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Volume V ď Ź Issue IV ď Ź India Edition

Harmony between man, nature and machine.


Harmony between man, nature and machine.


the nice thing about Bombay is that people don’t always presume to judge how much money you can spend by how you dress

The third generation arrives‌


What’s Hybrid? Straight Talkers

Another could be the suntanned face of a tourist, wearing cargos and a vest, swigging Another could be the suntanned face of a tourist, wearing cargos and a vest, swigging beer at Café Mondegar on Colaba Causeway, while scribbling in a diary. Yet another can be the familiar face of a preening actor, hanging out at the bar at Olive in Bandra, in a muscle t-shirt and designer jeans.

T

he nice thing about Bombay is that people don’t always presume to judge how much money you can spend by how you dress. I’ve found this to be true more often than not. After a hectic day at work and a couple of sweaty trips in the black and yellow city cabs, I have walked into Colaba’s fine diner Indigo, wearing jeans and a t-shirt, and found the staff as eager to please me as they were the expat businessman, in the Hugo Boss suit, who has a running tab at the restaurant. The corporate guy and the dabbawallas, both get on the Local (train) in the morning to get to their individual

occupied with the business of living, it cuts out a lot of drivel that would otherwise find its prey in an idle mind. People say Mumbaikars are selfabsorbed and snobbish. I think they believe in minding their own business. To each his own… space, is the motto. Perhaps it’s a shot at making up for the lack of physical space. work places. The person that eats at Italian ristorante Basilico, also on other occasions eats at Janata Lunch Home, both located in Pali Naka, Bandra. Of course the fact is that Mumbai is such a vast city, it is ridiculous to try and make any kind of generalisations. But a piece like this, that attempts to capture the cultural essence of the city in a few words, can only be written if certain assumptions are first put in place. Mumbai is a city in a hurry. Mumbaikars have something to do and somewhere to go at all times. Now, that’s a good thing because when someone is so

One thing that strikes you about Mumbai is that there will not be a single second in a day that you chance upon an empty spot on a street; that you’re not looking at hundreds of faces and hundreds of faces are not looking at you. In that never ending audio-visual presentation of faces, faces and more faces, there are some that make you pause on them for longer than a split second. One could be the weatherworn face of a fisherwoman sitting, holding her basket of wares, clad in a cotton sari hitched dhoti style, in the general compartment of a Local shuttling between Churchgate and Virar.

But they’re all faces of people caught up in the mad rush to fulfill the demands that the megapolis makes on them. In return, they get to be a part of the great Mumbai dream. Of course the fact is that Mumbai is such a vast city, it is ridiculous to try and make any kind of generalisations. But a piece like this, that attempts to capture the cultural essence of the city in a few words, can only be written if certain assumptions are first put in place. Mumbai is a city in a hurry. Mumbaikars have something to do and somewhere to go at all times. Now, that’s a good thing because when someone is so occupied with the business of living, it cuts out a lot of drivel that would otherwise find its prey in an idle mind. People say Mumbaikars are self-absorbed and snobbish. I think they believe in minding their own business. To each his own… space, is the motto. Perhaps it’s a shot at making up for the lack of physical space.

Gandhi studied and worked in New York before he returned to India and Khanna freelanced as a designer and stylist in Delhi, before they got together to launch their highly successful label Cue in 1998. The duo’s preference and forte lies in their experimentation with cuts and fabrics, rather than with embellishment. About their Chivas Fashion Tour 08 collection, Gandhi says, “It is a festive collection inspired by city life.” Their designs for this collection serve the dual purpose of work and party wear. One thing that strikes you about Mumbai is that there will not be a single second in a day that you chance upon an empty spot on a street; that you’re not looking at hundreds of faces and hundreds of faces are not looking at you. In that never ending audio-visual presentation of faces, faces and more faces, there are some that make you pause on them for longer than a split second. One could be the weatherworn face of a fisherwoman sitting, holding her basket of wares, clad in a cotton sari hitched dhoti style, in the general compartment of a Local shuttling between Churchgate and Virar. Another could be the suntanned face of a tourist, wearing cargos and a vest, swigging beer at Café Mondegar on Colaba Causeway, while scribbling in a diary. Yet another can be the familiar face of a preening actor, hanging out at the bar at Olive in Bandra, in a muscle t-shirt and designer jeans. But they’re all faces of people caught up in the mad rush to fulfill the demands that the megapolis makes on them. In return, they get to be a part of the great Mumbai dream.


Arun Pathak

Straight Talkers Gandhi studied and worked in New York before he returned to India and Khanna freelanced as a designer and stylist in Delhi, before they got together to launch their highly successful label Cue in 1998. The duo’s preference and forte lies in their experimentation with cuts and fabrics, rather than with embellishment. About their Chivas Fashion Tour 08 collection, Gandhi says, “It is a festive collection inspired by city life.” Their designs for this collection serve the dual purpose of work and party wear.

Manoj Sharma Straight Talkers

Gandhi studied and worked in New York before he returned to India and Khanna freelanced as a designer and stylist in Delhi, before they got together to launch their highly successful label Cue in 1998. The duo’s preference and forte lies in their experimentation with cuts and fabrics, rather than with embellishment. About their Chivas Fashion Tour 08 collection, Gandhi says, “It is a festive collection inspired by city life.” Their designs for this collection serve the dual purpose of work and party wear. One thing that strikes you about Mumbai is that there will not be a single second in a day that you chance upon an empty spot on a street; that you’re not looking at hundreds of faces and hundreds of faces are not looking at you. In that never ending audio-visual presentation of faces, faces and more faces, there are some that make you pause on them for longer than a split second. One could be the weatherworn face of a fisherwoman sitting, holding her basket of wares, clad in a cotton sari hitched dhoti style, in the general compartment of a Local shuttling between Churchgate and Virar. Another could be the suntanned face of a tourist, wearing cargos and a vest, swigging beer at Café Mondegar on Colaba Causeway, while scribbling in a diary. Yet another can be the familiar face of a preening actor, hanging out at the bar at Olive in Bandra, in a muscle t-shirt and designer jeans. But they’re all faces of people caught up in the mad rush to fulfill the demands that the megapolis makes on them. In return, they get to be a part of the great Mumbai dream.

One thing that strikes you about Mumbai is that there will not be a single second in a day that you chance upon an empty spot on a street; that you’re not looking at hundreds of faces and hundreds of faces are not looking at you. In that never ending audio-visual presentation of faces, faces and more faces, there are some that make you pause on them for longer than a split second. One could be the weatherworn face of a fisherwoman sitting, holding her basket of wares, clad in a cotton sari hitched dhoti style, in the general compartment of a Local shuttling between Churchgate and Virar. Another could be the suntanned face of a tourist, wearing cargos and a vest, swigging beer at Café Mondegar on Colaba Causeway, while scribbling in a diary. Yet another can be the familiar face of a preening actor, hanging out at the bar at Olive in Bandra, in a muscle t-shirt and designer jeans. But they’re all faces of people caught up in the mad rush to fulfill the demands that the megapolis makes on them. In return, they get to be a part of the great Mumbai dream.


Backlight

Straight Talkers Gandhi studied and worked in New York before he returned to India and Khanna freelanced as a designer and stylist in Delhi, before they got together to launch their highly successful label Cue in 1998. The duo’s preference and forte lies in their experimentation with cuts and fabrics, rather than with embellishment.

Simran

Brajesh Kumar

Gandhi studied and worked in New York before he returned to India and Khanna freelanced as a designer and stylist in Delhi, before they got together to launch their highly successful label Cue in 1998. The duo’s preference and forte lies in their experimentation with cuts and fabrics, rather than with embellishment. About their Chivas Fashion Tour 08 collection, Gandhi says, “It is a festive collection inspired by city life.” Their designs for this collection serve the dual purpose of work and party wear.

Gandhi studied and worked in New York before he returned to India and Khanna freelanced as a designer and stylist in Delhi, before they got together to launch their highly successful label Cue in 1998. The duo’s preference and forte lies in their experimentation with cuts and fabrics, rather than with embellishment. About their Chivas Fashion Tour 08 collection, Gandhi says, “It is a festive collection inspired by city life.” Their designs for this collection serve the dual purpose of work and party wear.

One thing that strikes you about Mumbai is that there will not be a single second in a day that you chance upon an empty spot on a street; that you’re not looking at hundreds of faces and hundreds of faces are not looking at you. In that never ending audio-visual presentation of faces, faces and more faces, there are some that make you pause on them for longer than a split second. One could be the weatherworn face of a fisherwoman sitting, holding her basket of wares, clad in a cotton sari hitched dhoti style, in the general compartment of a Local shuttling between Churchgate and Virar. Another could be the suntanned face of a tourist, wearing cargos and a vest, swigging beer at Café Mondegar on Colaba Causeway, while scribbling in a diary. Yet another can be the familiar face of a preening actor, hanging out at the bar at Olive in Bandra, in a muscle t-shirt and designer jeans.

One thing that strikes you about Mumbai is that there will not be a single second in a day that you chance upon an empty spot on a street; that you’re not looking at hundreds of faces and hundreds of faces are not looking at you. In that never ending audio-visual presentation of faces, faces and more faces, there are some that make you pause on them for longer than a split second. One could be the weatherworn face of a fisherwoman sitting, holding her basket of wares, clad in a cotton sari hitched dhoti style, in the general compartment of a Local shuttling between Churchgate and Virar. Another could be the suntanned face of a tourist, wearing cargos and a vest, swigging beer at Café Mondegar on Colaba Causeway, while scribbling in a diary. Yet another can be the familiar face of a preening actor, hanging out at the bar at Olive in Bandra, in a muscle t-shirt and designer jeans.

But they’re all faces of people caught up in the mad rush to fulfill the demands that the megapolis makes on them. In return, they get to be a part of the great Mumbai dream.

But they’re all faces of people caught up in the mad rush to fulfill the demands that the megapolis makes on them. In return, they get to be a part of the great Mumbai dream.

Straight Talkers

Straight Talkers

Kanika Sinha Straight Talkers

Gandhi studied and worked in New York before he returned to India and Khanna freelanced as a designer and stylist in Delhi, before they got together to launch their highly successful label Cue in 1998. The duo’s preference and forte lies in their experimentation with cuts and fabrics, rather than with embellishment. About their Chivas Fashion Tour 08 collection, Gandhi says, “It is a festive collection inspired by city life.” Their designs for this collection serve the dual purpose of work and party wear. One thing that strikes you about Mumbai is that there will not be a single second in a day that you chance upon an empty spot on a street; that you’re not looking at hundreds of faces and hundreds of faces are not looking at you. In that never ending audio-visual presentation of faces, faces and more faces, there are some that make you pause on them for longer than a split second. One could be the weatherworn face of a fisherwoman sitting, holding her basket of wares, clad in a cotton sari hitched dhoti style, in the general compartment of a Local shuttling between Churchgate and Virar. Another could be the suntanned face of a tourist, wearing cargos and a vest, swigging beer at Café Mondegar on Colaba Causeway, while scribbling in a diary. Yet another can be the familiar face of a preening actor, hanging out at the bar at Olive in Bandra, in a muscle t-shirt and designer jeans. But they’re all faces of people caught up in the mad rush to fulfill the demands that the megapolis makes on them. In return, they get to be a part of the great Mumbai dream. One thing that strikes you about Mumbai is that there will not be a single second in a day that you chance upon an empty spot on a street; that you’re not looking at hundreds of faces and hundreds of faces are not looking at you. In that never ending audio-visual presentation of faces, faces and more faces, there are some that make you pause on them for longer than a split second. One could be the weatherworn face of a fisherwoman sitting, holding her basket of wares, clad in a cotton sari hitched dhoti style, in the general compartment of a Local shuttling between Churchgate and Virar. Another could be the suntanned face of a tourist, wearing cargos and a vest, swigging beer at Café Mondegar on Colaba Causeway, while scribbling in a diary. Yet another can be the familiar face of a preening actor, hanging out at the bar at Olive in Bandra, in a muscle t-shirt and designer jeans.

Spacious Interior Straight Talkers

Gandhi studied and worked in New York before he returned to India and Khanna freelanced as a designer and stylist in Delhi, before they got together to launch their highly successful label Cue in 1998. The duo’s preference and forte lies in their experimentation with cuts and fabrics, rather than with embellishment.


Ravish Kumar Straight Talkers

Gandhi studied and worked in New York before he returned to India and Khanna freelanced as a designer and stylist in Delhi, before they got together to launch their highly successful label Cue in 1998. The duo’s preference and forte lies in their experimentation with cuts and fabrics, rather than with embellishment. About their Chivas Fashion Tour 08 collection, Gandhi says, “It is a festive collection inspired by city life.” Their designs for this collection serve the dual purpose of work and party wear. One thing that strikes you about Mumbai is that there will not be a single second in a day that you chance upon an empty spot on a street; that you’re not looking at hundreds of faces and hundreds of faces are not looking at you. In that never ending audio-visual presentation of faces, faces and more faces, there are some that make you pause on them for longer than a split second. One could be the weatherworn face of a fisherwoman sitting, holding her basket of wares, clad in a cotton sari hitched dhoti style, in the general compartment of a Local shuttling between Churchgate and Virar. Another could be the suntanned face of a tourist, wearing cargos and a vest, swigging beer at Café Mondegar on Colaba Causeway, while scribbling in a diary. Yet another can be the familiar face of a preening actor, hanging out at the bar at Olive in Bandra, in a muscle t-shirt and designer jeans. But they’re all faces of people caught up in the mad rush to fulfill the demands that the megapolis makes on them. In return, they get to be a part of the great Mumbai dream. One thing that strikes you about Mumbai is that there will not be a single second in a day that you chance upon an empty spot on a street; that you’re not looking at hundreds of faces and hundreds of faces are not looking at you. In that never ending audio-visual presentation of faces, faces and more faces, there are some that make you pause on them for longer than a split second. One could be the weatherworn face of a fisherwoman sitting, holding her basket of wares, clad in a cotton sari hitched dhoti style, in the general compartment of a Local shuttling between Churchgate and Virar. Another could be the suntanned face of a tourist, wearing cargos and a vest, swigging beer at Café Mondegar on Colaba Causeway, while scribbling in a diary. Yet another can be the familiar face of a preening actor, hanging out at the bar at Olive in Bandra, in a muscle t-shirt and designer jeans.



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