air travel figures have been significantly reduced. In 2008, SSI (Africa) could not provide consolidated air travel information. Therefore the overall total for CO2 was based on an extrapolation from reported information, primarily from the Netherlands. Figures reported by SSI for 2009 indicate that there is significantly less air travel by operations in this region. Comparing 2009 to the 2008 extrapolated total generated an overall air travel reduction greater

than 40% and overall CO2 reduction of 14%. We consider this to be a disproportionately artificial step towards our 25% target and not in the spirit of real reduction. We have therefore restated the 2008 air travel for SSI by using the 2009 ratio of air travel between the Netherlands and SSI. This is a better reflection of travel patterns. Overall, the restatement combines with actual reduced air travel and an increase in FTEs for a CO 2 reduction of 6.6% in 2009 versus 2008. Further detail about our energy use is presented below.


DHV Group

CO2 footprint of DHV Our CO 2 footprint indicates the impact on the environment and specifically on climate change. Based on the energy consumption in buildings and transportation, we have included the following data sources to calculate the total CO2 emissions: 2

+ Electricity consumption + Consumption of other building related energy (gas1 , oil1, district heating2 ) + Fuel consumption of company cars1 3 + Mileage of business travel with private car 3 + Mileage of business air travel ď&#x20AC;­ CO2 compensation = net total CO 2 emissions (note:

1,2,3

refer to the scopes of the GHG protocol)

As illustrated in the following graphs and table, the total estimated emissions for the DHV Group in 2009 is approximately 13,000 tons of CO 2 versus 13,700 tons in 2008. The decrease of 5% is primarily due to a decrease in air travel. Registered car travel however, increased, particularly in Africa and Europe. Total emissions per FTE is 2,910kg versus 3,115kg in 2008, a decrease of 6.6%.

- 59 -


The following table provides an overview of our CO 2 emissions by source and commitment to offsetting our impact.

- 60 -


DHV Group

Energy consumption of our offices We consume electricity and district heating as well as gas and oil products in our facilities. Consumption in both 2008 and 2009 was approximately 45,000 GJ. Electricity consumption per FTE worldwide is decreasing to an average of approximately 1,900 kwh/FTE in 2009 from 2,000 kwh/FTE in 2008.

Business travel The nature of our business requires travel to clients and project locations. Because air travel constitutes a large part of our emissions, in 2009 we made a point of improving the accuracy of our reporting. Whereas in 2008 we had significant extrapolation, SSI was able to provide external data in 2009 by changing to a single provider. The combination of better data and reduced travel resulted in a 42% reduction per FTE. The largest impact was from having reported data available rather than extrapolating air kilometers per FTE on the basis of data mostly in the Netherlands. Since this is not a good reflection of actual reduction, we have restated our air travel in 2008, bringing the ratio between SSI and the Netherlands in line with the 2009 ratio. There was an actual decrease in travel air travel by Dutch personnel of 13% per FTE in 2009. In calculating the total emissions, we have extrapolated reported data by FTEs.

The portion of electricity from renewable sources assumes that all electricity supplies that were not specifically reported, but extrapolated, stem from nonrenewable sources. Our portion of sustainable electricity was 41% in 2009 versus 37% in 2008.

- 61 -


household waste such as batteries. In this manner, we reduce the impact our resource consumption has on the environment. Priorities and targets We remain focused on gaining a deeper understanding of our environmental impact through the accurate registration of consumption data worldwide. This is ambitious and must be kept in proportion to the added value. We will focus on appropriate measures to reduce our footprint and to identify cost reductions and efficiency gains within our office operations on a local basis.

Paper usage Our current estimate on the use of printing and copying paper worldwide is approximately 141 tons, equivalent to about 31 kg per average FTE. This is a significant reduction versus prior years and reflects both an actual reduction and increased accuracy of reporting versus extrapolation. Since the end of 2007, the Dutch offices are supplied with FSC-certified paper. This represents half of our paper consumption. We further reduce our environmental impact by double-sided printing, stimulating digital archiving and reporting and by general recycling of paper. Waste management Multiple companies of the DHV Group have waste reduction and recycling programs for paper, toner cartridges, electronic equipment and hazardous

- 62 -

In principle our targets remain unchanged:  Monitor worldwide environmental data and work towards substantial data coverage for the environmental indicators.  Work towards achieving our target of 25% CO2 emission reduction versus 2008 by 2015.  Continue to review the existing procurement policy of DHV in the Netherlands, communicate the policy to our suppliers and share learning between locations.


DHV Group

5

REPORTING

5.1 Scope of Report Choices In line with previous years, this Report is prepared in accordance with the reporting criteria and guidelines of the B+ application level of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI). The DHV Group obtains its CR data from internal measurement and external sources or third parties. The data is gathered using a questionnaire and is integrated in the financial reporting lines. Definitions are communicated through a standard guidebook The selection of KPIs has been guided by internal stakeholder dialogue, reviews of peer organizations and the expertise of our sustainability consultants. We have confirmed the relevance of our approach and KPIs with our Supervisory Board and through external stake-holder dialogue. Priority is given through an assessment of issue significance in the light of our values, strategy and the known expectations of stakeholders. Furthermore, we were guided by the scope of influence we can exert to improve performance. We will report on those indicators over the coming years and we strive to improve our performance. Where appropriate, we present our current performance data next to the previous year in a relative way (using percentages and ratio’s) to make it possible for readers to monitor and measure progress year on year, unless the reporting protocol requires absolute figures to be disclosed. DHV defines coverage as the number of full time equivalents (FTE’s) working in Group companies that report data divided by the total number of FTE’s. The data

clarification table in section 5.3 shows the coverage per indicator. All Group companies are required to state whether figures for each indicator are estimated or calculated. For 2009, we set a key objective of improving our data accuracy, aiming to measure at least 60% for each indicator (expressed in FTE’s). This has resulted in both greater coverage and improved data accuracy. In line with the DHV Group’s updated CR reporting policy, this report includes data from entities that are fully owned or majority owned, or those entities where DHV has a controlling interest with respect to CR. This is a change in reporting scope as we have now excluded our alliance partners Delcan and Planetek, in which we are a minority shareholder, from the reported figures and graphs, unless noted otherwise. In previous years we had included these given the close relationship and our ambition to fully integrate these operations in our existing business. We have adjusted the 2008 figures to make it possible to monitor progress year on year. External assurance of our CR report is valuable to us and to you as a reader of the report. The DHV Group has engaged its external assurance provider PricewaterhouseCoopers Accountants N.V. to provide limited assurance on data in this Report. Please refer to the assurance report for information on the scope of the engagement, the work performed and the conclusions. We have published a printed CR summary booklet along with our Annual Report. This summary is meant to provide readers with a concise overview of our philosophy, policy and performance.

- 63 -


Boundaries This CR report covers the period from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2009 and is the fourth separate CR report of the DHV Group. It is published annually and complements the annual report. We intend to publish a combined report in 2010.

5.2 External assurance To the Executive Board of DHV Holding B.V.

ASSURANCE REPORT In accordance with DHV Group reporting criteria, all companies acquired in any given year, are required to report CR data as from the following year. An exception to this is the disclosure of total personnel figures and financial information which is reported in line with the Annual Report. Group companies that are divested are excluded from the reporting scope for the entire year in which the divestment took place. The reporting scope does not cover joint ventures or subcontracted operations.. The DHV Group reports on the performance of the majority-owned legal entities that are part of the DHV Group. Further details on the DHV Group’s participations are listed in the Annual Report 2009 on page 66. The selected KPIs relate to our own personnel for whom the DHV Group has the responsibility as employer, and exclude freelance personnel or staff hired through temporary staffing agencies. We report environmental KPIs on our permanent office locations. We have applied extra care when data has been estimated for locations where data are not readily available, e.g. in shared office locations.

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SCOPE AND RESPONSIBILITIES We have been engaged by the Executive Board of DHV Holding B.V., Amersfoort (‘DHV’) to review the content of DHV’s Corporate Responsibility (CR) Report for the year ending 31 December 2009 (hereafter referred to as ‘the Report’). A review engagement is aimed at obtaining limited assurance. The detail of review procedures is substantially less than audit procedures and consequently a review engagement provides less assurance than what would be obtained from an audit engagement. Therefore our Assurance Standard requires the review conclusion to contain a clear written expression of negative assurance by using double negation. We do not provide any assurance on the assumptions and achievability of prospective information (such as targets, expectations and ambitions) included in the Report. The Report contains references to information on websites. This information is excluded from our assurance scope. The Executive Board of DHV is responsible for the preparation and presentation of the Report. Our responsibility is to draw a conclusion on the Report based on our review.


DHV Group

REPORTING CRITERIA DHV developed its reporting criteria on the basis of the G3 Guidelines of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), as described in section 5.1: ‘Scope’. These reporting criteria include certain inherent limitations that can influence the reliability of the information.

Our most important review procedures consisted of:

DHV only reports on parts of the organization as the Report only includes data from DHV entities which are fully or majority owned. For further details on the reporting scope, refer to section 5.1 ‘Scope’ in the Report. We consider these reporting criteria to be relevant and sufficient for our engagement.

-

For several indicators the Report is not yet based on full coverage as intended by DHV per its reporting criteria. By including a data clarification table in section 5.3 of the Report, the coverage of the Report is clarified by showing for each indicator the number of FTEs working in entities that report on that indicator as a percentage of total FTEs. In our opinion this limitation with regard to the completeness of the Report and the reasons for it are acceptable. REVIEW PROCEDURES PERFORMED We planned and performed our review procedures to obtain a basis for our conclusion in accordance with Dutch law, including the Assurance Standard 3410N “Assurance Engagements relating to Sustainability Reports”, drawn up by the professional body of Dutch accountants (“Royal NIVRA”).

-

-

-

-

updating our understanding of the activities and the organization of DHV; analyzing public information to gain insight into CR aspects relevant to DHV and its industry during the reported period; investigating the acceptability and application of DHV’s reporting criteria in relation to the information requirements of its stakeholders; conducting interviews with responsible officers at head office in Amersfoort, aimed at understanding the progress made by DHV in the data gathering and reporting process and at evaluating the completeness, accuracy and adequacy of the qualitative and quantitative information in the Report; as far as necessary, assessing the design and functioning of the processes used for data capturing, collation, aggregation and validation, including the methods used for calculating and estimating results; performing analytical procedures on a sample basis on the data reported; reviewing the application of the G3 Guidelines of the GRI; evaluating the overall format and presentation of the Report, including evaluating the consistency of the information, in line with DHV’s reporting criteria.

We believe that the evidence obtained from our review procedures is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our conclusion.

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CONCLUSION Based on our review procedures nothing has come to our attention that causes us to believe that in accordance with DHVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reporting criteria: -

the reporting principles are not acceptable or have not been applied consistently; the events described did not take place during the reporting period or are not presented fully, accurately and timely; the information is not presented completely, accurately and adequately in all material respects.

RECOMMENDATIONS Our assurance engagement has led to recommendations for improvement which are reported to management. Without qualifying our conclusion above, we would like to draw the readersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attention to the following:

-

Last year we issued a qualified assurance report, because we were not able to conclude as to whether the reported data on air travel and subsequently on the total estimated CO2 emissions for 2008 were free from material misstatement. In this Report DHV has restated the 2008 CO 2 emissions data as described on page 59, while the CO2 emissions reduction objective of 25% for 2015 compared to 2008 was maintained. We have recommended DHV to assess whether it wants to recalculate its CO 2 reduction target and to use 2009 data as a baseline for monitoring its progress on this objective.

Utrecht, 21 May 2010 PricewaterhouseCoopers Accountants N.V.

Originally signed by F. van der Ploeg RA -

-

- 66 -

In 2009 DHV continued its engagement with key stakeholders by organizing a dialogue on its commitment to CR. The outcomes of this dialogue are summarized in the Report. For next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s CR report it is our recommendation to explain more explicitly what CR aspects stakeholders consider to be the most important for the company and how these insights are used by DHV to shape its CR agenda as well as its CR report. Although DHV has increased the number of entities that are now reporting on CR data, the coverage of the Report remains relatively low for some indicators, e.g. for electricity and other CO2 related indicators. We therefore recommend, like last year, to further increase the coverage in 2010 and to achieve a higher degree of completeness in the next CR report.


DHV Group

MANAGEMENT RESPONSE We value the professional and thorough approach of PricewaterhouseCoopers Accountants N.V. during this review engagement. The independent review provides additional assurance for the reader and helps to improve our process for data gathering and communicating progress. Regarding the specific recommendations: -

-

Key stakeholder input has been taken up in our strategy and CR agenda. That we have incorporated the stakeholder feedback summarized in section 3.3, Corporate responsibility in our strategy impact of stake holder on strategy, is illustrated throughout the report. In addition, we specifically created the CR Summary booklet, Taking Corporate Responsibility, and the CR at a Glance table in response to stakeholder requests for more accessible information. In the 2010 CR report, we will take up this recommendation to make the links more explicit.

-

We will keep to the target of a 25% reduction of CO2 emissions per FTE by 2015 versus 2008. This target and the accompanying commitments for compensating the balance were communicated widely in our organization as a motivator and clear signal of commitment to long term sustainability. The target is part of our new Group Strategy Document, Vision 2015. The GSP forms the basis of unit level 5 year plans. As explained in section 4.6, Caring operations - environmental performance, we have restated our CO 2 emissions level for 2008 to better reflect regional air travel patterns. We believe that the methodology has resulted in a realistic and fair assessment, and will serve as a credible baseline.

In closing, we would like to state that we are sincerely committed to corporate responsibility. We have taken significant steps during 2009, such as external audit and improvement of our Business Integrity Management System and accompanying Compliance Program. We set a target for CO 2 reduction and committed to a substantial level of compensation, even in these economically challenging times. Satisfactory progress was made in most every indicator. We continue to work internally and through our projects on sustainable development, with a special eye to capacity building.

Corporate responsibility reporting is a fairly young and intensive process. We know that there is a need to improve the overall process, along with the accuracy of reported data. In 2009, we were able to improve reporting on air travel and plan to do the same for electricity in 2010. Data gathering in different entities is impacted by regional differences in contracting services and information availability. This is something which we need to better understand and account for in system requirements and reporting criteria.

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5.3

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Data clarification table


DHV Group

- 69 -


5.4 Glossary and definitions BCF

Business Control Framework, a.k.a. Business Framework (internal document defining management structure and responsibilities. Includes the Authority Matrix of the DHV Group)

BEE BIMC

Black-Economic-Empowerment (related to South Africa) Business Integrity Management Committee

BIMS

Business Integrity Management System (the framework of business integrity organization)

Business Groups

The DHV Group has four Business Groups: Environment and Transportation; Water; Building and Industry; Aviation.

Business Principles CoP

Business Principles, a.k.a. Global code of Business Principles. Foundation document of the DHV Group, which provides a compass for behavior. Community of Practice. A group with a common topic of interest. Most frequently used to refer to the collaboration webpage of such a group.

CPP

Corporate Policy Paper (internal document defining five year strategy)

CR

Corporate Responsibility (equivalent to CSR)

CSI CSR

Corporate Social Investment (strictly community investment and engagement) Corporate Social Responsibility (equivalent to CR)

EB

Executive Board (governance body)

EC

Executive Council (governance body of senior management of the DHV Group), formerly International Policy Board (IPB)

EDP EPEA

Executive Development Program Environmental Protection Encouragement Agency

FTE

Full-time equivalent

FY

Financial Year

GRI IDA

Global Reporting Initiative International Development Agency (international financing organizations relating to development aid, e.g. the World Bank)

IMM

International Management Meeting (The assembly of the management of DHV Group companies)

KPI

Key performance indicator

NGO PwC

Non-governmental organization PricewaterhouseCoopers (Our External Assurance Provider)

Regions

The DHV Group is organized in four Regions: Europe; Asia; North America; Africa

SB

Supervisory Board (highest governance body)

Tender Board The Group

A committee within the DHV Group that reviews significant and risk submissions, thereby exerting control on integrity related risks. The DHV Group of companies

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DHV Group

5.5 GRI index Subject

Reference in CR Report 2009 (page number between brackets, AR indicates pages in Annual Report)

Vision and strategy 1.1

Vision and strategy regarding social responsibility

Statement by the Executive Board (7) Our view on corporate responsibility (15)

1.2

Description of key impacts, risks, and opportunities

Added value of CR to our business (16) CR in our strategy (27) and Risks (22)

2.1

Name of reporting organization

DHV Group Profile (9)

2.2 2.3

Products and/or services Operational structure

DHV Group Profile (9) Legal Structure (11)

2.4

Location of Headquarters

www.dhvgroup.com/offices

2.5

Countries of business

DHV Group Profile (9)

2.6 2.7

Nature of ownership Markets served

Identity (10) Annual report 2009, (AR 66, AR 70) DHV Group Profile (9)

2.8

Organization scale (Employees, Sales, Capitalization)

Annual report 2009 (AR 2 -3)

2.9

Significant organizational changes

Annual report 2009 (AR 13 Mergers, Acquisitions, Divestments, AR 7 Composition of Supervisory Board)

2.10

Awards received relevant to social, ethical, and environmental performance

Performance - Awards and rankings (35)

Profile

Report Parameters Report Profile 3.1 Reporting period

Scope of the report â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Choices (63)

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Subject

Reference in CR Report 2009 (page number between brackets, AR indicates pages in Annual Report)

3.2

Previous report

Scope of the report – Choices (63)

3.3 3.4

Reporting Cycle Contact information

Scope of the report – Choices (63) Home page of DHVGroup.com

Report scope and boundary 3.5

Process for defining report content

Scope of the report – Choices (63)

3.6 3.7

Report boundaries Specific limitations on the scope or boundary

Scope of the report – Boundaries (64) Scope of the report (63)

3.8

Basis for reporting on joint ventures and subsidiaries

Scope of the report – Boundaries (64)

3.9 3.10

Data measurement techniques and the bases of calculations, including estimations. Explain any decision for substantial diversion from the GRI protocol Explanation of re-statement

3.11

Significant changes from the previous reports in scope, boundary or measurement methods

GRI Content Index 3.12 Cross reference table

Data clarification table (68) Scope of the report – Choices (63) We have changed to reporting fully owned or majority owned entities only. This now excludes Delcan and Planetek. 2008 figures have been restated accordingly. 2008 estimation of air travel in SSi has been restated to better reflect actual travel patterns. (56) This table

Assurance 3.13

Policy and current practice on external assurance

Governance, Commitments and Engagement Governance

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Scope of the report – Choices (63) & Assurance report (64)


DHV Group

Subject

Reference in CR Report 2009 (page number between brackets, AR indicates pages in Annual Report)

4.1

Governance structure

Corporate Governance (30)

4.2 4.3

Independence of board members Independence unitary governance body

DHV Group website on corporate governance DHV Group has no unitary board

4.4

Shareholder and employee feedback mechanisms

Communicating with our Stakeholders (28)

4.5

Executive compensation and non-financial goals

DHV Group website on corporate governance

4.6 4.7

Control on conflict of interest in governance Determination of qualifications and expertise of the Board of Directors

Working with Dilemmas (32) Corporate governance (30 ) Representation and Commitment (26)

4.8

Mission, values and code of conduct

DHV Group website on Corporate Governance Our view on corporate responsibility (15) Business with integrity (37)

4.9

Control procedures internal compliance with principles

Integrity (37) and DHV Group website on Corporate Governance

4.10

Processes for evaluating the economic, environmental and social performance of the Board of Directors

DHV Group website on Corporate Governance Corporate governance (30 )

Commitments to external initiatives 4.11

Precautionary policies and approach

Representation and Commitments (26)

4.12 4.13

Endorsed voluntary charters and external principles External memberships

Representation and Commitments (26) Representation and Commitments (26)

Stakeholder Engagement 4.14

List of engaged stakeholders

Impact of stakeholders on strategy (28 )

4.15 4.16

Identification and selection of stakeholders Stakeholder consultation

Impact of stakeholders on strategy (28 ) Impact of stakeholders on strategy (28 )

4.17

Use of information

Impact of stakeholders on strategy (28 )

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Subject

Reference in CR Report 2009 (page number between brackets, AR indicates pages in Annual Report)

Economic performance indicators DMA Disclosure on management approach Economic performance EC1

EC2

Direct economic value generated and distributed, including revenues, operating costs, employee compensation, donations and other community investments, retained earnings, and payments to capital providers and governments Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities due to climate change

Management approach (30 )

Key economic figures (11) Added value of CR to our business (16), Risks (22)

EC3

Coverage of the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defined benefit plan obligations

partial on www.dhv.nl/pensioenfonds (Dutch only) and Professional and personal development (44)

EC4

Significant financial assistance received from government

not reported

Market Presence EC6

Policy, practices, and proportion of spending on locally-based suppliers at significant locations of operation

not reported

EC7

Procedures for local hiring and proportion of senior management hired from the local community at locations of significant operation

People care - diversity (47) People care â&#x20AC;&#x201C; management origin (48)

Indirect economic impacts EC8 Development and impact of infrastructure investments and services provided primarily for public benefit through commercial, in-kind, or pro bono engagement EC9 (add)

Understanding and describing significant indirect economic impacts, including the extent of impacts

not reported partial at People care (41)

Environmental performance indicators DMA Materials

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Disclosure on management approach

Management approach (30 )


DHV Group

Subject

Reference in CR Report 2009 (page number between brackets, AR indicates pages in Annual Report)

EN1

Materials used by weight or volume

Environmental performance (58-60)

EN2 Energy

Percentage of recycled input materials

not relevant

EN3

Direct energy use by source

Environmental performance (58)

EN4

Indirect energy use by source

Environmental performance (58 - 60 )

Water EN8

Total water withdrawal by source

not reported

EN11

Location and size of land owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas

not relevant

EN12

Description of significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas

not reported

Biodiversity

Emissions, effluents and waste EN16 Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight

Environmental performance (58)

EN17

Other relevant indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight

Environmental performance (58)

EN18

Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reductions achieved

partial on Caring operations (56-57)

EN19 EN20

Emissions of ozone-depleting substances by weight NO, SO, and other significant air emissions by type and weight

not relevant not relevant

EN21

Total water discharge by quality and destination

not relevant

EN22

Total weight of waste by type and disposal

not reported

EN23 Total number and volume of significant spills Products and services

not applicable

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Subject

Reference in CR Report 2009 (page number between brackets, AR indicates pages in Annual Report)

EN26

Initiatives to mitigate environmental impacts of products and services, and extent of impact mitigation

EN27

Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials that are reclaimed by category

Our sustainability/transparency tool available to staff includes environmental aspects (36) not applicable

Compliance EN28

Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations

not reported

Significant environmental impacts of transporting products and other goods and materials used for the organization's operations, and transporting members of the workforce.

Environmental performance (58)

Transport EN29

Social performance Indicators DMA

Disclosure on management approach

Management approach (30 )

LA1

Total workforce by employment type, contract and region

LA2

Total number and rate of employee turnover by age group, gender and region

People care - diversity (47) and - employment conditions (50) Partially - People care (42-43) People Management (68)

Employment

Labor/Management relations LA4 LA5

Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining power Minimum notice period(s) regarding operational changes

not reported not reported

Occupational Health and safety LA7 LA8

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Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities by region Education, training, counseling, prevention, and risk-control programs in place to assist workforce members, their families, or community members regarding serious diseases

People care â&#x20AC;&#x201C; health and safety (51) not reported


DHV Group

Subject

Reference in CR Report 2009 (page number between brackets, AR indicates pages in Annual Report)

Training and Education LA10 LA11 (add)

Average hours of training per year per employee by employee category Programs for skills management and lifelong learning that support the continued employability of employees and assist them in managing career endings

Professional and personal development (44)

LA12 (add)

Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews

Professional and personal development (44)

Diversity and Equal Opportunity LA13 Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity LA14

Ratio of basic salary of men to women by employee category

Professional and personal development (44)

People care - diversity (47 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 49) not reported

Human rights DMA

Disclosure on management approach

CR management approach (30)

Investment and procurement practices HR1 HR2

Percentage and total number of significant investment agreements that include human rights clauses or that have undergone human rights screening Percentage of significant suppliers and contractors that have undergone screening on human rights and actions taken

not reported not reported

Non-Discrimination HR4 Total number of incidents of discrimination and actions taken Freedom of association and collective bargaining HR5

Operations identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at significant risk, and actions taken to support these rights

Child Labor HR6 Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labor, and measures taken to contribute to the elimination of child labor

Integrity (37)

not reported

People care (47)

- 77 -


Subject

Reference in CR Report 2009 (page number between brackets, AR indicates pages in Annual Report)

Forced and compulsory labor HR7

Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor, and measures to contribute to the elimination of forced or compulsory labor

not reported

Disclosure on management approach

Management approach (30 )

Society DMA

Community SO1 Nature, scope, and effectiveness of any programs and practices that assess and manage the impacts of operations on communities, including entering, operating, and exiting

not reported

Corruption SO2 SO3

Percentage and total number of business units analyzed for risks related to corruption Percentage of employees trained in organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anti-corruption policies and procedures

Integrity (37) Integrity (37)

SO4

Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption

Integrity (37)

SO5

Public policy positions and participation in public policy development and lobbying

not reported

Compliance SO8 Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and regulations

not reported

Product Responsibility Performance Indicators DMA Disclosure on management approach Customer Health and Safety Life cycle stages in which health and safety impacts of products and services are assessed for improvement, and percentage of significant products and services categories subject to such procedures Product and Service Labeling

Management approach (30 )

PR1

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not reported


DHV Group

Subject

Reference in CR Report 2009 (page number between brackets, AR indicates pages in Annual Report)

PR3 PR5 (add)

Type of product and service information required by procedures, and percentage of significant products and services subject to such information requirements Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction

not reported Quality and customer satisfaction (40)

Marketing Communications PR6

Programs for adherence to laws, standards, and voluntary codes related to marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship

not reported

Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services

not reported

Compliance PR9

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- 80 -


DHV Group

6

COLOPHON

Publisher DHV Group P.O. Box 219 3800 AE Amersfoort The Netherlands www.dhvgroup.com Dutch Trade Register DHV Holding B.V. 31021655 Publication date May 2010 This Corporate Responsibility Report 2009 (PDF only) as well as our CR Summary 2009 is available on DHV Group - CR Summary 2009. The DHV Group Annual Report 2009 is available on www.dhvgroup.com/annualreport.

6.1 Contact details / offices An up-to-date overview of addresses and contact details can be found on DHV Group - Offices.

- 81 - 81 -


DHV Group

- 82 -


CR Report 2009