Page 1

Corporate Responsibility Report 2008 DHV Group

Mission Our mission is to provide multidisciplinary services for the sustainable development of our living environment, in a close relationship with clients, employees, and partners, based on mutual loyalty, while providing a solid return to our shareholders. May 2009


2BProfile

CONTENTS

DHV Group

PAGE

INTRODUCTION

3

STATEMENT BY THE EXECUTIVE BOARD

4

1 1.1 1.2 1.3

PROFILE Key economic figures Legal structure Corporate responsibility at a glance

5 6 7 8

2 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4

PHILOSOPHY Our view on corporate responsibility Added value of corporate responsibility to our business Our vision on the future of corporate responsibility Our impact

10 10 10 12 12

3 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6

POLICY From ambition to action Commitment to external principles Corporate responsibility in our strategy Corporate responsibility inside concept Our future Our challenges

16 16 17 18 20 24 25

4 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4

PERFORMANCE Awards and rankings Inside business and innovation Business with integrity People care

28 28 29 30 32

CR Report 2008 DHV Group No part of these specifications/printed matter may be reproduced and/or published by print, photocopy, microfilm or by any other means, without the prior written permission of DHV Group; nor may they be used, without such permission, for any purposes other than that for which they were produced. The quality management system for policymaking and management of the DHV Group has been approved against ISO 9001. Š

-1-


2BProfile

DHV Group

4.5 4.6

Community care Caring operations

42 45

5 5.1 5.2 5.3

DIALOGUE Who are our stakeholders Communicating with our stakeholders External memberships and appointments

52 52 52 52

6 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5

REPORTING Scope External assurance Data clarification table Glossary and definitions GRI index

53 53 54 57 62 63

7 7.1

COLOPHON Contact details / offices

73 73

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 2 -


2BProfile

DHV Group

INTRODUCTION

At the DHV Group, we focus on sustainable development in terms of people, planet, and profit in our services to clients and in fulfilling our responsibility to stakeholders for maintaining a sustainable enterprise. We strive for transparency with regard to corporate responsibility (CR) and began annual reporting on performance and challenges from this perspective in 2006. This was predominantly with information about our operation in the Netherlands. In 2007, we also began including information from the regions: Europe, Asia, Africa, and North America. This CR Report has been reviewed by external assurance provider PricewaterhouseCoopers. Please see the section Scope of Report for further information on the scope of this report. Annual Report 2008

For those readers who would like to have a brief overview of our CR philosophy, policy and performance, we have created a summary booklet, Taking Corporate Responsibility, Highlights 2008. This is available in print and digitally at www.dhv.com/cr-report. In addition to this CR report, please also see our Annual Report 2008, specifically the sections “Developments in our Global Network” (pages 19-26) and “Projects; Connect & Deliver” (pages 27-37), for examples of how sustainability and collaboration are integral to the Group’s activities.

CR Report 2008

Corporate Responsibility Summary 2008

We invite you to respond to this report and engage us in dialogue about related activities, Marga Donehoo Tobias Stöcker

- Director Corporate Initiatives - Corporate Responsibility Manager

Mail us at: cr@dhv.com

-3-


2BProfile

DHV Group

STATEMENT BY THE EXECUTIVE BOARD

Over the next decades, the world’s population will increase from six to nine billion. Sea levels are rising, while drought decimates once flourishing regions. Safety and security will be at a premium, and communities all over the world are facing increasingly complex challenges. The demand for energy will grow exponentially, along with the need for food, clean air and water. More and more, we find that we are exhausting the ability to provide, absorb and replenish basic needs.

We seek opportunities for added value in our business, partnerships, and internal processes, and recognize that the challenges ahead will require making step changes together with others. We invite your feedback on our activities and look forward to new partnerships.

These issues call for new solutions. Intense cooperation, significant investments (particularly in R&D), and enormous perseverance are needed. Public and private parties, as well as knowledge institutions, are gaining a better understanding of interdependencies and are coming together to improve the health of eco-social systems. Contributing to the sustainable development of our living environment is core to the mission of the DHV Group. Our philosophy “Corporate Responsibility Inside” emphasizes that taking responsibility starts with a conviction inside; looking to our own behavior and finding opportunities within the projects that we execute. In each of these, we learn more about integrating and ways to reduce, adapt, re-use, build capacity, and generate positive impact. This is where we have the greatest influence and where we can help create repeatable successes.

CR Report 2008

Bertrand van Ee (President)

Piet Besselink (Vice President)

Amersfoort, the Netherlands, 13 May 2009

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 4 -


Profile

1

DHV Group

PROFILE

The DHV Group is a global provider of consultancy and engineering services in the following markets: – Water – Transportation – Spatial Planning and Environment – Building and Industry – Aviation We are a company for people from people. Our services directly impact people, society, and the environment. Starting with our early roots in flood control, post war construction, and development aid, we have continuously performed work that lies in the field of human activity and touches the communities we serve. This heritage of working with communities is reflected in our respect for people, local conditions, and the environment. We are active worldwide through a network of local offices in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North America. Clients Our major clients are: – Governments – Industry, Commercial Services, Contractors, and Developers – Public Sector and Semi-Government – International Development Agencies

CR Report 2008

Our key values are integrity, respect, and freedom. We act with a deep commitment to integrity, accountability, and making a positive contribution in society. We promote empowerment, coupled with strong personal and professional responsibility. We welcome different perspectives and support freedom of thought and action. The DHV Group is an independent company and signatory to the United Nations Global Compact and the Partners Against Corruption Initiative (PACI) of the World Economic Forum. More details on our profile can be found on the corporate website and on pages 4-5 and 19-22 of our Annual Report 2008.

-5-


Profile

Showcase project

DHV Group

1.1

Key economic figures

The following is an overview of our economic performance. More detailed information is available in our Annual Report 2008. Economic Value retained (â‚Ź thousands) 2008

2007

2006

477,314

392,227

360,830

Operating costs

248,210

193,267

168,316

Employee wages and benefits

Direct economic value generated Revenues Economic value distributed

An alternative approach to dike reinforcement “Building with nature� is the essence of the concept developed for the Dutch Directorate for Public Works and Water Management by DHV, knowledge institute Wageningen IMARES and design-office Alle Hosper. Cultivating salt marshes on the mudflats side of the Dutch Closure Dike has many advantages over traditional dike heightening, while offering at least the same level of safety. Salt marshes are vegetation on top of stable mudflats and sandbanks, which are only submerged during storms and spring tides. Salt marshes trap sediment, a process that ensures that the salt marshes grow on their own, accompanying the rising sea level. The concept is quickly implemented, creates a brand new nature area, and does not cost significantly more than traditional dike heightening.

CR Report 2008

209,837

186,465

180,149

Payments to providers of capital

3,539

2,170

2,374

Payments to government

5,638

3,156

2,663

386

360

ND

10,090

6,809

7,328

Staff in headcount

5,320

4,730

4,042

Average full-time equivalents

4,717

3,986

3,782

Community investments Economic value retained Personnel of DHV

Figures for community investments do not include investments in kind. Since our community involvement is primarily organized on a local basis, these totals do not represent all activity.

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 6 -


Profile

1.2

DHV Group

Legal structure

The legal structure of the DHV Group is detailed in the Annual Report 2008 in the sections “Participating Interests” (page 66), “Shareholding Structure” (page 70) and “Structure and Management DHV Group” (page 71).

CR Report 2008

-7-


Profile

1.3

DHV Group

Corporate responsibility at a glance

Key figures 2008 (2007)

Targets 2008

Accomplishments 2008

Targets 2009

Core business and innovation - Investment in R&D: € 17.7 million (€ 16.4 million)

- Make innovative capacity, especially regarding sustainability more effective - Link global experience in sustainability work

- 3 patents for sustainable products. Piloted new sustainable water technology. - International water technology transfer. - Innovation program launched in South Africa with a high focus on sustainability. - Developed green airports tool box.

- Maintain investment in R&D. Increase number of patents. - Continue technology transfer. - Awards that recognize sustainability.

Integrity - BIMS (Business Integrity Management System) cases: 7 (10) - none open

- Assure compliance through BIMS and expand dialogue and alignment with partners, clients and suppliers

- Updated Global Code of Business Principles. - Enhanced BIMS with a Project Integrity Risk Indicator and standard wording for client and partner integrity clauses.

- Roll-out Global Code of Business Principles. - External audit of BIMS compliance. - External whistle blower program.

Partnerships

- Increase structured dialogue with clients and staff - Connect with external parties with focus on sustainability

- Revitalized local account management. - Initiated external dialogue on CR policy and performance. - Connected with parties on sustainability, became member of Young LFN, and signatory to the UN Global Compact.

- Further strengthen account management. - Continue CR stakeholder dialogue. - Expand participation with select forums.

Communities - Investment in community projects: • € 386,000 (€ 360,000) • Hours community initiatives: 5,770 (2,760)

- More accurate monitoring for our (financial) engagements and to stimulate the link between expertise and philanthropy. - Encourage a greater emphasis on building futures and sustainability as appropriate to the local context.

- Emphasis on building futures and sustainability as appropriate to the local context. - Education and community involvement adopted by several entities.

- Continue level of investment, especially on education and capacity building.

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 8 -


Profile

DHV Group

Key figures 2008 (2007)

Targets 2008

Accomplishments 2008

Targets 2009

People management - Jobs created: 372 (239) - Staff covered by career development programs: 64% (58%) - Avg. training hours per FTE: 34 (36) - Female workforce: 30% (28%) - LTI cases/200,000 hours: 0.4 (0.7)

- Improve retention of staff - Use career planning and development to grow capabilities - Increase global HR network

- Increased structured dialogue with staff. - Performed strategy survey among international leadership group (top 100). - Launched program for Early Career Development. - Improve retention of staff was not achieved, ratio of outflow increased by 2%. - Increased collaboration between global HR managers.

- Continue with small group sessions. - Implement recommendations regarding career development. - Establish HR network and Community of Practice.

Our operations - Green electricity: 38% (37%) - Avg. CO2 footprint/FTE: 3,210 kg (3,630 kg) - Avg. paper/FTE: 49 kg (61 kg)

- Reduce our CO2 footprint - Review the Dutch procurement policy of DHV

- CO2 footprint appears to have decreased, but data have a high percentage of estimation. - Sharpened environmental requirements in procurement and mobility policies.

- Establish target and plan for CO2 reduction. - Continue revision of Dutch procurement policy. - Share learning between locations.

Reporting and Transparency - CR Report ranked #16 of 146 and #1 in the services sector by the transparency benchmark of the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs.

- Improve coverage and accuracy of CR reporting - Leverage increased transparency to improve activities

- Improved coverage and accuracy of People data. - Individual companies initiated activities based on increased insight.

- Improve accuracy of CR reporting and provide more interim feedback to stimulate action.

CR Report 2008

-9-


Philosophy

2

PHILOSOPHY

2.1

Our view on corporate responsibility

Our view on corporate responsibility is that we are part of the global living environment and have an obligation to make a positive contribution. We believe that taking a collaborative approach in combination with high levels of expertise results in practical solutions, with greater potential for long term success. Our contribution to corporate responsibility is centered on sustainable development, as expressed in the Group mission below. We see this as a commitment to future generations as well as to the stakeholders of today.

“Our mission is to provide multidisciplinary services for the sustainable development of our living environment, in close relationship with clients, employees and partners, based on mutual loyalty, while providing a solid return to our shareholders.�

2.2

Added value of corporate responsibility to our business

DHV Group

others who are also looking for ways to improve sustainability. This enhances innovation as well as project execution. Our business benefits from the increased focus on transparency and integrity, as this provides a better business environment. Internally, our focus on sustainability strengthens the ability to attract and retain talent, provides a stimulus for innovation, and prompts us to reduce waste. Taking corporate responsibility in our own actions is a reflection of our commitment to sustainable development. Market Environmental awareness and the demand for sustainable and innovative solutions continue to grow despite the world economic crisis. To a certain extent, sustainable development will actually benefit from the crisis, through a sharpening of plans. Objectives are being more clearly defined, planned and budgeted, and stimulus packages in several countries specifically target longer term investment. The DHV Group’s experience with integrating sustainability objectives in projects and in promoting transparency in the process enables us to be a reliable partner for realizing combined goals. Topics around which we are able to make a significant contribution are climate change (particularly related to water), mobility, and urban development in both urban planning and with individual buildings. In addition to project execution capabilities, we have built-up considerable environment and sustainability specific consulting expertise.

A focus on corporate responsibility, particularly in terms of sustainable development, contributes to our business in a number of ways. The greater demand for sustainable solutions expands the market for our services and technologies. Having a common focus enables us to work more easily with

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 10 -


Philosophy

DHV Group

Showcase project

Innovation Innovation invariably involves insight from various perspectives and openness to questioning and collaboration. We are experiencing that the drive for sustainability is stimulating more parties to work together and jointly share risks as well as opportunities. In addition to investing our own resources in innovation, we have worked closely with universities and research institutions and have received support for research from governmental bodies. We have also worked together with clients and other consulting and engineering firms through jointly sponsored professional organizations. A new trend is that companies from different industries are actively seeking synergies, and that private and municipal parties are more open to hosting pilot programs and becoming a launching client. This not only provides an opportunity to accelerate development, but also brings stronger operational and maintenance insight.

Helping people help themselves In May 2006 an earthquake struck Yogyakarta and Central Java, killing over 5,700 people, injuring 60,000, and destroying and damaging thousands of homes. Housing reconstruction received a high priority. DHV was responsible for the overall project management of this reconstruction project. The approach was to help people help themselves. Beneficiaries had to organize themselves in community groups, which were provided with designs for earthquake-resistant houses and training in construction methods. Donor money was transferred directly into their bank accounts and they were taught simple bookkeeping methods. By July 2008, the reconstruction of all 15,153 houses was completed. More than 500 field staff assisted the communities with the reconstruction efforts.

Promotion of integrity Integrity issues have an enormous impact on the lives of people and the functioning of economies. The DHV Group applies a zero tolerance policy that is assured through our Business Integrity Management System (BIMS). This has an impact on where we choose to operate. Even though the choices present dilemmas and possible loss of business, greater transparency leads to a more level playing field and reduces risk. We are seeing an increased openness to dialogue.

CR Report 2008

Quest for talent Employee engagement is essential to excelling in the type of work that we do. Being able to contribute to communities and the environment is a strong motivator for many working at the DHV Group. Coupled with this, the DHV

- 11 -


Philosophy

DHV Group

standard expectations as corporate responsibility continues to move into the main stream.

Group aspires to be an employer of choice, differentiating through an engaging work environment that offers ample opportunity for creativity, personal initiative and enterprise. This is particularly important given the shortage of resources and high turnover rate in a number of regions. Tracking our progress through CR measurements helps in benchmarking across the company and in keeping attention to aspects such as career development, internal promotion, diversity, and training.

The year 2009 is anticipated to be one of large uncertainties and worldwide economic turmoil. We are taking a sober, yet confident approach and believe that the scope of our activities and the markets that we serve will continue to generate opportunities.

2.3

2.4

Our vision on the future of corporate responsibility

Major changes in climate, economies, ecosystems and social structures are revealing themselves. The rate of change has been accelerating and the global society is challenged to adapt more rapidly than initially thought necessary. In our view it will require more intense collaboration and innovation to find the necessary solutions. In the coming years this will receive increased attention in more parts of the world, particularly as scarcity and the need to ensure safety become more pronounced. We also anticipate a growing focus on achieving development goals through sustainable enterprise and capacity building, in order to decrease reliance on continuous aid and philanthropy. The role of companies like us and how we fill in corporate responsibility will not only meet with increasing expectations from stakeholders, but will become an integral part of the value that is delivered. Efforts to reduce waste in our own operations and for our customers, develop talent, and create effective and responsible business models will be instrumental to success. At the same time, many measures that now seem extraordinary will become

CR Report 2008

Our impact

On the economy The DHV Group philosophy is “Local delivery of world-class solutions� – to apply state-of-the-art knowledge to specific local contexts in which we operate. A key ingredient of this strategy is operating through national offices, hence establishing local economic entities run by local management which are connected to the whole of the DHV Group. In this way our business creates economic value and contributes to sustainable development through: the payment of local taxes; job creation; sourcing materials and services locally; and working on projects that enhance the local quality of life. In addition to providing employment, a number of DHV Group companies share their success with staff through profit sharing and the possibility to buy company shares. The DHV share plan was renewed in 2008 and now gives significantly wider opportunities for employees to participate. Furthermore, we contribute to the well-being and development of local communities through donations, sponsoring and contributions in kind.

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 12 -


Philosophy

Showcase project

DHV Group

Because we mainly provide knowledge based services, rather than manufactured goods, our supply chain has a relatively small impact compared to other organizations. However, the sourcing of e.g. energy, paper, furniture, catering, IT infrastructure and housing receives attention from an environmental perspective. In comparison, we believe that the network of professional parties with whom we cooperate – clients, business partners and sub-contractors – has greater relevance to our operations. We select business partners that are compatible with our business principles and code of conduct. We are especially mindful in selecting potential partners for joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions, with culture being one of the selection criteria in our merger process. In this way, we seek to safeguard our own integrity and create value for our shareholders, the environment and the global community.

Community building across the Black Mfolozi River The Black Mfolozi River bridge project in a remote area of KwaZulu-Natal earned the Best Community-Based project award from the South African Institution of Civil Engineers’ Pietermaritzburg branch. A primary and high school are located on one side of the river, causing some 90 students to cross the river twice a day to get to and from school. Their lives were regularly put at risk due to frequent flooding and crocodile attacks. The project used a simple design to maximize work opportunities for local labor. SSI, a DHV Group company, was responsible for the design review and site supervision. The project team built more than just a bridge, organizing community outreach initiatives such as career guidance, skills training, and a soccer tournament to encourage co-operation between the communities.

CR Report 2008

On people The DHV Group and alliance partner Delcan employ over 5,300 professional and support staff. We engage with employees in regular performance reviews, personal development trajectories, work/life balance and career planning. The DHV Group strives to safeguard the safety and security of its workforce, does not support nor engage in forced labor or child labor and as employer is open to direct dialogue with staff and parties who collectively represent staff. Our work has an impact on people and communities where our clients undertake their projects. For example, work on infrastructure or water systems has enormous impact on people living close by, in addition to the eventual users. We work closely with our clients to appropriately engage their stakeholders in the course of our projects.

- 13 -


Philosophy

Showcase project

DHV Group

On the planet We impact the planet in two primary ways: through the business projects which we execute and through our own operations. Our projects can have significant impact on the environment. This literally includes all environmental aspects such as water, air, soil, biodiversity, spatial functions and non-renewable resources. We market services and technologies that contribute to improvement of the environment and we avoid participation in projects that do not consider their impact on the environment.

Ottawa favors walking and cycling As part of its overall objective for community development, the City of Ottawa wants major road corridors to become more livable and functional, with a special emphasis on sustainable transportation solutions. DHV partner Delcan was retained to complete Ottawa’s “Road Corridor Planning and Design Guidelines”. The study included use of adjacent land, boulevard treatments, pedestrian and cycling facilities, vehicle and bus facilities, signage and other urban design aspects. The new guidelines encourage people to cycle or walk by re-programming existing right-of-ways. The guidelines also promote the design of major roads as “Green Streets”, which incorporate innovative solutions for drainage, surfaces, and landscape interventions to produce sustainable infrastructure.

CR Report 2008

I believe that each project can be carried out with respect for our living environment. We are geared towards using our know-how for sustainable roads, green buildings construction and CO2 management. Marta Podedworna, Specialist Environmental Protection, DHV, Poland

Our own operations have a direct effect on the environment through the consumption of energy, water, space and other natural resources. The biggest direct impact is through travel. Our work often makes it necessary to regularly be where our clients and projects are located. The interaction amongst our member companies also demands travel. We consume fossil

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 14 -


Philosophy

Showcase project

DHV Group

fuels through the use of airplanes, automobiles and public transport. Furthermore, we provide office facilities for our people and therefore contribute to the emission of greenhouse gases through electricity production, heating and material consumption. We have decided to pay more attention to our CO2 footprint in terms of emissions from travel and housing related energy consumption. Water and material consumption are relevant, but on a much smaller scale. We are therefore giving priority to energy use monitoring and improving energy use.

Clean transport fueled by waste The production of green gas from sludge and waste has not been profitable yet. DHV is looking at the possibilities from a different perspective. By thinking creatively about technologies and processes, DHV is connecting parties in specialty fields and markets in a unique way. The result is the creation of “smart chains� that produce win-win situations for all parties involved. In a commission from the Dutch province of South Holland, DHV orchestrated a chain arrangement whereby four parties began working together – parties which previously had little in common: namely, a bus company, a household waste plant, the water board and a sludge incinerating installation. Goal: making busses run on green gas: a win-win situation for everyone.

CR Report 2008

- 15 -


Policy

DHV Group

3

POLICY

3.1

From ambition to action

People: In the sphere of social and personal interaction, we emphasize our core values of respect, integrity and freedom. • We believe that personal attention, development opportunities and a climate for sustainable enterprise are key to our success. • We promote a culture of openness and teamwork. • We value and will increase diversity in our dialogue and decision making process.

To guide our efforts, the DHV Group has formulated the following ambitions, which we translate into policy, strategy and business development: Business: Active pursuit of sustainable innovations is essential to our continuity and profitability. We partner with our clients and business partners, and take a leading role in sustainability issues within our industry. Our greatest contribution is achieved through our projects. • We invest in developing sustainability related technology and employee capabilities. • We apply a zero tolerance policy towards corruption. • We provide tools and training for our employees to support them in recognizing opportunities and threats for sustainable change. • We stimulate opportunities to combine sustainability and profitability. Dialogue: We are in dialogue with internal and external stakeholders and will continue this in a structured and effective manner. • We are positive towards requests for cooperation and membership in third-party initiatives that promote sustainability. Participation is assessed in terms of social and ecological merits and alignment with our core business. • We accept the feedback from our stakeholders as an important input for our decision making, and acknowledge their views in determining our strategy.

CR Report 2008

We continue to increase involvement inside and outside the company.

At home I try to live in an environmentally friendly manner. In work I try to inspire clients to deal with ecological and landscape values in a positive way and have respect for the values and social-economic perspective of each stakeholder in the area. Theo Klink, Director Water, Ecology and Spatial Development, DHV, the Netherlands

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 16 -


Policy

DHV Group

Operations: In our policies for business operations such as mobility and housing we strive to decrease negative environmental impact and pursue continuous performance improvement. • We strive to achieve positive environmental impact and establish measurable targets. • We stimulate energy efficiency in our housing and mobility policies. • We seek opportunities for supply chain improvement.

Showcase project

100% runway recycling in Taiwan NACO is designing and managing the major airside upgrade at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport. The project includes the rehabilitation of 1.2 million m2 of concrete pavement and the construction of 1 million m2 of new pavement to accommodate the anticipated growth of air traffic, including direct flight connections to China. This project is a showcase of sustainable pavement rehabilitation, as all existing pavement material is being recycled on site through a technique called “rubblization”. This saves more than 700,000 tons of natural resources and significantly reduces carbon dioxide that is normally emitted in the transport of waste and new material.

Communities: We strive to understand mutual dependencies and commit to making a positive impact on our communities and environment. • We do not act in ways that knowingly cause harm. • Non-profit activities concentrate on “Building Futures”, our engagement for educational and economic development, and “The Living Environment”, our actions to preserve and restore a healthy planet.

3.2

Commitment to external principles

The DHV Group considers a range of international frameworks and principles as important impulses for the positive development of the world’s economy, ecology and social and cultural structures. The list below contains those which we regard as having the greatest impact on the Group’s business: The UN Global Compact – The DHV Group is signatory to the UN Global Compact since 2008. We advocate the ten principles on Human Rights, Labor Standards, Environment and Anti-corruption as an important guideline

CR Report 2008

- 17 -


Policy

for our business conduct. We undertake to integrate these principles, including a precautionary approach to environmental challenges, in our policy, strategy and business decisions. PACI Principles for Countering Bribery – Partnering Against Corruption Initiative (PACI) is a business driven effort to combat global corruption. DHV is a PACI signatory, advocating a zero tolerance policy towards bribery and an effective program implementation. The Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) – is a valuable international guideline to structure sustainability reporting in a way that helps to create a comparable and adequate reporting standard. We employ the third generation (G3) guidelines to our own CR report and are an organizational stakeholder of GRI. The guidelines for multinational enterprises of the OECD – we conform to the guidelines for business conduct in international operations. The Millennium Development Goals – the goals are an important target for the world society to achieve a sustainable future. Through our projects and business conduct, we contribute to the achievement of multiple goals, e.g. a sustainable environment, drinking water and a global partnership for development.

DHV Group

3.3

Corporate responsibility in our strategy

The internal Corporate Policy Paper (CPP) articulates the vision, mission and strategy of the DHV Group. Corporate responsibility leadership is designated as one of the key objectives. We recognize the interconnectivity of benefits to people, planet and profit for sustainable development. Our long-term goal is to achieve “Corporate responsibility Inside”, making CR an integral part of our regular business. We have identified four key priority areas: integrity, sustainability in our projects, the impact of our own operations and people development. In line with our philosophy of local delivery, CR programs are established locally. In 2008, both SSI and Delcan launched their respective CR programs. These are aligned to local priorities, and take into account the Group’s approach, as well as principles such as the UN Global Compact and GRI reporting guidelines.

The conventions of the International Labor Organization – amongst other objectives, we subscribe to the promotion of decent work for all, the freedom to collective bargaining and the ban on child and forced labor.

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 18 -


Policy

Showcase project

New ecological city in the sea for Tianjin Over the next ten years the population around Tianjin’s import harbor is expected to grow to 300,000 inhabitants. DHV, together with Architekten Cie., designed the city’s extension into the sea. The innovative and sustainable masterplan strikes a balance between living, working and recreation for an island area of 100 km2. Environment Minister Cramer of the Netherlands visited the land-reclamation site in November 2008. “It is good to see here,” she said, “that Dutch engineers can convey their unique expertise in the areas of dikes, water and land-reclamation to their Chinese counterparts.”

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

The following elements are organized from a Group perspective: – The Business Integrity Management System framework, including reporting and confirmation – Quantitative and qualitative reporting from the entities through the quarterly financial reporting process. The information requested is a selection of GRI criteria, and is centrally validated, evaluated and reported to management – Overall education and dialogue related to corporate responsibility and sustainable development, e.g. through the Executive Development Program, International Management Meeting and news bulletins – Sharing of best practices, such as basic implementation tools and project examples. Impact of stakeholders on strategy Starting point for strategy on corporate responsibility The formalization of our approach to corporate responsibility was in response to a 2005 staff survey among Netherlands personnel. The survey indicated that many staff personnel felt strongly about sustainable operations, community involvement and sustainable innovation. They indicated that a formal program, such as had been established for the Business Integrity Management System, was necessary to increase awareness. A CR workgroup was established to further define what such a program should include. In 2007 we expanded dialogue with our global operations. Corporate responsibility was discussed at the 2007 annual International Management Meeting. Subsequently an international team of DHV Group management addressed CR in a global context during the course of their Executive

- 19 -


Policy

Development Program (EDP). They concluded that there were different perceptions across the company, as well as different approaches. They also found that there is broad employee support and pride around CR activities. The EDP group recommended that an overall company framework be built around people, planet and profit; to increase education and communication on CR; and to maintain flexibility for spontaneous local initiatives. These elements are now a part of our approach to CR. External feedback We also incorporate external interests in our corporate responsibility strategy. The cooperation with other parties in projects and our participation in associations and networks helps keep us informed about the expectations of the outside world. This has led us to become more explicit about including and communicating sustainability aspects in our work, e.g. in our proposals and publications. For this reason, we are also active in the organization of dialogue platforms such as the Dutch National Sustainability Congress, the Green Building Festival in Toronto and round table discussions on topics such as urban planning. In 2007 we began taking a more structured approach to aligning with established guidelines and principles as mentioned in the section “Commitment to External Principles�. In 2008 we began conducting structured stakeholder dialogue with clients, financial partners, universities, NGO’s and government. Supply chain choices As a knowledge organization, our supply chain is very limited. We look for common values and business principles as a part of selecting partners. However, DHV does not produce nor manufacture products and hence has no suppliers of parts or materials in the context of our core business. Nonetheless, we have suppliers for our facilities such as energy and other

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

building related supplies and we are working with agencies and business services. Until now, we have not paid explicit attention to our suppliers in terms of sustainability, although we have a history of conscientiously selecting our business partners. The procurement activities of DHV in the Netherlands have been screened for improvements and an update of our policy is under development. Staff is however already practicing socially and environmentally sound procurement, for example by purchasing paper produced through chlorine free or FSC-certified processes. Likewise, the disposal of materials receives attention, e.g. the possibilities to reduce, recycle and re-use. Our efforts to procure locally and to consider environmental and social aspects in the process will receive more attention in the future.

3.4

Corporate responsibility inside concept

The business in which we operate has a natural emphasis on sustainability. Creating sustainable living environments requires our professionals to search for those solutions that have a positive impact under the given circumstances. We seek advantageous solutions in cooperation with our clients, business partners and involved stakeholders. To support our professionals in finding those solutions and pay specific attention to CR issues, DHV developed its own methodology for evaluating the degree of sustainability in our projects. A supporting transparency tool is available online to employees. This tool functions as a guideline for professionals to strengthen their attention to sustainability. In 2008 it was

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 20 -


Policy

used on 30 projects. In 2009 we will be able to begin analyzing trends and integrating the tool in our normal course of business. In order to further increase awareness of CR, our internal publications have put a greater focus on highlighting those aspects of our work. Capability statements on environmental topics were prepared as a result of the working seminar “e-vent”, which was held in 2007. Bundling and communicating our global expertise on such subjects as Environmental Impact Assessments have helped colleagues offer these services in regions where this is a new requirement. In daily business, DHV Group companies find multitudes of sustainable solutions for ecological, social and process related challenges. Some are very technical and complex, others combine basic concepts with innovative applications. External parties have recognized us for our qualities in respect to CR. The Group has received numerous awards and is selected to work on outstanding projects. Management approach The management of corporate responsibility is a part of the regular management structure within the DHV Group as described under the heading of Corporate Governance. The internal Business Control Framework describes the “hard controls” in place such as our Authority Matrix, as well as the “soft control” elements such as beliefs, values, leadership and governance structures, which together form the control environment that guides how the company is managed and deals with risks.

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

The following summary of the DHV Group management approach is included per the methodology and categories of GRI. More detailed information on the individual indicators is referenced in the GRI Cross Reference Table. Goals, Performance and Policy Formulation of strategy, policy and goals for the DHV Group is the responsibility of the Executive Board. This is developed in dialogue with members of the International Policy Board (IPB). Ongoing matters, strategy, goals and policy are further reviewed with the Supervisory Board, which consists of external members. Major strategic and organizational issues are decided through shareholders meetings. Strategic guidelines and ambitions are communicated to the organization through the Corporate Policy Paper (CPP) which is the basis for Business Plans for the Groups and Regions. These are subsequently cascaded and supported by Business Unit and country plans. Reporting of performance is performed on a quarterly basis, through the financial reporting cycle and discussed at International Policy Board meetings. Economic: our policy of “Local delivery of world-class solutions” emphasizes operating through national offices. We have selected nine home countries in which to establish local economic entities, run by local management and networked with the whole of the DHV Group. In this way our business creates steady economic value and contributes to sustainable development through job creation, the payment of local taxes; sourcing materials and services locally; and working on projects that enhance the local quality of life. We pay market conform wages and provide secondary conditions which support health and well being. In addition to employment, a number of DHV Group companies share their success with staff through profit sharing and the possibility to buy company shares. The DHV share plan was renewed in

- 21 -


Policy

2008 and now gives significantly wider opportunities for employees to participate. In addition to the economic contribution of our own operations, we strive to involve local communities and suppliers in the projects that we execute for our clients. This regularly entails capacity building through training and experience that is gained during the project. Finally, we contribute to the wellbeing and development of local communities through donations, sponsoring and contributions in kind. This is primarily in support of communities where our operations are located, but is also stimulated as a part of our projects. Being a knowledge-based organization, we put a special emphasis on education. Environment, Labor, Human Rights, and Society: overall policy for these aspects is guided by principles established in the Corporate Policy Paper, Global Code of Business Principles and the Business Integrity Management System. Our management approach is best illustrated by the following extract from our Global Code of Business Principles, which explains our company values.

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

Our Key Values Our key values, Integrity, Respect and Freedom are at the heart of our business. Together they create an environment of which we can be proud and where people can enjoy their work. Integrity Integrity is the basis for trust from our clients and trust within the company. We strive to uphold the highest professional standards, provide sound solutions and avoid conflicts of interest. We respect the letter and spirit of applicable national and international legislation and regulations. The DHV Group has a zero tolerance policy toward corruption, bribery, collusion, extortion, fraud and other forms of improper actions for corporate or personal financial gain. This also applies to actions by our business partners. These integrity principles are made concrete through our Business Integrity Management System (BIMS) and the accompanying Compliance Program. Respect Respect is our basis for teamwork. We treat others as we wish to be treated and appreciate different perspectives. In our policies and relationships, we act with respect for the rights and dignity of individuals, as well as for the societies in which we live and work. Our company policy does not tolerate discrimination or violation of human rights and upholds the international conventions of labor standards, including those on child and forced labor. We act with respect for the environment and strive to make a positive impact though our projects and operations. Freedom Freedom forms the basis of our approach. The DHV Group is a wholly independent organization, without external shareholders. This independence enables us to shape our own direction and to carry responsibility for our legacy and future. The same is true for individuals. Our company policy promotes empowerment and accountability. We support freedom of association, speech, thought and action, while recognizing the business framework in which the Group operates. We value openness and choice, believing that this environment attracts and develops strong professionals who are able to provide clients with independent and creative solutions.

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 22 -


Policy

Appropriate implementation is primarily determined at the country level, with regional oversight. In addition, there is a separate channel for integrity related reporting and a “whistle blower program�. This process is overseen by the Compliance Officer who reports on this to the DHV Group President and who has a direct line to the Supervisory Board. Additional information on environmental focus is contained elsewhere in this report and referenced in the GRI Cross Reference Table. Product Requirements: the determination of product (service) requirements is a joint responsibility between the Business Groups and the Regions. The Business Groups have the primary responsibility for developing and maintaining these as appropriate to their expertise positions. The Regions advise on local adaptation and implementation. Organizational responsibility Organizational responsibility in all facets, Economic, Environmental, Labor, Human Rights, Society and Product Responsibility is accorded in the same cascading approach as above. The Executive Board makes appointments at the International Policy Board (IPB) level and dialogues with IPB members about managerial appointments at the subsequent level. A particular focus is given to Management Development across Business Groups and Regions as well as to diversity. The balance of the organization is appointed and managed at Business Group and local levels. Managers of similar functions are encouraged to network in order to share best practices and harmonize approaches. In addition, taskforces are periodically established to further corporate initiatives such as a Global Knowledge Broker network to enhance knowledge sharing.

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

An exception to the overall decentralized organizational approach is the centralized controller organization. Business Group and Regional controllers are appointed by the Director of Finance and Control, to whom they report functionally and in a direct hierarchical line. The controllers provide operational support and reporting to the units that they serve. Training Training needs and programs in all facets, Economic, Environmental, Labor, Human Rights, Society and Product Responsibility are determined at a business group and local level, with the exception of management level training such as the Executive Development Program and mandatory company wide training and awareness regarding the Business Integrity Management System. These are determined at EB level. A DHV University is in the process of being established, in order to function as an umbrella organization for greater commonality and standardization across the group in topics such as Project Management and Business Development Monitoring Monitoring in all facets, Economic, Environmental, Labor, Human Rights, Society and Product Responsibility takes place along organizational lines, augmented by audits and management visits. As previously mentioned, quarterly financial and corporate responsibility reporting are conducted via the controller organization. Business Group and Region directors submit and discuss quarterly reports with the Executive Board. The Executive Board submits and discusses the DHV Group’s quarterly report with the Supervisory Board.

- 23 -


Policy

Corporate governance The Executive Board (EB) and Supervisory Board (SB) of DHV Holding B.V. are guided by the principles and best practice provisions of the Dutch corporate governance code. The management of the DHV Group is the responsibility of the EB. This includes responsibility for formulating and implementing corporate objectives and strategy, and for resulting policy and financial performance. The International Policy Board (IPB), which consists of the directors of the Business Groups and Regions as well as the staff directors of Finance and Control, Corporate Business Development, and Corporate Initiatives and Legal Affairs, is led by the EB and acts as an extension of the EB in formulating and implementing policy. The DHV Group’s ambitions and profile as well as mission and vision are presented in the Corporate Policy Paper (CPP), which includes corporate responsibility issues. This document outlines the DHV Group strategic plans for the coming five years and is the responsibility of the EB. The IPB is consulted in the preparation of the CPP and it is approved by the SB. The CPP is presented and discussed yearly during the International Management Meeting (IMM). The EB chairs the IMM and its participants consist of the top management of the DHV Group. The EB is selected on its ability to perform their responsibilities as outlined above. They are evaluated on their accomplishments, skills and expertise with which they lead the DHV Group. Their knowledge and involvement with corporate responsibility is part of this, as our CR policy and performance influences the Group’s ability to deliver sustainable solutions in a responsible way.

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

Within this framework, the DHV Group has adopted a decentralized organizational structure in order to enhance its responsiveness to specific client needs. The Group is organized in four Business Groups and four Regions where we maintain a permanent presence. We provide services through a family of brands, utilizing the organizational structure to combine engineering and consulting of the highest quality with an in-depth knowledge of local conditions, language and culture. The Business Groups have a primary responsibility for developing and maintaining expertise positions, while the four Regions focus on relationships and local delivery. Profit and loss responsibility is at the Business Unit/Country level. This management approach is applied to all facets of the DHV Group operations, incorporating Corporate responsibility on all levels. (See our corporate website for our organizational chart) For additional information on www.dhv.com/corporategovernance.

3.5

corporate

governance

see

Our future

The market outlook for the DHV Group remains positive, both in terms of market focus and regional presence. Major trends such as the awareness of climate change, the further growth of mega-cities and the demand for natural resources provides opportunities in environment, urban planning, transportation and water markets. We will continue to strengthen our expertise profiles in these areas and to contribute to global sustainability through innovation and by working with others.

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 24 -


Policy

DHV Group

3.6 As every drop makes an ocean, I contribute to my living environment in simple ways by creating awareness amidst my neighborhood about the importance of using recyclable items, saying no to plastics and encourage usage of products made by poor and mentally challenged children, which in small ways help towards the social, environmental and economic well being of the society and the living environment as a whole. Sumita Akhaury Sahay, Deputy Director Spatial Planning and Urban Development, DHV, India

Our goals for the next years related to corporate responsibility are to continue and accelerate the initiatives that we have begun. Goals for 2009 are stated in the table CR at a Glance. We are reviewing our initial measurements, the process for gathering these and the focus on operations in different regions. During 2009 we intend to set a limited number of SMART targets which support our philosophy of CR Inside and our approach of Local delivery of world-class solutions. We believe that especially with the uncertainties ahead, a focus on flexibility and agility will be important to the future.

CR Report 2008

Our challenges

Dilemmas are inherent to our business operations. For the DHV Group these dilemmas generally entail whether or not to participate in a project due to questions of integrity, negative impact to society or the environment, or to avoid situations of (perceived) conflicts of interests. Cases are evaluated on an individual basis, within the framework of our Business Integrity Management System framework and the Tender Board Process. When such conflicts are anticipated, management dialogue is triggered at the tendering phase through the Tender Board procedure. The dialogue is first raised at the business unit and regional level, but is escalated in line with the Authority Matrix. As a general rule, the DHV Group avoids operations in countries where integrity abuse exists to the extent that it precludes the successful completion of services, presents a danger to personnel, or where our work would result in negative consequences in terms of people and planet. When operating in countries where there is a known pattern of corruption or abuse, we are selective in the work that we take on and parties with whom we work, identifying niches where we believe we can contribute to greater sustainability and perform our work keeping to integrity standards defined in our Business Integrity Management System. For example, we are involved with water management, wastewater treatment, drinking water projects and urban planning in countries that may be considered repressive regimes. We believe that our activities in these can make a positive contribution to local communities and the environment, and that we can solve more by staying in contact. In situations such as these, we keep in close dialogue with our employees.

- 25 -


Policy

Perceived conflicts of interest can arise when we perform work in an advisory capacity, for example to governmental authorities and wish to later provide services or technology in the execution phase. In this, we strive to be open and transparent in our involvement and future objectives. This requires dialogue, directly or through professional associations. For example DHV and other parties worked together with the Netherlands Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management through ONRI, (the Dutch Association of Consulting Engineers) to establish a code of principles regarding such conflicts, the “Scheiding van Belang” (separation of interest) document. This is now in standard use. DHV has also developed an internal procedure for determining the potential for and avoidance of such conflicts. In daily operations, conflicts of interest are also prevented by our observance of secrecy agreements, internally as well as externally. We believe that maintaining an independent position is critical to quality of services that we offer our clients. The first two cases below illustrate dilemmas of perceived conflict of interest. The latter two entail decisions to decline work which DHV would liked to execute. Both of those projects were a good match with our expertise and would have meant a sizable portion of work for the respective regional office. 1)

DHV consultants are advising a city in the planning of a major new development project. The city is an important client for DHV. At the same time, DHV provided services to a small neighboring municipality that was against this development due to concerns about possible annexation. DHV helped create a strategic reaction which meets both the interests of the municipality and its neighbor city. The two services are performed by separate DHV consultants. Both clients are aware of and do not object to DHV involvement with the other party. Up to this

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

point, there was no dilemma. However, the relations are still under pressure” and DHV began working with the city to present its project at a national industry conference. The dilemma was whether DHV should take steps to ensure equal exposure. DHV initiated dialogue. The outcome is two sessions, one for each at the conference. The agreements on the program are: respect for each other’s position, as a start for discussion with other municipalities on how to deal with these kinds of situations. 2)

An example of perceived conflict of interest concerns a DHV employee who is a member of a local city council. The city has asked DHV to perform an estimate review on a project for a new city hall / library complex. In his role in the city council, the employee has objected to this expansion and was surprised to learn that his employer had been selected for this service. The concern was that this could be construed as a way to secure his cooperation. The employee reiterated his objection and requested that DHV be removed from the review. In actuality, DHV had been selected because there are only four companies in the country experienced with this type of work and the other three were disqualified because they were involved with the original estimate. Furthermore, DHV believes that it is able to avoid a conflict of interest through its standard procedure of assigning nonrelated personnel. However, since one of its employees is actively involved with the case and the situation is further complicated by this employee living adjacent to the planned development, DHV has agreed with the city council that it is better to withdraw and not pursue this assignment.

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 26 -


Policy

3)

DHV Group

The last example concerns an economic aid project. DHV had been asked to prepare a proposal for overall project management of a development project. However, the level of effort envisaged by the contracting parties is substantially lower than the staffing which DHV believes is necessary. DHV would most likely not be held responsible for eventual overruns, but believes that the approach puts both itself and the overall success of the project at risk. Although both contracting parties are significant clients in the region, DHV has decided to respectfully decline to pursue this work, with an explanation why.

In these examples we are not naming parties, however feel that through actions such as these and openness with those involved, we not only maintain our independent position, but also help to improve the overall approach to dilemmas.

My personal passion for nature drove me to dedicate my career to efficient, sustainable architecture more than 15 years ago; since that time I have tried to be conscious about consuming less and living simply but well. Tom Ponessa, Integration Manager – Sustainable Design, Delcan, Canada

CR Report 2008

- 27 -


Performance

4 4.1

PERFORMANCE Awards and rankings

In 2008 we received prestigious awards, which underscore our expertise positions and drive for sustainability. Among others: • The Tunnel Rodenrijseweg of the expressway N470 in the Netherlands won the European Concrete Award (ESCN) in the category Civil Engineering. The tunnel has a daring design and was constructed using sustainable materials (architect: Marius van den Wildenberg). • DHV was part of the team that won the Future Search 2008 (NLPB), a Dutch competition for the most innovative idea for building management. • Delcan: Best of ITS Award in the Best New Innovative Practices Category for the Lake County Passage System Project from the Intelligent Transportation Society of America (ITSA). • Delcan: Canadian Consulting Engineering Award of Excellence for the Kicking Horse Canyon Bridge Phase II Project from the Association of Consulting Engineers of Canada. • SSI: Engineering Excellence Award from the Consulting Engineers South Africa (CESA) for the Clean Room Project for the Biovac Institute in Cape Town, South Africa. • SSI: Best Community-Based Project of 2008 by the Pietermaritzburg branch of the South African Institution of Civil Engineering for the construction of a bridge over the Black Mfolozi River for two communities in the remote Mahlabathini district of KwaZulu-Natal.

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

A selection of related rankings **: 2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

Top 200 International Design Firms

*

44

41

42

38

Top 150 Global Design Firms

*

56

58

61

43

The Swedish Association of Architects and Consulting Engineers (STD): The top 300 European Consulting Engineering and Architectural groups

*

22

19

28

16

24

26

22

29

33

Transparency Benchmark of the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs; for the CR Report (out of 100 points = # 16 of 146 participants)

*

73

45

51

40

Scenter research (about the transparency of policy in annual reports of Dutch companies)

*

8.0

8.2

6.0

5.4

Engineering News-Record

Dutch engineering weekly “Technisch weekblad”: Top Dutch companies' R&D investments

* ranking not yet available ** For purposes of comparison, rankings in this table are shown in the year to which the company data relates versus the release dates or report titles of the issuer.

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 28 -


Performance

4.2

Inside business and innovation

Accomplishments and challenges 2008 Promoting and improving the sustainable character of our core business has been a focus point in our corporate strategy. It is an integral part of line responsibility and fostered among member companies with support from the DHV Group director of corporate initiatives. Our largest operations have established programs for CR to pull together existing activities and provide more focus. DHV in the Netherlands appointed a CR Manager in 2007. Both SSI in Africa and Delcan in North America established programs in 2008. Smaller operations are conducting CR activities within the definition of the corporate framework. Our innovation is regularly acknowledged through external awards and projects granted explicitly because of our innovative solutions. Internally, we have worked on the innovation agenda to combine the necessary freedom for entrepreneurial innovativeness with supportive organizational structures. There are numerous examples to illustrate the degree of sustainability in our core business. Our challenge is to leverage the activities and learning on individual projects and to promote a consistent approach in assessing opportunities for sustainability and subsequently evaluating the implementation. In 2008 we made a more concerted effort to share successes through internal publications and networking events. Sustainable innovation Innovation is a key aspect of the DHV Group’s services, as evidenced by the type of contracts we perform as well as by the industry awards which we win.

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

In 2008 all major operating brands won prestigious awards, examples can be found above in the chapter “awards and rankings”. DHV Group companies are involved with technical Research and Development. In 2008, DHV requested 3 patents, primarily for sustainability related innovations such as our NEREDA® technology www.nereda.net. Our R&D investments increased from € 16.4 million in 2007 to an estimated € 17.7 million in 2008 (whereof € 11 million in the Netherlands). DHV was ranked by the Dutch engineering weekly “Technisch Weekblad” from number 26 to number 24 in the recent listing of Dutch R&D companies. Recent internal R&D investments include the development of GeO Value, a tool to help municipalities, corporations and developers evaluate the economic feasibility of area development plans. GeO Value takes into account both land and exploitation costs. By combining GIS, calculation models and an interactive Map Table, GeO Value quickly visualizes and calculates the value of options. This enhances communication and can substantially accelerate decision making. Bujar Nushi (DHV) explains GeoValue to Ms Sybilla Dekker at the PROVADA fair 10 June 2008.

- 29 -


Performance

4.3

DHV Group

Business with integrity

Business Integrity Management and Discrimination The DHV Group applies a structured approach to integrity in its business practices. The application and management of our Business Integrity Management System (BIMS) is the practical implementation of a sustainable economic and moral business model. All DHV companies are required to apply BIMS.

Business integrity policy at the DHV Group covers a wide array of aspects from corruption, fraud and conflict of interest, to the whistleblower scheme. A corporate compliance officer is appointed as part of the BIMS. The compliance officer reports on the observance of our business principles and any incidents, directly to the Executive Board and with a direct link to the Supervisory Board. In 2008, a total of seven cases were reported, three less than in the previous year. All incidents were closed. Two cases were found to be in violation of BIMS and resulted in termination of employment.

Cases of violation of our business integrity policy and actions taken Region

# Cases 2008

# Cases 2007

Nature of cases 2008 and actions taken

The Netherlands

3

0

1)

Fraud by employee against company – invoices for services not rendered. Employment terminated, authorization practices changed.

2)

Finders fee to partner as part of proposal effort. Not a BIMS violation.

3)

Local party engaged client personnel to obtain documentation for final contract payment to DHV. No BIMS violation. This is a standard and transparent procedure.

Europe (excl. the Netherlands)

3

3

Three cases of questions from Czech controller regarding level of charging for IT services. No BIMS violation. Documentation being provided. Cases closed.

Africa

1

0

Theft by employee from the company. Discovered through company audit. Employment terminated.

Asia

0

7

North America

NA

NA

CR Report 2008

Delcan has its own integrity system and is not included in this BIMS reporting.

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 30 -


Performance

DHV Business Groups and Regions report quarterly on integrity issues. All employees must adhere to those principles and line management is responsible for a proper implementation in business processes. In the Netherlands, new employees are specifically educated about our Business Integrity Management System (BIMS) through introductory courses. In 2008, Asia put a specific emphasis on communication of BIMS, with positive results. Both the use of BIMS integrity clauses in partner contracts and the Project Integrity Risk Indicator are now a part of standard procedure. Paying taxes is a legal obligation which we strictly follow. As work in international contexts can sometimes be especially complex, policy mandates an advice by our external tax advisors for projects abroad. International tenders are presented to our own tender board that exerts extra control on integrity related risks. As a sign of commitment to its integrity policy, DHV is signatory to has the Partnering Against Corruption Initiative (PACI) of the World Economic Forum. This initiative is joined by companies that acknowledge and implement the principles of zero tolerance of corruption and bribery through an effective internal system. Seventy-eight percent of all staff worldwide are covered by a formal, active program against discrimination. Topics include equal pay, sexual harassment and the accommodation of religious observance.

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

Quality Standard and customer satisfaction The changes in percentages between 2007 and 2008 regarding ISO9001 are due to increased structuring and reporting in most regions. Customer satisfaction programs are organized on a decentralized level, tailored to the demands of local business units. Extrapolating the available data, 56% of our operations utilized a structured customer satisfaction program in 2008, meaning that those entities have documented procedures, implemented processes and procedures for measurement and analysis. Entities that have more informal programs are not included in this figure even though they do solicit information on customer satisfaction. FTEs covered by ISO9001 certification per region 2008

2007

99%

100%

100%

91%

85%

83%

100%

72%

North America

82%

75%

Worldwide

95%

91%

The Netherlands Africa Asia Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

Child labor The DHV Group emphasizes the importance of international frameworks and conventions, amongst which the International Labor Organization (ILO) conventions to ban child labor. As a consulting and engineering firm we do not run significant risk of involving child labor. Under no circumstances will

- 31 -


Performance

the DHV Group use child labor nor participate in projects in which other parties do. Looking back and forward We have achieved satisfactory progress with a number of objectives for 2008: Contract clauses providing for observance of business integrity by partners and subcontractors were applied and a Project Integrity Risk Indicator was added as a tool to the BIMS. The tool provides a quick and easy assessment of integrity risks on projects, and then a file to document how integrity risks have been addressed. The project’s country is assessed based on two well-known indices, Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index and the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business ranking. The DHV Global Code of Business Principles was updated in 2008 and will be rolled out in 2009. Arrangements have been made for external auditing of BIMS compliance, as well as for an external whistle blower capability. Both will be initiated in 2009.

4.4

DHV Group

By creating multi-party holistic projects which involve education, poverty alleviation, health and environmental interventions simultaneously, we make the most essential contribution to a sustainable living environment. Pauline Makama, Corporate Social Investment Manager, SSI, South Africa

Each DHV Group company implements HR policies which are suitable to local circumstances. In developing countries we implement a standard that is higher than local norms, for example in health care and office facilities. In order to strengthen alignment and the one-company concept, Human Resource officers are sharing practices and exploring opportunities for greater harmonization in areas such as cross-company assignments, training, and development opportunities

People care

The DHV Group consists of a family of operations with long term roots in its home countries. Together, we form a network of experts that deliver worldclass solutions, but are managed locally. All member companies adhere to compatible core values and business principles, promoting diversity and personal development.

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 32 -


Performance

DHV Group

In keeping with our strategy of internationalization, the ratio of staff based in the Netherlands and the other regions is shifting toward a larger representation in other regions. In 2008 the percentage of staff based in the Netherlands shifted from 46% to 43%. Heads per region 2008

2007

The Netherlands

2,289

2,196

Africa

1,015

835

Asia

815

710

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

610

424

North America

591

565

Worldwide

5,320

4,730

Headcount is presented in line with the annual report. Other ratios are calculated on the basis of actual CR data reports. See the data clarification table for more details.

In 2008, we created 372 new employment opportunities, compared with 239 in 2007. The strongest growth in employment opportunity was achieved in Africa, followed by Asia. This was encouraging given the tight resources and high labor turnover in these regions. Recruiting remains a high point of attention in South Africa, where we wish to retain our top three position in the market and we continue to see good growth opportunity. As explained in the Annual Report, the DHV Group is implementing a home country strategy, concentrating operations on a limited number of countries in which we can achieve critical mass. For this reason, we have chosen to divest smaller operations in Taiwan and Bolivia. Employment creation (excluding acquisitions/divestments) 2008

2007

62

109

Africa

160

107

Asia

104

25

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

23

5

North America

23

0*

372

246

The Netherlands

Worldwide * Restated from -7 to align with 100% inclusion of Delcan

CR Report 2008

- 33 -


Performance

DHV Group

There was an overall positive organic growth in personnel. The level of outflow is never-the-less a point of attention. Although this includes the completion of fixed term contracts and reflects challenges in Asia, it is still higher than desired. The outflow ratio of 13% in the Netherlands is comparable to peers and in line with the sector average of 10-15%. However, in the quest for talent, we wish to further improve retention in all regions and we are addressing this on a regional basis in our policy and by increased attention to career development. Incoming and outgoing staff 2008

2007

Incoming

Outgoing

Incoming

Outgoing

The Netherlands

369

307

414

305

Africa

244

84

334

227

Asia

449

345

118

93

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

190

167

145

140

North America

137

114

121*

121*

1,389

1,017

1,132

886

Worldwide

The combination of organic growth and outflow resulted in a decrease of average years of employment in the company. Average Employment duration in years 2008

2007

10

11

Africa

5

7

Asia

7

6

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

6

4

North America

9

8

8.1

9

The Netherlands

Worldwide

Professional and personal development Professional and personal development is critical in our line of business. Integration of knowledge, cooperation between divisions and staff exchange foster creativity. Professional training, career development programs, performance reviews, and also assistance for retiring and terminating staff are important factors to address.

* 2007 restated to align with 100% inclusion of Delcan Career and performance reviews are applied on the basis of local policy. At this time approximately 64% of worldwide staff is reported to be receiving regular career and performance reviews. This is a slight increase over the previous year, but is not considered to be an acceptable level. Indications are that more performance reviews are conducted than reported, at a more informal level. This is an item for further discussion.

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 34 -


Performance

DHV Group

Overall training opportunities taken by staff remained relatively constant during the past year. In the Netherlands, all new employees receive a twoday training course for their introduction, which accounts for the substantial difference compared to other regions. In response to an employee survey, Delcan in North America developed a more structured training program during 2008, which will be implemented in the coming year. Training hours per FTE 2008

2007

2006

The Netherlands

50

51

47

Africa

40

ND

21

Asia

16

14

10

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

16

12

13

1

8

6

34

36

33

North America

Worldwide

Programs for retiring employees are part of in the local HR strategies. Approximately 59% of the worldwide workforce is covered by a program to assist with retirement or termination. Those programs have different objectives and range from information on retirement schemes to monetary support and/or active job placement assistance. Delcan and DHV in the Netherlands maintain their own pension schemes for staff. Young professionals within the DHV Group are connected through respective “Young� networks. Representatives from all DHV Group home countries came together and conducted parallel work sessions during the 2008 International Management Meeting. They made presentations on strategic topics to the International Leadership Group. A study trip to Poland was held later in the year to promote knowledge sharing.

New training and development initiatives included an Early Career Development program, training and certification in project management that was conducted in all regions and a (limited) number of staff exchanges. The focus on project management reflects our greater attention to risk and business basics, as well as growth in the responsibility, size and complexity of the average projects that we are managing. The Executive Development Program (EDP) was not offered in 2008. The next series will commence in 2009.

CR Report 2008

- 35 -


Performance

DHV Group

where they exchanged knowledge and experiences. At the annual International Management Meeting of the DHV Group, 20 young professionals from different countries and Business Groups presented their own vision and strategy for DHV to the management. In 2009 we are planning a new study trip within Europe, this year the Young Professionals will visit DHV in the Netherlands. In the Netherlands, YoungDHV also participates in the Young Professional of the Year 2009 Election. Frank Weijnen represents our company in a competition with 21 other companies. Also, a group of enthusiastic YoungDHV members is participating in the Young Leaders for Nature Forum, a community of young professionals from various companies, which aims to contribute to a sustainable environment. And that’s not all, we have much more coming!”

Picture of some Portuguese colleagues during the 2008 study trip to Poland. Annemarieke Verbout, chairperson of the board of Young DHV, talks about a good year 2008 and their way ahead: “2008 was another great year for YoungDHV. We hosted many terrific work related and social events, both within the Netherlands and worldwide. We continued the Global Newsletter, sharing news and experiences on projects, innovations, international cooperation and cultural aspects among young professionals within DHV, Delcan, SSI and NACO. In October colleagues from Dutch, Portuguese, Polish and Czech DHV offices gathered in Warsaw,

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 36 -


Performance

Diversity The DHV Group believes that a diverse workforce is an asset that adds great value to our business, because it promotes creativity, innovativeness and flexibility. We define diversity in terms of gender, age and background. We select new staff on professional and personal qualifications and do not tolerate discrimination. The Group emphasizes the importance of local recruitment and local management, combined with selective exchanges of staff and external or expatriate managers. The average age worldwide remained essentially unchanged at 41 years of age during 2008. The workforce of the DHV Group is mostly male and aged between 30 and 50. There are fewer staff members under 30 than those above 50, underlining the importance of recruiting and retaining younger employees for future growth and professional capacities. The slight increase in female staff to 30% of the workforce is positive and the age distribution is satisfactory. However, we wish to increase the percentage of women in professional positions and in management. This will require additional attention, changes in recruiting channels and in career planning.

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

Percentage of women in workforce 2008

2007

2006

The Netherlands

27%

25%

24%

Africa

33%

34%

34%

Asia

23%

22%

20%

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

41%

36%

36%

North America

37%

33%

31%

Worldwide

30%

28%

27%

- 37 -


Performance

DHV Group

Average age of the workforce

Management development 2008

2007

2006

The Netherlands

41

41

42

Africa

39

40

41

Asia

39

39

37

The Netherlands

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

41

40

38

North America

44

44

44

% of management vacancies filled internally 2008

% of management vacancies filled internally 2007

79% (23 of 29)

65%

Africa

0% (0 of 4)

100%

Asia

0% (0 of 6)

71%

17% (1 of 6)

0%

0% (0 of 6)

86%

47% (24 of 51)

66%

Europe (ex. The Netherlands) Worldwide

41

41

41

Management origin Consistent with our policy of local delivery and management, ninety-nine (99%) percent of our management is local staff. This is complemented with a small number of expatriate and exchange personnel. Almost all management vacancies in 2008 were filled with local candidates, approximately half of which were internal candidates. The portion of females in our worldwide management was 16% in 2008, down from 17% in 2007. As mentioned previously, we aim to increase the percentage of women at a management and professional level. To this purpose, we signed the Talent to The Top Charter in 2008 and have committed to increasing the percentage of women at the top and sub top of our organization based in the Netherlands. We intend to use the learning from this initiative across regions and for other aspects of diversity.

CR Report 2008

North America

Worldwide

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 38 -


Performance

DHV Group

Governance bodies DHV features three bodies that have governance functions: the Supervisory Board, the Executive Board and the International Policy Board (IPB). The boards are relatively homogenous, as is typical for our industry. One of the five Supervisory Board members is female, as is one of the thirteen members of the IPB. Four nationalities and five distinct fields of professional background are represented on the IPB. We have appreciated the different perspectives that this has brought and we will continue to pursue this agenda at all levels.

More information on the governance bodies of DHV is available in our Annual Report 2008 on pages 6, 8 and 10.

The International Policy Board of the DHV Group. From left to right top row: Roel Overakker, Piet Besselink, Jan Cees Overbosch, Bertrand van Ee, Piet van Helvoort. Middle row: Eugene Gr端ter, Jim Kerr, Vic Prins, Johan van Manen. Front row: Chris Engelsman, Arnold Galavazi, Marga Donehoo, Naren Bhojaram.

CR Report 2008

- 39 -


Performance

Employment conditions The quest for talent has been one of the main challenges of the past years. A shortage of qualified, technical professionals is evident on the labor markets around the world. The labor market for engineers in Africa is especially tight; and in explosively growing economies such as China and India there is a special challenge to retain talent. One of the advantages that the DHV Group can offer employees is freedom to develop. There are many of opportunities within the Group, as well as a focus on improving the flow of knowledge and staff. Staff exchange, knowledge sharing and training play important roles in developing our individual and joint capabilities. Contractual employment conditions conform to local market conditions. In general, it is our policy to set fixed remuneration at market average and variable above average. In 2008 a Group-wide compensation policy was established, forming the basis of country-specific implementation. We have started to move to more flexible, performance-based remuneration in Asia, South Africa, and the Netherlands. Profit sharing with staff in 2008 was € 6.8 million versus € 6.0 million in 2007. In order to offer greater opportunity for ownership, we launched a new Employee Share Plan. A total of 280 colleagues joined in the first round and purchased 4% ownership in our Group. The depositary receipts for shares generated an 11% return in 2008, including a € 0.70 per share dividend. The medium term targeted average rate of return is 15%.

DHV Group

satisfaction surveys is not generally practiced. Management has recognized this as an area for improvement. Delcan conducted an employee survey in 2008 and in the Netherlands several divisions conducted employee surveys. Another survey was conducted among the international leadership group to assess alignment with strategy, motivation, development needs and perceived equitable compensation. This indicated a general level of satisfaction of 7 on a scale of 1-10. A broader survey is under consideration for the 2009 / 2010 timeframe. Percentage of staff with fixed-team contract 2008

2007

2006

The Netherlands

12%

15%

14%

Africa

22%

23%

15%

Asia

57%

65%

62%

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

35%

43%

46%

North America

12%

10%

5%

Worldwide

23%

27%

25%

DHV Group companies tend to rely on individual and group dialogue between management and staff in their communication to gauge employee satisfaction. Monthly staff meetings and regular performance reviews are examples of such opportunities. The application of structured employee

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 40 -


Performance

DHV Group

The structure of our workforce in terms of contract and employment types is tending to a lower percentage of fixed-term contracts, which we expect will continue in the current economic situation. Fluctuations in staffing needs will tend to be addressed through agency personnel. Strategic hires will seek the commitment of a permanent contract. Regional differences are in line with local practices. The proportion of part time employees in our workforce increased in 2008, especially in the Netherlands, where working part-time is a social trend across all sectors.

Health and safety 2007 was the first year in which we accumulated global data on injuries and fatalities. No fatalities occurred during the year 2008. Lost Time Injuries (LTI) per 200.000 working hours, (approximately 100 labor-years) decreased from 0.7 to 0.4 cases. Operations in Portugal, with a higher presence of staff on construction sites and executing maintenance at client locations has improved, but continues to warrant local management attention. Frequency and Severity of Lost Time Injuries 2008

Percentage of part-time employees

The Netherlands Africa

2007

cases per

lost days

cases per

lost days

200.000

per

200.000

per

2008

2007

2006

working

200.000

working

200.000

34%

20%

ND

hours

working

hours

working

0%

3%

3%

hours

hours

Asia

0%

1%

0%

The Netherlands

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

6%

3%

7%

Africa*

0.0

0.0

ND

ND

North America

3%

5%

2%

Asia*

0.0

0.0

0.3

25.9

Europe (ex. NL)

1.6

35.9

2.9

16.1

North America

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.2

Worldwide

0.4

9.6

0.7

14.6

Worldwide

16%

12%

17%

0.4

12.2

0.5

14.0

* Note that 2008 data for Africa and Asia are based on 5% and 25% FTEcoverage respectively.

CR Report 2008

- 41 -


Performance

Priorities and targets The past two years have strongly emphasized growth. In 2009, we will concentrate on consolidating in terms of turnover and staff, and on implementing synergies with the (new) members of our Group. We are approaching the year soberly in view of the economic uncertainty, but we will continue to invest in our people. The focus will be on retention with selected strategic recruiting. In terms of development, we will continue with the programs for younger staff, restart the Executive Development Program, and develop a similar program for medior staff. Employee feedback has indicated a desire for more staff exchange. Differences in opportunities across the markets and regions can add extra motivation and flexibility in this area. A policy is being developed by DHV B.V. to serve as a basis for assignment conditions in the case of international short term exchanges. Training programs will be more geared to direct business needs such as project management and also for industry specific opportunities such as certification for Cradle 2 Cradle. Global cooperation between business groups and HR departments will be essential to take advantage of opportunities and mitigate the negative impact of the economic downturn. This will include the sharing of people needs and availability lists and the facilitating of staff exchange.

DHV Group

4.5

Community care

The people working at the DHV Group support many aspects of community care through personal initiatives as well as company sponsored activities. This involvement varies with personal interest and regional needs. In North America, volunteerism that is linked to health and wellbeing is very active. Colleagues in the Netherlands are often involved in projects for developing countries and environmentally related projects. In South Africa, the Saturday schools continue to be taught by colleagues in their own time. Following the earthquake in China, colleagues donated money and then created an opportunity in which DHV could participate in the design of an earthquake proof school on a non-profit basis. As a Group, we are very proud of their engagement and take this opportunity to thank and congratulate all of them for their energy to make our world a better place. From a company perspective, we emphasize two distinct fields of community activities: The first is “Building futures” through education and economic development, which is a natural fit with our business. We are involved with universities and at primary and secondary education levels. DHV companies cooperate with universities in research and development, student placements and student research projects. We convey (technical) skills and knowledge that are related to our expertise and make them accessible to youth and entrepreneurs in developing nations. The second is the “Living Environment”, promoting sustainability in an environmental sense. We fill this in through active membership in platforms, programs and partnerships in which our business units engage.

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 42 -


Performance

In order to create more transparency, several entities have established frameworks or policies around community activities and sponsoring. We favor community efforts close to our business, with the flexibility to address specific local needs. E.g. SSI views Health as an additional pillar of their CSI engagement. The nature of our decentralized organization offers the opportunity to fit community engagement to local circumstances, resulting in many different activities. Below we give a general impression of our engagement by mentioning a small selection of our various community engagement activities.

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

“Building futures” • Delcan has run its scholarship program since 1982, funding scholarships for students in Canadian universities and professional organizations, as well as awarding scholarships to Delcan employee’s children. • Delcan is partnering with “United Way” in Canada and the US. • SSI has expanded its own “Saturday school”, staffed with SSI professionals that educate high-school aged youth from disadvantaged backgrounds in the fields of math and engineering. This project was such a success in its first year that the concept has been extended to start in three more offices in 2008. • DHV in the Netherlands continued its cooperation with the innovative local weekend school of Pet’je af. We support the start-up of the school financially and through experts who hold classes in their field of expertise. • DHV partners in Brainport Eindhoven in the Netherlands. This is a unique cooperative network of businesses, governments and educational institutions open to new ideas. • Several entities engage in student placements on incidental and structured levels, enabling students to research academic topics in business surroundings or allow them to experience our work first hand. DHV is partner of the Business in Development (BiD) network. The BiD organizes worldwide business-plan challenges in which entrepreneurs have the chance to fine tune their business models with an expert coach. The network is linked to interested investors.

- 43 -


Performance

DHV Group

SSI Saturday School Initiative.

Official opening of the Pet’je af weekend school location Amersfoort in 2008.

CR Report 2008

DHV in the Netherlands, in cooperation with educational institutions and colleagues from the water sector, initiated a program where-in grammar school students are supported by water professionals in practical assignments that are related to the water sector. This initiative aims to interest more students to choose a career in the water sector.

“Living Environment”: • SSI joined forces with DWAF (Department of Water Affairs & Forestry) and several local municipalities to increase environmental awareness through a symbolic cleanup of a section of the Kaalspruit River, a heavily polluted water course in the East Rand township of Tembisa. SSI environmental sector organized this day of clean-up, workshops and tree-planting. • DHV the Netherlands participated in a number of initiatives that have environmental agendas: e.g. the Aqua-for-All foundation that focuses on safe drinking water, sanitation and sustainable water management in developing countries. We have continued to cooperate with the WWF in the Netherlands and the open source mobility platform c,mm,n. Building on the initial attempt to register the numerous contributions we have noted an increase in activities, primarily in hours. Financial contributions amounted to approximately € 386,000 in 2008 (€ 360,000 in 2007). Contributions of (paid) staff time during work hours increased from 2,760 to around 5,770 hours in 2008. This does not include individuals’ engagement outside working hours. The accuracy of our monitoring has not changed significantly as community involvement activities continue to be primarily local initiatives.

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 44 -


Performance

DHV Group

4.6

Caring operations

Environmental challenge The indirect impact on ecosystems which we have through our projects is by far more significant than the direct impact of our operations. Nonetheless, it is our responsibility to proactively minimize the negative effects of our own operations.

Kaalspruit River clean up by SSI, DWAF, and several local municipalities.

Priorities and targets Our objectives are unchanged for 2009 and include increased accuracy of monitoring of our (financial) engagements. We will continue community involvement that is appropriate to the local context and will further encourage the emphasis on “Building Futures” and the “Living Environment”.

CR Report 2008

As an office based organization, we impact the environment primarily through energy consumption in buildings and transportation, the usage of materials and water consumption. We are striving to collect environmental data from all DHV Group companies around the world. Our challenge in identifying the proper environmental issues was the diverse environments in which we operate. For example, in the Netherlands, we might be challenged with regulations on energy efficient buildings and we strive to reduce gas consumption for heating purposes. In hot climates, the electricity consumption for air conditioning has more relevance. By analyzing other organizations’ approaches, the GRI guidelines and incorporating our own environmental expertise, we have identified the following aspects to be most relevant to our own operations: Energy consumption of our offices Business travel Paper usage The CO2 footprint of the DHV Group as derived from our energy consumption from buildings and travel.

- 45 -


Performance

DHV Group

We are satisfied with the progress of reporting in 2008, but recognize the shortcomings in environmental data coverage and accuracy.

Showcase project

Photo: Dutch Prime Minister Jan Peter Balkenende (L) meets Tim Jeanné,

General

Manager

DHV

Due to the expansion of the DHV Group in 2008 and inclusion of data from alliance partner Delcan at 100% versus the earlier 40%, we have not been able to maintain FTE-coverage of energy data at 2007 levels. This is mostly in the area of travel data. The proportion of members who do not register this information has grown to an extent that scaling-up from (primarily) Netherlands data may not be a good representation of overall air travel. SSI and Delcan, for example comprise approximately 40 smaller offices, which book their travel independently. This situation will improve in 2009 when SSI begins using a central travel agency, but we will have to continue to review our methodology as the profile of our company changes.

Shanghai at DSM’s China Campus, 29 October 2008.

See the data clarification table for details on the basis for data coverage, conversion factors and exploration.

Green DSM China Campus The DSM China Campus is one of the first LEED* Gold-certified buildings in China, incorporating water conservation and energy savings, indoor environmental quality, renewable and locally available building and decoration materials, waste management and recycling during construction and daily operation. DHV was responsible for developing the overall building concept, the “green” design, and overseeing construction and for commissioning activities. The environmentally-friendly campus houses 600 employees and uses 30% less energy and 70% less water than conventional buildings. For this project, DHV teamed with de Architekten Cie. and Dutch knowledge center TNO. * LEED Green Building Rating SystemTM is an international standard for developing high-performance sustainable buildings.

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 46 -


Performance

DHV Group

Environmental performance CO2 footprint of DHV Our CO2 footprint indicates the impact on the environment and specifically on climate change. Based on the energy consumption in buildings and transportation, we have included the following data sources to calculate the total CO2 emissions: + Electricity consumption2 + Consumption of other building related energy (gas1, oil1, district heating2) + Fuel consumption of company cars1 + Mileage of business travel with private car3 + Mileage of business air travel 3 – CO2 compensation = net total CO2 emissions (note:

1,2,3

refer to the scopes of the GHG protocol)

As illustrated in the following graphs, the total estimated emissions for the DHV Group in 2008 is approximately 16,000 tons of CO2 versus 15,600 tons in 2007. The emission data for 2007 has been restated from the previous total of 15,000 tons to reflect that 100% of Delcan employees are now included in the formula for extrapolating. In addition, some minor changes were made due to a review of data submitted for 2007. This increase of about 7% in total emissions is less than the 17% increase in FTE, meaning that the worldwide average CO2 footprint per person has decreased.

CR Report 2008

- 47 -


Performance

Energy consumption of our offices We consume electricity and district heating as well as gas and oil products in our facilities. Global energy consumption has increased along with the increases in personnel. Electricity consumption per FTE appears to be decreasing to a worldwide average of approximately 2,000 kwh/FTE in 2008 (2,200 kwh/FTE in 2007). We noted that energy consumption patterns are very different among the different geographical regions.

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

The portion of electricity from renewable sources has been reassessed, taking a more conservative approach, whereby the reported amount of green electricity purchases is not extrapolated to the whole organization. We thus assume that all electricity supplies that were not reported, but extrapolated, stem from non-renewable sources. Consequently, we restate our portion of sustainable electricity as 38% in 2007 and 37% in 2008.

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 48 -


Performance

DHV Group

Business travel The nature of our business requires travel to clients and project locations. It appears that on there was less travel per FTE in 2008, even though air travel increased in absolute terms. Because air travel does constitute a large part of our emissions, it is a point of attention to improve the accuracy of our reporting. For example, as two of our companies (NACO and DHV Holding) have substantially higher air travel requirements compared to other Group member, we have decided to exclude air travel from these operations in the formula for extrapolating to the total for DHV Group travel. This has led to a restatement of 2007 data.

While calculating the total emissions, we have extrapolated reported data by FTEs and are aware that the FTE coverage of air travel (46%) is below the recommended threshold for extrapolation. Paper usage Our current estimate on the use of printing and copying paper worldwide is approximately 247 tons, equivalent to about 50 kg per average FTE. The total volume has been constant, but with more people working at the DHV Group, this has resulted in less paper per person. Since the end of 2007, the

CR Report 2008

- 49 -


Performance

Dutch offices are supplied with FSC-certified paper. This represents roughly half of our paper consumption. We further reduce our environmental impact by double-sided printing which was introduced with our new IT hardware, stimulating digital archiving and reporting and by general recycling of paper. Waste management Multiple companies of the DHV Group have waste reduction and recycling programs for paper, toner cartridges, electronic equipment and hazardous household waste such as batteries. In this manner, we reduce the impact our resource consumption has on the environment, by separating different waste streams and preventing hazardous materials from getting into the environment. Priorities and targets We remain focused on gaining a deeper understanding of our environmental impact through the accurate registration of consumption data worldwide. This is ambitious and must be kept in proportion to the added value. We will focus on appropriate measures to reduce our footprint and to identify cost reductions and efficiency gains within our office operations on a local basis. Our targets remain in principle unchanged: • Monitor worldwide environmental data and work towards substantial data coverage for the environmental indicators • Establish target and plan for CO2 emission reduction • Continue to review the existing procurement policy of DHV in the Netherlands, communicate the policy to our suppliers and share learning between locations.

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

The Dutch situation DHV stakeholders in the Netherlands require more attention and detailed reporting of environmental performance than stakeholders in other countries. For this reason, we are including this section on DHV Holding, DHV B.V., NACO and Infocus. There was decrease of air travel per FTE in 2008 compared to 2007. Although people have been encouraged to reduce air travel by for example using teleconferencing and combining trips, it is too early to tell whether this is a trend. Public transport and car travel levels have essentially remained the same. We expect that 2009 and especially 2010 will show the impact of the new mobility guidelines which were designed to stimulate use of public transport. The CO2 footprint of our Dutch operations has decreased slightly due to decreased air travel and now amounts to just over 4.1 tons. Paper consumption increased despite the new IT infrastructure and a policy of double sided printing. This development will be subject to closer examination in 2009. First trials with CO2 emission compensation programs were established in 2007. The compensation took place through the Climate Neutral Group the Netherlands, which compensates approximately 75% of emissions through certified projects in sustainable energy and energy efficiency and 25% in certified forestation projects.

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 50 -


Performance

DHV Group

Environmental performance per FTE DHV Group companies in The Netherlands* 2008

2007

2,717

2,762

5.9

5.9

Car travel (km)

12,169

12,097

Air travel (km)

10,321

11,398

Public transport travel (km)

1,570

1,546

Net CO2 (kg)

4,151

4,340

65

61

Electricity (kWh) Building related energy (GJ)

Paper (kg)

* Environmental performance per average FTE in the Netherlands. This includes data from DHV Holding, DHV B.V. NACO and, Infocus. More attention is being given to energy efficiency of new office locations. The renovation of our headquarters in the Netherlands will substantially improve its energy efficiency. Our office location ‘Las Palmas’ in Rotterdam, for which we did the structural engineering, was one of the top three finalists of the prestigious international MIPIM Award 2009 in the 'Refurbished Office Buildings' category. In line with our policy to lead by example, DHV in the Netherlands have committed to a program of the province of Utrecht to strive to become a CO2 emission neutral organization and is investigating the feasibility to include sustainability criteria in the procurement of materials and services.

CR Report 2008

- 51 -


Dialogue

5 5.1

DHV Group

DIALOGUE Who are our stakeholders

Our stakeholders include public and private sector clients, employees and business partners, (internal) investors, governments of countries in which we work, and society at large. The latter is often represented by nongovernmental organizations (NGO) in the areas of communities, transparency and the environment. They expect clarity, commitment and transparency as a basis, and seek added value from us through innovation and simple implementation. In our work, we often engage clients’ stakeholders in the context of the projects we execute.

5.2

Engaging our internal stakeholders The DHV Group is employee-owned, indirectly through the primary shareholder, the DHV Foundation, and directly through the DHV Group Employee Share Plan. Investment in the company is viewed as a long term commitment to a healthy operation, earned through activities consistent with the company’s mission. In addition to this economic voice, staff has a voice in policy development. Our CR program evolved from the results of a survey in 2005 amongst staff in the Netherlands. Staff engages in direct dialogue with line management and CR management regarding their suggestions or questions. One example in 2008 was a very open and constructive dialogue about our operations in China and on how DHV deals with the societal challenges there and in other Asian home countries.

Communicating with our stakeholders 5.3

Engaging external stakeholders In 2008, we began conducting structured stakeholder dialogue with clients, business partners, knowledge institutes, and select NGOs. This project will run until the first half of 2009, and hence we are not publishing results at this time. Our first experiences are promising and we are planning to continue this dialogue in varying forms with diverse stakeholders. DHV in the Netherlands continued to initiate broad public debate on sustainability themes through its sponsoring of the 9th Dutch National Sustainability Congress, through several seminars and DHV Round table talks. Staff members participate in numerous external organizations and thereby maintain ongoing dialogue with external networks.

CR Report 2008

External memberships and appointments

DHV participates at committee and advisory level in national and international industry organizations, consultation platforms, employers’ organizations, Chambers of Commerce, associations and knowledge institutes. In this way, we area able to maintain close ties between the company and the societal arena. This is extremely important to remaining abreast of issues facing the world and to identifying opportunities to act. A list of the memberships and appointments held by the members of the Executive Board and senior management is available on our corporate website. It should also be noted that numerous other staff members, at all levels and in all divisions of the DHV Group, are similarly involved in such external activities.

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 52 -


Reporting

DHV Group

6

REPORTING

This has our full attention. People related data were prioritized during 2008, which has resulted in both greater coverage and improved performance.

6.1

Scope

External assurance of our CR report is valuable to us and to you as a reader of the report. We continued our engagement for limited assurance with our external assurance provider. Please refer to the assurance report for information on the scope of the engagement, the work performed and the conclusions.

Choices The DHV Group began reporting conform the GRI guidelines in 2007. For the second year, we have achieved GRI B+ level. The data gathering process is part of our financial reporting lines, using questionnaires, and definitions have been reviewed and updated. The selection of KPIs has been guided by internal stakeholder dialogue, reviews of peer organizations and the expertise of our sustainability consultants. Priority is given through an assessment of issue significance in the light of our values, strategy and the known expectations of stakeholders. Furthermore, we were guided by the scope of influence we can exert to improve performance. We will report on those indicators over the coming years and we strive to improve our performance. Where appropriate, we present our current performance data next to previous years, using ratio’s and normalized data to increase the understanding of trends and developments. Restatements of data are highlighted in the relevant sections and the data clarification table. An example is the 2008 inclusion and 2007 restatement of data for alliance partner Delcan at 100%, in order to better reflect CR performance in line with the worldwide network of resources. Environmental data have been reported by most DHV Group companies. However, it remains challenging to increase data coverage and accuracy.

CR Report 2008

For the first time, we have published a printed summary of this CR report along with our Annual Report. This summary is meant to provide our readers with a concise overview of our philosophy, policy and performance. Boundaries This CR report covers the period between 01 January 2008 and 31 December 2008 and is the third separate CR report of the DHV Group. It is published annually and complements the annual report. Mergers that have taken place during the reporting period will be included in the CR report of the following year. Exception to this is the disclosure of total personnel figures. Divestment decisions during the reporting period result in the exclusion of the respective part of the business. We do not report on joint ventures or subcontractors. The DHV Group reports on the performance of the majority-owned legal entities that are part of the DHV Group. Additionally, we report on the performance of DHV Planetek, Taiwan (49% ownership) and Delcan, North America (40% ownership) in recognition of DHV representation on these

- 53 -


Reporting

DHV Group

company’s boards and regular joint initiatives. Further details on the DHV Group’s participations are listed in the Annual Report 2008 on page 66.

Standard requires the review conclusion to contain a clear written expression of negative assurance by using double negation.

The selected KPIs relate to our own personnel for whom the DHV Group has the responsibility as employer, and exclude freelance personnel or staff hired through temporary staffing agencies.

We do not provide any assurance on the assumptions and achievability of prospective information (such as targets, expectations and ambitions) included in the Report. Also we did not review the data reported for the year ending 2006. The Report contains references to information on websites. This information is excluded from our assurance scope. The Executive Board of DHV is responsible for the preparation and presentation of the Report. Our responsibility is to draw a conclusion on the Report based on our review.

We report environmental KPIs on our permanent office locations. We have applied extra care when data has been estimated for locations where data are not readily available, e.g. in shared office locations.

6.2

External assurance

To the Executive Board of DHV Holding B.V.

REPORTING CRITERIA DHV developed its reporting criteria on the basis of the G3 Guidelines of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), as described in section 6.1: ‘Scope’. These reporting criteria include certain inherent limitations that can influence the reliability of the information.

QUALIFIED ASSURANCE REPORT SCOPE AND RESPONSIBILITIES We have been engaged by the Executive Board of DHV Holding B.V., Amersfoort (‘DHV’) to review the content of DHV’s Corporate Responsibility (CR) Report for the year ending 31 December 2008 (hereafter referred to as ‘the Report’). A review engagement is aimed at obtaining limited assurance. The detail of review procedures is substantially less than audit procedures and consequently a review engagement provides less assurance than what would be obtained from an audit engagement. Therefore our Assurance

CR Report 2008

DHV only reports on parts of the organization as the Report only includes data from DHV entities which are fully or majority owned and from those joint ventures where significant influence in respect of CR is exercised. For further details on the reporting scope, refer to section 6.1 ‘Scope’ in the Report. We consider these reporting criteria to be relevant and sufficient for our engagement. For several indicators the Report is not yet based on full coverage as intended by DHV per its reporting criteria. By including a data clarification table in section 6.3 of the Report, the coverage of the Report is clarified by showing for each indicator the number of FTEs working in entities that report on that indicator as a percentage of total FTEs. In our opinion this limitation

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 54 -


Reporting

with regard to the completeness of the Report and the reasons for it, are acceptable, with the exception of the air travel indicator for 2008. REVIEW PROCEDURES PERFORMED We planned and performed our review procedures to obtain a basis for our conclusion in accordance with Dutch law, including the Assurance Standard 3410N “Assurance Engagements relating to Sustainability Reports”, drawn up by the professional body of Dutch accountants (“Royal NIVRA”). Our most important review procedures consisted of: • Updating our understanding of the activities and the organization of DHV; • Analyzing public information to gain insight into CR aspects relevant to DHV and its industry during the reported period; • Investigating the acceptability and application of DHV’s reporting criteria in relation to the information requirements of its stakeholders; • Conducting interviews with responsible officers at head office in Amersfoort, aimed at understanding the progress made by DHV in the data gathering and reporting process and at evaluating the completeness, accuracy and adequacy of the qualitative and quantitative information in the Report; • Assessing the design and functioning of the processes used for data capturing, collation, aggregation and validation, including the methods used for calculating and estimating results; • Performing analytical procedures on a sample basis on the data reported; • Reviewing the application of the G3 Guidelines of the GRI;

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

Evaluating the overall format and presentation of the Report, including evaluating the consistency of the information, in line with DHV’s reporting criteria.

We believe that the evidence obtained from our review procedures is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our conclusion. BASIS FOR QUALIFIED CONCLUSION The Report is not yet based on full coverage, because for several indicators not all DHV entities are able to report reliable data. With regard to air travel, DHV gathered data from entities that together represent 46% of the organization in terms of FTE’s. This provides an insufficient basis for extrapolation to the whole organization as is done for other indicators. Accordingly we are not able to conclude as to whether the data and graphs relating to air travel for 2008 on pages 47, 49 and 60 and subsequently the reported number on total estimated CO2 emissions for 2008 on page 47 is materially misstated. QUALIFIED CONCLUSION Based on our review procedures nothing has come to our attention, except for the possible effects on the data and graphs relating to air travel for 2008 and subsequently the reported number on total CO2 emissions for 2008, as explained in the ‘basis for qualified conclusion’ paragraph, that causes us to believe that in accordance with DHV’s reporting criteria: • the reporting principles are not acceptable or have not been applied consistently; • the events described did not take place during the reporting period or are not presented fully, accurately and timely;

- 55 -


Reporting

the information is not presented completely, accurately and adequately in all material respects.

RECOMMENDATIONS Our assurance engagement has led to recommendations for improvement which are reported to management. Without further qualifying our conclusion presented above, we would like to draw the readers’ attention to the following. • Although DHV has increased the coverage of indicators in the sections ‘people care’ and ‘community care’, the Report is not yet based on full coverage as intended by DHV per its reporting criteria. Although the coverage is clarified in the data clarification table in section 6.3 of the Report, we recommend DHV to further increase the number of entities that report CR data, particularly with regard to environmental indicators in the ‘caring operations’ section; • In this Report DHV is reporting on the stakeholder dialogues that were conducted in 2008. We recommend DHV to summarize the outcomes of these dialogues in future CR reports and to clarify to the readers how these outcomes have influenced the CR activities of DHV, including its CR reporting.

DHV Group

MANAGEMENT RESPONSE We recognize that the recommendations are in line with our ambition to continuously improve on corporate responsibility in our business. We wish to assure the reader that these recommendations will have our attention. In 2008, DHV Group entities placed additional focus on integrity and people aspects. In 2009, we will emphasize stakeholder dialogue and environmental reporting as indicated in sections 5.2, Dialogue and 4.6, Caring Operations. Specifically, we refer the reader to page 46 of this report which addresses the concern of the assurance provider regarding the coverage of air travel data.

Utrecht, 13 May 2009 PricewaterhouseCoopers Accountants N.V Originally signed by drs. F.S. van der Ploeg RA

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 56 -


Reporting

6.3

DHV Group

Data clarification table 2008 *

Indicator

FTE cover -age **

2008 *

FTE coverage **

The Netherlands

2008 *

FTE coverage **

2008 *

Africa

FTE coverage ** Asia

2008 *

FTE coverage **

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

2008 *

FTE coverage **

Units

Worldwide

North America

% of FTE's under ISO9001

%

95%

99%

99%

100%

100%

100%

85%

95%

100%

100%

82%

100%

% of entities with active Customer Satisfaction Program

%

56%

100%

98%

100%

5%

100%

11%

100%

0%

100%

100%

100%

% of FTE’s covered by active non-discrimination Program

%

78%

100%

94%

100%

95%

100%

54%

100%

0%

100%

100%

100%

= 2008 data extrapolated to 100% FTEcoverage unless stated otherwise = FTE coverage of reported data Notes

Business with integrity

People care People Management Total number of payroll staff

heads

5,301

100%

2,323

100%

987

100%

793

100%

607

100%

591

100%

Headcount is presented here as it is used in subsequent ratio's. This number differs from the total headcount presented within the annual report by the 19 people working at Turgis, South Africa. This is in line with our choice to include acquisition from the first full FY onwards.

Average number of payroll staff

FTEs

4,991

100%

2,126

100%

980

100%

767

100%

569

100%

550

100%

FTE are presented as used in subsequent ratio's. This number and the average FTE count presented within the annual report financial statement differ because acquisitions are included in the CR report only from the first full FY onwards. Furthermore, the financial statement present only 40% of DELCAN staff in compliance with accounting rules.

Total growth in employment opportunities

heads

372

100%

62

100%

160

100%

104

100%

23

100%

23

100%

Staff turnover men

heads

218

100%

5

100%

108

100%

79

100%

10

100%

16

100%

Staff turnover women

heads

154

100%

57

100%

52

100%

25

100%

13

100%

7

100%

Total inflow men and women

heads

1,389

100%

369

100%

244

100%

449

100%

190

100%

137

100%

Total outflow men and women

heads

1,017

100%

307

100%

84

100%

345

100%

167

100%

114

100%

Ratio of outflow

%

19%

100%

13%

100%

9%

100%

44%

100%

28%

100%

19%

100%

CR Report 2008

The ratio of outflow is (total outflow)/(total heads)

- 57 -


Reporting

DHV Group 2008 *

Indicator

Units

FTE cover -age **

Worldwide

2008 *

FTE coverage **

The Netherlands

2008 *

FTE coverage **

2008 *

Africa

FTE coverage ** Asia

2008 *

FTE coverage **

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

2008 *

FTE coverage **

North America

= 2008 data extrapolated to 100% FTEcoverage unless stated otherwise = FTE coverage of reported data Notes

Personal and professional development Training hours per average FTE

hours/FTE

Average employment duration of staff

years

34

96%

50

100%

40

100%

16

73%

16

100%

1

100%

8

100%

10

100%

5

100%

7

100%

6

100%

9

100%

% of FTE's covered with active programs for retiring/leaving staff

%

59%

100%

94%

100%

0%

100%

54%

100%

0%

100%

100%

100%

% of staff with regular PA and career development reviews

% of heads

64%

100%

78%

100%

96%

100%

57%

100%

20%

100%

5%

100%

100%

Diversity Age structure Younger than 30 (men)

heads

626

100%

262

100%

163

100%

74

100%

75

100%

52

Younger than 30 (women)

heads

432

100%

165

100%

99

100%

67

100%

70

100%

31

100%

30 - 50 (men)

heads

2,125

100%

947

100%

332

100%

489

100%

150

100%

207

100%

30 - 50 (women)

heads

954

100%

394

100%

185

100%

115

100%

137

100%

123

100%

Older than 50 (men)

heads

946

100%

490

100%

163

100%

47

100%

134

100%

112

100%

Older than 50 (women)

heads

218

100%

65

100%

45

100%

1

100%

41

100%

66

100%

% female staff

% of heads

30%

100%

27%

100%

33%

100%

23%

100%

41%

100%

37%

100%

Average age

years

41

100%

41

100%

39

100%

39

100%

41

100%

44

100%

Management structure % of local managers in reporting period

% of mngt

99%

100%

99%

100%

100%

100%

87%

100%

100%

100%

99%

100%

% of female managers in reporting period

% of mngt

16%

100%

13%

100%

14%

100%

29%

100%

28%

100%

15%

100%

% of management vacancies filled internally

% of mngt vac

47%

100%

79%

100%

0%

100%

0%

100%

17%

100%

0%

100%

% of management vacancies filled with local candidates

% of mngt vac

98%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

83%

100%

Employment conditions % of fixed term contracts

% of heads

23%

100%

12%

100%

22%

100%

57%

100%

35%

100%

12%

100%

% of part timers

% of heads

16%

100%

34%

100%

0%

100%

0%

100%

6%

100%

3%

100%

0.4

65%

0.4

95%

0.0

5%

0.0

25%

1.6

79%

0.2

100%

Health and Safety Frequency Lost Time Injuries per 200.000 working hours

CR Report 2008

cases/200.000 hours

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 58 -


Reporting

DHV Group 2008 *

Indicator

Units

Severity Lost days per 200.000 working hours

days/200.000 hours

Number of fatalities

cases

FTE cover -age **

Worldwide

2008 *

FTE coverage **

The Netherlands

2008 *

FTE coverage **

2008 *

Africa

FTE coverage ** Asia

2008 *

FTE coverage **

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

2008 *

FTE coverage **

North America

9.6

65%

12.2

95%

0.0

5%

0.0

25%

35.9

79%

0.2

100%

0

100%

0

100%

0

100%

0

100%

0

100%

0

100%

= 2008 data extrapolated to 100% FTEcoverage unless stated otherwise = FTE coverage of reported data Notes

Community care Community investment in cash

1,000 â‚Ź

Community investment in hours

hours

386

100%

273

100%

93

100%

6

100%

2

100%

12

100%

Where no data was available, we assumed 0.

5,771

100%

1,814

100%

3,877

100%

40

100%

0

100%

40

100%

Where no data was available, we assumed 0.

Caring operations Energy consumption Total electricity consumption

GJ

35,851

67%

20,793

100%

3,867

5%

1,892

100%

1,706

73%

ND

0%

Total other building related energy consumption

GJ

16,297

78%

12,644

100%

0

100%

0

100%

ND

0%

ND

0%

Total energy consumption company car related

GJ

106,025

85%

63,371

100%

13,464

95%

4,214

100%

13,194

73%

ND

0%

Total Energy consumption

GJ

158,173

Electricity per average FTE

kwh/FTE

Proportion of green electricity purchased %

%

96,808

1,995

17,332

2,717

6,105

1,096

ND

685

37%

88%

63%

100%

5%

5%

247

91%

137

100%

51

49

91%

65

100%

52

5,503

61%

3,338

95%

ND

ND

833

Asian and African offices are climate controlled with electricity

There is insufficient data for Europe and North America to calculate a total energy consumption for that region. For the figure worldwide, we extrapolated on the basis of FTE from the other regions' data.

ND

0%

100%

0%

93%

ND

0%

95%

8

68%

26

73%

15

100%

95%

10

68%

46

73%

27

100%

0%

272

59%

ND

0%

0

100%

Data are not extrapolated, corresponding to the assumption that green energy purchase agreements are known if existing. This way we make a conservative estimation. Where no data was available, we assumed 0. 2007 had to be restated from 55% to 38% to fit this assumption.

Material consumption Total paper consumption

tons

Paper consumption per average FTE

kg/FTE

Business travel total kilometers Total Public transport kilometers

CR Report 2008

1,000 kms

- 59 -


Reporting

DHV Group 2008 *

FTE cover -age **

Worldwide

2008 *

FTE coverage **

The Netherlands

2008 *

FTE coverage **

2008 *

Africa

FTE coverage ** Asia

2008 *

FTE coverage **

Europe (ex. The Netherlands)

2008 *

FTE coverage **

North America

= 2008 data extrapolated to 100% FTEcoverage unless stated otherwise = FTE coverage of reported data

Indicator

Units

Notes

Total Air kilometers

1,000 kms

42,315

46%

21,938

100%

ND

0%

4,143

25%

ND

0%

ND

0%

The extrapolation of air-kms has been based on reported data excluding data from the DHV Holding and NACO. Those two companies have a significantly higher air travel requirements (factor 4 to 5) based on their core business than is the case for other DHV companies.

Total Car kilometers

1,000 kms

41,087

80%

25,867

100%

5,265

95%

1,111

100%

2,849

28%

ND

0%

Car travel includes all kms with lease, company and hired cars as well as declared kms of business travel with private cars.

Business travel average km per FTE Public transport kilometers

km/FTE

1,102

61%

1,570

95%

ND

0%

355

59%

ND

0%

0

100%

Air kilometers

km/FTE

9,916

46%

10,321

100%

ND

0%

5,403

25%

ND

0%

ND

0%

Car kilometers

km/FTE

8,232

80%

12,169

100%

5,373

95%

1,449

100%

5,006

28%

ND

0%

CO2 emissions from electricity

tons

2,150

67%

847

100%

0

5%

429

100%

236

73%

ND

0%

CO2 emissions from other building related energy

tons

855

78%

663

100%

0

100%

0

100%

ND

0%

ND

0%

CO2 emissions from total car travel

tons

7,785

85%

4,638

100%

1,000

95%

309

100%

974

73%

ND

0%

CO2 emissions from air travel kilometers

tons

5,332

46%

2,764

100%

ND

0%

522

25%

ND

0%

ND

0%

CO2 emissions compensated

tons

89

59%

89

100%

ND

0%

0

95%

0

20%

ND

0%

Total Net CO2 emissions

tons

16,033

Stated average car kilometers for The Netherlands include NACO, DHV B.V., Infocus and DHV Holding B.V.

CO2 Emissions

8,823

ND

1,260

ND

Where no data was available, we assumed 0.

ND

Total CO2 footprint per average FTE kg/FTE

3,212

46%

4,151

100%

ND

0%

1,643

25%

ND

0%

ND

0%

Composition of CO2 footprint CO2 emissions electricity

% (rounded)

CO2 emissions other building related energy

% (rounded) 5%

8%

CO2 emissions car travel

% (rounded)

49%

53%

CO2 emissions air travel

% (rounded)

33%

31%

ND

CR Report 2008

13%

10%

ND

34%

ND

ND

ND

0%

ND

ND

ND

25%

ND

ND

41%

ND

ND

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 60 -


Reporting

DHV Group

(* Conversion factors for CO2 emissions

factor

source

Electricity

country specific

"WRI: Indirect CO2 Emissions from Purchased Electricity. Version 3.0. December 2007. GHG"

Natural gas

1m3=1,7756kg CO2

"2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories" Natural Gas

Oil

1kg=0,8litres=0,0423GJ = 3,102kg CO2

"2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories on Fuel Oil"

District Heating

1GJ=29,2kg CO2

"Environmental Technology for the 21st century (IEA publication)" - assumed 48% CHP

Gasoline

1l=2,38kg CO2

"Emission factors for the TNT CO2 calculation model" on Gasoline

Diesel

1l=2,75kg CO2

"Emission factors for the TNT CO2 calculation model" on Diesel

Kilometers of business travel for private cars

1km=0,19kg CO2

GHG UK DEFRA data on medium petrol cars 2007

Kilometers of business air travel

1passenger km=0,126kg CO2

GHG UK data on medium haul

CR Report 2008

- 61 -


Reporting

6.4

DHV Group

Glossary and definitions

BCF BEE BIMS Business Groups CPP CR CSI CSR EB FTE FY GRI IDA IMM IPB KPI NGO PwC Regions SB Tender Board The Group

CR Report 2008

Business Control Framework (internal document defining management structure and responsibilities. Includes the Authority Matrix of DHV.) Black-Economic-Empowerment (related to South Africa) Business Integrity Management System (the framework of business integrity organization) The DHV Group has four Business Groups: Environment and Transportation; Water; Building and Industry; Aviation. Corporate Policy Paper (internal document defining five year strategy) Corporate Responsibility (equivalent to CSR) Corporate Social Investment (strictly community investment and engagement) Corporate Social Responsibility (equivalent to CR) Executive Board (governance body) Full-time equivalent Financial Year Global Reporting Initiative International Development Agency (international financing organizations relating to development aid, e.g. the World Bank) International Management Meeting (The assembly of the management of DHV Group companies) International Policy Board (governance body of senior management of the DHV Group) Key performance indicator Non-governmental organization PricewaterhouseCoopers (Our External Assurance Provider) The DHV Group is organized in four Regions: Europe; Asia; North America; Africa Supervisory Board (highest governance body) A committee within DHV that reviews significant and risk submissions, thereby exerting control on integrity related risks. The DHV Group of companies

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 62 -


Reporting

6.5

DHV Group

GRI index

Subject

Reference in CR Report 2008 (page number between brackets)

Vision and strategy 1.1

Vision and strategy regarding social responsibility

Statement by the Executive Board (page 4)

1.2

Description of key impacts, risks, and opportunities

CR in our strategy (18), Our impact (12) and Added value of CR to our business (10)

Name of reporting organization

DHV Profile (5)

2.2

Products and/or services

DHV Profile (5)

2.3

Operational structure

Legal Structure (7)

2.4

Location of Headquarters

www.dhv.com/offices

2.5

Countries of business

DHV Profile (5)

2.6

Nature of ownership

Annual report 2008, page 70

2.7

Markets served

DHV Profile (5)

2.8

Organization scale (Employees, Sales, Capitalization)

Annual report 2008

2.9

Significant organizational changes

Annual report 2008

2.10

Awards received relevant to social, ethical, and environmental performance

Our core business - Awards and rankings (28)

Profile 2.1

Report Parameters Report Profile 3.1

Reporting period

Scope of the report – Choices (53)

3.2

Previous report

Scope of the report – Choices (53)

3.3

Reporting Cycle

Scope of the report – Choices (53)

3.4

Contact information

Home page of DHV

Report scope and boundary 3.5

CR Report 2008

Process for defining report content

Scope of the report – Choices (53)

- 63 -


Reporting

DHV Group

Subject 3.6

Reference in CR Report 2008 (page number between brackets) Report boundaries

Scope of the report – Boundaries (53)

3.7

Specific limitations on the scope or boundary

Scope of the report (53)

3.8

Basis for reporting on joint ventures and subsidiaries

Scope of the report – Boundaries (53)

3.9

Data measurement techniques and the bases of calculations, including estimations. Explain any decision for substantial diversion from the GRI protocol

Data clarification table (56)

3.10

Explanation of re-statement

Scope of the report – Choices (53) and respective sections

3.11

Significant changes from the previous reports in scope, boundary or measurement methods

We have accounted CR performance data of our Alliance Partner Delcan for 100% instead of 40%. 2007 figures have been restated accordingly.

GRI Content Index 3.12

Cross reference table

This table

Policy and current practice on external assurance

Scope of the report – Choices (53) & Assurance report (54)

Assurance 3.13

Governance, Commitments and Engagement Governance 4.1

Governance structure

Corporate Governance (24)

4.2

Independence of board members

DHV website on corporate governance

4.3

Independence unitary governance body

DHV has no unitary board

4.4

Shareholder and employee feedback mechanisms

Communicating with our Stakeholders (52)

4.5

Executive compensation and non-financial goals

DHV website on corporate governance

4.6

Control on conflict of interest in governance

Corporate Governance (24)

4.7

Determination of qualifications and expertise of the Board of Directors

Commitment to external principles (17)

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 64 -


Reporting

DHV Group

Subject

Reference in CR Report 2008 (page number between brackets)

4.8

Mission, values and code of conduct

DHV website on Corporate Governance

4.9

Control procedures internal compliance with principles

Integrity (30) and DHV website on Corporate Governance

4.10

Processes for evaluating the economic, environmental and social performance of the Board of Directors

DHV website on Corporate Governance

Commitments to external initiatives 4.11

Precautionary policies and approach

Commitment to external principles (17)

4.12

Endorsed voluntary charters and external principles

Commitment to external principles (17)

4.13

External memberships

External memberships and appointments (52)

Stakeholder Engagement 4.14

List of engaged stakeholders

Dialogue (52)

4.15

Identification and selection of stakeholders

Dialogue (52)

4.16

Stakeholder consultation

Dialogue (52)

4.17

Use of information

Dialogue (52)

Economic performance indicators DMA

Disclosure on management approach

CR management approach (21)

Economic performance EC1

EC2

CR Report 2008

Direct economic value generated and distributed, including revenues, operating costs, employee compensation, donations and other community investments, retained earnings, and payments to capital providers and governments

Key economic figures (6)

Financial implications and other risks and opportunities for the organization’s activities due to climate change

not reported

- 65 -


Reporting

DHV Group

Subject

Reference in CR Report 2008 (page number between brackets)

EC3

Coverage of the organization’s defined benefit plan obligations

partial on www.dhv.nl/pensioenfonds (Dutch only) and Professional and personal development (34)

EC4

Significant financial assistance received from government

not reported

Market Presence EC6

Policy, practices, and proportion of spending on locally-based suppliers at significant locations of operation

not reported

EC7

Procedures for local hiring and proportion of senior management hired from the local community at locations of significant operation

People care - diversity (35)

Indirect economic impacts EC8

Development and impact of infrastructure investments and services provided primarily for public benefit through commercial, in-kind, or pro bono engagement

not reported

EC9 (add)

Understanding and describing significant indirect economic impacts, including the extent of impacts

partial at Our impact (12)

Environmental performance indicators DMA

Disclosure on management approach

CR management approach (22)

EN1

Materials used by weight or volume

Environmental performance (49 and 59)

EN2

Percentage of recycled input materials

not relevant

EN3

Direct energy use by source

Environmental performance (48)

EN4

Indirect energy use by source

Environmental performance (48, 49)

Total water withdrawal by source

not reported

Materials

Energy

Water EN8

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 66 -


Reporting

DHV Group

Subject

Reference in CR Report 2008 (page number between brackets)

Biodiversity EN11

Location and size of land owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas

not relevant

EN12

Description of significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity in protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas

not reported

Emissions, effluents and waste EN16

Total direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight

Environmental performance (47)

EN17

Other relevant indirect greenhouse gas emissions by weight

Environmental performance (47)

EN18

Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and reductions achieved

partial on Environmental performance (50)

EN19

Emissions of ozone-depleting substances by weight

not relevant

EN20

NO, SO, and other significant air emissions by type and weight

not relevant

EN21

Total water discharge by quality and destination

not relevant

EN22

Total weight of waste by type and disposal

not reported

EN23

Total number and volume of significant spills

not applicable

Products and services EN26

Initiatives to mitigate environmental impacts of products and services, and extent of impact mitigation

Our sustainability/transparency tool available to staff includes environmental aspects (20)

EN27

Percentage of products sold and their packaging materials that are reclaimed by category

not applicable

Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations

not reported

Compliance EN28 Transport EN29

CR Report 2008

Significant environmental impacts of transporting products and other goods and materials used for the organization's operations, and transporting members of the workforce.

Environmental performance (49)

- 67 -


Reporting

DHV Group

Subject

Reference in CR Report 2008 (page number between brackets)

Social performance Indicators DMA

Disclosure on management approach

CR management approach (22)

LA1

Total workforce by employment type, contract and region

People care - diversity (37) and - employment conditions (39)

LA2

Total number and rate of employee turnover by age group, gender and region

People care (33 and 57)

Employment

Labor/Management relations LA4

Percentage of employees covered by collective bargaining power

not reported

LA5

Minimum notice period(s) regarding operational changes

not reported

Occupational Health and safety LA7

Rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities by region

People care – health and safety (41)

LA8

Education, training, counseling, prevention, and risk-control programs in place to assist workforce members, their families, or community members regarding serious diseases

not reported

Training and Education LA10

Average hours of training per year per employee by employee category

Professional and personal development (35)

LA11 (add)

Programs for skills management and lifelong learning that support the continued employability of employees and assist them in managing career endings

Professional and personal development (35)

LA12 (add)

Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews

Professional and personal development (34)

Diversity and Equal Opportunity LA13

Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity

People care - diversity (37 – 39)

LA14

Ratio of basic salary of men to women by employee category

not reported

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 68 -


Reporting

DHV Group

Subject

Reference in CR Report 2008 (page number between brackets)

Human rights DMA

Disclosure on management approach

CR management approach (22)

Investment and procurement practices HR1

Percentage and total number of significant investment agreements that include human rights clauses or that have undergone human rights screening

not reported

HR2

Percentage of significant suppliers and contractors that have undergone screening on human rights and actions taken

not reported

Non-Discrimination HR4

Total number of incidents of discrimination and actions taken

Integrity (30)

Freedom of association and collective bargaining HR5

Operations identified in which the right to exercise freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at significant risk, and actions taken to support these rights

not reported

Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of child labor, and measures taken to contribute to the elimination of child labor

Integrity (31)

Child Labor HR6

Forced and compulsory labor HR7

Operations identified as having significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor, and measures to contribute to the elimination of forced or compulsory labor

not reported

Disclosure on management approach

CR management approach (22)

Nature, scope, and effectiveness of any programs and practices that assess and manage the impacts of operations on communities, including entering, operating, and exiting

not reported

Percentage and total number of business units analyzed for risks related to corruption

Integrity (30-32)

Society DMA Community SO1 Corruption SO2

CR Report 2008

- 69 -


Reporting

DHV Group

Subject SO3

Reference in CR Report 2008 (page number between brackets) Percentage of employees trained in organization’s anti-corruption policies and procedures

Integrity (31)

SO4

Actions taken in response to incidents of corruption

Integrity (30)

SO5

Public policy positions and participation in public policy development and lobbying

not reported

Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and regulations

not reported

Compliance SO8

Product Responsibility Performance Indicators DMA

Disclosure on management approach

CR management approach (23)

Customer Health and Safety PR1

Life cycle stages in which health and safety impacts of products and services are assessed for improvement, and percentage of significant products and services categories subject to such procedures

not reported

Product and Service Labeling PR3

Type of product and service information required by procedures, and percentage of significant products and services subject to such information requirements

not reported

PR5 (add)

Practices related to customer satisfaction, including results of surveys measuring customer satisfaction

Integrity (31)

Marketing Communications PR6

Programs for adherence to laws, standards, and voluntary codes related to marketing communications, including advertising, promotion, and sponsorship

not reported

Monetary value of significant fines for non-compliance with laws and regulations concerning the provision and use of products and services

not reported

Compliance PR9

CR Report 2008

Error! Reference source not found. Error! Reference source not found.- 70 -


Reporting

CR Report 2008

DHV Group

- 71 -


DHV Group

7

COLOPHON

Publisher DHV Group P.O. Box 219 3800 AE Amersfoort The Netherlands www.dhv.com Dutch Trade Register DHV Holding B.V. 31021655 Publication date May 2009 This Corporate Responsibility Report 2008 (PDF only) as well as our CR Summary 2008 is available on www.dhv.com/cr-report. The DHV Group Annual Report 2008 is available on www.dhv.com/annualreport.

7.1

Contact details / offices

An up-to-date overview of addresses and contact details can be found on www.dhv.com/offices.

CR Report 2008

bijlage 0 - 73 -

CR Report 2008  

DHV Corporate Responsibility Report 2008