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FineLifestyles SPRING 2017 | VOLUME 3 ISSUE 1

SPOTLIGHT ON THE LENSIC A New Subscription Season and More

SANTA FE & ALBUQUERQUE

HUMANITARIAN AMMA EMBRACES THE WORLD ONE HUG AT A TIME SILVER BULLET PRODUCTIONS USING FILM TO FOSTER COMMUNITY SCHOOL FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH A PROGRESSIVE APPROACH TO ANTHROPOLOGY


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FIRST WORD With Fine Lifestyles editor EMMALY WIEDERHOLT

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pring is about renewal. The days grow longer and, slowly, signs of life start to surface; gorgeous purple and white lilac bushes burst forth, while tulips and daffodils add a bit of color underfoot. Here at Fine Lifestyles, we’re all about renewal too, even if it’s a renewed look at a revered and long-standing establishment. Take, for instance, The Lensic. Built in 1931 and revived in 2001, the theater continues to refresh itself every year by bringing the vanguard of performance to Santa Fe. Other well-regarded organizations, like the School for Advanced Research, offer progressive approaches to sharing and studying culture. Or consider Silver Bullet Productions, which gives teenagers on tribal reservations the tools to tell their stories through film. Organizations like these keep our state fresh and forward-thinking. Then there are all the personal ways we renew ourselves each vernal equinox. World-renowned humanitarian Amma comes through Buffalo Thunder every spring to give hugs and dispense wisdom. Perhaps a hearty hug (from Amma or even a friend or family member) might be just the thing we each need to keep a wholesome outlook.

FineLifestyles SANTA FE & ALBUQUERQUE

SPRING 2017 Volume 3 Issue 1 EDITOR Emmaly Wiederholt emmalyw@finelifestylessw.com DESIGN DeAnne Bell COVER Joel Aalberts, Lensic Executive Director Nancy Zeckendorf, Lensic Chair and Founding Director Photography by Kate Russell PHOTOGRAPHY Linda Carfagno, Caitlin Elizabeth, Kate Russell, Ernest Trujillo CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kelly Skeen, Svenja Soldovieri, Deborah Stone PUBLISHER Mike Puzey mikep@finelifestylessw.com 910.508.3694 ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

As the world inexorably turns, the Land of Enchantment sheds its winter coat and prepares to breathe again. Trevor Burns trevorb@finelifestylessw.com 505.216.6856

Emmaly

Keith Yates keithy@finelifestylessw.com 505.236.9319

PUBLISHER

Mike Puzey mikep@finelifestylessw.com 910.508.3694

Joe Encinias joee@finelifestylessw.com 505.250.2202

Fine Lifestyles Santa Fe, is published four times a year by Fine Magazines, LLC. We reserve the right to edit any materials chosen for publication including photographs. We reserve the right to reject or accept any article, photograph, images or advertisement. All contents of Fine Magazines, LLC, publications are copyrighted 2017 with all rights reserved, except for original articles submitted to Fine Lifestyles, where copyright resides with the author. No other part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of Fine Magazines, LLC or its writers. The name Fine Lifestyles Santa Fe, its logo and material cannot be reproduced without the written consent of the publishers. The views and opinions expressed in the expert advice columns herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Fine Magazines, LLC or the companies it represents. The information contained herein is of a general nature and is not intended to address the circumstances of any particular individual or entity. Although we endeavor to provide accurate and timely information, there can be no guarantee that such information is accurate as of the date it is received or that it will continue to be accurate in the future. No one should act upon such information without appropriate professional advice after a thorough examination of the particular situation. Return Undeliverables to: 4216 Cactus Flower Lane, Santa Fe, NM 87507


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34 CONTENTS DEPARTMENTS STYLE .................................................... 8 HEALTH & WELLNESS ......................18 ARTS, DINING & ENTERTAINMENT .. 27 HOUSE & HOME ................................ 53 PETS ..................................................... 74 SPORTS, REC & TRAVEL ................. 78

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WHEELS ................................................81 BUSINESS ...........................................82

FEATURES COVER: The Lensic: A New Subscription Season and More ...................................34 Amma Embraces the World .............. 18 School for Advanced Research .......28 Silver Bullet Productions .................... 32 O’Keeffe Trail Rides at Ghost Ranch ........................................... 78

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THE

WILD WORLD OF LEATHER What is it about leather that draws so many, from cowboys and motorcyclists to rock stars and fashionistas? Its durability finds use in sporting equipment, accessories and upholstery, while its ageless appeal makes it the ultimate statement, from shoes to hats and everything in between.

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the material to less readily discolor or lose shape, and is popularly used worldwide. The chromium salts lend it a distinctive color, called “wet-blue.” Aldehyde tanning uses compounds that leave the leather pale cream colored, and is often found in automobiles. Labor intensive, brain tanning uses emulsified oils from the brains of animals, and is known for its exceptional softness. Leather can be utilized in the following forms: full-grain, top-grain and split. Full-grain leather has not been sanded or buffed, and thus keeps its original fibrous texture and durability. Top-grain leather—that which is most commonly found in high-end leather products—has had the more fibrous part of the hide removed before being sanded and finished. Split leather is created from the fibrous part of the hide once the top-grain of the raw hide has been separated. Split leather is what is used to make suede. When it comes to leather, many an animal rights activist has raised an eyebrow. Luckily, there are now several alternative synthetic options for those who might cherish the look and feel of leather but not want to harm animals in the process. Popular alternatives are made of vegan microfibers or polyvinyl chloride. The wild world of leather has existed for thousands of years and, as new technologies add to the list of possibilities, will continue for many a year to come. From learning to tan a hide yourself to buying one-of-a-kind leather clothes/accessories, there is much to appreciate and admire.

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ost of us know leather is derived from animal hides, but few appreciate the variety of leathers—both in terms of tanning processes and animal selections— available. The sheer breadth of the industry is enough to make the uninitiated among us question what we’re really purchasing when we buy a leather wallet, belt or vest. Most leather is cowhide, though almost any animal skin you can think of can be turned into exquisite leather. Kangaroo leather, for instance, is known for its blend of strength and flexibility. Ostrich leather has become a favorite due to its bumpy texture as a result of the bird’s feather follicles, and is used by many major fashion houses. Fish leather—from salmon to eel and everything in between—is popular for shoes and handbags, and is favored for its unique design motifs and pigmentation. Really, almost any animal skin—think buffalo, alligator, snake, ox or yak—may be used for leather. The tanning options are endless and extensive. Tanning is necessary to stabilize the proteins of the animal skin so it does not putrefy, but what type of tanning a leather-maker applies depends on the type of animal skin and desired end product. A few of the more common processes include vegetable, chrome, aldehyde and brain tanning. Vegetable tanning uses tannins found in organic matter, like wood, leaves or roots. However, vegetable tanned leather is not stable in water, and tends to shrink and discolor. Chrome tanned leather uses chromium salts that allow

STYLE


CASA NOVA Where Craft and Art Meet Photos Linda Carfagno

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atalie Fitz-Gerald likes to refer to her shop as a “visual feast,” which accounts for how often she produces that special “wow” factor among her customers. The Santa Fe resident owns Casa Nova, an up-market gallery located in the city’s historic Railyard district. Creating a medley of cultural fusion, Fitz-Gerald personally sources her stock from primarily African countries, though other regions of the world are also represented. “I was born in South

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Africa,” she notes, “and for many years I admired all the wonderful art being created in rural cooperatives. I knew I wanted to open a store one day and sell those exceptional products.” “I work with anywhere from 25 to 30 cooperatives at any given time,” says Fitz-Gerald. “It’s a collaborative effort with regards to design, product development and marketing, and I always strive to be very sensitive to issues of heritage and tradition.”

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Fitz-Gerald’s co-conspirator is the ever-effervescent Nelly-Joy Irakoze, a Burundi native who previously ran a Santa Fe bed and breakfast. “The best thing about Casa Nova is the joy I feel when I walk in the door,” she says. “I am very fortunate to be part of this amazing gallery, and am happy to be surrounded every day by the unique art and craft Casa Nova offers. It brings me back home each time I enter Casa Nova. What else to ask? Casa Nova has become my home!”

Fitz-Gerald admits her goal is not only to bring out the best of Africa’s artistic talent, but also to support and nurture the artists, craftspeople and designers in the interest of poverty alleviation and sustainable livelihood creation. “Your purchase helps give them a sustainable income toward financial independence,” she says. She notes how her customers love the stories behind the products, as well as the fact they can make purchases with a social conscience.

Currently showcased in the gallery are the Kuba textiles, from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Woven from the raffia palm, the elaborate and complex geometric designs are generally sewn onto a main woven panel of fabric, which is then embellished with repetitive patchwork, applique and embroidery to form a textured surface. These richly tactile fabrics influenced, among others, the famous French artist Henri Matisse; he combined the African aesthetic with his own vivid color palate.

Fitz-Gerald also leads tours to Africa once a year, an insider’s tour for those interested in exploring the continent in depth. She infuses the experience with cultural and culinary forays, as well as with a hearty dose of adventure, safari, flora, fauna and, of course, art.

While traditionally used as ceremonial skirts, the Kuba’s intriguing designs also make great interior décor; through unique shops like Casa Nova, anyone can now admire and find inspiration in the Kuba textiles, using them as pillow or bed covers or hanging them as art in their own right. “The Kuba are used both functionally, ritually, and for barter and exchange,” Fitz-Gerald explains. “The middle color is woven by the men, and the women complete the applique. From an artistic and design standpoint, they are absolutely brilliant.” These Kuba textiles are part of an extensive textile collection available at Casa Nova Gallery including, but not limited to, Indigo, Mudcloth, Kente Cloth, felted fabric, Oaxacan, Chinese and South East Asia textiles.

STYLE

Casa Nova by Natalie 530 S. Guadalupe St. 505.983.8558 CasaNovaGallery.com


N K I T C S D

Simple elegance will never go out of style. Simple elegance will never go out of style.

For over 25 years, owner Dean Cheek designing and For has overbeen 25 years, owner making his custom designed Dean Cheek has been designing knitwear. His knitwear has and making his custom become a fashion staple designed for men, knitwear. His knitwear has become women, and dogs all over the a fashion allboutique over the is world, world,staple and his openand seven is days a week. his boutique open seven days a week.Come Comeininand andwatch watchDean Dean knit whileknit indulging in the incomparable while indulging in the incomparable softness of handsoftness of hand-loomed knits loomed knits featuring alpaca, featuring alpaca, cashmere, bamboo cashmere, bambooThere and custom and custom blends. is always blends. There is always something something new to see and try on. new to see and try on. Complete Complete yourlook newwith lookjewelry, with jewelry, your new accessories and unique gifts, accessories and unique gifts, all all made USA. made in in thethe USA.

102 E Water St. (Entrance on Shelby St.) | www.dcknits.com 505-471-3640 | Dcknits112@msn.co m


BE THE DIFFERENCE WEAR THE DIFFERENCE By Svenja Soldovieri

The last time we checked in with designer Hillary Randolph, she had just debuted walk in GRACE, her new line of candy-colored dog collars and leads that look amazing and do good too. GRACE donates 10 percent of proceeds from the line to Heart & Soul Animal Sanctuary in Glorieta, which also benefits from sales of her best-selling leather-and-bead bangles, designed by Hillary’s daughter, Coco. STYLE


WE BELIEVE THAT BEING PART OF A COMPASSIONATE AND THRIVING COMMUNITY MEANS SUPPORTING NONPROFITS AND CHARITIES THAT MAKE A POSITIVE DIFFERENCE, BOTH HERE IN SANTA FE AND ACROSS THE NATION

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n fact, philanthropy is a vital part of GRACE’s business model, founded on the idea that a successful business should profit and have impact. “We believe that being part of a compassionate and thriving community means supporting nonprofits and charities that make a positive difference, both here in Santa Fe and across the nation,” Hillary says. Shortly after the brand debuted last year, Hillary began offering share with GRACE gatherings in private settings where GRACE jewelry and lifestyle sales raise money and awareness for the host’s favorite charity. GRACE typically donates 20 percent of proceeds, and share with GRACE made meaningful contributions to the Environmental Defense Fund and Hospice of the Chesapeake last year. “There’s great synergy in these events,” Hillary remarks. “I love how we’re breaking the traditional mold of having to ask for donations. The host brings her friends together out of passion for her cause and, if they fall in love with the jewelry, they’re contributing too.” Hillary’s longstanding dream to support local nonprofits has also recently come to life. For the past year, GRACE researched local charities to find the perfect fit for the brand. “There is so much need here in Santa Fe, it was difficult to pick just one,” Hillary explains. “And, although we liked

the idea of supporting several, we didn’t want to dilute our impact.” Fortunately, an introduction to 100 Women Who Care Santa Fe made everything possible. This growing group (now 130 women strong) operates on a simple concept: they meet four times per year, with each member donating $100 per meeting. In the space of one hour, the women listen to brief presentations by three local nonprofits; one is selected via a group vote and receives $100 from each member, for a total of $10,000 (and more than $40,000 per year). Since the two runner-up organizations are ineligible to present again for 12 months, Hillary decided to donate a portion of her quarterly proceeds to them, so everyone comes out a winner. “100 Women Who Care was an ‘aha!’ moment for me,” Hillary describes. “It’s a community of local women with an efficient model, which really resonates with everyone. It’s all about women connecting for a cause, which suits the GRACE mission perfectly. In one short hour, 100 committed women collect $10,000 that immediately impacts Santa Fe. It’s an amazingly powerful effort.” Meanwhile, Coco will soon initiate 50 Kids Who Care for Santa Fe youth, so stay tuned. Hillary Randolph STYLE

For more information about 100 Women Who Care Santa Fe, visit their website at www.100WomenWhoCareSantaFe.com. To host a share with GRACE trunk show in your home, contact GRACE gallery at 505.780.5611.

GRACE 125 E. Palace Ave. 505.780.5611 WearYourGrace.com


JOIN US FOR OUR HEARTSTAR DIAMOND EVENT – APRIL 27, 28, 29 FREE SOLITAIRE WITH PURCHASE OF A HEARTSTAR DIAMOND

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HEARTSTAR: The Perfect Diamond

hat do you see when you look at a diamond? You see light...reflected and refracted. No other diamond reflects more light than a HeartStar. The HeartStar, one of the finest cut and proportioned round diamonds produced today, reflects up to 93 percent of incoming light.

LOVE SHOULD that gives the HeartStar diamond its name. Less than one percent of world diamond production is cut to these high standards. COME NATURALLY While this elite company does include “ideal cut,” “Tolkowsky cut” The HEARTSTAR diamond is the perfectly cut, natural diamond, and AGS “000 cut”natural diamonds, HeartStar iscut truly born of the finest crystal the and then perfectly for the best of exceptional brilliance. the best, clearly showing its perfect facet alignment, symmetry and brilliance.

Every HeartStar diamond is hand selected, regraded and oftenAVAILABLE AT Mark Schneider, one of the few living designers to have a piece re-polished. It is then sent to the American Gem Society’s Gem of jewelry on permanent display in the Smithsonian Institution Laboratory for the most stringent grading and certification in the Gem and Mineral Hall, will be visiting Butterfield Jewelers June industry. Many HeartStar diamonds are laser inscribed on the 22-24. Call to make an appointment to girdle with an AGS certificate number for security. design a custom piece with him! 2411 SAN PEDRO NE The history of the HeartStar dates back to 1919 when Marcel ALBUQUERQUE, NM, 87110 Tolkowsky—the Einstein of the diamond industry—published his groundbreaking work on the perfect diamond. He christened 505-884-5747 / 866-410-1716 it the “Modern American Brilliant Cut.” To this day, Tolkowsky’s basic 57 facet formula has never been improved upon. Butterfield Jewelers 2411 San Pedro NE, Albuquerque 505.884.5747 ButterfieldJewelers.com

Only in the last decade or so has cutting technology been good enough to consistently produce the HeartStar. Upon close inspection, one can make out the classic heart and star pattern Mark Schneider

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Authentic Traditions

505.983.6689 • Studio 2 • Plaza Galeria www.authentictraditions.com


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HEALTH & WELLNESS

Embracing the World

One Hug at a Time By Emmaly Wiederholt Photos courtesy MAM Amritapuri.org

Most of us enjoy a good hug; it affirms our humanity on a basic level, allowing one person to value another through embrace. Friends and family are always deserving of a good hug, but complete strangers? Imagine someone who has made it her life work to hug as many people as possible. Such a person exists, and her name is Amma. 18

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Amma (also known as Mata Amritanandamayi) is a worldrenowned humanitarian and spiritual leader from India. For the better part of her 63 years, she has committed herself to the greater good by establishing a network of charities known as Embracing the World. Among her targeted projects are disaster relief, hospitals and the Amrita University, all of which are aimed at uplifting society’s neediest. But it is her compassionate, loving embrace—to date she has hugged over 36 million people worldwide—for which she is best known and loved. New Mexico is a longtime stop of Amma’s, alongside major cities in Europe, Australia, India and North America. She has made a point to visit our great state since the late 1980s. This June, Amma will be at the Hilton Buffalo Thunder for three public programs and a retreat. “Amma’s programs are a celebration. To receive darshan (a hug) from Amma is a blissful experience,” says Jagrati McGrath. “I feel a deep sense of peace and love that is all-pervading. Even observing Amma as she hugs people for long hours is incredibly moving for me. Everyone is welcome, from all different faiths, cultures and walks of life.” Jagrati first met Amma in 1997, before relocating to Santa Fe in 2000 to work and be part of the Amma Center of New Mexico. Yes, Amma has a center here in New Mexico dedicated to spreading her selfless teachings. The ashram (similar to a monastery) is located just outside Santa Fe off Old Santa Fe Trail. Built on the property of Steve and Cathi Schmidt, the couple became devotees of Amma after her initial visit to New Mexico in 1987. The spiritual center, which offers weekly services, opened in 1993, and the ashram, where several people live and worship, was completed in 1996. The Schmidts originally hosted Amma’s visits to New Mexico, but Amma soon drew crowds much too large for the property to manage. La Fonda hosted Amma’s visits for a while, before she outgrew that venue as well. Albuquerque’s Marriot Pyramid North

took up the mantle before Hilton’s Buffalo Thunder became the venue of choice three years ago for its size and accommodations. In addition to free public programs, Amma also hosts a retreat at Buffalo Thunder, one of three total held in North America. “Amma leads by example. Observing her love and compassion in action has inspired me to give back in my own community,” reflects Jagrati. “It is joyful to be involved in selfless activities, whether that’s cleaning up trash along the Santa Fe River, participating in the Amma Center of New Mexico’s Burrito Project, which feeds over 100 people in need each week, or volunteering to help with the many activities around hosting Amma’s visit to Santa Fe in June.”

To learn more, visit Amma.org.


Just What Your Body Needs

Photos Caitlin Elizabeth

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ody of Santa Fe is a community health and wellness center that offers leading-edge spa treatments, studio and fitness classes, eco-conscious clothing, a health café, childcare seven days a week, and community events. A therapist herself for over 40 years, owner Lorin Parrish founded BODY in 2003 after having been the director of the New Mexico Academy of Healing Arts since 1984. The custom approach to health and healing is what makes Body unique. “I hire amazing therapists, and then I let them create a custom treatment for each client,” Parrish emphasizes. In an industry heavily governed by protocol and trends, the uniqueness of each treatment at BODY is refreshing. “All of our therapists are so qualified that I can give their talent free rein.” All of BODY’s therapists and estheticians are trained to meet each client where he or she is, and then offer a variety of options for treatment. For a person with rosacea-prone skin, a peel can result in inflammation, but there are alternative treatments. “It’s so common for people to book a deep tissue massage when it’s often the last thing they need,” Parrish describes. “And that’s

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where our therapists’ extensive knowledge and experience become so valuable. For example, they might recommend lymphatic techniques for stress reduction, or polarity therapy for head-to-toe balancing.” She continues: “The same is true with our yoga program. We have 18 instructors who readily adapt to their students’ needs and offer many different approaches ranging from restorative, hatha, vinyasa and therapeutic yoga. We have something for everyone.” From DNA skincare products with ionically-bonded 100 percent organic ingredients to Prairie Underground apparel made in the Pacific Northwest, Parrish carefully curates the products she carries in the boutique with a focus on quality and sustainability. “When clients get what they actually need, they feel better overall,” Parrish says. “It doesn’t matter if its bodywork, food, clothing, yoga, dance or childcare; I love empowering people in small ways.”

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Body of Santa Fe 333 W. Cordova Rd. 505.986.0362 BodyofSantaFe.com


Expert ADVICE

DR. MARK RASMUSSEN, OD Optometric Physician 1651 Galisteo St, Suite 1 505.983.7746 ultimateeyecaresantafe.com

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ately, we’ve been getting a lot of questions about blue light. Let’s see if we can shed some light on the issue.

First of all, what is blue light? Sunlight contains red, orange, yellow, green and blue light rays. Combined, this spectrum of colored light creates what we call ‘white light’ or sunlight. Light rays that have relatively long wavelengths contain less energy, and those with short wavelengths have more energy. Rays on the red end of the spectrum have longer wavelengths and, therefore, less energy. Rays on the blue end of the spectrum have shorter wavelengths and more energy. Approximately one-third of all visible light is considered high-energy, or blue light. SOME KEY THINGS TO REMEMBER ABOUT BLUE LIGHT: 1. Blue light is everywhere. Sunlight is the main source of blue light, but there are many man-made, indoor sources of blue

What is blue light and does it cause damage?

light as well, including fluorescent or LED lighting, and flat screen televisions. Most notably, the display screens of computers, electronic notebooks, smartphones and other digital devices emit significant amounts of blue light. The amount of blue light emitted from these devices is only a fraction of that emitted by the sun, but the amount of time people spend using these devices and the proximity of these screens to the eyes leads to concerns. 2. The eye is not very good at blocking blue light. Virtually all blue light passes through the cornea and lens, reaching the retina. 3. The fact that blue light penetrates the retina (the inner lining of the back of the eye) is important, because lab studies have shown that too much exposure to blue light can damage light-sensitive cells in the retina. This causes impairment resembling macular degeneration, which can lead to permanent vision loss. 4. Blue light scatters more easily than other visible light and thus is not as easily focused. Looking at computer screens and other digital devices can contribute to digital eye strain. 5. Blue light protection may be even more important after cataract

HEALTH & WELLNESS

surgery. If you are about to have cataract surgery, ask your surgeon what type of intraocular lens (IOL) will be used to replace your cloudy natural lens, and how much blue light protection the IOL provides. You might benefit from eyeglasses that have lenses with a special blue light filter, especially if you spend long hours in front of a computer screen or other digital devices. 6. Not all blue light is bad. It’s welldocumented that some blue light exposure is essential for good health. It boosts alertness, helps memory and cognitive function, and elevates mood. Blue light is also important in regulating the body’s natural wakefulness and sleep cycle. However, too much blue light at night can disrupt this cycle, potentially causing sleeplessness and daytime fatigue. Many lens manufacturers have designs to help limit excess blue light. There are tinted lenses and coatings that can be put on your eyeglasses to help. Make an appointment with Dr. Mark Rasmussen for a comprehensive eye examination. It’s a good way to monitor eye health, maintain good vision, and keep track of your blue light protection needs. Article courtesy allaboutvision.com.

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Photo by Caitlin Elizabeth

Paving the Way in

LUXURY SENIOR LIVING By Debbie Stone

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here’s a reason The Montecito Santa Fe was recognized as the “Best Senior Community in New Mexico.” Actually, there are several, ranging from exceptional amenities and social opportunities to restaurant-quality food and stellar customer service. For residents of The Montecito, it’s akin to resort-style living, complete with easy access to all the City Different offers. The lavish, pet-friendly campus, located on 15 sprawling acres, is designed to encourage activity, while also serving residents’ every need. There are walking trails, a state-of-the-art fitness center, private outdoor hot tubs, a billiard room, a putting green, a shuffle board court, a library featuring an expansive collection of literature, an art studio for painting, pottery and crafts, a fullservice spa, a signature salon and barber, multi-purpose meeting rooms boasting lectures, educational seminars, chef’s chats and cooking demos, and even a nightclub.

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When it comes to dining, Garbo’s Restaurant (open to the general public), boasts an upscale atmosphere with culinary cuisine prepared by Executive Chef Arnold Arvizo, who hails from a Le Cordon Bleu and Four Seasons background. “We get rave reviews on our food,” notes Rachael Hemann, Montecito’s Community Relations Director. “Everyone loves it.” The state-of-the art fitness center and chic spa is also highly regarded by residents and, not surprisingly, it is one of the most popular venues on campus. It’s hard not to get a good workout in a place that has all the bells and whistles when it comes to weights and cardio equipment. Plus, there’s a range of exercise classes emphasizing strength and mobility, including Tai Ji Quan. The full-time fitness director, Michael Brown, is certified by N.A.S.M., A.C.S.M., and the Oregon Research Institute for Tai Ji Quan: Moving for Better Balance. Another highlight is the nightclub. The Starlight Lounge and Cabaret is the place for libations, music and live entertainment. And the best part is that residents don’t even need to leave the property to enjoy a drink in the evening. Additionally, concierge services are available 24-7, with a multi-passenger van and luxury car transportation on hand for grocery runs, doctor appointments, shopping and more. The personal valet provides door-to-door transportation and room-service throughout the entire campus. Construction is currently underway to finish up a new central island in front of the clubhouse. The island will include a relaxing sitting area featuring kinetic sculptures from local artist Mark White and horse sculptures from local sculptor Siri Hollander, as well as additional parking. When you add in the stellar staff, The Montecito provides active living at its finest. According to Ms. Hemann, there are about 140 seniors who make their home at The Montecito. The majority live independently, while those needing help with certain daily tasks like showering, dressing and taking medications reside in assisted living apartments where they receive customized care. “We are getting close to being full,” she adds, “so now’s the time to come and check us out. We would love to show you why The Montecito is such a special place.”

The Montecito Santa Fe 500 Rodeo Rd. 505.428.7777 www.MontecitoSantaFe.com Photo by Caitlin Elizabeth

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Expert ADVICE

Detecting Decay Earlier than Ever

DR. VIRGINIA SHARPE Sharpe Dental Studio 6 Calle Medico, Ste. 2 505.982.4686 SharpeDentalStudio.com

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raditionally, tooth decay has been assessed by dentists identifying soft spots in teeth. But this approach only detects decay when it is already well underway. Using Spectra, an intraoral fluorescent camera, dentists can now objectively measure tooth density, and in many cases detect decay well before it is visible. Spectra is the first ergonomic, noninvasive, handheld digital imaging instrument that aids in the detection of decay. By quickly and reliably identifying decay-causing bacteria in fissures and on occlusal surfaces, Spectra is an effective tool in promoting oral hygiene. How exactly does Spectra work? Lightemitting diodes (LEDs) project highenergy, violet-blue light at a wavelength of 405 nm onto tooth surfaces. Light of this particular wavelength stimulates bacteria to fluoresce red while healthy enamel fluoresces green. The result is a weather map of sorts—anything red needs attention, and colors leading up to red need to be closely monitored.

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The Spectra is the vanguard of this type of technology, though density cameras have been available for about a decade or more. Dr. Sharpe has been using Spectra on her patients for two years, and finds it essential to the efficacy of her dentistry practice. Previously, X-rays were taken (though that too has been replaced by digital imaging) and then the film would be assessed. If a dark spot was detected, the dentist would then touch the spot on the tooth with a sharp metal tool to discern softness, signifying the need for a filling. Now, with the use of Spectra, a filling can be much smaller with less natural tooth structure removed if the decay is detected early enough; Spectra allows for readings of slight changes in density. If decay has just started, a dentist can use a laser without even employing anesthetic to remove the problem area without sacrificing much of the tooth structure. With early and accurate detection methods like Spectra, gone are the days of numbness and crowns.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Dr. Sharpe uses Spectra on every patient she sees, especially the chewing surfaces of teeth or areas around old fillings. At least once a year, another reading is done to monitor for any changes. Painless and unobtrusive, Spectra consists of a wand with a tiny camera hooked on the end. The hygienist simply waves the wand over each tooth while cleaning, and an image is captured showing tooth density. The image then appears on a screen, where the patient can look at it as well. Of course, in terms of avoiding tooth decay, preventative home-care like brushing, flossing, eating health and getting regular dental checkups are paramount to good tooth health. “It’s like anything else with health and your body; if you do preventative measures, you’re always going to end up better down the road,” says Dr. Sharpe. But when the occasional tooth decay does come up, technologies like Spectra allow for earlier and more accurate diagnosis, causing less toothache in the long run.


Senior Lifestyle, A FAMILY OWNED COMPANY, is committed to creating environments designed to delight our residents and their family members.

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“I can measure the direct results from advertising in Fine Lifestyles Magazine by the comments my clients have made about the article… and the best part… they made purchases.”

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“What I appreciate most about Fine Lifestyles Magazine is it reaches the right people and the results were sales!” - Lisa Rodgers of Longworth Gallery WHAT’S ON YOUR WISH LIST? AL PACINO STOPS THROUGH TOWN THE CONCORSO PAYS TRIBUTE TO DENISE MCCLUGGAGE BALLOONING GALORE

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For more information, call 910.508.3694 HEALTH & WELLNESS


Experience The Lensic! Taiko drumming, live theater, Irish music, world-class dance, and more from Lensic Presents

March 23 Kodo Taiko Performing Arts Ensemble

KODO

March 28 Menopause: The Musical March 26 Dervish May 11 Reduced Shakespeare Company:

William Shakespeare’s Long Lost First Play

REDUCED SHAKESPEARE COMPANY

May 23 Jessica Lang Dance Tickets: Lensic.org, 505-988-1234 JESSICA LANG DANCE

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ARTS, DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

An Advanced Approach to

ANTHROPOLOGY By Emmaly Wiederholt Photos Courtesy of the School for Advanced Research

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ucked away on Garcia Street is the School for Advanced Research (SAR), an institution devoted to supporting synergies between the social sciences and Native American art. Housed on the eightacre estate of legendary 1920s-era White sisters Amelia Elizabeth and Martha Root, SAR offers seminars, lectures, field trips, Native American artist residencies, rotating scholar positions and an unparalleled Native American art collection, making it a leading force in the field of anthropology today. SAR has been around, in one form or another, for 110 years. Founded in 1907 as the School of American Archeology, virtually every major site in the region—including Chaco Canyon, Mesa Verde and Bandelier—was connected to the organization. As archeology became assimilated into mainstream science, the mission of the organization changed with the times, and was renamed the School of American Research. Douglas Schwartz became president in 1967 and brought new energy to the enterprise, which was accelerated by Elizabeth White’s bequest of her property. (Previously, SAR had been housed downtown.) With the infusion of new energy, a new name, and a new campus, SAR expanded its breadth to become the tour de force in anthropology it is today. “What’s exciting about SAR is how it brings together scholars and artists from various backgrounds to get the friction that results from different points of view,” says President Michael F. Brown. “Because of where we are based, we inevitably have scholars who speak to Southwestern topics, but we might also have a scholar whose work focuses on Bolivia or Bulgaria. However, their research interests— which might be anything from water to healthcare to economic development—overlap. Synergy comes from bringing together someone who is, for example, studying family systems in China with someone who is writing about Native American kinship. They learn from each other and challenge each other.” One of the most important books to come out of SAR is “Writing Culture: The Poetics

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TOP: 2013 Dubin Fellow Glenda McKay (Ingalik-Athabascan). Photo by Jason S. Ordaz MIDDLE: 2015 King Fellow Marlowe Katoney (Diné). Photo by Elysia Poon BOTTOM: 2015 Dubin Fellow Melissa Melero (Northern Paiute). Photo by Elysia Poon

ARTS, DINING & ENTERTAINMENT


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Petit point coin pin, artist unknown, Zuni Pueblo, c. 1950, cat. no. SAR.1989-7-163. Photo by Addison Doty. Basketry installation, “The Bingo One,” Linda Aguilar (Chumash) (2011 Dobkin Fellow), 2011, cat. no. SAR.2011-10-1A-Q. Photo by Addison Doty. Water jar, unknown artist, Zuni Pueblo, 1880-1890, cat. no. SAR.1978-1-145. Photo by Addison Doty. 2016 Dobkin Fellow Kathleen Wall (Jemez Pueblo) Photo by Elysia Poon.

and Politics of Ethnography,” edited by James Clifford and George E. Marcus, which critiques the relationship between the anthropologist and the people being studied. Another book, “Senses of Place,” edited by Steven Feld and Keith H. Basso, problematizes the idea of place. These are just two examples of the seminal literature that has come out of SAR, and also demonstrates SAR’s current progressive approach to research. “SAR has played a significant role in the movement to recognize that indigenous peoples should be regarded as experts on their own cultural systems,” reflects Brown. One of the most lauded aspects of SAR is its collection of over 12,000 historic and contemporary objects from Native American tribes throughout the Southwest. The collection includes Pueblo ceramics, Navajo and Pueblo textiles, wooden and stone carvings, jewelry, basketry and two-dimensional art.

“It’s one of the best collections of Native American art that exists anywhere,” says Brian Vallo, Director of SAR’s Indian Arts Research Center. Vallo distinguishes that the collection’s purpose is research, as opposed to exhibition, though visitors can arrange a tour. The collection was originally created to serve the academic community, and was amassed as a preservation effort. In fact, many ceramic pieces were specifically commissioned by SAR from Pueblo masters, including San Ildefonso’s Maria Martinez, Santa Clara’s Margaret Tafoya, and Acoma’s Marie Z. Chino and Lucy Lewis. Vallo characterizes SAR as prioritizing engagement with the source communities from which the objects in the collection derive. “In our recent history, we have established strong working relationships with the tribal communities,” Vallo describes. “The outcome enhances the collection’s documentation, as well as allows us to open our doors so the artists, educators, scholars and leaders from the communities can engage with the materials.”

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TOP: “Basket Dance,” Awa Tsireh (Alfonso Roybal) (San Ildefonso Pueblo), c. 1918, cat. no. IAF.P1. Photo by Addison Doty. BOTTOM LEFT & RIGHT: Indian Arts Researcher Center, Vault One Photos by Jennifer Day.

One recent project to come out of SAR is a set of guidelines for facilitating collaboration between museums and source communities. The guidelines help communities gain access to museum collections, breaking down the old paradigm of artifacts being preserved behind glass or closed doors. Vallo says the goal is to open those barriers and create strategies for communication, for the care of the collections, for the documentation associated with the objects, and for physical access, which might include loans for arts revitalization projects or travelling educational exhibitions. “These guidelines are free, and we have gained so much positive feedback from communities and tribal museums,” Vallo explains.

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Looking to the future, both Brown and Vallo see SAR expanding on its current philosophical approach to working alongside communities. “We have established programs centered around a wide spectrum of community engagement,” says Vallo. “We have worked hard to establish partnerships with a network of museums and institutions, allowing us to increase exposure of our collection and research, while also bringing partners to the table to think about how our work can positively impact policy, academics, and the tribal communities themselves.”

For more information or to become a member, visit sarweb.org.

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Save the Date

an event not to be missed

Santa Fe s’ Most Fantastical, Exotic Gala reserve your seats now Tickets $500 / Magical Forest Sponsors $600. Space is limited—reserve your tickets today! Contact Kelly Waller at kwaller@lensic.org or 505-988-7050 x 1212. Exquisite wine-paired dinner served on Santa Fe’s most notable stage Mystical entertainment | World-class live aution items | Fantasy costumes encouraged, black tie optional 211 W. San Francisco Santa Fe, New Mexico Lensic.org | 505-988-7050 All proceeds benefit The Lensic, Santa Fe’s nonprofit, member-supported performing arts center


Using Film to Foster COMMUNITY AND CULTURE By Christa Valdez Photos Pamela Pierce

According to legend, a silver bullet is a simple and seemingly magical solution to a complex problem. Pamela Pierce, president and founder of the Santa Fe nonprofit Silver Bullet Productions (SBP), certainly seems to have tapped into a magical combination of passion, progress and preservation. SBP was born out of Pierce’s desire to address a multitude of issues she saw facing the Native American communities during her time as director of the New Mexico Coalition for Charter Schools. High dropout rates, boredom and loss of culture were concerns Pierce increasingly had during her tenure.


FILM REQUIRES SKILLS LIKE ORGANIZATION, TECHNOLOGY, TEAMWORK, WORK ETHIC AND STORY-TELLING

Pierce began to question what could provide substantive solutions. A good start seemed to be, in her words, “an approach focused on grassroots learning that engaged students with their community while also teaching skills with both immediate and long-term applications. What could provide that kind of relevant jumpstart to educational success? Film.” As the state film industry began to grow and thrive at a monumental rate, it became clear to Pierce that filmmaking was a viable vehicle for exciting and relevant learning. Along with the support of her husband, Bob, and an impressive volunteer board, Silver Bullet Productions began to take shape. By the end of 2004, Pierce left her position at NMCCS to focus fulltime on SBP, building upon a mission to use educational film projects to solve difficult problems facing rural and tribal communities in New Mexico. “Film requires skills like organization, technology, teamwork, work ethic and story-telling,” Pierce says. “More than a tool for entertainment, film can be used to excite academic topics, secure oral histories, and bring community together.” An SBP production workshop is organic, thoughtful and farreaching. SBP’s education committee makes recommendations for possible participating communities in order to ensure it is a good fit for that particular community or tribe. Workshops are funded 75 percent by SBP and 25 percent by the community itself. Every workshop is completely customized and respects the sovereignty of the tribal nation with whom they are working. The only requirement for workshops is that the final film involve characters who make choices—tough choices. Topics from past student workshop films have included suicide prevention, dropout prevention, health decisions, anti-bullying and leadership. At the conclusion of each workshop, new camera equipment, computer and software remain at the school, in the community. Beyond awards from organizations including New Mexico Women in Film and the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts, as well as the honor of having community documentary films

“Canes of Power” and “A Thousand Voices” air on New Mexico PBS, it is the lasting effects of its work in the communities that sets SBP apart from other film organizations. This spring will see the completion of the latest SBP production, “Defending the Fire,” which provides a look at the kind of person who chooses to fight, protect and defend his/her culture, people and environment. Not unlike the warriors being featured at SBP, Pamela says, “I come to film production as a weapon against ignorance and as a catalyst for learning.” “Defending the Fire” will have its first public screening on March 23rd at the Jean Cocteau Cinema. Silver Bullet Productions will also be hosting a benefit concert fundraiser on April 19th at Vanessie. Tickets for both events can be purchased at www.silverbulletproductions.com.

To learn how to get involved, visit SilverBulletProductions.com.


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Cover Story

Spotlight on The Lensic A New Subscription Season and More at Santa Fe’s Nonprofit Performing Arts Center

Balé Folclórico da Bahia performs at The Lensic. PHOTO BY: Gabriella Marks

“The Lensic? I love The Lensic!” Joel Aalberts has heard those words again and again since taking the helm as executive director at The Lensic Performing Arts Center last summer. “And everyone I meet has a Lensic story to share,” says Aalberts, whose height and signature bowtie make him easy to spot around town. “They rave about an amazing concert or watching their kids perform on our stage. People of a certain age tell me about first dates and kisses on our balcony, back when The Lensic was a movie theater!” Joel Aalberts and Nancy Zeckendorf PHOTO BY: Kate Russell Photography

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he Lensic has always been a place where memories are made. As only the second executive director at The Lensic since the 86-year-old theater re-opened as a nonprofit performing arts center in 2001, Aalberts takes carrying on that tradition very seriously. “We want everyone who attends a Lensic performance to have an experience they will long remember.” Aalberts has been busy planning artistic programming for the upcoming year. He’s also focused on expanding The Lensic’s education programs and community ties, making sure people of every age and from every part of Santa Fe benefit from the theater space and the arts. “With Joel here and settled in, we’re poised to strengthen and grow the programs we’ve put in place over these first 15 years,” says Nancy Zeckendorf, founding director and chair of The Lensic’s board of directors.

A NEW SUBSCRIPTION SEASON

This year, for the first time, The Lensic will offer a subscription package for its September 2017 to May 2018 Lensic Presents series— the series of music, dance, theater and performance events programmed by The Lensic itself. The subscription option will allow patrons to reserve the best seats in advance while enjoying the lowest prices of the season. Lensic members, as always, will have exclusive early access to tickets. “I’m thrilled that we’ve grown to a point where we can have a subscription series and events of this caliber,” says Zeckendorf. “We have the programming to rival what you’d see in cities five times our size.”

PHOTO BY: Kate Russell Photography

The full Lensic Presents season will be announced later this spring, but patrons can look forward to an exciting mix of Lensic favorites and exciting new performers, many of whom will be making their Lensic debuts.

FUN FOR FAMILIES

The Lensic will add more family-specific events over the next year, too. The theater kicked off 2017 with a Family Fun Day, welcoming hundreds of children for games, arts activities and a concert by folk-rock band Trout Fishing in America. “Kids from all over the city were dancing in the aisles and in front of the stage,” Aalberts recalls. “Parents were thrilled, and we were thrilled, too. I think families will love what we have in store for them.” TOP: Culture and community at The Lensic. BOTTOM: Children dance near the stage at Family Fun Day. COVER STORY

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PHOTO BY: Kate Russell Photography

EDUCATION PROGRAMS THAT BENEFIT ALL

Of course, The Lensic has a history of providing programs that reach young people in Santa Fe and beyond. The theater welcomes students from the Santa Fe Public Schools for free performances throughout the school year. More than 150 high school students and 10 college students have participated in The Lensic’s Technical Theater Internship program since it was founded in 2002, earning academic credit while learning skills like lighting, rigging and sound engineering. And the Future Voices of New Mexico film and photography program, which fosters filmmaking and photography talent in schools throughout the state, is growing in scope and popularity. The program received a stunning number of entries for its 10th annual awards ceremony and film screening, to be held at The Lensic on May 2.

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE

“It’s a very exciting time at The Lensic,” says Zeckendorf. “I think the Santa Fe community is going to love what we have in store.” “We’ll continue to entertain, inspire and surprise audiences of all ages,” Aalberts says. “The arts have the power to bring us together.” The Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W. San Francisco Street 505.988.1234 www.Lensic.org TOP: Buses bring thousands of students to The Lensic for free performances each year. BOTTOM: The Future Voices of New Mexico program supports student filmmaking and photography. COVER STORY


Paul-Henri Bourguignon 50 YEARS A MODERNIST By Kelly Skeen

“I

think producing art for more than 50 years is unusual, but producing art that grows and changes and never becomes static—that’s remarkable.” Jane Hoffelt is the estate trustee for Paul-Henri Bourguignon (1906–1988), who was a Belgian painter, journalist, art critic and photographer. She, along with gallery owner and director Connie Axton, organized a 50-year retrospective of the artist’s work that will open at Ventana Fine Art this June. It will be the first retrospective of Bourguignon’s art ever to be held in New Mexico. Bourguignon studied art and art history in Brussels; he held his first exhibition of paintings at 22 years-old at Brussel’s Galérie d’Egmont, which sold out immediately. Even with his early success as a painter, Bourguignon pursued journalism and art criticism at Belgian newspaper La Phare, exposing him to Europe’s forefront modernists and succession of art movements. As a journalist, Bourguignon

PARIS Acrylic 18" X 20"

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GIRL TALK Acrylic 19” X 13”

THE GREEN BOTTLE Acrylic 15” X 12”

traveled extensively to places like France, Spain, Italy, Yugoslavia, North Africa and more. Once the war in Europe and German occupation of Belgium ended, Bourguignon expanded his travels to the exotic locations of Haiti and Peru. The vibrancy of the people and culture in Haiti captivated Bourguignon; he ended up living in the country for more than a year and became part of its flourishing art scene, which he was initially sent to write about for La Phare. Haiti was an unexpected haven for European and American artists and writers, such as author Truman Capote and Surrealist poet André Breton. Bourguignon was drawn to the country’s rich history and moved by the dichotomy of its people who were poverty-stricken yet full of life. There, and in Peru where he also spent nearly a year, he wrote, took photographs and observed, full of wonder and excitement.

By adding vibrant color and complex brushwork, the chaos of a Haitian village or the elegance of Parisian architecture came alive. Bourguignon’s genres ranged from evocative figures and portraits to expressionist landscapes and scenes derived from his travels. A range of these subjects painted from the 1930s to 1980s will come together for the exhibition in June. Ventana Fine Art 400 Canyon Road 505.983.8815 www.VentanaFineArt.com

Bourguignon then moved to the United States with his wife Erika Eichhorn, an anthropologist who had also been living in Haiti. They created a haven in their Ohio home filled with an extensive library of art books, artifacts, paintings and photographs from their travels. It was in Ohio, after having spent years interviewing modern art masters, writing about their work and photographing people and cultures around the world, that Bourguignon picked up his brushes again. Through his journalistic work and cultural experiences, he’d become a perceptive observer of the human condition and had acquired an in-depth knowledge of modern art painters and movements. He used these influences in his early gouaches and later acrylics, as well as in pencil and ink drawings. With just a few strokes or simple lines, Bourguignon was able to capture the essence of a persona or the energy of a place. MOJACAR, SPAIN Gouache 9” X 12” ARTS, DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

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Frank Balaam LIGHT THROUGH THE TREES By Kelly Skeen

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he primal peace of an undisturbed forest is where oil painter Frank Balaam finds inspiration, resilience, and life’s inherent beauty. A twisted branch, dancing leaf or elongated trunk will draw the artist’s attention to a single tree, and he will focus on its individuality for hours as he sketches. Back in the studio, a forest slowly emerges as Balaam gives meticulous attention to every piece of the dauntingly dense landscape. Using the difficult technique of reverse painting, Balaam begins with the foreground and works backward, giving each individual speck of the painting a powerful vibrancy and distinct presence. His heavy application of paint contributes to

SANTA FE HIDDEN MARSH II Oils on Canvas 60” x 60”

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AUTUMN SONG Oils on Canvas 24” x 72”

the luminous texture of the composition, while his jewel-like colors swirl across the canvas with an uplifting energy. Eventually, each individual leaf, branch and blade of grass begins to sing together in harmony, coalescing into an orchestrated choir of color and light. “My philosophy in paint emphasizes the importance of each individual to the whole,” says Balaam. “Any individual color or brushstroke cannot be discounted or removed from the final painting without its contribution being missed.” Originally from northern England, Balaam spent over 50 years traveling the world with painting as his constant companion. From portraiture to murals to landscapes inspired by locations in Africa, Italy, America and more, Balaam’s range of genres was as profound as the stamps in his passport. However, in 2005, the artist encountered a significant shift in style after he lost 1,000 artworks to a destructive fire at the Pioneer Hotel in Globe, Arizona, which housed his gallery. Just a few years earlier, he also unexpectedly witnessed a forest fire’s raging destruction on a plein air painting excursion in northern Arizona. “I took a photo of what I was painting and we drove out of there as fast as we could,” Balaam recalls. “But as I watched the trees, it was as if they turned and looked towards the coming fire. They couldn’t get out of the way.” Balaam felt an affinity with the Arizona trees as he helplessly watched the hotel fire engulf his gallery. Since then, his work has consisted solely of trees and forests as paintings of renewal and metaphors for society. They represent the vulnerability of our own existence which, like the trees, is subjected to the actions of dominant forces. Painting the forest is a form of reflection and connection for Balaam, whose mission is to elevate the spirit of the viewer. His most recent work celebrates diversity within our society while also offering a sense of universality. Balaam honors each fractional difference among his trees, from knobby branches to gnarled trunks, rather than stylizing or manipulating their design. Through this careful attention, he highlights the character of each tree as it coexists with the balance of the entire forest. “There must be a trillion trees on the planet and no two branches are alike,” says Balaam. “I think that’s something to celebrate.”

GAZE—SKIRTS OF LIGHT Oils on Canvas 14” x 11”

See Balaam’s new work at International Attraction opening at Ventana Fine Art on May 19th. Ventana Fine Art 400 Canyon Road 505.983.8815 www.VentanaFineArt.com

ARTS, DINING & ENTERTAINMENT

MOONLIGHT SONATA III Oils on Canvas 44” x 44”

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ARTISTS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Melanie DeLuca, Yellowman, Ric Charlie, Randy Chitto

Growing Day by Day True West is Here to Stay Over the past two years, True West has grown from a little gallery attempting to fill the hole left by the legendary Packard’s on the Plaza, to a burgeoning force in its own right in Santa Fe’s gallery scene. Just up from the Plaza on Lincoln Avenue near Marcy Street, True West hosts a large array of authentic Native American traditional and contemporary jewelry, pottery, weavings, carvings, sculpture and art. 42

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wners Craig Allen and Lisa Sheridan opened True West in December 2014 and, in the past two years, have achieved unparalleled success and acclaim from artists and customers alike. “We’ve had a 40 percent increase in business last year alone,” Allen says. Referring to the recent addition of the neighboring space, he shares: “We’ve also doubled our size in terms of square footage.” With that added square footage, True West now has room to represent 136 artists, up from 56 when the business first opened. Sheridan sums: “We are one of the fastest growing galleries in town.”

that the collectors asked Allen and Sheridan to sell. One of the collections was started in the late 1800s by a minister to the Plains Indians. Looking forward, Sheridan says True West is here to stay. “You read and hear about so many galleries closing, but we’ve fast become a fixture,” she reflects. Allen adds: “Our ultimate goal is to give every artist a comfortable home, as well as to give customers a place with fair pricing and great quality to shop. We’re a trusted source.” True West Santa Fe 130 Lincoln Avenue 505.982.0055 TrueWestSF.com

Customers say True West reminds them of Packard’s, the iconic store that lived on the Plaza from 1944 to 2013 and was known not only for the quality of its Native American art and jewelry, but also for the integrity with which it handled business. Allen and Sheridan were formerly associated with Packard’s as managers. “We’re carrying on the torch,” says Sheridan. “Packard’s was a destination because of their honesty, the quality of merchandise, and the longstanding trust among artists and customers.” That integrity continues today at True West. “The artists truly feel welcomed and appreciated here,” says Craig. In fact, so many artists wanted to come on board with the gallery that it soon outgrew its space. When the landlord made the space next door available, the overwhelming response True West had received made expansion viable. With the expansion, True West will begin offering workshops this summer. Artists associated with the gallery will give classes or demonstrations in painting and pottery. Interested participants can sign up on the True West website, as class size is limited. The mezzanine in the back of the new space is the perfect intimate place for these workshops, allowing for the daily activity of the gallery to continue uninterrupted. In the gallery itself, artists of note include Navajo painter Yellowman, San Ildefanso potter and silversmith Erik Fender, Hopi silversmith Steva LaRance, and Navajo goldsmith Ric Charlie. True West is also the recent recipient of two large art collections

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ELODIE HOLMES

Liquid Light Glass Contemporary Glass Gallery & Studio

Demos • Hours 10 am - 5 pm Mon - Sat • 926 Baca Street Suite 3 • Santa Fe, NM 87505 505.820.2222 • www.liquidlightglass.com • sales@liquidlightglass.com • Photo: Wendy McEahern

FineLifestyles SANTA FE & ALBUQUERQUE

HERE’S WHAT SANTA FE IS SAYING ABOUT FINE LIFESTYLES:

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“Fine Lifestyles Magazine is amazing! Best advertising we have ever done.”

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“The advertorials give the reader a sense of who we are as business owners. I have gotten more results from Fine Lifestyles Magazine than any other marketing we have done.” - Hillary Randolph of GRACE Jewelry TURQUOISE 101 SECRET JEMEZ HOT SPRINGS NORDIC SKIING LIKE NEVER BEFORE

BARKER REALTY Celebrating 50 Years

For more information, call 910.508.3694 ARTS, DINING & ENTERTAINMENT


SAZÓN Where Great Ambiance and Great Cuisine Meet Photos Ernest Trujillo


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t takes three elements to ensure a successful restaurant: great food, great service and great ambiance. Much has been said about Sazón’s delightful contemporary Mexican cuisine, cooked to perfection by renowned Chef Fernando Olea. And, of course, the impeccable service makes the popular restaurant’s wheels turn. But it is the ambiance, designed by Suzanna J. Becerra, that is Sazón’s finishing touch. Upon walking into the establishment, guests are greeted by an aweinspiring chandelier hanging overhead, which was made in Guadalajara. “I wanted people to walk in the restaurant, look up and say, ‘Wow,’” comments Suzanna. “I was going for a sophisticated look that also made guests feel like they were walking into a home. It being a Mexican restaurant, the décor had to be full of color and life, but my real inspiration came from Fernando’s great energy and love of Mexican cuisine. We felt that Fernando deserved a stage befitting his extraordinary talents. Creating Sazón’s atmosphere came from my heart.” Also in the restaurant’s foyer is a bright red painting of a horse by Julio de Rita. His horses, repeated in other paintings throughout the restaurant, employ a fauvist use of color, and his layering is reminiscent of pointillism. “His work is so vibrant,” Suzanna says. “I just adore his use of colors and layers.” This blend of color and detail is repeated throughout the restaurant. Take Tanya Talamante’s Katrina and Katrin paintings, which depict a Dia de los Muertos man and woman in exquisite detail. “If you look at the paintings closely, it’s quite extraordinary. I believe these are masterpieces,” says Sazón owner Lawrence Becerra. A favorite of the Becerras and of many Sazón diners is the signature sensual portraiture of Frida Kahlo by Fragoso Maiz. “His ability to speak straight to the soul is incredible,” describes Suzanna. “Everybody wants to buy his paintings off the wall.” Scattered throughout Sazón are the paintings and delicate sculptures of Abiquiú resident Armando Lopez. Using mixed media mainly derived from organic materials, his whimsical dream-like structures exhibit high-level craftsmanship. “His work is mesmerizing and phenomenal,” says Suzanna. “All of the artwork is part of our private collection. Some is for sale; some not,” Lawrence explains. “These are all very talented artists, and we are helping them build a following here in the United States.” Not to be outdone by the art on the walls, Chef Fernando Olea is offering new specials that include shrimp consomme—served Puebla-style with a chipotle base—and bone marrow—baked and served with fresh tortillas and fresco salsa. Another new favorite is the beef kidney and heart, with a cabernet reduction and served with homemade bread crostinis. The wine list continues to evolve, featuring wines from Spain, Argentina, the U.S. and Mexico. A new reserve list has been added that features iconic wines from around the world. Sazón, which has now been in business over a year and a half, continues to flourish as a result of Fernando’s talent, Suzanna’s eye, and Lawrence’s measured hand. “We’ve been overwhelmed, surprised and delighted by the response to the restaurant,” says Lawrence. Fernando adds: “We have a great local base, as well as tourists from all over the world. It’s enormously gratifying.” Sazón 221 Shelby St. 505.983.8604 www.SazonSantaFe.com

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Have Dinner With Us

The Teahouse

821 Canyon Rd, Santa Fe · 505.992.0972 · teahousesantafe.com


So Sweet · So Fresh

OUR SHOP IS PERFECT when you are in the mood for that perfect treat or when you are in need of that perfect gift in any season. Our patrons will find: over 20 flavors of handmade fudge, a wall of licorice in assorted flavors from around the world, fresh dipped and glazed fruits, handmade chocolates, custom-made cakes, hard candy, rock candy, truffles, and some unexpected treats. We also have classic sweets, custom confections and modern delights. You may want to spice things up with local flavors unique to New Mexico. THE CANDY LADY IS A NEW MEXICO TRADITION for over 37 years. The Candy Lady moved two years ago.

Come visit our new location in Albuquerque’s Old Town!

The Candy Lady

424 San Felipe NW, Albuquerque · 505.243.6239 · TheCandyLady.com


PERSIAN CUISINE WITH A TWIST

Photos Caitlin Elizabeth

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iven its cosmopolitan nature, Santa Fe’s residents are never surprised to find restaurants offering international cuisine along its winding streets. However, until November, the City Different could not count Persian fare among its culinary establishments. Firstgeneration Iranian-American chef Neema Sadeghi recently renovated an old adobe on Canyon Road and opened Milad Persian Bistro on November 8th, 2016. Combining traditional Middle Eastern cuisine with a modern interpretation, Milad Bistro softly blurs the lines between old world and new. Originally from Washington DC, Sadeghi says he’s always worked in the service industry, though he learned how to cook Persian cuisine at home from his family. After working in several restaurants in a myriad of capacities, he wanted to contribute to Santa Fe’s culinary community. Milad Persian Bistro was born. “I call it contemporary Persian because, though we do things very traditionally, we sometimes add our own twist,” explains Sadeghi. Take the falafel, for example. Sadeghi makes his falafel with beets and whole chickpeas, giving them not only a unique flavor, but a beautiful color as well. In fact, color is a driving force in Sadeghi’s culinary inspiration. “I love naturally colorful ingredients like turmeric, saffron

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ARTS, DINING & ENTERTAINMENT


and beets, and how they can be presented as part of a dining experience,” Sadeghi describes. Many of Milad Bistro’s dishes are quite traditional, like the kabobs and the sabzi plate (an assortment of herbs with in-house pitas, feta cheese and walnuts). Some of the dishes combine traditional recipes with a new interpretation. Take the fesenjun flatbread. Normally, fesenjun is a pomegranate walnut stew prepared with duck or chicken, and served over basmati rice. Sadeghi has taken the pomegranate and walnut base, added butternut squash, caramelized onion and feta cheese, and served it on flatbread made in the oven to order, revolutionizing the dish while still preserving the flavors. While the menu itself is set, on any given night Sadeghi cooks up a dish to augment what the restaurant already offers. Going forward, he expects his specials to reflect the seasons. Ingredients are sourced locally and seasonally when possible. The lamb and much of the produce, for instance, is from New Mexico. However, because the cuisine is Persian, many of the spices and rice varieties are imported. Another ‘contemporary’ aspect of the restaurant is the wine list. While Persian cuisine is not typically paired with alcohol, Sadeghi has paired his menu with an expansive array of carefully selected wines from around the globe. Of note is the Darioush label, made by Persian wine-makers in California.

As for the décor, Milad Bistro features original paintings by Sadeghi’s mother, Sepideh Majd. After studying art and art therapy—which eventually led her and later Sadeghi to Santa Fe—Majd has continued to paint throughout her life. Her portfolio proved perfect for the interior décor of her son’s restaurant. “At its roots, Persian culture is founded in the arts. I’ve created Milad Persian Bistro to highlight and share that poetic history. Food is always a good bridge to connect people and share cultures,” reflects Sadeghi. “Cuisine is a great form of communication.” Milad Persian Bistro 802 Canyon Rd. 505. 303.3581 MiladBistro.com


Come by Midtown Bistro and enjoy your favorite cocktail and a wonderful meal in our new bar area!

901 W. San Mateo

·

505.820.3121

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MidtownBistroSF.com


Introducing the Wolf induction range. Two simple concepts, one brilliant combination.

30" induction range

The precision and control of the induction cooktop combined with the even heat circulation of the Wolf dual convection oven. Induction gives high to low end control as precise and powerful as any gas cooktop. The oven delivers uniform heat across all racks to produce faster, more consistent, more predictably delicious results. Come experience the new Wolf induction range today.

Sierra West Sales 856 St.Michael’s Drive | Santa Fe, NM 87505 | 505.471.6742 swappl@msn.com | sierrawestsales.com


FL

House & Home

Real Estate Market Insights Homes for Sale 4Q16

228

3Q16

242

2Q16

2.24%

244

1Q16 4Q15

253 223

Inventory in the Residential Luxury Market continued a steady decline throughout the year, as with most market segments. The fourth quarter in each year generally shows lower inventory than other quarters and we expect the typical seasonal bounce in the first quarter of 2017.

S

anta Fe’s Residential Luxury Market continued its five year rise in 2016, and saw a significant 16.2% increase

in the number of luxury homes sold from the previous year. This is the single biggest increase we have seen in many years and indicates a high level of consumer confidence in our local market. The steady increase in sales resulted in a dynamic 33.1% increase from five years ago. DBarker@SantaFeRealEstate.com LBarker@SantaFeRealEstate.com 505 992 3563 505 490 2626

530 S. Guadalupe St., Santa Fe • 505 982 9836 • SantaFeRealEstate.com


The Santa Fe Luxury Real Estate Market Luxury Sales

Luxury Selling Price

per Sq. Ft.

4Q16 3Q16

5.07%

31

4Q15

days

3Q16 2Q16 1Q16 4Q15

$329 $313

4Q15

$315

Prices in the luxury market are showing a slight increase, with the average selling price per square foot up more than 5% over the previous year’s fourth quarter.

Luxury Days on Market 67

1Q16

32

The fourth quarter of 2016 experienced a remarkable 21.8% increase in the number of Luxury Home Sales from the same time period the previous year.

4Q16

$334

2Q16

30

1Q16

$331

3Q16

33

2Q16

21.8%

4Q16

39

Luxury Original vs Selling Price

169 159

4Q16

92%

3Q16

92%

2Q16

218 226

4.54%

As inventory decreased and unit sales increased, the days-on-market average declined by 67 days from the fourth quarter of 2015. This is great news for sellers and instills a sense of urgency in buyers when they find the ideal home.

91%

1Q16 4Q15

236

Price

90% 88%

A rising momentum in selling prices is further indicated by a 4.54% increase in listing price vs. selling price. Negotiations on price are getting tighter as the luxury market strengthens.

We foresee 2017 continuing this trend as all indicators are pointing toward continuing improvements. The majority of the increase in the luxury market was in the $1m - $2m range, with sales over $2m decreasing slightly over the last five years. It’s the highly desirable properties in this price range that continue to attract interest and sell, and larger and dated properties that are not as appealing.

For real-time neighborhood specific data & statistics, visit SantaFeRealEstate.com/Market-Insights *Data source: All information contained herein is derived from the Santa Fe MLS and is believed to be accurate.

The Locals’ Choice for over Fifty Years!


Spotlight broker

F

rom a commercial fishing career in the Bering Sea of Alaska, to a record breaking real estate broker in Santa Fe, Britt Gladu’s journey has been an interesting one. A name familiar to many in Santa Fe, especially in the Las Campanas community, Britt began her real estate career 17 years ago in Scottsdale, AZ where she elevated her ranking to one of the top in the industry in a highly competitive market.

there is always a way. often, achieving desired results takes coloring outside the lines to simply get the job done for our clients.

Britt found her way to Santa Fe in 2011 and continues to specialize in residential real estate acquisition, unique luxury properties, homes with historic significance, and investment opportunities. Britt attributes her work ethic and creative ability to achieve results to her years of fishing under extreme conditions. “Commercial fishing in the Bering Sea pushed you to problem solve when solutions and critical thinking were crucial to the overall success and safety of the crew.” During the 1990’s, commercial fishing in Alaska was a prosperous industry, which provided healthy capital funding to invest upon conclusion of each season. While living in Seattle, WA and pursuing her Bachelors of Nursing Degree, Britt exercised her inherent ability to identify prime investment opportunities. “I had developed a trust and deep respect for my real estate broker, who always kept my best interests at the forefront. She deeply inspired me to consider all real estate variables which may affect value, quality of life, and measurable real estate investment results”.

Britt is dedicated to the community of Santa Fe and has served on the Event Committee for the Lensic Center for the Performing Arts, as a Board of Directors member for the First Tee of Santa Fe, and as a Co-Chair of the Public Policy Committee for the Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce. She feels a deep sense of pride in representing Barker Realty | Christie’s International Real Estate. “The support all brokers receive is unprecedented in my 17 years in the business. Philanthropic contributions Associate Brokers make to organizations in Santa Fe are often matched by David and Lisa Barker. A locally owned and operated boutique real estate company, with the ultimate luxury branding of Christie’s International Real Estate, Barker Realty is dedicated to Santa Fe.” Britt subscribes to a work-hard, play-hard philosophy. She has rafted down the Grand Canyon as an assistant river guide (swamper), is a former member of the Arizona Golf Association who assisted with Pro-Am tournaments, a competitive USTA tennis player in Santa Fe, a skier, and has hiked throughout the Southwest and Pueblo ruins. Britt learned how to fly fish this past summer and enjoyed exploring the Pecos River with her English Labrador (Kodi). “Exploring the Pecos Wilderness has intensified my love for New Mexico. Catching my first rainbow trout after hiking up to Stewart Lake the summer of 2016 was an epic moment in time!” n


Tremendous Views and Value in Las Campanas Premier Elevated View Lot in Las Campanas

49 Paseo Aragon | $800,000 3 Bedrooms | 3 Bathrooms | 3,041 Sq. Ft. mls # 201604320

3 Calle Ventoso West $995,000 4 Bedrooms | 4 Bathrooms 3,504 Sq. Ft. | mls # 201601780

9 Deer Circle | $1,595,000

4 Bedrooms | 5 Bathrooms | 5,277 Sq. Ft. mls # 201700473

63 Paseo Aragon (Lot 68) $142,000

62 Mustang Mesa (Lot 685) $365,000 2.8 Acres ON WAIVER

5.145 Acres | 224,116 Lot Size mls # 201602075

Britt’s Recent Listing / Sales Results

PENDING

Highest Land Sale in 5 years: 5 Camino Campanario 1.026 Acres | 44,693 Lot Size $435,000 sales price

9 Wildhorse $1,395,000 4 Bedrooms | 4 Bathrooms 4,300 Sq. Ft. | mls # 201700219

73 Thundercloud $1,198,000 4 Bedrooms | 3 Bathrooms 3,460 Sq. Ft. | mls # 201605455

Highest Resale Per Sq. Ft. in 2 years: 10 Calle Venado 4 Bedrooms | 5 Bathrooms 3,621 Sq. Ft. $1,525,000 at $421 Per Sq. Ft.

505 930 4105 | BGladu@SantaFeRealEstate.com

BrittGladu.com 530 S. Guadalupe St. Santa Fe, NM 87501 • 505 982 9836 • SantaFeRealEstate.com


A Dream Design

Overlooking Bishops Lodge Road By Debbie Stone Photos Caitlin Elizabeth

S

amuel Design Group is in the business of making dreams come true. The well-known and award-winning Santa Fe design firm has been specializing in creating interiors tailored for high-end residential, commercial and hospitality clients for nearly 20 years. Owner Lisa Samuel and her team take pride in their ability to communicate effectively with clients, and to collaborate and work together toward the aim of creating spaces that support the end user. “It’s more than just the look of the place or the functionality that’s important,” explains Samuel. “It’s ultimately a holistic experience we want our clients to have when they’re in the space.” With any project, the team’s process involves getting to know each client personally in order to understand their goals so that the team may develop a unique design sequence. With extensive training in architecture, lighting and interior design, Samuel—a Santa Fe native—also serves as a mentor to up-and-coming designers. “I share my knowledge with other designers in order to help them be successful, to be the best they can be. This is part of my journey and an important personal mission,” she reflects. One such designer is Patrick Allen, who joined the firm a year ago and who recently completed designing an upscale pied-à-terre located off Bishops Lodge Road. “The project was for a couple who wanted a getaway for themselves,” says Allen. “They bought a three bedroom 1800 sq. ft. home on a hilltop with incredible views of the Jemez Mountains. The design inspiration was a combination of Southwest style with a focus on the couple’s shared history in the Bishop’s Lodge area.” The wife’s family had vacationed at Bishop’s Lodge Resort during the summers when she was growing up. The resulting theme that developed emphasized celebrating roots while showcasing the eclectic spirit and historical aspects of Santa Fe. “We were playful with color throughout the house, and used vibrant orange, red and blue as accent colors against a neutral backdrop,” Allen describes. “We also used the couple’s art collection as a jumping off point for the color palette and the furnishings, all of which are complementary to the Southwest aesthetic.” As an example, he cites: “The clients have this beautifully embroidered Huipil, a traditional blouse worn by women in Central America that actually belonged to the wife’s great-grandmother. We designed a custom shadowbox over the mantel and then drew out colors from there to use as accents in the design.”

inviting sensibility. The project, which began last June, was completed mid-September. “The clients were so delighted with the end results,” says Allen. “It definitely exceeded their expectations.”

There’s even a found item from Bishop’s Lodge Resort—a headboard—that’s now in one of the two master suites in the home. “A great piece,” notes Allen, “and a nice memento from the property that meant so much to our client.” Other furnishings he describes as having a handsome rustic quality, with a comfortable and

Samuel Design Group 607 Cerrillos Rd., Suite A Toll Free 844.284.6999 Studio 505.820.0239 SamuelDesignGroup.com ABOVE: Patrick Allen, Allied ASID Photo by Ernest Trujillo

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Design Solutions Made Easy

T

By Debbie Stone

hinking about building a new home or remodeling your office can be an exciting prospect. However, it can also be overwhelming to consider all the options and factors involved. Enter La Resolana Architects of Santa Fe. Owner Earl Hilchey, a licensed architect, has over 29 years of experience providing design solutions for a variety of commercial and residential projects, including single homes and multi-family housing, churches, banks, medical facilities, offices, senior centers and fitness training centers. “I do a mix of new and remodels,” says Hilchey. “Every space is different and has its own set of requirements. And each client has different needs. My job is to understand all of the factors involved and come up with a solution that will work best and ultimately satisfy the client.” Hilchey spends much time with each of his clients and utilizes a ‘Needs and Options Review’ to provide them with information about the project. “This is a low commitment consultation,” he explains, “with the goal of educating the client, outlining their concerns, answering their questions, determining building criteria and helping to establish a budget for the project.” Hilchey not only does the planning and design, but also oversees all the details related to the project including supervising the work force internally, directing outside consultants, scheduling, preparing reports and construction documentation. Hilchey finds the creative process to be exciting. “It’s the fun part,” he says. “I enjoy the challenge of design work because no two projects are the same.” La Resolana Architects By Appointment Only 505.280.9123 LaResolanaArchitects.com

ABOVE: Earl Hilchey, Photo by Linda Carfagno TOP TWO PICTURES: Seventh Day Adventist Church, Las Vegas, New Mexico BOTTOM TWO PICTURES: Private Residence, Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Let us create your Dream Room...

Custom made and one of a kind furniture

CI

Cowboys & IndIans of santa fe fine furniture | women’s apparel | home furnishings 505.982.8280 72 East San Francisco Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501 www.candisantafe.com cowboysindianssf@aol.com


MADE in the Shade It’s great to spend time outdoors admiring New Mexico’s stunning landscape but, at 7,200 ft. above sea level, wind and sun exposure can wreak havoc to both skin and furniture. Santa Fe Awning has a solution that offers the best of both worlds: With a Santa Fe Patio Wind and Solar Screen, you can enjoy your view to its full extent.

“S

creens are our number one product,” says manager Sara Talachy. “Many homes here have a West-facing patio to take advantage of the sunset. Our screens drop down to block both direct sunlight and wind. They can take a highwind load, which is unusual in the industry, and we have a lot of wind in New Mexico. With our screens, people can sit outside and actually enjoy their patios. It also protects the sun from coming into West-facing windows and bleaching the furniture and floors.” The screen’s fabric allows for 90 to 95 percent blockage. At the same time, the screens are completely transparent from the inside, but do not allow for outsiders to see in. An unexpected asset to the screens is how much they reduce cooling costs. Talachy had her house built specifically to test how effective the screens could be at reducing summer heat. She has three large 12 x 9 Westfacing windows. The first summer, she did not have a screen installed, and the house would heat to 84 or 85 degrees. The second summer she had the screens up, and the house did not get above 72 degrees. Though she had a swamp cooler, she purposefully did not turn it on either summer so as to get a comparison on the efficacy of the product.

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WITH OUR SCREENS, PEOPLE CAN SIT OUTSIDE AND ACTUALLY ENJOY THEIR PATIOS “The other nice thing is the wind blockage,” she describes. “I have a patio with a table, but without the screen I couldn’t eat outside very often because of the wind. With the screens down, I could eat outside with napkins on the table.” Santa Fe Awning owner Jeff Maul— who is also Talachy’s father—wanted to create screens that were New Mexico proof, able to withstand the sunniest and windiest days. The screens typically do not have to be replaced for 10 to 15 years. Another innovation is the width of the screen. Because the last thing homeowners want is a seam gutted view, Maul achieved a fabric width of 126 inches, the first awning company in the world to mill fabric that wide. Another popular product is Santa Fe Awning’s shade sails, which are ideally placed above a pool or hot tub. “They are often described as geometric flying shapes for shade,” Talachy says. The sails are made of a fabric that stretches in order to achieve a taut and wrinklefree surface. “Our goal is to create a comfortable environment outdoors by blocking the wind and minimizing the sun,” Talachy sums. “It can mean installing a patio screen or it can mean building artistic shade with the shade sails.” With a little help from Santa Fe Awning, your patio can be your spring and summer domain.

Santa Fe Awning 28 Bisbee Ct., Suite B-7 866.989.8678 SantaFeAwning.com

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Eternity Home

Discover a unique collection of furniture and accessories! 505.982.6286

135 West San Francisco Street


Restoring a Rug’s Magic

TEXTIVAL CELEBRATES 20 YEARS

R

ufus Cohen has been restoring rugs and textiles since 1988. The son of an Andean textile scholar, Cohen became passionate about preserving the beauty of handmade textiles for future generations. After years of apprenticing at California’s Talisman Restoration, he opened Textival in Albuquerque to share his passion and expertise with others. Now in its 20th year, Textival offers rug and textile cleaning and restoration for oriental rugs, Navajo and southwestern textiles, decorative rugs, and ethnographic textiles. Most rug cleaners gravitate toward mechanization, but what’s unique about Textival is its commitment to doing work by hand. “We use traditional handwashing techniques, but with modern materials and innovative treatments for difficult staining and color run,” Cohen explains. “People are surprised to learn our reweaving processes all replicate the slow and tedious methods by which the pieces were first created.” A large part of Textival’s work is specifically devoted to cleaning and restoring Navajo rugs. In this regard, Textival is unique in the state, meticulously carding, spinning and dying by hand, thus bringing their decades of experience to the Navajo restoration process. This is one reason the workshop has become a nationwide destination for Navajo rug collectors looking to properly care for their pieces. In addition to Cohen, Textival’s senior staff includes David Hartshorne, who specializes in Navajo rug washing and color run removal, and Kayla Paul, a weaver specializing in twill techniques and Navajo rug restoration. Textival’s team does regular free pick-up and delivery throughout the region, from Albuquerque and Santa Fe to Eldorado, Pojoaque and Los Alamos. “It’s about bringing the magic of the past back to life,” Cohen reflects. “We’re able to take very damaged rugs and textiles, and restore them to the point where they are fine art again. Sometimes they are as fresh and bright as they were off the loom. In this way, we’re able to highlight and respect the work of the past.” Textival Rug & Textile Workshop 505.242.9889 2300 Buena Vista SE Ste. 122, Albuquerque textival.com

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Expert ADVICE

Our Services and Roof Coatings

KLAUS HERRING President/CEO

Alpha Restoration & Construction Services, Inc. 505.473.2057 3812 Oliver Road Santa Fe, NM Klaus.H@ARCS247.com www.ARCS247.com

“THE TROUBLE WITH US IS THAT THE GHETTO OF THE MIDDLE AGES AND THE CHILDREN OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY HAVE TO LIVE UNDER ONE ROOF.” Anzia Yezierska

O

ur company, Alpha Restoration & Construction Services, Inc. (ARCS for short), has been doing business as a New Mexico licensed general contractor since December 2008. Since we started, the core of our business is commercial and residential disaster

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ABOVE: Making repair to a foam roof prior to installation of roof coating.

restoration. As disaster restoration specialists, ARCS’ certified staff of experts focuses on fire and water damage restoration, smoke cleanup, water/flood dry-out services, sewage abatement and mold remediation. Since 2010, ARCS has slowly added additional capabilities, focusing on commercial and residential roofing and roof maintenance services, as well as commercial and residential remodeling. Our roofing services start with roof maintenance. We believe that a wellmaintained roof can last significantly longer than normal life expectancy. To that end, we usually perform a no-cost roof assessment for our customers and make maintenance recommendations. Depending on the roof system installed and the work required, roof maintenance can run anywhere from a minimum charge to several thousand dollars. Recently, ARCS became a GACO certified roof coating installer. As such, we are offering the finest roof coating products

HOUSE & HOME

available in the United States with the best coating system warranty. Many competitors offer a “lifetime” roof coating warranty, which is usually limited to the material only. ARCS is able to offer the same “lifetime” warranty, but we believe a “system warranty” is actually a much better solution for our customers since it covers both materials and installation of the coating. This type of warranty is extended for up to 20 years on both commercial and residential roofs. It is backed by GACO, the manufacturer of the roof coating, and GACO will send its technical experts to inspect the installation of the coating before it is accepted into warranty. Currently, the installation of roof coatings is still considered “roof maintenance,” as it is applied over existing roof membranes and does not require building permits. We have received notification that this may end this summer. The reason is that many unqualified, unscrupulous and unlicensed individuals are applying these coatings without regard for the condition of the underlying roof.


TOP LEFT: Cleaning of roof surface prior to installation of roof coating. TOP RIGHT: Installation of primer and seam sealer. LEFT: Installation of roof coating. BELOW: Testing the mill thickness of the roof coating to verify proper install.

It is our opinion that requiring building permits for roof coating installations is actually a good thing for consumers. It will require that each roof, before coating, is carefully assessed to determine if it is a candidate for coating. Roofs that have pumice, roofs that have moisture trapped between layers, or roofs with significant structural damage to the roof membrane should never be considered for roof coating. In many instances, foam roofs are candidates for roof coatings. In fact, we see roof coating on foam roofs as a viable alternative to removing and replacing such roofs, provided that the foam roof has been thoroughly inspected and does not hold moisture. We use a thermal imaging camera to look for suspected areas with moisture, and then confirm by using moisture meters whether the foam roof is either wet or dry. If there are only a few “wet” areas, repairs can be made before roof coating installation. If there are

too many wet areas, it becomes cost prohibitive to make repairs, and the foam needs to be removed and replaced with another roofing material. If roof coatings are installed over roofs that do not qualify, the resulting damage caused to roofs and structures can be significant and very costly to repair. In many instances, we’ve seen coatings installed over wet areas, thus trapping moisture and eventually resulting in significant mold contamination and wood rot. In cases where roofs are beyond maintenance or coatings, ARCS offers an array of solutions ranging from metal and shingle installations for pitched roofs to Modified Bitumen, PVC or TPO flat roof systems for residential and commercial buildings. To schedule a free roof assessment, call ARCS at 505.473.2057.

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Helping You Buy the Home of Your Dreams

M

ike Novak specializes in the purchase and sale of single and multi-family residences, as well as commercial building and leasing, commercial and residential land, land development, relocation and income property within the cities of Albuquerque, Rio Rancho, Corrales, Los Ranchos de Albuquerque, Los Lunas, Edgewood, Tijeras, Bernalillo and Placitas. The Albuquerque native was always interested in real estate, and one day decided to pursue his dream. Today, 20 plus years later, he’s sold everything from a $1,500 vacant residential lot to an $8,000,000 27-acre commercial development. However, his primary interest is helping people buy and sell their residential properties. Whether it’s a first-time home buyer, a “step up” home, a luxury dream home, or even a downsized home later in life, Novak takes special pride in working closely with his clients. For example, if a client comes to him with shaky credit,

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Novak works with that customer to repair their credit, making their home-buying goals achievable. “My clients aren’t just clients; they end up becoming long term friends,” he explains. If you’re considering buying a home, whether for the first time or fourth time, Novak advises prospective homebuyers to get everything in order. “Contact me early on to work with the lender,” he counsels. “In today’s market, financing is more challenging for some. We show our clients a pathway to get their credit and financing where it needs to be in order to buy that dream home.” When selling a home for his clients, Novak start with a pre-listing appointment to advise his sellers on how to prepare the property to sell in the least amount of time for the highest possible price. Novak sums: “If you are in the residential market to buy or sell a home, give me a call and I will put my 20 plus years of real estate expertise to work for you.”

HOUSE & HOME

Mike Novak Remax Masters 6705 Academy NE, Suite A Albuquerque 505.280.2062 www.mikesnmhomes.com


New Mexico’s PREMIERE Mortgage Lender

P

innacle Capital Mortgage prides itself on serving the greater Albuquerque/Santa Fe area. Founded in January 2008 with the knowledge and efforts of highly experienced lending professionals, the mortgage company has quickly grown to become a premiere mortgage lender in the state.

companies. The latter are typically licensed through state and federal resources.” Valencia says the most gratifying aspect of his job is helping people achieve their dreams. “Buying a home is one of the most daunting decisions in a person’s life. Helping people realize their dream of owning a home is incredibly satisfying.”

Anthony Valencia has worked in Albuquerque with Pinnacle Capital Mortgage for five and a half years, and enjoys the opportunity to help his clients get into the home of their dreams. He got into the mortgage business back in 1993 while working for Sun West Bank and, over the past 24 years, has accrued the knowledge and acumen critical to best serve his clients.

Tony Valencia, MLO-217836 8300 Carmel Ave NE, Building 1 Suite 104 Albuquerque 505.239.6326 www.TonyValencia.com

Pinnacle Capital Mortgage is a division of Finance of America Mortgage, which means Valencia’s clients get both the benefits of local underwriting and processing (not to mention personal service), while also benefitting from the financial security of being under the umbrella of a national company. For someone interested in buying a home, he cautions, “Price and rates aren’t everything. Make sure your loan officer is fully licensed and educated. There’s a big difference between banking loan officers and loan officers that work for mortgage

© 2015 A division of Finance of America Mortgage LLC | Equal Housing Lender | NMLS 1071 | AZ BK 0910184 | Licensed by the Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act. Some products may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral subject to approval. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Terms and conditions apply. Subject to qualification.

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"I Love Clean Rugs!"

BEFORE

A

AFTER

Michael Mull

Is Your Area Rug in Need of a Cleansing or Some TLC?

t One World Rug Care, New Mexico’s only DO NO HARM rug care facility, owner Michael Mull and his team have taken the initiative to operate as a chemical free, nontoxic, hypoallergenic and pet-friendly rug cleaning firm, honoring the health of clients’ homes. Since its inception in 1993 in Palm Desert, California, the company has been a family-owned business, offering professional area rug cleaning with an exquisite gallery of hand-crafted art from around the world. In 2013, the company reopened in Albuquerque, with the goal of continuing its tradition of no shared automated washing pits or submersion immersion communal wash baths.

the most appropriate methods. Specializing in seven different styles of cleaning, the company is confident in its results. By operating with this level of expertise, One World Rug Care has received countless awards for outstanding customer service and satisfaction worldwide. In 2014, the company was voted one of the top 72 rug care experts in the world by Carpet Collectors Magazine. In 2015, it was rated #1 in New Mexico by the Persian Rug Collectors Guide, with honorable recognition as an active restoration specialist with the Academy of Oriental Rugs. For free rug care advice, this top-notch company is just a phone call away. Or stop by to visit One World Rug Care’s gallery.

As pollens, moth infestations, allergens and many other contaminates find their way into rugs, the standard unfortunately became washing several rugs at once in communal wash pits, instead of treating each rug on a need-by-need basis. One World Rug Care quickly assessed that this crosscontamination is dangerous, and thus fabricated custom methods of cleaning so that each rug and/or textile could be cleaned via

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One World Rug Care 8212 Pan American Frontage N Albuquerque 505.821.0302 OneWorldRugCare.com


Roman Shades

ycomb shades

Photos by Kate Russell

Rest Easy We've Got You Covered With Hunter Douglas window fashions, the possibilities are endless.

Hunter Douglas offers a wide variety of window fashions in an array of fabrics, textures and colors. Contact us today. We’re the Hunter Douglas experts, guiding you in the selections that’ll make your home even more beautiful––whatever your style.

Hunter Douglas offers a wide variety of window fashions in an array of fabrics, textures and colors. Contact us today. We’re the Hunter Douglas experts, guiding you in the selections that’ll make your home even more beautiful–– whatever your style.

Linson's Design Source

1305 Cerrillos Rd S-M: Closed T-F: 10-5 Sat: 12-4 505-984-8700 www.linsonsdesignsource.com

1305 Cerrillos Road, Santa Fe • 505.984.8700 quality@linsonsdesignsource.com • linsonsdesignsource.com •


Bring the Theater Experience Home Enjoy Movie Night Like Never Before Audio • Home Theatre • Automation • Security • Network Solutions

502 Cerrillos Road | 505.983.5509 | lpascual@asoundlook.com | www.asoundlook.com |


Let Fine Lifestyles Help WITH SOCIAL MEDIA BLASTS As an increased value to our physical publication, we now have added a Social Media product to enhance your online exposure targeting your readers, and followers, beyond the Santa Fe area as well as internationally! As such, we can provide you with continuous exposure on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Linkedin, Tumblr and Google+. We consistently promote our social media sites. This promotion has resulted in over 3800 Social Media likes in 12 months, with an average of 1200 active engagements per week. Enhanced Digital and Social Media Presentation—Enhanced Digital advertising as an add-on to our physical publication. This solution offers Priority appearances and additional promotion via our entire online portfolio. We will work with you to ensure that we focus on the desired message, or product offering. Fine tuned client base and location(s) (i.e. Texas, France, Tokyo, etc) targeting. Regularly work with you to adjust images and info presented to match your ongoing promotions, events and marketing efforts. Posts will occur two to three times per day, across all of our social media outlets. Social media campaigns 2x/month that will be directed to your preferred target market and back-linked to your online presence Premier banner ad time on our Fine Lifestyles website, which will back link to your online presence A monthly report card will be generated to provide you with feedback on your campaign results (i.e. likes, shares, clicks, demographics, etc) 1.910.508.3694

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Saving The Horse that Shaped the American West By Emmaly Wiederholt

Photos Sierra Perkins

Horses are indelibly linked to the mystique of the American West. However, most of us don’t know the particular breed of horse responsible for that mystique. A small-statured horse known as the Spanish mustang came over with Columbus before becoming the horse of choice for conquistadors, Native Americans and cowboys alike. Today, the Spanish mustang is unfortunately under duress; its numbers have greatly dwindled in recent decades.

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oug Lanham, president of the Spanish Mustang Foundation, is part of a team devoted to saving the Spanish mustang from extinction. Through partnerships with breeders and through educational outreach, the foundation seeks to preserve what once was the most common horse found in the West. “I’ve always been fascinated with horses,” says Lanham. “After I was exposed to this particular breed, I decided to get involved. There are only about 2,000 registered Spanish mustangs living today. It’s the horse that came over with Columbus on his second voyage to the New World; it’s the horse the conquistadors rode; it’s the horse the Native Americans rode, often called the buffalo runner; it’s the American cowboys’ first horse, the Pony Express horse. It’s a very hardy horse, but it’s been bred out over time because it is small.”

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Lanham goes on to explain how in the 20th century, larger horses like thoroughbreds became preferable to little horses like the Spanish mustang. Bigger and stronger horses became vogue as interest in smaller and nimbler horses waned, causing them to no longer be bred. Additionally, the Spanish mustang’s affiliation with Native Americans caused the horse to be unpopular with pioneers overtaking native lands. About 13 years ago, Lanham and his friend Donna Mitchell founded the Spanish Mustang Foundation with the purpose of supporting the little Spanish mustang in every possible way. One of the biggest projects of the foundation is to financially aid breeders who are working to keep the horse flourishing. For instance, the foundation works closely with the Brislawn family, who owns the Cayuse Ranch in Wyoming. Over a century ago, the Brislawns went directly to the Utes and Cheyenne to procure some of the last remaining buffalo runners. The horses were brought back to the ranch, which was homesteaded in 1916, and the ranch’s focus became ensuring that the Spanish mustang did not disappear. Today, there are 300 to 400 Spanish mustangs living on Cayuse Ranch. In addition to supporting breeders, the Spanish Mustang Foundation works in conjunction with La Jara Ranch in Galisteo. The ranch is home to Spanish mustangs from a small breeding program where 25 to 30 mustangs happily roam. The foundation also created a documentary film, Return of the Horse, in 2012. The film recounts the Spanish mustang’s historical role in shaping American culture. In the past, the foundation has hosted youth camps and leadership clinics, which it hopes to continue in the future. “Our primary focus is making sure this horse will still be here in 50 years,” Lanham reflects. Folks can get involved in helping to save the Spanish mustang by making a donation or volunteering.

To learn more, visit SpanishMustangFoundation.org. PETS


Building Compassionate Animal Stewardship

ONE LESSON AT A TIME Photos Sara Palmer/APNM

THE LESSON HAD JUST FINISHED, and it was now recess time for the third-grade class. But Anna didn’t want to leave. Instead, she asked her teacher if she could stay behind to talk to Miss Sherry. Anna had been paying close attention to this week’s subject matter from The Animal Connection program—dog fighting and cock fighting. She listened carefully as Miss Sherry explained about these cruel “sports” and why they are so terrible. And illegal.

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And the children love the program, especially the ability to learn alongside the therapy dogs. As one Albuquerque fifth grader said, “Before this program, I didn’t know how much protection and help animals need and how many things are required to take good care of them. It’s changed my feelings. I feel closer to my dog.”

The teacher gave Anna permission to stay, and Anna sat down with Miss Sherry. “I think I finally understand something that happened to me when I was little,” Anna began. “My mom had a job that took her away from home for three days in a row, and I had to stay with my dad. Every Friday night, we went to a place where there were lots of dogs and everyone kept yelling at them. The last time we went, policemen came. My dad put his gun in my coat pocket and a policeman took him away. I had to go and stay at a house with people I didn’t know. The next day my mom came to get me.”

The program is tremendously popular and in great demand throughout the state. A comprehensive 12–week program is available for grades 3–5 and 6–8, in addition to a 4–week program created especially for Pre-K–2nd grades. There are also presentations for adults on topics such as how to safely report animal cruelty, clarification and explanations of local and state animal ordinances, The Americans with Disabilities Act, and the link between animal abuse and domestic violence.

“I was at a dog fight, wasn’t I?” Animal Protection of New Mexico’s The Animal Connection programs were developed to build compassionate animal stewardship through learning activities aligned with the Common Core Standards adopted by the New Mexico Public Education Department. Sherry Mangold, director of the programs and a retired award-winning school teacher, works with a team of educators, volunteers, and therapy dogs to engage students with experiential learning that goes far beyond the classroom. Children share with their parents what they have learned about spaying or neutering their family dog, adopting an animal, loosening a collar that hasn’t been checked in years, and, in one case, turning down an invitation to see a cock fight.

However, the programs’ reach is limited by lack of funding. “Awakening both children and adults to the compassion and responsibilities necessary to humanely care for an animal is a life– changing lesson,” Sherry explains. “It is difficult and disheartening to have to turn down requests because of lack of sponsorship.” The Animal Connection is one of the many programs of Animal Protection of New Mexico (APNM), a statewide nonprofit with offices in Santa Fe and Albuquerque, whose vision is ‘to make humane the new normal.’ Whether it’s helping rural animal shelters establish better practices, offering feed assistance to horses in need, providing safe havens for the animal victims of domestic violence so human victims can leave to safety, strengthening laws, raising funds to allow former research subject chimps to finally reach sanctuary, or working to ban cruel practices like cock fighting, dog fighting, and wildlife killing contests, APNM and its legislative arm, Animal Protection Voters, work tirelessly to change things for the better. If you want to help, consider making a donation. You can give online at apnm.org/ donate. Or contact APNM’s Chief Development Officer, Elizabeth Wolf (505.933.1123 or elizabeth@apnm.org), to find out more about giving opportunities.

Sherry notes that, throughout the program, students consistently experience revelations that involve recognizing that animals are sentient beings who not only need the same things that humans do, but are also dependent on us to provide these things for them. Sometimes, significant revelations like Anna’s occur. In these cases, cruel and neglectful behavior that was thought to be normal is now recognized through eyes of compassion as something hurtful and wrong. The program is delivered first where it’s needed most: in communities throughout the state with high rates of crime and poverty. To awaken feelings of compassion and empathy in children who have grown up in violent and dangerous environments is a vital step toward breaking the cycle of violence.

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SPORTS, REC & TRAVEL

The Landscape that Captured O’Keeffe’s Heart By Debbie Stone

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eorgia O’Keeffe—one of the most significant artists of the 20th century—is known for her paintings of bold flowers, dynamic cityscapes and lush landscapes, as well as bones and skulls set against the stark desert sky. Her images are iconic, and put her at the forefront of American Modernism. She is forever linked to New Mexico, where she spent nearly 50 years of her life finding inspiration in her surroundings. O’Keeffe owned two homes in the state; one in the village of Abiquiu about 50 miles northwest of Santa Fe, the other at Ghost Ranch just beyond Abiquiu.

head wrangler Jeff Kennedy. “We do an orientation for everyone when they come, where the wrangler demonstrates the basics of riding a horse. The other part of the orientation includes showing photographs of landscapes painted by O’Keeffe at Ghost Ranch, specifically ones that our guests will be riding through on the tour.” Wranglers are well-versed in the history of the ranch and, during the ride, they share the history of the place as it transitioned from a haven for outlaw cowboys into a guest

Those on a quest to learn more about this internationally recognized artist will often first make a stop at the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, followed by a visit to her home and studio in Abiquiu, which is open to the public for tours from March through November. Some then head further up the road to Ghost Ranch to get a feel for the scenery that provided much of the subject matter for her work. Though O’Keeffe’s house at Ghost Ranch is not open to the public, visitors can still experience the area in a number of ways ranging from hiking amid the rock cathedrals and canyons to taking the guided O’Keeffe landscape tour via motorbus. Another option is to explore this majestic mecca on horseback via an O’Keeffe landscape trail ride. Open to all skill levels (ages eight and above), the ride is offered twice a day yearround depending on weather and trail conditions, as well as at sunset twice weekly during the warmer months. No prior riding experience is necessary. “Most of our guests are beginners and a number of them have never been on a horse before,” explains Photo by Bennett Edwards

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ranch for the rich and famous and, finally, into an educational and retreat center run by the Presbyterian Church. They also describe the geology of the area and discuss the extensive archaeology and paleontology found in the Ghost Ranch Museum on site. According to Kennedy, the narration is not scripted, so each wrangler has his/her own twist on how the information is delivered. Rides are 90 minutes long and usually cover five to six miles, with sights that include the red and yellow cliffs of the Piedra Lumbre, the black trails of waterfalls against canyon walls, O’Keeffe’s beloved Cerro Pedernal, Gerald’s Tree and, of course, her house. “We do a loop around the house,” says Kennedy, “so that everyone can see what it looks like from the outside and the incredible views she had of the area.”

PEOPLE LOVE IT OUT HERE BECAUSE IT’S SO BEAUTIFUL AND THEY GET TO EXPERIENCE IT IN ON A HORSE, WHICH MAKES IT EVEN MORE SPECIAL.

SPORTS, REC & TRAVEL

Kennedy has 25 horses, mostly quarter horses with a few Tennessee Walkers and Morgans thrown in for good measure. For the majority of these creatures, Ghost Ranch is their home. “They have a good life here,” comments Kennedy. “They’re great horses—Westerntrained neck reining—and they are very responsive and safe.”

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There is a limit of six riders for the scheduled O’Keeffe trail ride. Larger groups are accommodated by advance arrangement. High season is typically summer, though Kennedy reports it has been extending into fall and late spring. “We are sold out several weeks in advance during the busiest times, which is great for us, but it is clear that the demand is increasing and we are looking at possibly adding more rides in the future,” he says. “This past year, we had approximately 2,500 people ride with us.” Kennedy feels that the popularity of the tour is due to several factors. “It’s obviously the connection to O’Keeffe that’s the draw,” he notes, “but it’s also the landscape that attracts people. There’s nothing like it. It’s dramatic with that ‘wow’ factor.” He adds, “People love it out here because it’s so beautiful and they get to experience it in on a horse, which makes it even more special.” For Kennedy, the rewards of his work are seeing and hearing the wonderful reactions of his riders: “That makes it all so worthwhile.”

For more information, visit www.GhostRanch.org.

Photo by Jamie Clifford


Expert ADVICE

WHEELS

Buying a Recreational Vehicle

TERRY ROBERTS Rocky Mountain RV & Marine 505.292.7800 12700 Central Ave SE, Albuquerque Rmrv.com

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uying a recreational vehicle is a fun and exciting time. It’s an investment in spending time with your family and friends, making memories that last a lifetime. To help alleviate some of the confusion in buying an RV, there are certain things to know and do before making a purchase.

time by narrowing down the dealer’s inventory, therefore limiting the number of units you’ll have to look at. If you visit a dealership that takes you out to the lot amongst hundreds of vehicles without taking the time to discuss these type of questions, turn and run. You will find yourself more confused than ever and will have wasted hours of valuable time.

Decide what type of RV will work best for you: motor home, fifth wheel, travel trailer, toy hauler, truck camper or fold down? Rent first if possible. This will give you firsthand experience as to what type of RV works best for you. Otherwise get out a pen and paper and write down the following: How will you mostly be using your RV, for short and local or long and extended trips? How many people will it need to accommodate? What is the tow rating of your vehicle? Where are you going to store it? What dollar amount (monthly payment or cash purchase) can you comfortably afford? Make a list of “must haves” you want in your RV, as well as a list of “don’t wants”.

Find a reputable dealership. There are hundreds of places to buy an RV, but what most people miss is that the RV is just part of the purchase. You will also be investing in the dealership. Find a dealership who will be able to support you throughout years of RV-ing. The easiest way to start is by searching their online reviews. This can be a bit misleading, as a 5-star rating from one reviewer isn’t as impressive as a 4-star rating from 30 reviewers. What dealer offers the best warranty? What dealer has the most certified technicians? What dealer offers mobile service to their customers? Most people will attest they get better service/satisfaction from locally owned family businesses than from corporate owned dealerships.

Take the answers to these questions and your lists to the dealership. This will save

Once at the dealership, first ask for a tour of the facility. This is extremely important,

WHEELS

as you will be able to see the type of support you can expect in the future. How extensive is their parts and accessory department? How clean is their service department, where your investment will be worked on? During the tour, you will get a sense of how happy the employees are; everyone knows you get better service from happy employees. You will also get a feeling of how proud your tour guide is of their place of employment; everyone knows you get better service from employees who are proud of the place they work. Lastly, an RV purchase should be enjoyable and fun. If the purchase becomes exhausting and stressful, take a step back and reevaluate where you are making that purchase.

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ONE COMPANY’S DREAM

TO POWER THE CITIES OF THE FUTURE By Emmaly Wiederholt

Every once in a while there emerges from the proverbial woodwork an upstart company with the plans, tools and technology that might actually revolutionize the world as we know it. One such company, UbiQD, is based out of Los Alamos, and is using quantum dots to rethink how we power cities.

ABOVE: Matt Bergren (Vice President), Aaron Jackson (Director of Nanocomposites), Nikolay Makarov (Director of Applied Physics), Hunter McDaniel (President), and Karthik Ramasamy (Director of Chemistry)

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he company was founded in 2014 by Hunter McDaniel as a spin-off from Los Alamos National Labs, though they’re also using licensed technology from MIT. UbiQD’s premise focuses on a class of materials known as quantum dots. Quantum dots are vanishingly small particles of semiconductor that can only be seen with an electron microscope. They have a fundamental property that allows them to absorb a large spectrum of light and then convert that energy into a single glowing color. For example, a quantum dot can absorb sunlight and release red light, though the output color can be tuned by changing the size of the particle. Because the dots can efficiently convert one spectrum of light into another, they have many applications. The most popular application of quantum dots today is in displays, i.e. monitors, smart phones, tablets and televisions. Most major screen manufacturers already have products with quantum dots on the market. However, conventional quantum dots are highly toxic, very expensive and, in some cases, unstable. They are comprised of metals like cadmium, phosphorus or lead, which are lethal and thus highly regulated. Then there’s cost; if you were to buy quantum dots, you might pay upwards of $10,000 per gram. Screen manufacturers work around these obstacles by encapsulating a tiny quantity of quantum dots in thick plastic. But for most other applications, the toxicity and expense limit the utility. Enter UbiQD, short for ubiquitous quantum dots. Though quantum dots are not new— the technology has been around for about 30 years—UbiQD is employing a new composition of quantum dots that solves some of its previous problems. First, UbiQD doesn’t create its quantum dots from metals with high toxicity; their technology uses copper, zinc and indium— all elements humans can safely be around in reasonable quantities. “We borrowed ideas from the solar industry,” McDaniel says, “because they had a lot of the same toxicity problems. There’s a popular solar material—cadmium telluride—that was too toxic to put on rooftops. It only works out in the desert on solar farms. Our material has a similar chemical structure as the cadmium-based material, but what we’ve done is swap out the cadmium with copper and indium. Together, they behave the same as cadmium.”

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Meanwhile, the materials can be produced cheaper as well. McDaniel joined LANL as a post-doc, and worked under Victor Klimov, who had been studying quantum dots for 20 years. Through a partnership with Sharp Corporation, the low-cost non-toxic alternative was developed. Perhaps the most exciting application of the technology, and the one pursued by UbiQD, is using the quantum dots as a window tint to harvest sunlight in order to generate electricity. The company’s ultimate goal is to power cities through quantum dots on the windows of skyscrapers. Barriers of entry into the skyscraper market aside, the company must first test its technology, and their model alpha testers are greenhouses. “The idea is to generate electricity from the light plants can’t use,” explains McDaniel. “Plants don’t absorb green light; they reflect it. We would place our quantum dots in the plastic rooftop of a greenhouse. The light the plants absorb best—red mainly—will pass through, and the other colors will be converted into electricity.” UbiQD is currently seeking greenhouse operators who are interested in helping test the product, and plans are underway to install quantum dots in partner greenhouses beginning in 2018. Other applications McDaniel foresees are security inks, LED lighting, luminescent paint, pharmaceutical screenings and non-destructive testing in welds. The company’s main focus, however, is windows. From greenhouses, UbiQD plans to expand its dots to commercial building windows in 2019, slowly making the technology more available. For now, UbiQD is looking for investors to support the company’s manufacturing capacity. “Glass is ubiquitous, and the need for electricity is ubiquitous,” McDaniel asserts. “We want to supply a solution that architects, building owners and tenants will all love but won’t notice, all the while still generating clean electricity. Our goal is to power the cities of the future.”

For more information, visit www.UbiQD.com. 84

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Santa Fe Wealth Advisors | Paul Maher, CRPC® | santafewealthadvisors.com | 505.428.0461

With kindness and respect, from Santa Fe Wealth Advisors Charting the path to your financial security

On the crucial journey from today through retirement, Paul Maher is the person you want at the helm…

Analyzing the world for your financial security

Your money plays a crucial role in how you and your family live and thrive, as well as in the security of your future. The decision to involve a financial advisor is just as crucial, and requires a great deal of trust.

Paul Maher seeks to build and maintain that trust with three key qualities: Transparency, Consistency & Predictability Every day the markets are open presents both risk and opportunity. Through active, daily participation, Paul ensures his clients can be confident he has their best interest in mind at all times.

TRANSPARENCY

Paul is passionate about his work, his family, and his community, and is dedicated to protecting his clients’ investments.1 Committed to keeping his practice a manageable size, Paul honors every client with daily attention to their portfolio.

CONSISTENCY

Through diligent, daily research and evaluation, Paul acts in his clients’ best interest each day their investments are exposed to market behavior. With the use of Technical Analysis and its inherent Risk Management evaluations,2 Paul stays focused on his clients’ financial goals utilizing fee-based, no-transaction-cost management programs within the highly dynamic global market environment.

PREDICTABILITY

Paul guides each portfolio’s progress with a steadfast evaluation of Risk and Opportunity across all global asset classes. With a deep understanding of the Risks and Opportunities presented within the global financial marketplace, Paul has identified factual indicators that allow him to make monetary decisions on his clients’ behalf with a high degree of certainty.

Anyone can hold the helm when the sea is calm. Partner with Paul Maher and trust Santa Fe Wealth Advisors to guide you through the ever-changing seas of today’s global financial marketplace. Reach out today for a one-on-one discussion about your investment goals. Santa Fe Wealth Advisors | Paul Maher, CRPC® santafewealthadvisors.com | 505.428.0461 1. Paul lives and works in beautiful Santa Fe, New Mexico, with his supportive wife, Briana. 2. Technical analysis is a method of evaluating securities by analyzing statistics generated by market activity, such as past prices and volume. Technical analysts do not attempt to measure a security's intrinsic value, but instead use charts and other tools to identify patterns that can suggest future activity. Paul A. Maher is a Registered Representative, offering securities through IFS Securities, LLC, Member FINRA/MSRB/ SIPC, 3414 Peachtree Rd. NE, Suite 1020, Atlanta, GA 30326 Phone: 404.382.5223

Charting the path to your financial security

Analyzing the world for your financial security


Creating Energetically Healthy Environments By Debbie Stone Photos Linda Carfagno

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ane Phillips is a trained medical intuitive, psychic, medium and paranormal investigator, as well as owner of Geyser, LLC. Her company offers a variety of energy clearing services to homeowners, real estate agents, property managers and business owners. Phillips is a Minnesota native who spent 30 years as a mortgage broker before moving to Santa Fe. She did her first “clearing” in 2010 for a real estate agent whose listing had been on the market for over 365 days. The home went under contract within a week. She has since earned recognition and a solid reputation for her services, especially within the local real estate community. “Realtors call me, either because they’ve used me successfully in the past or have heard of my work from others,” explains Phillips. “They have a property that’s been on the market for a long time and it’s just not moving. There’s something about the place that’s preventing it from getting sold. Possibly there was a death or a divorce or something negative that happened, and there are lots of emotions remaining. I go in and clear it, which typically takes about two to three hours and, often within a few weeks, the house sells.” She cites an example of a home near Dallas, TX, where a suicide had previously occurred in the garage and the real estate agent hadn’t been able to get any offers on the house. Remotely working on the residence, Phillips realized the wife, who was the one who committed suicide, hadn’t “crossed over.” After she cleared the space, the house sold in a week. Phillips utilizes a variety of tools in the performance of her work, including dowsing rods, bobbers and

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pendulums. She is able to clear properties from a distance with the aid of Google Maps, a floor plan, and the names of the individuals living in the residence. She describes: “I do this more and more, as it can be just as effective and takes less time than if I were to make an in-person visit. By working remotely, I am able to clear properties all over the United States.”

I’M PASSIONATE ABOUT CLEARING THE ENERGIES AROUND PEOPLE AND THEIR PROPERTIES TO ALLOW FOR A BETTER LIVING EXPERIENCE

Homeowners who have hired Phillips testify to the efficacy of her skills. They note their houses feel better, they’re more comfortable in the space—less afraid or nervous—and the energy surrounding them has positively shifted. Some tell her they’re able to sleep more easily and their animals are happier. For real estate agents, the result may be a sale and, for business owners, an increase in customers and sales. Says Phillips: “I’m confident in what I do after all these years of work in the field. I am able to clear a variety of energetic issues. I’m passionate about clearing the energies around people and their properties to allow for a better living experience.”

Geyser Energy Clearing Services 505.919.8379 PO Box 22519 Santa Fe, NM 87502 www.GhostBusting.org

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Expert ADVICE

Kate Rollins Kate Rollins Web Design, LLC (website design, SEO & SMM) 888.242.1773 www.KateWebDesign.com

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f a website developer tells you that WordPress is not the right platform for your website, my advice is to lose their number. They are failing to provide good web design service by depriving their clients of value and cost-efficiency. WordPress is the most popular content management system, and has matured immensely over the past 15 years. You will be hard pressed to find something you can't do in WordPress today. This platform integrates great design with top online marketing tools through third party plugins (software tools), and is much more user-friendly, versatile and less vulnerable than its main competitors, Joomla and Drupal.

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Why You Should Build Your Website in WordPress

Before WordPress, web designers had to create composition designs in Photoshop, based on what the client desired in terms of appearance. If the client was not impressed, we kept creating. We live in a fast paced world, and while money may not be an issue for some businesses, time always is. Most of my clients are either on a budget or need their website ready yesterday—which makes going with a “custom,” entirely php-coded website, rather than with a ready-to-go, highly customizable, premium Wordpress theme, simply unnecessary. With tens of thousands of beautifully designed themes and more than 48,000 plugins for every function you need, WordPress is the perfect solution for any website, not just for blogs (as in its infancy years). It takes a fraction of the time and price to build a website in WordPress, compared to doing it from scratch. Its open-source format allows developers to reprogram and customize it to do pretty much anything anyone needs. I can use one well-developed, flexible theme to create very different websites, as I customize each to reflect my client’s branding and marketing goals. Can anyone in possession of undaunted computer savvy create a website in Wordpress? If you are aiming for a mediocre final result, the answer is yes. If your goal is to express the uniqueness of your brand and stand out from your competition with beautiful design and impeccable performance, don’t waste your time; hire a professional web designer. In a nutshell, WordPress is your best choice because it is: RESPONSIVE (choose a responsive theme) USER friendly (choose an experienced web developer to ensure this)

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B W

SEO friendly (choose a developer who is a marketing specialist) CUSTOMIZABLE (your theme needs to be modified to reflect your brand identity) FLEXIBLE (choose a good theme) SECURED (use hack defense and backup plugins) E-COMMERCE friendly SELF-MANAGEABLE (you have full control and can update your website inhouse) POWERFUL (there’s a plugin for everything!) Your website is an essential part of your branding and needs to be updated and maintained on a regular basis, and to change as your business changes. A wellchosen, flexible WordPress theme will allow you to adapt the look and functions of your website right along with your changing marketing goals. Kate's photo by Daniel Quat


Expert ADVICE

What’s Smarter Paying Off Debts or Investing?

Bob Graham

Financial Advisor Edward Jones Investments 510 N. Guadalupe Street, Suite L Santa Fe Office 505.820.0076 Toll Free 866.830.0076 bob.graham@edwardjones.com www.edwardjones.com | | |

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f you’re just starting out in your career, you will need to be prepared to face some financial challenges along the way—but here’s one that’s not unpleasant: choosing what to do with some extra disposable income. When this happens, what should you do with the money? Your decisions could make a real difference in your ability to achieve your important financial goals. Under what circumstances might you receive some “found” money? You could get a year-end bonus from your employer, or a sizable tax refund, or even an inheritance. However the money comes to you, don’t let it “slip through your fingers.” Instead, consider these two moves: investing the money or using it to pay off debts. Which of these choices should you pick? There’s

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no one “right” answer, as everyone’s situation is different. But here are a few general considerations: • Distinguish between “good” and “bad” debt. Not all types of debt are created equal. Your mortgage, for example, is probably a “good” form of debt. You’re using the loan for a valid purpose – i.e., living in your house – and you likely get a hefty tax deduction for the interest you pay. On the other hand, nondeductible consumer debt that carries a high interest rate might be considered “bad” debt—and this is the debt you might want to reduce or eliminate when you receive some extra money. By doing so, you can free up money to save and invest for retirement or other goals. • Compare making extra mortgage payments vs. investing. Many of us get some psychological benefits by making extra house payments. Yet, when you do have some extra money, putting it toward your house may not be the best move. For one thing, as mentioned above, your mortgage can be considered a “good” type of debt, so you may not need to rush to pay it off. And from an investment standpoint, your home is somewhat “illiquid”— it’s not always easy to get money out of it. If you put your extra money into traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds, you may increase your growth potential, and you may gain

BUSINESS

an income stream through interest payments and dividends. • Consider tax advantages of investing. Apart from your mortgage, your other debts likely won’t provide you with any tax benefits. But you can get tax advantages by putting money into certain types of investment vehicles, such as a traditional or Roth IRA. When you invest in a traditional IRA, your contributions may be deductible, depending on your income, and your money grows on a tax-deferred basis. (Keep in mind that taxes will be due upon withdrawals, and any withdrawals you make before you reach 59 and a half may be subject to a 10 percent IRS penalty.) Roth IRA contributions are not deductible, but your earnings are distributed tax-free, provided you don’t take withdrawals until you reach 59 and a half, and you’ve had your account for at least five years. Clearly, you’ve got some things to ponder when choosing whether to use extra money to pay off debts or invest. Of course, it’s not always an “either-or” situation; you may be able to tackle some debts and still invest for the future. In any case, use this money wisely—you weren’t necessarily counting on it, but you can make it count for you. This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.




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Lisa Samuel ASID, IIDA, NMLID #313 607 Cerrillos Road, Suite A 505.820.0239





Santa Fe, NM 87505

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607 CERRILLOS RD., SUITE A samueldesigngroup.com TOLL FREE 844.284.6999 | STUDIO 505.820.0239 SAMUELDESIGNGROUP.COM



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