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DEZINE B L A C K

INTERVIEW: CHRIS DEVOUR We hear from 25 year old freelance photographer, Chris Devour.

&

W H I T E

SURROUNDING SOULS Avi Ben Zaken reflects feelings through a series of portraits of family and friends.

INTERVIEW: DANIEL STOLLE We interview Germany-born internationally published artist, Daniel Stolle.


SHADES OF

GREY In this very special issue of DEZINE, we’re going to strip back the colour and take a look at artists and photographers who have done the same with their work. As with every issue, we’ll be admiring the work of some seriously talented creatives, but this time we’ll be finding out their thoughts on the art of monochrome. We hope you enjoy this special issue.

B.


S P E C I A L T H A N KS TO. . .

CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Ben Wainman

PRODUCTION EDITOR: Evangeline South

PROOF READER: Emma Brown

ADVERTISING COORDINATOR: Ryan J. Leeming

DESIGNERS/ARTISTS: Nico Inosanto, Daniel Stolle, Fetrik Vilius

MODELS: Aisii, Paula Almeida, Claudia Demian, Ana Elena, Paulina Frankowska, Diana Maria G, Agnieszka Gołebiewska, Taylor Hodgetts, Denisa Hodisan, Melanie LeTourneau, Daniela Lupi, Adela Maria Marius, Cristiana Mitrea, Aleksandra Roszyk, Katherine Smits, Georgiana Vlaicu

PHOTOGRAPHERS: Chris Devour, Anna Dyszkiewicz, Robert MacNeil, Jason Mageau, Geraint Rowland, Ross A. Wilson, Avi Ben Zaken

WRITERS: Stephanie Benfield, Angela Tempest, Ben Wainman

And a huge thank you to www.mptvimages.com


COV E R S H OT

Photographer: Chris Devour Model: Georgiana Vlaicu


CO N T E N TS

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32

50

92

76 12

31

INTERVIEW: CHRIS DEVOUR

THE POWER OF BLACK &

Freelance photographer,

WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY

Chris Devour, from Oradea,

Stephanie Benfield talks about

Romania returns to DEZINE.

the power of black and white.

32

48

INTERVIEW: DANIEL STOLLE

TOP ARTISTS WORKING

JASON MAGEAU

We interview artist Daniel Stolle,

IN MONOCHROME

Jason is a photographer with

who’s work has been featured in

Monochrome is a style that has

years of experience shooting

publications across the world.

been used for many generations.

for major brands.

76

50

92

SURROUNDING SOULS

STARS AND CARS

Avi Ben Zaken reflects feelings

In this edition, look back at

through a series of portraits of

some iconic stars of the past

family and friends.

with their equally iconic cars.


CO N T E N TS

116

124

140

150

164

124

116 POST GRUNGE ILLUSTRATION

ROSS A. WILSON

The artwork is a unique record of

We hear Ross Wilson’s

a subculture that influenced the

thoughts on colour and black

lyrics and music of Nirvana.

and white photography.

140

150

164

LOVE LETTERS

DEVINYL THE BOOK

ANNA DYSZKIEWICZ

FROM THE ATTIC

The main goal of this project is

We take a look at the work of

Step into the imagination of

showcase and to promote the

Anna Dyszkiewicz, a

photographer, Robert MacNeil.

Devinyl typeface.

photographer based Poland.

176

192

TRAVELLING IN

GET SOCIAL

BLACK AND WHITE

Want to follow or see more of

Geraint Rowland collects black

the amazing talents featured in

and white shots from his travels.

this issue? This is your page!


WWW.VELOSKIN.CC


A very British skincare brand for cyclists by cyclists VeloSkin products have been crafted using the finest natural ingredients to provide premium performance skincare for cyclists. Our products are enriched with vitamins, minerals, amino acids and proteins to provide lasting protection and kick start the skin recovery process.


A N I N T E RV I E W W I T H

CHRIS DEVOUR We hear from 25 year old freelance photographer, Chris Devour, from Oradea, Romania.

Featured Models Adela Maria Marius, Diana Maria G, Denisa Hodisan, Daniela Lupi, Georgiana Vlaicu, Aisii, Claudia Demian, Cristiana Mitrea, Ana Elena


“photography is quite subjective, there isn’t one way to do things, it depends on the person. ”

Obviously you’ve appeared in the magazine before with the wonderful ‘Indoor Stories’ but for our readers who may not be familiar, tell us a bit about yourself and how you first got into photography?

First of all I would like to thank you guys for the first feature, I was really happy to see my work featured in your magazine. I am a 25 year old freelance photographer from Oradea, Romania but most of my projects were done in Bucharest during my masters degree, my studies focus on political science and security ( my favourite courses where on Marxism and post colonial/ intersectional feminist ) however my passion was always photography and graphic design. I started taking photos when I was 15-16 with a small digital camera, and gradually got to where I am today, through a lot of practice and ups and downs. I used to draw a lot when I was younger and loved to collect things from pictures to toys or other interesting stuff, I guess all this evolved into combining drawing or graphic design with photography for certain projects.

Who or what are your main sources of inspiration?

Different artists, I would probably need a long list to name all of them, as I follow most of them on Instagram or tumblr. I wouldn’t say that there is a linear inspiration for what I do, I get it from all types of sources, from dark symbolism to editorial fashion to architecture or just nice aesthetics, history inspire me a lot as it was one of my favourite subjects in school and later on in college. Obviously artistic perspective is very subjective so that’s what I personally find as an inspiration. You seem to work primarily in black and white, why is that?

Mostly because I see details better in black and white, secondly because I have dichromacy, which means too many colours will make it harder for me to distinguish certain patterns. I usually go for really cold or really warm tones when I shoot colour, but most of the time I find it more relaxing for the eyes and I see the perspective better when I shoot black and white.


C H R I S D E VO U R


C H R I S D E VO U R


What would be the best piece of advice that you could give a new photographer?

What has been your favourite photography project to work on so far?

To practice every day and find the style that fits your perspective or vice versa. I don’t really like to give advice as I believe as mentioned before that photography is quite subjective there isn’t one way to do things, it depends on the person.

In regards to conceptual work, I would say my faceless project with Suciu Sebastian, I love every editorial I do, and I also really like quick shootings that are planned from one day to another.

What do you look for in a model when you are planning a shoot?

This is again quite subjective, I usually look for a face that inspires me for my ideas, I wouldn’t say that I have a pattern for a model, if I think of an idea I then look for someone that would fit that concept. However, even when I plan the whole thing, what happens during the shoot is quite spontaneous and I end up doing something totally different and I think that is the beauty of it.

What are you currently working on, is there anything we should be looking out for?

Because of my job (not related to photography ) I only get the weekends for shootings, thus I don’t have anything special planned, I would like to travel to Bucharest more often as I have moved back home to Oradea, in order to plan new shootings, but I will be doing some new projects over the summer.


The Power Of Black & White Photography Writer / Stephanie Benfield

With technological advances, the plethora of colour and styles, there is a lot to be said for how black and white photography is still a prominent art form in photography.

Black and white photography is not seen as an archaic method. It is not even considered behind the times; even photography has advanced into the full-colour spectrum looking sharper and brighter than ever. Black and white photography is art in its own right. Benefits of Black and White Photography • Timeless • Clarity of lines • Atmospheric • Classis and poignant • Focussed on the subject. Ultimately, black and white photography can capture subjects, scenes and settings in a way that other methods can’t compete with.Your attention is not distracted with colour; the image allows you to focus entirely on the subject matter and the art form. Key Elements of Black and White Photography While monochrome photography is considered effortless and simply stylish, there are imperative factors that you need to consider when conducting this type of photography;

1. Lighting With black and white photography, you need definition and clarity. To achieve this, you need to ensure great lighting that hits the subject at the perfect angle to provide a clean and crisp image. Experiment with different lighting options to find the one that gives you the most definition and makes your picture shine. 2. Composition Often the best black and white photographs are those that take a minimalistic approach.You may find with a busy composition the lines are blurred and you lose the clarity of black and white. However, this is your art to experiment with, so choose an arrangement that works for you and the effect you want to achieve. 3. Perspective Context and perspective are important factors in black and white photographs as you can lose a lot of depth in monochrome photographs. When you focus your shot, think about the foreground and background and whether you can position the subjects in a way that gives you the best perspective. Black and white photography is a beautiful style to work with but be prepared with time and patience to achieve your desired looks and create art that is truly magical.


A N I N T E RV I E W W I T H

DANIEL STOLLE Daniel Stolle has been an illustrator since 2007. The Germany-born artist has worked with the likes of The New York Times, Scientific American, DER SPIEGEL and many more.

Featured Artwork Daniel Stolle


Tell us a bit about yourself and what you do?

My name is Daniel Stolle. I have been an illustrator since 2007. I was born in Germany but I’ve lived in Finland for a long time. Once upon a time, I studied Industrial Design, but after graduation, I decided to become an illustrator. I work mostly in editorial illustration. Who are some of the clients you've worked for?

The New York Times, The New Yorker, Scientific American, New Scientist, DER SPIEGEL, DIE ZEIT, Neue Zürcher Zeitung and many more. And which has been your favourite project to work on?

It is hard to name just one. My favourite projects are the ones, where I get a sense of really working together with an art director. Both sides need to have a sensibility for the other side’s ideas and specific needs. About the actual results of the work my drawings - some projects I do not like when I finish them, but then I understand

their value after a while. Sometimes it goes the other way round. Who or what are your main sources of inspiration?

When I hear the word “inspiration” I think of little sparks, that are flying through the air. When these little sparks hit an “artist”, he or she needs to drop everything and go into a wild creation frenzy until his or her inspiration is transformed into “the artwork”. This has sadly never happened to me. Time to create these illustrations for magazines and newspapers is very limited. I just need to sit down, figure it out and draw it. Drawings often need to be revised and changed several times due to any amount of reasons. Even though that sounds very bland, I value the process very much, it is maybe just more unglamorous than one would imagine. When I see inspiration as intermediate influences and things I am interested in, then there is, of course, a lot to talk about. A long time ago I started collecting photographs, printed matter, and drawings, that have something that interests me, it could be the colour, composition, subject

“The more sombre mood of these black and white images makes them suitable for the darker subject matter like crime, violence, and mental issues.”


matter, concept or plain weirdness that make me take notice. They are mostly low-resolution photos I copied from the web, but also childhood photographs and other various odds and ends. When I am stuck on something or like to break away from the same old ideas, I browse through this folder of images. My head constantly tries to form connections between an image and the problem I am working on. I guess a fancy way to call it would be: lateral idea generation. This is a good way for me to become “inspired”. What effect do you think it has to create a piece in black & white as opposed to using colour?

I’d like to say, that these black and white images are only a part of what I am doing. I also make very different images. For me, illustrators who do not adhere to one strict formula or “style” are more interesting. The more somber mood of these black and white images makes them suitable for the darker subject matter like crime,

violence, and mental issues. I have also realized that using these shaded images allows me at the same time to be more explicit and vaguer. As an example: I can show only a small part of something or somebody in the bright light, and leave most of it unrevealed in the dark, and still, there is a sense of realism in it. When using full colour and flat light it is harder to be so measured and subtle. What are you currently working on, is there anything we should be looking out for?

I am usually working on 1-3 editorial illustration projects at a time - so there is always something in the works. I publish the ones I like to my website, Instagram or Twitter. In the background, I am always chipping away at some over-ambitious personal projects that so far have all been doomed to fail. To not jinx my current one even more, I prefer not to talk about it yet.


Who Are the Top Monochrome Artists? Writer / Angela Tempest

Monochrome art is an style that has been used by artists for many generations and has a subtlety that mixtures of colours can sometimes overwhelm. The use of shades of a single colour, most often black or brown, is used in many different ways ranging from abstract art to spiritual pieces and more. Here are some of the top artists who currently use monochrome in their work. Ryan Travis Christian Ryan Travis Christian was born in Oakland, California and is currently based in Chicago. His work is known for its monochrome themes as well as for their humour and pattern, with just the right amount of madness. There are even a few googly eyes included for effect. He is currently showing through Western Exhibitions, a nomadic, commercial gallery that moves around locations in Chicago.

Michelle Grabner Michelle Grabner is a painter and conceptual artist from Oshkosh, Wisconsin who often creates abstract pieces using monochrome. Her works have been featured in the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago as well as the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Victorian and Albert Museum in London.


Evan Gruzis Evan Gruzis is an American artist born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and who is now based in New York, where he held his first solo exhibition in 2008. He has created a denim collection for The Hole gallery in the city as well as other still life pieces. He also creates monochrome pieces that have a digital quality to them and is also renowned for his use of ‘space grey’. He currently has a featured exhibit called Atavistic Zen in the Duve, Berlin. Christian Holstad Christian Holstad is an American artist from Anaheim, California who is now based in New York. His work can be seen in collections including at the Carnegie Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art. He is known for creating ranges from installations and also for creating grey drawings made from rubbed out newspaper print. Robert Holyhead Robert Holyhead is a British painter who often uses monochrome, although not always in shades of black or brown. His works are known for their use of white ground left uncovered as well as the use of intensively coloured shapes and geometric patterns.

Robert Longo Robert Longo is a New York native who became famous for his monochrome paintings in the 1980s called the ‘Men in the Cities’ which showed sharply dressed men (and women) in contorted positions. His works often feature black and white clothing as well as using graphite and charcoal. Eva Rothschild Eva Rothschild is a sculptural artist born in Dublin who has shown her works in galleries including the Tate Modern in London and the 303 Gallery in New York. Her frequent work with black metal and materials reference the Minimalism movement of the 1960s-70s and she uses materials such as paper, leather and Plexiglas in her creations. Oscar Tuazon Born in Seattle, Oscar Tuazon is now based in Los Angeles and creates sculptures, architecture and also mixed media pieces. He favours monochrome themes and grey concrete in many creations and has exhibited around the world, including London, New York, Paris and Tokyo.


F E AT U R E D P H OTO G R A P H E R

JASON MAGEAU JASON MAGEAU is a professional photographer with years of experience shooting for major brands and insurgent underground artists alike. He has a bulletproof reputation in the music industry, as a photographer, web designer, personal manager, and young entrepreneur. A business he cofounded made the Inc. 500 list at number 232 for one of the fastest private growing companies in America.

Featured Models Cory Wells, Kelly & Brixton Mageau, Shelly Scholten, Nick Lopez Prints available at mptvdecor.com


H

is photography work has been used for international album campaigns for releases affiliated with Sony Music, Universal Music Group, and larger indie labels alike. He’s shot for Trip Advisor and Oyster. His work appears in tastemaker rock music publications, including Revolver, Rock Sound, Alternative Press, Music Connection, Modern Drummer, Outburn, and Substream. Moodygrams, Instagood, Bleachfilm, and other popular Instagram hubs have proudly showcased his photographs. Yet despite all of these impressive accomplishments, Mageau credits something beautifully simple yet enduringly profound as his inspirational source: fatherhood. After learning in his high school darkroom and pursuing a multimedia degree at Brooks College in Long

Beach, California, Mageau put the camera away to focus on developing a career in the independent music scene and among lifestyle brands. “I picked the camera back up when my son Brixton was born and immediately fell in love with capturing and documenting his life,” Mageau explains. “I wanted to leave behind and create something for him with which he could see his childhood through my eyes.” Whether working on a social media campaign for major brands, like smartphone centered technology company Mophie, or capturing unique landscapes and portraits for physical display use in personal residences and businesses, Mageau maintains a keen eye for fine art minded detail. Whether working in his much beloved B&W tones or vibrant full color, Mageau has a knack for harnessing the drama, beauty, pathos, imagination, and dynamics of everyday locations, people, animals, and life.


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THE PURVEYORS OF SLEEP


P H OTO S E R I E S : SURROUNDING SOULS

“Surrounding souls project was created during my 4 years in Wizo Design academy as a personal project. It reflects feelings through a series of portraits, most of them friends or family. The way they interpret my being, merge with it, or ignore it completely. I was trying to focus on composition and expression, for 3 years my (40D canon) camera was configured on black and white, It felt like a long lesson I had to learn�

Avi Ben Zaken Photographer


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RETROSPECTIVE

S TA R S AND CARS In this edition of DEZINE, we take a look back at some of the iconic stars of the past with their equally iconic cars.

Photo Credits All photographs: Š mptvimages.com Fine art prints of all images available at mptvdecor.com


Charlton Heston Charlton Heston at home with his 1967 Jaguar E-Type 4.2 OTS. Photo taken in 1967 by David Sutton.


Clint Eastwood Clint Eastwood at home with his 1958 Jaguar XK 150 S. Photo taken by Gene Trindl, c. 1960.


Clint Eastwood Clint Eastwood with his Ferrari 275 GTB. Photo taken in 1965 by Gunther.


Elizabeth Taylor Elizabeth Taylor and 2nd (out of 7) husband Michael Wilding on MGM lot. Michael’s car is a Jaguar XK 120. Photo taken in 1952.


Sean Connery Sean Connery on the set of “Goldfinger” with his Aston Martin DB 5. Photo taken in 1964.


James Coburn James Coburn at home in Los Angeles. His cars are the 250 GT California and Lusso Ferrari. Photo taken in 1966 by David Sutton.


Frank Sinatra Frank Sinatra leaving Nancy Sinatra’s high school after a performance in a 1955 Ford Thunderbird. Photo taken in 1955 by Bob Willoughby.


Steve McQueen Steve McQueen at home with wife Neile and his 275 GTS Ferrari. Photo taken in 1967 by Gunther.


Debbie Reynolds Debbie Reynolds before going into Paramount Studios to film “The Pleasure of His Company.� Her car is a Lincoln Continental Mark II. Photo taken in 1960 by Sid Avery.


Roger Moore Roger Moore and his Jaguar XK 150. Photo taken in 1956 by Eric Skipsey.


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8 0 A N D 9 0 ' S M U S I C C U LT U R E : P O ST G R U N G E I L LU ST R AT I O N

“Fetrik Vilius is a contemporary Indonesian artist with a passion for illustration and graphic design, but he is known best for his stylized ink drawings and combination imagery. Fetrik used a mixture of narration and music subculture references from 80’s to 90’s to produce post-grunge illustrations. "Music and art is one of the things that greatly influenced the work of art, and really there is no standard for my art". Vilius Fetrik became involved with art in early 2011 when he started to create his own clothing designs, in which his first was applying an image of a skateboard onto a T-shirt. His work has been inspired by music including grunge, punk, post rock and youth lifestyle (Smoking, drunks, skateboarding and legal highs). The artwork is a unique record of a subculture that influenced the lyrics and music of Nirvana. The music gives very distinctive touches, from the punk music which was born and raised in CBGB that soon became a famed venue of punk rock, including new wave bands such as The Ramones, Television, Patti Smith Group, Blondie and Talking Heads. From the early 1980’s onward, CBGB was known for hardcore punk. ”

Fetrik Vilius Artist


8 0 A N D 9 0 ' S M U S I C C U LT U R E : P O ST G R U N G E I L LU ST R AT I O N


FETRIK VILIUS


8 0 A N D 9 0 ' S M U S I C C U LT U R E : P O ST G R U N G E I L LU ST R AT I O N


FETRIK VILIUS


F E AT U R E D P H OTO G R A P H E R

ROSS A. WILSON At seventeen Ross completed a City and Guilds in photography, but he’d had his first camera since the age of twelve, staging toys as if they were scenes in movies. We hear Ross’s thoughts on colour and black and white photography and why he chooses to shoot in both.


N

owadays I shoot both colour or black and white, although they’re really two different languages. Which one I use depends on what I’m trying to communicate or, in the case of black and white, what I don’t want to communicate. We see in colour so black and white is the absence of information and I find it’s useful to think of black and white images being defined by what they subtract from an image in order to make other elements stand out; less is more.

For me a colour photograph encourages us to judge what we see, it’s how we see the world every day so it’s harder to switch off our knee jerk thoughts and reactions. Sometimes that’s your intention, but sometimes you want people to step back from that reaction and look at the world from another angle. Black and white invites the viewer to concentrate more on composition and geometry and to find harmony and dynamics in those elements. I think it can also turn everyday objects into symbols and encourage people to find meaning in them.


W

hat much of my street photography work is about is trying to find the strangeness and beauty that we miss in everyday life, which is all too easily taken for granted. A photograph, whether black and white or colour, allows us to do that. But with black and white I feel it takes that idea to another level, divorcing us of our prejudice, alienating us from the world we know and understand, in the hope of looking at it with new eyes. When it comes to landscapes the same principles apply, black and white focuses the geometry, light, form,

texture and composition. Those are all arguably intellectual ideas. However I find once you’ve begun to appreciate these elements you gain a new appreciation of the landscape, of nature itself and the world we’re living in, and that can lead to quite powerful emotions. Black and white then, to me, is like a lens that filters out our instinctual reactions, enhances often unappreciated elements of the world we live in, and sometimes transports us to this strange and amazing place that’s right under our noses.


P H OTO S E R I E S : LOV E L E T T E R S F R O M T H E AT T I C

“Imagine you and some friends are walking through the woods and you discover an old broken down house. You explore it, going from room to room taking in the energy within it. How long has this house been empty for, what secrets does it hold? You make your way to the attic and you find a box of very old photographs, As you look through them you can’t help wonder who they are, where they came from and what they mean.”

Robert MacNeil Photographer


F E AT U R E D P R OJ E C T

DEVINYL THE BOOK The main goal of this project is showcase and to promote the Devinyl typeface. This book had to represent in the most appropriate way the typeface, which has decorative elements. Devinyl comprises a family of 8 styles, from the art-deco inspired ‘line’ to the ‘stencil’, often used in street art. All the fonts share the same base. The book is mainly promoting the Stencil font as it was the most interesting to highlight in this artwork. Only 20 copies of this book were produced, the binding was hand-made and the die-cutting was done by a small cutting machine.

Nico Inosanto Type Designer


F E AT U R E D P H OTO G R A P H E R

ANNA DYS Z K I E W I C Z We take a look at the work of Anna Dyszkiewicz, a photographer based in Poznan, Poland who shoots primarily in black and white. “There are no rules for good photographs, there are only good photographs.” - Ansel Adams

Featured Models Agnieszka Gołębiewska, Paulina Frankowska, Paula Almeida, Aleksandra Roszyk


A N N A DYSZ K I E W I C Z


A N N A DYSZ K I E W I C Z


A N N A DYSZ K I E W I C Z


A N N A DYSZ K I E W I C Z


P H OTOJ O U R N A L : T R AV E L L I N G I N B L AC K & W H I T E

Geraint Rowland Photographer


I

believe that by converting an image to black and white one adds an extra element that is often lost with colour photography. With landscape photography, converting to black and white can add to the sense of scale and vastness of a scene. With documentary photography, converting to black and white can make the scene more powerful and alive. And with people photography, converting to black and white can add to and increase the captured emotion, whether that be happy or sad, lost or lonely. Photographer, Ted Grant's quote

on black and white photography sums this up beautifully: “When you photograph people in color, you photograph their clothes. But when you photograph people in black and white, you photograph their souls!� I rarely take a photograph thinking I will convert it into black and white, instead it happens later in the editing stage. The reason for converting to black and white normally depends on the light in which the photo was taken, but it can also be due to the atmosphere or mood of the image.


I love how the black and white conversion to this rural scene captured in Cusco, Peru, gives the image a dated and atmospheric feel.


The genuine happiness and innocence of these children in Belen Market, Iquitos, Peru is magnified by the conversion into black and white. The beauty of the light on the water is also accentuated by this process.


Taken during the Day of the Dead Carnival in Mexico City. Here the black and white conversion adds to the atmosphere and spirit of the carnival.


For a brief moment the light under the pier in Santa Monica was amazing yet it didn't quite work in colour. Converting to black and white exaggerated the amazing light show and the addition of a photographer in the frame added to the image.


This confrontation between a shop owner and the Police in Downtown Mexico City is brought to life by the black and white conversion. One can almost feel the tension.


Taken through the window on a road trip through West Africa I captured this boy as we passed through the border between Mauritania and Mali. His eyes show a lot of emotion which the black and white conversion helps bring out.


The final conversion is of Surfers waiting to enter the Ocean in Lima, Peru. In this image I believe the black and white tones add to the power of the Ocean and the dark forces of Mother Nature.


GET SOCIAL DEZINE CONTRIBUTORS & FEATURED FACES

Aisii

Paula Almeida

Instagram: www.instagram.com/aisii

Instagram: www.instagram.com/itspaulaalmeida

Model featured in an interview with Chris Devour.

Model featured in Anna Dyszkiewicz’s feature.

Claudia Demian Instagram: www.instagram.com/diademi Model featured in an interview with Chris Devour.

Chris Devour Behance: www.behance.net/chris-devour Facebook: www.facebook.com/ckdevour Cargo: cargocollective.com/chrisdevour Tumblr: chris-devour.tumblr.com Instagram: @chrisdevour Chris is a photographer based in Bucharest, Romania.

Anna Dyszkiewicz Website: annadyszkiewicz.pl Behance: www.behance.net/annadyszkiewicz Facebook:

Ana Elena Instagram: www.instagram.com/anaelenaaaa Model featured in an interview with Chris Devour.

www.facebook.com/ANNADYSZKIEWICZ.PHOTOGRAPHER/

Instagram: www.instagram.com/annadyszkiewicz/ Photographer based in Poznan, Poland.

Paulina Frankowska

Diana Maria G

Instagram: www.instagram.com/paulinafrankowska

Instagram: www.instagram.com/dianamaria.g

Model featured in Anna Dyszkiewicz’s feature.

Model featured in an interview with Chris Devour.

Agnieszka Gołebiewska Instagram: www.instagram.com/aga_g1

Taylor Hodgetts Model featured in ‘Love Letters from the Attic’

Model featured in Anna Dyszkiewicz’s feature.

Denisa Hodisan Instagram: www.instagram.com/denihodisan Model featured in an interview with Chris Devour.

Nico Inosanto Website: nootype.com Behance: www.behance.net/NicoInosanto Instagram: www.instagram.com/nootypefonts Born in Switzerland in 1994, Nico Inosanto is a graphic and type designer who loves working on typographic projects.


Melanie LeTourneau Model featured in ‘Love Letters from the Attic’

Robert MacNeil Website: www.robmacneil.com Instagram: www.instagram.com/robmacneilphoto Twitter: twitter.com/mycamerahatesme Robert MacNeil is an acclaimed Canadian photographer. Robert is the photographer behind ‘Love Letters from the Attic’ which features in this issue.

Adela Maria Marius

Daniela Lupi Model featured in an interview with Chris Devour.

Jason Mageau Website: www.jasonmageauphoto.com Instagram: www.instagram.com/jason.mageau Jason is a professional photographer with years of experience shooting for major brands and insurgent underground artists alike. He has a bulletproof reputation in the music industry, as a photographer, web designer, personal manager, and young entrepreneur. A business he co founded made the Inc. 500 list at number 232 for one of the fastest private growing companies in America in 2016.

Cristiana Mitrea

Instagram: www.instagram.com/adelamariamarius

Instagram: www.instagram.com/cristianamitrea

Model featured in an interview with Chris Devour.

Model featured in an interview with Chris Devour.

Aleksandra Roszyk Instagram: www.instagram.com/rooszola

Geraint Rowland Facebook: @geraintrowlandphotography Instagram: @geraint_rowland_photography

Model featured in Anna Dyszkiewicz’s feature. Photographer and regular DEZINE Contributor, Geraint travels the world and shares his photojournals with us and our readers.

Katherine Smits Model featured in ‘Love Letters from the Attic’

Daniel Stolle Website: www.danielstolle.com Daniel Stolle has been an illustrator since 2007. The Germany-born artist has worked with the likes of The New York Times, Scientific American, DER SPIEGEL and many more.

Fetrik Vilius Behance: www.behance.net/fetrikvilius Twitter: twitter.com/patrickvilius Instagram: www.instagram.com/fetrikvilius

Georgiana Vlaicu Instagram: www.instagram.com/georgiana.vlaicu Model featured in an interview with Chris Devour.

Fetrik Vilius is a contemporary Indonesian artist with a passion for illustration and graphic design.

Ross A. Wilson Website: www.rossawilson.com Instagram: www.instagram.com/rossawilson Twitter: twitter.com/RossReactFilms At seventeen Ross completed a City and Guilds in photography, but he’d had his first camera since the age of twelve, staging toys as if they were scenes in movies.

Avi Ben Zaken Behance: www.behance.net/Evilhakfar “Ever since I can remember, I was taking photos and drawing the urban environment of my small industrial town, located near the Mediterranean Sea. The visual world has always been my passion and I strive to excel in it”


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DEZINE Black & White  

Welcome to a very special issue of DEZINE, an online magazine dedicated to the creative. This issue focusses on the use of black and white i...

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