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devil’s advocate stanton college preparatory school

Your vote. Your voice. Our future.

The2012

MOCK

ELECTION

How 742 people at Stanton cast a vote for the next president of the United States of America. By AUVION BRADSHAW

no. 1 | november 2012 devilsadvocatepaper.blogspot.com

TS L U

E H T

S E R

E R A

! N I


devil’s advocate

Production Staff Adviser Larry Knight

Official Publication of Stanton College Preparatory School | no. 1 | november 2012

Editor-in-Chief Alexandra Morgante Managing Editor Leah Quisenberry

DIY Crafts Pinterest is a well known as a do-it-yourself craft central. We found some popular crafts and put together some simple steps for you to try them too!

PAGE 05

Section Editors Alexis Brown (Opinions) Kia’ Cooper (Features) Taylor Galloway (Sports) Laura Gerbec (Student Life) Kathryn McMullen (Photography)

#OnlyAtStanton

PAGE 06

Reporters Sanaa Belkaich Auvion Bradshaw Ryan Carter Samantha Foss Manya Goldstein Emily Iseley Savannah Mika Kyle Sanchez

The Devil’s Advocate tracked the hashtag #OnlyAtStanton on Twitter and we included your tweets!

Results of the Mock Election

Contributing Writers Elliott Beale Mendel Goldstein Rachel Jaffe Jonathan Kemp Matthew McKetty

Seven hundred and forty-two Stanton students, teachers and staff members participated in the 2012 Mock Election. Will it be Barack Obama? Will it be Mitt Romney? In this issue we have the statistics, student quotes and more.

PAGE 08

PAGE 11

A profile piece on juniors Adam and Paul Genners and their journey to success through baseball.

Coping with Losing

Stanton’s sports teams have experienced much heartache and much triumph this year. Reporter Ryan Carter takes a look at how different athletes take a loss.

PAGE 12

PAGE 15

devilsadvocatepaper.blogspot.com

Liberal vs. Conservative Sophomore Matthew McKetty and junior Mendel Goldstein discuss the differences of the two presidential candidates.

In this issue of the Devil’s Advocate, the staff worked together to showcase the results of our 2012 Mock Election. The election gave the students who aren’t old enough to vote, a chance to express their opinion. The election of our future president is important for all of us to consider because they are the spokesperson of our future. I hope that everyone who participated, especially in the national election, took their true values into consideration (you can check out some student’s views in the Opinions section). In addition to the results, we included a variety of other stories. Incorporating our fellow students into the paper is a big addition. You might notice in the Student Life section, we have a section titled #OnlyAtStanton. This is for all of my fellow tweeters to get involved by tweeting things that kids “only at Stanton” would understand. We are always looking for contributing writers and new ideas. Let us know if you’re looking for a chance to voice your opinion or if you’d like to make a suggestion for future story ideas! photo by Kathryn McMullen

The Genner Double Play

Editor’s Note

Contributing Advocates: The Devil’s Advocate is searching for contributing writers, photographers, and artists. Contact Alexandra Morgante at aleemorgante@gmail.com. Ads and Sponsorships: The Devil’s Advocate is dependant on our advetisers and our sponsors. When you purchase an ad with us, it reaches a diverse student population that can help your business. We can also design your ads. Our prices are: $25 (1/4 page), $50 (1/2 page), $75 (insert), $100 (full page b/w), or $150 (back page color). Contact Leah Quisenberry at leahquiz@gmail.com, or Mr. Knight at knightl1@ duvalschools.org. Printed at Florida Sun Printing, Callahan, Fla.

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Focused on the Future By SAMANTHA FOSS, Student Life Reporter

From a very young age children are asked who they want to be when they grow up. Most respond with the typical professions: firefighter, ballerina, astronaut, maybe even a cowboy. These are usually childhood fantasies due to imagination and TV. As they start becoming young adults the questions start becoming more straight forward. Parents, teachers and counselors are normally asking students about their dreams and goals, what they want to become in life. Often, the question students are faced with is “where do you see yourself in ten years from now?” Many teenagers have to pause and think about that question for a moment. A vast majority of them may be thinking of how they’re going to perform on their next chemistry test or if they will be the starting quarterback in the next football game. Most of them are unsure about what their plans are when it comes to their future. “I am still indecisive, but I am leaning toward pediatrics,” said senior Arunsrinivasan Poshunmugam. Others however see a bigger picture for themselves in life, imagining a future of where they would like to be, and make their professions and goals their number one priority. “Playing in the Barcelona Stadium with everyone screaming my name in the stands, and making the winning goal,” said Kyle Beluscak, a sophomore at Stanton and self-described soccer fanatic. When Beluscak looks into his future he sees himself as a soccer star and role model to many kids around the world. His drive stems from playing for Stanton’s soccer team and also for Jacksonville Fury, a local club team. He motivates himself by pushing to play perfect games and always trying his best in practice.

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Due to its great academic reputation for being a top college preparatory school, enrolling in Stanton is an opportunity for all of its students. Many feel attending the school provides them with a good education, superior preparation for college, and a solid chance to achieve their future goals. Ninety-eight percent of Stanton’s 2012 graduates went to college, which is evidence of the excelled education Stanton provides their students and how it is beneficial to them when applying for college. Seniors at Stanton strive to go to the best schools in the nation; when senior year comes they realize that all the stress, long nights of studying and endless piles of homework have paid off. They have acquired skills that enable them to attend the best schools in the nation, such as Boston University, University of Florida, Duke University or Florida State University. Students are also inspired by their parents, and what colleges they may have attended, or what professions they have pursued, and want to follow in their parents footsteps. “My parents are environmental engineers and seeing what they do for a living, it also gave me the passion to pursue it,” said junior Logan Smith. While Smith strives toward his goal he faces challenges along the way. “Obstacles in my way are my academics and my schedule, with soccer and school it’s difficult to do well.” Sports are also and important factor in students’ futures, they may see themselves more as an athlete. While still keeping up their grades, some students may see themselves as the star wide receiver, or some may have a goal to pitch a no-hitter game.

Do It Yourself

“I see myself as a professional baseball player in ten years, hopefully playing for the Philadelphia Phillies,” said Keenan Bell, a freshman, who plans to play for Stanton’s baseball team in the spring. Bell’s inspiration is Derek Jeter, a shortstop for the New York Yankees who has played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball. “He is a successful interracial baseball player who gives me confidence to achieve my passion, and love for baseball,” said Bell. Some people want an athletic career and others see themselves in a business environment. Junior Zoë Mignone aspires to be a lawyer, however her dream of attending Columbia University is challenged by her GPA. “I don’t think I can get into my dream school because my GPA will likely not meet the requirements,” said Mignone. Most people have to overcome several obstacles when pursuing of their dreams. Students set higher goals for themselves, to achieve life long pursuits. “Financially, going to Boston will be difficult, but it’s the best school,” said Jamie McNulty, a senior who dreams of going to Boston University and pursuing a degree in physical therapy. In ten years many things can change; most people have to overcome several obstacles to achieve their dreams. A child may fantasize about being a super hero and saving the world, then eventually grows up to be a doctor and saves lives everyday. Childhood dreams may evolve into something bigger, something that will help decide choices you make and professions you take on. Dream big, life has many opportunities to take advantage of.

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You w eadb and ill Fabri need: c stri One of our favorite pastimes is browsing Pinterest p Head and picking out crafts we’d love to do, but how many ba A ma rush F abric nd b t t 1 n . Fold of us get around to them? Here are four of our staff glue Pain dark pai the e the nd of inted favorites, made easy for the busy Stanton lifestyle. a n i p f o e l w d the fa end o ob Glo br ady t f the he nd re fabric ic strip in t a k n 2 c a i . e fl h S l strip t c d a s r t to r , an it i to m alf and glu oll th paint ake a ar so e j k r n a G e o d lue th tight, together fabric mas the t n i u e s r a m o a r l j w a o all ce . then yers sh he glo nter toget und the c 3. Lea 1. Wa sh in d inside t u r h e b v e n e abo r per ter tw lors aint sh aroun o p c l i u l o i a e t s d r ti 2 inc ically bru a sm o mo hes o secur ng as you tom 2. Dip f fabr ith tw e flow go. o w f o t i h c w e flow . Glue 4. Cu er ep t t t s t h e t g t e i r h a x e and t cess rn pe o the fabric ov fabric y ove 3. Re er to dr headb off of w o l l and. the botthe b 4. A o t t om a headb nd and, l et dr glue the y flowe Frin r to t ge S he c

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By SAVANNAH MIKA, Student Life Reporter

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photos from Pinterest

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student life / november 2012 / 5


The Teenage Workforce: Stanton’s Student Employees By SANAA BELKAICH, Student Life Reporter

Jobs in high school are becoming more and more of a trend, and although some people may argue that having a job teaches responsibility, there is the consequence of students focusing more on the job than on school and homework. With 7.8 percent of Americans unemployed, according to the September job report, high schoolers often have no choice but to get a job. The benefits for having a student job is that students learn responsibility and skills that will help them in the real world and they can pay for college. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, 50 percent of American teenagers hold informal jobs, such as babysitting or yard work, by age 12. The average high school student works 20 hours per week, about 10 percent work full time, 35 hours or more, according to Middle Earth, a website that educates students on youth adulthood. One Stanton student, sophomore Zachary Stevens, works as a lifeguard at Naval Air Station Jacksonville base pool. During the summer Stevens works 35 hours a week; during school, he works 10 hours. “I really enjoy my job, because you are always working together and making good friends. The one thing I don’t like is always worrying about the stress of someone dying while you’re on duty,” said Stevens. Another Stanton student with a job is junior Kate Jordan. She has been working at a concession stand at the Westside Soccer Club for a year and a half and she works 16 hours a week. “It’s a soccer club I used to play for so I get to see my friends, but it’s awful that some people need to sort their priorities,” said Jordan, who deals with the struggle of doing work for school and having to handle a job. “Because I work, I’ve learned how to time manage and some nights I’ve definitely had to stay up to catch up for the time I’ve spent working,” said Jordan. The minimum work age requirement in Florida for teens is 14 and the number of hours is also limited for teens under the age of 16. Teenagers that are 14 through 15 may work

three hours a day during school weeks and eight hours during non-school weeks. For 16 through 17, they may work four hours on school days and up to eight on weekends and no more than 30 hours a week during the school year, according to Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. Stanton senior Umbar Malik works at Hollister in the St. Johns Town Center and has learned many lessons about how to manage her time and help out customers. Malik said the primary thing her first job has taught her is the importance of responsibility. “Every time I go shopping, I consider how long it took me to earn the money and how hard I worked for it,” said Malik, who also mentioned her favorite thing is meeting new people and helping them pick out clothes. “The job I enjoy the most is working the register because it keeps me occupied,” said Malik, who also added that on slow business days her job can get boring and she can get very exhausted. “There isn’t a single second I get to sit down unless I’m working after hours to close down the store. When I first started, I thought it would be a super easy job but I always come home craving my bed,” said Malik. She also learned how to manage her time by working on the weekends and not letting it interfere with school work. “My parents initially wanted me to quit my job when school started but luckily I learned to balance school and work by only working weekend shifts,” said Malik. This helps her balance her school and work life. According to Snagajob, a website that helps young people like Malik balance work and school life, students who work should make a schedule and stick to it. They can do this by finding a job that has a flexible schedule to fit their time. This helps students prioritize and they can stick to what is planned and not get distracted. Once students get into a habit of their schedule, it helps them keep that balance.

#OnlyAtStanton

Finding a balance between school and a job benefits students when they complete a resume or college application. When students can maintain a job, while maintaining their grades, it shows motivation and dedication. According to Colby-Sawyer, a website that helps youth fill in their college resumes, students should include their experiences that have been done paid or unpaid and tell where, along with outlining the skills and accomplishments they have gained. Plus, describing the activities can show leadership skills on what is being done and outlining strengths and weaknesses. Overall, having a job has its pros and cons. It helps students develop skills such as responsibility and motivates them for the future; however, sometimes they tend to put too much focus on the job and it takes an unhealthy toll on their grades.

Stanton Statistics The Devil’s Advocate took a random sample of 100 students at school about their job status and hours worked per week. Do you have a formal job? (i.e. not babysitting, lawn care, etc.) 2% 9th

70% No

30% Yes

7% 10th 8% 11th 13% 12th

Out of the sample taken, 30% of the Stanton students hold a formal job, including a number of freshmen and sophomores, who are typically under the age of 16. The percent increases with the grade, when students turn 16 and more job opportunities are available.

How many hours do you work per week? The sample survey showed that during the school year, students with jobs typically average between zero to 10 work hours per week, but surprisingly showed that the second most common average was between 25 to 30 hours per week.

16% 25-30 hours 6% 15-20 hours 14% 10-15 hours

64% 0-10 hours

4 day ago #OnlyAtStanton do we check our grade portals multiple times per day

@OnlyAtStanton

Tweet #OnlyAtStanton for a chance for your tweet to be featured in the next issue of the Devil’s Advocate.

12 minutes ago @OnlyAtStanton are there more kids playing four square than basketball in gym

5 days ago @OnlyAtStanton do people skip class to go to the library

5 days ago @OnlyAtStanton do you have more tests in one day than classes

6 days ago #OnlyAtStanton do people say YOLO for homework 2 days ago To show school spirit at a pep rally a flag was made out of AP World notecards

2 days ago #OnlyAtStanton is it okay to have a backpack either equally the size of you or bigger

6 / devil’s advocate / student life

7 days ago @OnlyAtStanton are notecards worth more than money


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2012 Mock Election Results

*Obama

Voters

Gender

Gender Percentage

By AUVION BRADSHAW, Features Reporter

There was a total of 742 participants in the 2012 Devil’s Advocate Mock Election, this number -

Voting has always been an essential function for shaping our society. Because voters decide the future, it is important to be involved in the election process. That’s where young voters come in. The youth is vital to politics which is why they need to become involved. Acknowledging the importance of the presidency and election process Recently, Stanton students and faculty participated in the mock election to choose the winner of the 2012 Presidential Election. The candidates for president are Republican candidate and former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney and Democratic President Barack Obama. improve the state of our economy which included cutting taxes and enhancing health care for families. Also, President Obama has accounted for eliminating malicious threats to the country such as Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden. Overall his plan is to essentially create an economy built to last. Gov. Romney’s platform, however, focuses on economic recovery by planning to carry out the tasks of cutting federal spending, and bringing social security reform.Voters used these

President Barack Obama differing platforms on major issues to help make their decision on who they felt deserved to be the next president. The mock election results reveal how students and faculty are likely to vote based on their preference. This condensed election process served as a laid-out model for today’s national elections.

Republican nominee Mitt Romney. Out of the 687 student voters and 55 faculty voters, 58 percent of the votes were for President Obama. Amongst the student population, President Obama maintained the lead in votes for every grade level during the mock election despite the close calculation of 87-71 votes from the senior class. Surprisingly, only 67 of the 158 senior participants are registered voters which shows only 42 percent were eligible to vote in the nationwide election at the time of the mock election. However, President Obama’s lead was the greatest in the freshmen class with a difference of 43 votes, although the total votes between every grade level averaged to 29. According to the faculty voters, members of staff from every department exceeded Romney’s votes regardless of the few votes in his favor. With only 18 Romney votes accumulated out of the12 total departments, faculty and staff elected President Obama. The following, data is separated by gender, ethnicity, grade level, and Honors and IB.

Romney Voters

33%

Juniors

67%

8 / devil’s advocate / features

Obama Voters

38 M

44 %

48 F

55 %

35 M

32 %

73 F

67 %

32 M

36 %

55 F

63 %

White Black Asian Latino Multiracial

40 33 8 10

White 19 Black 32 Asian 21 Latino 7 Multiracial 7 White 28 44 Black Asian 22 Latino 5 Multiracial 9 White Black Asian Latino Multiracial

Romney Voters

27

23 39 19 3 4

43% 57%

Obama Voters

Honors Voters Romney Voters

*Romney

Gender

Gender Percentage

40 M

52 %

36 F

47 %

Freshmen

35 M

51 %

33 F

48 %

45 M

62 %

Sophomores

Juniors 27 F

Seniors

Obama Voters

63 %

Seniors

42% 58%

76 F

Sophomores

Faculty Votes

Romney Voters

36 %

Freshmen

Voters

Cumulative School Votes

43 M

I.B. Voters

Ethnicity / Race

37 %

39 M

54 %

32 F

45 %

Ethnicity / Race White Black Asian Latino Multiracial

53 4 12 2 4

White Black Asian Latino Multiracial White Black Asian Latino Multiracial

53 1 8 2 4 55 2 7 6 2

White 49 Black 6 Asian 1 Latino 8 Multiracial 7

41%

59%

Obama Voters

*Key M=Males F=Females

** All 2012 Mock Election views and statistics DO NOT represent the views of Mr. Knight or the Devil’s Advocate staff. All data is based on the student and faculty votes. features / november2012 / 9


2012 Mock Election Results

*Obama

Voters

Gender

Gender Percentage

By AUVION BRADSHAW, Features Reporter

There was a total of 742 participants in the 2012 Devil’s Advocate Mock Election, this number -

Voting has always been an essential function for shaping our society. Because voters decide the future, it is important to be involved in the election process. That’s where young voters come in. The youth is vital to politics which is why they need to become involved. Acknowledging the importance of the presidency and election process Recently, Stanton students and faculty participated in the mock election to choose the winner of the 2012 Presidential Election. The candidates for president are Republican candidate and former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney and Democratic President Barack Obama. improve the state of our economy which included cutting taxes and enhancing health care for families. Also, President Obama has accounted for eliminating malicious threats to the country such as Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden. Overall his plan is to essentially create an economy built to last. Gov. Romney’s platform, however, focuses on economic recovery by planning to carry out the tasks of cutting federal spending, and bringing social security reform.Voters used these

President Barack Obama differing platforms on major issues to help make their decision on who they felt deserved to be the next president. The mock election results reveal how students and faculty are likely to vote based on their preference. This condensed election process served as a laid-out model for today’s national elections.

Republican nominee Mitt Romney. Out of the 687 student voters and 55 faculty voters, 58 percent of the votes were for President Obama. Amongst the student population, President Obama maintained the lead in votes for every grade level during the mock election despite the close calculation of 87-71 votes from the senior class. Surprisingly, only 67 of the 158 senior participants are registered voters which shows only 42 percent were eligible to vote in the nationwide election at the time of the mock election. However, President Obama’s lead was the greatest in the freshmen class with a difference of 43 votes, although the total votes between every grade level averaged to 29. According to the faculty voters, members of staff from every department exceeded Romney’s votes regardless of the few votes in his favor. With only 18 Romney votes accumulated out of the12 total departments, faculty and staff elected President Obama. The following, data is separated by gender, ethnicity, grade level, and Honors and IB.

Romney Voters

33%

Juniors

67%

8 / devil’s advocate / features

Obama Voters

38 M

44 %

48 F

55 %

35 M

32 %

73 F

67 %

32 M

36 %

55 F

63 %

White Black Asian Latino Multiracial

40 33 8 10

White 19 Black 32 Asian 21 Latino 7 Multiracial 7 White 28 44 Black Asian 22 Latino 5 Multiracial 9 White Black Asian Latino Multiracial

Romney Voters

27

23 39 19 3 4

43% 57%

Obama Voters

Honors Voters Romney Voters

*Romney

Gender

Gender Percentage

40 M

52 %

36 F

47 %

Freshmen

35 M

51 %

33 F

48 %

45 M

62 %

Sophomores

Juniors 27 F

Seniors

Obama Voters

63 %

Seniors

42% 58%

76 F

Sophomores

Faculty Votes

Romney Voters

36 %

Freshmen

Voters

Cumulative School Votes

43 M

I.B. Voters

Ethnicity / Race

37 %

39 M

54 %

32 F

45 %

Ethnicity / Race White Black Asian Latino Multiracial

53 4 12 2 4

White Black Asian Latino Multiracial White Black Asian Latino Multiracial

53 1 8 2 4 55 2 7 6 2

White 49 Black 6 Asian 1 Latino 8 Multiracial 7

41%

59%

Obama Voters

*Key M=Males F=Females

** All 2012 Mock Election views and statistics DO NOT represent the views of Mr. Knight or the Devil’s Advocate staff. All data is based on the student and faculty votes. features / november2012 / 9


Political Viewpoints

Obama’s Stanton Votes: Then and Now *Key M=Males F=Females

Freshmen

Sophomores

Juniors

Seniors

Total Gender Votes 2008

2012

2008

2012

102 M

76 M

62 %

64 %

62 F

43 F

38 %

36 %

48 M

38 M

34%

44 %

94 F

33 F

66 %

56 %

43 M

35 M

38 %

32 %

70 F

73 F

62 %

68 %

33 M

32 M

36 %

37 %

59 F

56 F

In Issue #2 of the 2008-2009 Devil’s Advocate, the mock election results presented President Obama as the winner. Similar to this year’s outcome, he managed to secure a majority of the votes under every grade level and maintain sufficient leads in most areas. President Obama received more than 50 percent of votes this year and in 2008. Statistically, his votes accounted for 57 percent of students. In 2008, 56 percent of students who participated were female voters with majority of overall votes coming from the freshmen class; a trend that was evident in the 2012 Mock Election as well. Moreover, throughout the last 12 years, more voter tendencies were revealed within the outcome of the mock elections. Since 2000, there have been four mock elections held at Stanton and each time the student participa-

By the Numbers: The History of Stanton’s Mock Elections

10 / devil’s advocate / features

Total Votes

Gender Percents

64 %

63 %

2008

164

142

2012

119

86

113

108

92

87

tion has decreased; in 2000 there was 943 total votes accounted for, whereas this year’s mock election only reached 687 votes. Every mock election since 2000 revealed the democratic candidate as the winner, with the exception of the 2004 race between Sen. John Kerry and Republican nominee George W. Bush. In that election Bush received the majority of the votes. The Stanton Mock Election has revealed the winner of the popular vote in the last four presidential elections. Although Al Gore won the popular vote in 2000, Bush won the electoral college votes and was re-elected in 2004. President Obama was elected in 2008 but his chances for serving a second term will be determined in today’s election.

“The youth are the leaders of our generation. If we are not aware of the world then we aren’t prepared to be leaders.” -Omar Hebeishy, 10th “I think we need to be educated about who we are going to vote for, for the president when we actually are able to vote.” -Sarah Ratliff, 12th “We’re growing up and we’re supposed to be aware of the importance of voting and understand how it works. Since most of the people at school are about to be legal adults, I think they play a bigger role in who gets elected and that’s major for our society.” -Justin Brinkley, 11th “The election process is important to the youth because it provides them an opportunity to voice themselves and their ideas in a world where youth isn’t always taken seriously.” -Alex Story, 1lth “It’s

important because the person who will be the better candidate will help me with financial assistance for college.” -Jaden Durity, 11th

For more student quotes visit our website: www. devilsadvocatepaper.blogspot.com

2000 Mock Election

2004 Mock Election

2008 Mock Election

2012 Mock Election

Bush: 313 votes, 33% Gore: 414 votes, 44%

Bush: 440 votes, 56% Kerry: 305 votes, 39%

McCain: 372 votes, 42% Obama: 511 votes, 58%

Obama: 400 votes, 58% Romney: 287 votes, 41%

Total number of votes: 943

Total number votes: 791

Total number of votes: 884

Total number votes: 687

*does not include third party candidates

*does not include third party candidates

*less than 1% was third party

*does not include faculty/staff votes


The Genners Double Play Twins Paul and Adam Genners not only share their looks, they also share a love for baseball. This love has helped them make a name for themselves both on and off the field.

photo by Alexandra Morgante

By EMILY ISELEY, Sports Reporter

It was on a Thursday night this past spring that Stanton made history, a night when the stadium lights illuminated the diamond floor of clay and freshly cut green grass. By the ninth inning, it was 3-2 and Stanton only needed one more out to claim the title of District Champion. A batter uniformed with the purple and gold of the Columbia Tigers stepped up to bat. The ball was pitched and the sound of aluminum bat greeting baseball cracked through the air. This ball would determine the game. Anticipation hung in the air, gravity dropped the ball into the right field gap where it was caught in a dive by Stanton sophomore Paul Genners. The next week the varsity baseball team made history again. In the regional quarterfinal match, the Blue Devil’s faced off against Tallahassee Leon. The game remained tied 3-3 until the bottom of the ninth inning, when Stanton sophomore Adam Genners hit the winning RBI (runs batted in) that claimed Stanton’s first postseason victory. The Genners’ roles in those final plays served as the game changers that moved the baseball team further into the playoffs than Stanton had ever been before. Unfortunately, the next game’s outcome was not a victory. Now that both Adam and Paul are juniors, this year’s season is expected to turn out even more successful. Besides the numbers on the back of their jerseys, few features set the Genners apart. It seems the identical twins not only share appearances, but also a talent for the game of baseball.

Joining the varsity team their freshman year, the twins have made themselves prominent athletes in the region. Earlier this school year, the Genners’ talents took them out of the region when they were chosen to represent the region of North Florida in the 17U National Trials in North Carolina. Playing since the age of five, baseball has become somewhat of a career for Adam and Paul. In order to meet the high level of competition from their peers, the Genners need to constantly train to improve their fitness level and playing skills. “I train year-round because baseball is a year-round sport,” said Adam Genners. Outside of school, the twins have been playing for travel teams such as the Jacksonville Whitecaps and Team North Florida. Playing competitively for high-leveled teams like these requires extra practice and dedication. “I do something every day,” said Paul Genners. “Whether it’s the gym or hitting 100 balls off the tee.” Competing at a high level is only one difficulty Paul and Adam are facing. Going to Stanton also means there are bigger demands to perform well academically. Despite these obligations, the main reason the twins came to Stanton is for academics. Balancing dreams for both their sport and school, they hope for a way to combine the two. Although getting into a college with both a good educational program and baseball team is difficult, the Genners are not backing down.

“I have never been persuaded to give up,” said Paul. “I have played with a broken wrist before!” Although giving up isn’t option for the the Genners, Adam is currently experiencing a minor setback. Last November, he injured a vertebrae in his spine, a result of his swing when playing baseball. Although the injury hasn’t crippled him enough to keep him from the game, he’s had to go through physical therapy for almost a year. Unfortunately, his spine has gotten worse after playing in North Carolina in August, so physical therapy has become something he goes to every week. Despite this, he isn’t too worried about the setback. “I’ll definitely be recovered enough for this year’s season,” said Adam. The Genners’ interest in baseball is part of a family legacy. Along with Paul and Adam, their two older brothers Chris and Nick, as well as their father, all have been involved with baseball. “My brothers and my dad both used to play. I wanted to be like them so I started playing and turned out loving it,” said Paul. Some credit for the Genner’s success in baseball can be given to their family. “My parents pay for all the showcases and tournaments. Plus they are both willing to go to the fields to practice with me when I want to. Which is rare,” said Paul Genners. Paul and Adam aren’t just known for being talented baseball players, they are also viewed in high regard by their peers. The two Stanton juniors have a reputation for their easy friendships and sense of humor.

“I always see Paul as the fun baby type and Adam more mature, but they both have a way of making people laugh,” said junior Kelyana Chau. Apart from baseball and friends, the Genners spend time helping the community by volunteering. Paul’s volunteer services have been spent at various charity runs like Relay for Life and MS Mud Run, as well as being the camp counselor at Sabal Palm Elementary. An inevitable factor on being on the same team with your twin brother is sibling rivalry. “I hate losing to him!” said Adam. Despite their competitive attitudes, the twins have each other’s back. “Adam comes through every time for me and the team. If a ball is hit to him, I don’t even watch the whole play anymore. I can count on him to drive me in and make plays,” said Paul. With the Genners now juniors at Stanton, expectations for this year’s baseball team are high. “I’m expecting big things,” said Paul. “We have a talented team full of hard workers.” Whether they are on Stanton’s campus or the baseball fields, Adam and Paul Genners have made themselves prominent athletes, friends, and students. Their ability to thrive, as well as have fun, in baseball, school, or just life in general is what places them above average teenagers. Being twins doesn’t make Adam and Paul any more average, in fact, the two athletes determination has made them somewhat of a double-play. sports / november 2012 /11


Sidelines: Favoritism on the Field By TAYLOR GALLOWAY, Sports Editor

photo by Kathryn McMullen

Coping with Losing By RYAN CARTER, Sports Reporter

photo by Kathryn McMullen

Losing is something that every athlete has to face, but how they deal with the inevitable must be learned on their own.

To an athlete the most hated thing is losing; the pure fear of defeat causes them to work as hard as they can in order to avoid it. When an athlete is faced with a loss it can be devastating and this pain can only be medicated by one thing, winning. Losing can be motivational for some athletes. Whether it’s the idea of losing to a team or even an individual. “Losing motivates me to do better and push my limits, I never want to hold back because holding back is what makes you lose,” said junior diver Lizzy Tillo. Holding back because of poor preparation can also be a heavy weight on an athlete’s mind. “I blame myself because I want to do as well as I can. Even if I technically won, I still feel like I lost when I don’t do my personal best. The win isn’t satisfying when you haven’t done something to the best of your ability.” Her thoughts are shared by many athletes, but there are other aspects of coping with losing and how athlete’s deal with it. Athletes cope with losing in various ways; some become motivated and others get discouraged. “We use it as fuel,” said senior Megan Federico. “ Winning feels better and that makes it worth the extra effort to win.” This may be the case for many athletes because losing is not something that can be taken to heart, but instead personal. “Whenever I saw we were losing I just knew we had to get better,” said junior wrestler Josh Briones who also gave his insight from the helpless experiences of watching his teammates both excel and fail from beside the mat. “Watching my teammates lose hurt, it made me realize that winning is worth everything it takes.” Learning from losses is just as important as using them for motivation to some athletes. “You can learn from your mistakes and what you can improve on,” said freshman baseball player Vincent Wong. Some athletes take losing very negatively and instead of using it as motivation to get better they go into a tailspin. This can be seen when a pitcher gets frustrated because he walked a batter, and instead of moving on from it he continues to get frustrated and miss the strike zone. Another example is when a quarterback throws an interception, gets antsy and then throws a few more interceptions.

12 / devil’s advocate / sports

Losing not only involves losing a game, athletes can lose individual plays, and this can lead to more mistakes and cause frustration. Athletes also have the option of taking losing in stride and begin to focus on the next game or match. “I keep on going, there really isn’t any reason to focus on what could have been done when there’s another game to play next week,” said freshmen football player Jiles Gober. Others do not necessarily take losing harshly, but are just impartial to it. “I’m fine with it, I just don’t prefer it,” said sophomore soccer player Dino Savvidis. Athletes like Savvidis choose to be calm and collected, as opposed to fiery and out of control when they try to come back from a loss. Team athletics allow the coping of losing to come more easily. “This is harder to do in an individual sport, but absolutely crucial in a team sport.” said eHow contributing writer Ty Wright in a 2011 article entitled, “How to Help Children Deal with Losing.” Losing is something to be learned from, but blame is not something that should be passed around because of a loss. “Don’t assign blame to anyone. Don’t get down on yourself. If competing in an individual sport, accept that losing is all part of competing and moving on,” said Wright. Preparation is what coaches look at as a way of avoiding losing in general, “I try to work really hard so we don’t have to do it often,” said Stanton varsity softball coach Bob Flemming. Athletes work hard to put themselves in a spot to win and the harder they work the better position they will be in. There are other coaches who are just involved in sports for the experience and because they enjoy being around their students outside of the classroom. High school athletes and professional athletes have different motivations to bounce back from losses. In the professional world athletes are motivated by money, the better their performance the more they get paid. In the high school world athletes are motivated by scholarships, pride, and acceptance from their peers. Bouncing back from a loss is one of the best ways to cope with losing. Whether it’s a nail biting last minute win or a blowout, victory id the best way to dal with a loss. Winning is everything to athletes and will always be the best way to cope with losing.

As a child we are all taught many valuable life lessons such as “treat others the way you want to be treated,” and “life isn’t always fair.” However, it seems the people that fill our heads with these sayings might be the ones who are guilty of breaking these them the most. A combination of these two principles seems to be broken by many coaches toward their athletes. The coach of the team is supposed to be someone who wants the best for each individual player. Along with being a coach, they should also be someone the athlete trusts and goes to for not only athletic advice but personal advice as well. However, more often than not, this person is guilty of showing favoritism toward particular players. The coach normally shows favoritism toward the athlete that has the most star quality. An effect of this favoritism is extra training and one on one time with the coach. This attention should not be limited to the person that is currently showing the most progress, but to the players who work hard and dedicate their time to the sport. Free passes on mistakes should not be given to the player who is currently regarded as the best. This phenomenon can be found in high school sports and professional sports. In a 2011 Cleveland Plain Dealer article entitled “Shaquille O’Neal on LeBron: James ‘was allowed to do whatever’” writer Tom Reed wrote that NBA superstar LeBron James is given special treatment compared to other players on the team. O’Neal said Mike Brown, former coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers, did not make James take responsibility for his actions in fear that James would leave Cleveland if he did. According to O’Neal when the team watched footage of their previous game, Brown would not critique James for his wrong doings but would criticize the other players. This shows how coaches will do anything to please a player that has star quality but does not do the same for an average player. Instead of giving the so called “favorite” a free pass, coaches should take the approach NFL coach Joe Philbin had toward wide receiver Chad Johnson. According to FOX News, the Miami Dolphins coach Philbin made it clear Johnson would be released from the team if he did not correct his temper. Even though most coaches would not go through with this because of the effect of losing a key player, Philbin released Johnson from the team when he was charged with simple domestic battery against his wife. This shows how certain coaches hold each player to the same standard, no matter what their athletic ability may be. Favoritism is something that should not be tolerated on sport teams. Being on top should consist of hard work and determination, but more often than not the coach favors one athlete and let their mistakes pass by without any correction. Each athlete should be held to standards and be given the same opportunity as long as they take the initiative.


Alexandra Morgante, Editor-in-Chief Leah Quisenberry, Managing Editor Alexis Brown, Opinions Editor Kia’ Cooper, Features Editor Taylor Galloway, Sports Editor Laura Gerbec, Student Life Editor Kathryn McMullen, Photography Editor The Devil’s Advocate serves as the official newspaper of Stanton College Preparatory School. It is produced monthly by members of the Journalism class. The editors reserve the right to edit any material submitted to the paper for content, grammar, length, and accuracy. The Devil’s Advocate is a public forum for student expression, which encourages free exchanges of opinions concerning controversial and non-controversial community and school related issues. The ideas and advertisements expressed within the newspaper are not necessarily those of the newspaper adviser, school administration, or the Duval County Public School Board. The Devil’s Advocate accepts advertisements from all businesses in the Stanton community. The ad format can be given to the staff or the adviser, Mr. Larry Knight. Students, faculty, and parents may contact the staff and adviser at (904) 630-6760 ext. 143 or at knightl1@duvalschools.org.

Teenage Political Apathy As the 2012 presidential elections are upon us, it is hard to discount the unfortunate ignorance of America’s youth. Teenagers all over the country are unaware of major political figures and events. Even Stanton College Preparatory School, known for its rigorous academics and prestigious students, is plagued with this problem. Students sit in their classes memorizing poems and algebraic equations, yet are clueless about what is happening in our country. We believe teenagers must be informed in order to develop their own political opinions, and in time be able to contribute to selecting the next leader of America. The sad truth of our modern society is that the majority of students are unaware of important current events that take place every day. As we are in the midst of an election season, it is more important than ever to tune into the news. We would hope that if students were asked to name the presidential candidates, all of them would easily be able to, but this is not the case.  In a 2011 Newsweek study, one-third of Americans could not identify the current vice president. If this is the amount of political knowledge adults have, we can assume that students know even less. Watching the news is a rarity for teenagers, while picking up a newspaper is unheard of. Thus, we are left with the dilemma of uninformed youth. Despite their lack of political knowledge, most teenagers can claim they are either a Republican or Democrat merely from the political beliefs of their family. Do they know anything about what their supposed party stands for? Probably not.  Though a good starting point, this is far from the sufficient knowledge they should have. While some blatantly admit they know nothing about politics, others try to sound like an informed, intelligent American. The issue lies in the source of this information. Teenagers often pick up various statements from their families and peers, basing their political views on them. Rarely does anyone think for themselves and gather enough information to form their own political opinions.   While national politics is extremely important, local news bears the same significance. Students should be aware of state and local political figures such as the mayor, governor, and senators because they have a direct impact on our communities. They make decisions that affect our quality of life in areas including local businesses, education, and emergency services. Compared to national elections, voting for local figures may seem insignificant but should be given as much thought and concern. Both are the duty of each and every American and need to be treated as such. The question still arises-why should we even care about politics? Many students think working hard in school is all that is needed at this point in their lives. This is a poor mindset to maintain as high school does not last forever, and these students will soon be thrust into the realities of life. Uninformed teenagers become uninformed adults; therefore, we must start now. Being aware of the current state of our country and the significant happenings that occur will lead students to become more rounded, knowledgeable individuals. Excelling in school is not enough. As the future of America, we must be actively involved in truly understanding what occurs in the amazing country that we live in.

Staff Endorsment of President Obama The United States of America is fighting to defeat a national recession and push its way out of an economic slump. President Barack Obama took on the job of pulling the nation out of recession in 2008, and the next election takes place on Nov. 6, 2012. The United States is still struggling from the recession, and the next presidential term will determine whether the country will be able to completely recover. The Republican candidate, former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, is his competitor. We, the Devil’s Advocate Staff, have chosen to endorse President Barack Obama to be elected for another presidential term. We made this decision through an anonymous staff vote without the involvement of the teacher Mr. Larry Knight. The reasons for our choice include Obama’s support for same sex marriage, abortion, the new healthcare system, and his overall perseverance in trying to restore America. President Obama is characterized by most people as a “pro-choice” advocate, meaning people should possess the right to have an abortion if they choose to do so. We agree with this view because we feel it is an individual’s choice whether they bring another person into the world. They should not be forced to do so if they are financially or physically unable to. According to a New York Times article published on Sept. 4, 2012, President Obama’s Democratic platform states, “The Democratic Party strongly supports Roe v. Wade and a woman’s right to make decisions regarding her pregnancy, including a safe and legal abortion, regardless of ability to pay.” Governor Romney, on the contrary, believes abortion should be banned, except for a few extreme cases such as rape. Not only is President Obama pro-choice, but he also supports the idea that individuals possess the right to love and marry whomever they choose, whether it be someone of the same gender or not. Throughout his first presidential term, same-sex marriage has become legal in Connecticut, New York, New Hampshire,Vermont, Washington, Massachusetts, the District of Columbia, and Iowa. On the other hand, Romney is completely against the legality of samesex marriage because he believes that marriage is, by definition, a relationship between a man and woman alone. Along with Obama’s support for abortion and same-sex marriage, one of the traits we most admire in him is his care for the poor struggling class of America. His new “Obama-care” is aimed at providing an equal opportunity to people of the upper, the middle, and the lower classes. All individuals have an equal right to fight for their life, and medical costs should not prevent that. His healthcare system aims to provide people who cannot afford medical costs the ability to receive emergency medical care anyway. On the contrary, others strongly dislike that a portion of their taxes go to the healthcare of those who cannot afford it. They think this welfare only encourages those people to continue living unemployed, while they live off of those who are employed. We believe, though, that giving a portion of our taxes for benefit the needy is only a small sacrifice necessary for the well-being of our society. We believe that President Obama is battling to restore America, increase jobs, and pull our nation out of this terrible recession. He may be criticized by some, but we believe that he will always persevere.

cartoon by Keandra Brinson

Editorial Staff 2012-2013

opinions / november 2012 / 13


Facebook is the bane of every Stanton student’s existence. We all love to go on there, but after spending two hours on the site we all regret going there to begin with. Early evening study plans turn into late night lucubrations, trying to cram in as much information as quickly as possible so we can at least get a decent amount of sleep. I am pretty sure every Stanton student has been in this predicament at least more than once already this year. Mark Zuckerberg pioneered social networking and created the modern social stratosphere that most people in the world partake in. Soon came Jack Dorsey’s Twitter, which, on paper, should take up less of our time because of its 140 character limit; however, the fact that seemingly 99 percent of celebrities are on there and the fact that everybody seems to post once ever two minutes makes it just as much of a time consumer as Facebook. Then in addition to those two giants there is Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, Myspace (yes, it still exists), Google+, and YouTube, which all add to our limitless list of online distractions. According to a study done by Pew Research in 2011, 73 percent of teens are actively using social media. So, of the approximately 1,500 students here at Stanton, that would mean about 1,095 of students use social media; however, I would venture to say not only is that number higher at Stanton, but more than likely most students use sites like Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram a lot longer than they should on a regular basis. It is also interesting to see how each of the social networking sites have evolved. For instance, Twitter seems to have become a place where everybody rants about something - from how bad Facebook is, to how stupid they think an assignment is. Twitter has essentially become the go-to site for teenagers to complain about anything and everything. This is something that can get pretty annoying at times, but still seems to tie up our time because it is a place where we can go and see we are not the only ones who hated that English essay. Facebook has basically become a homework site for students where everyone trades information on assignments, which is why we can always justify going on Facebook because it is for homework, right? But if that were the case then we would only stay online for a few minutes as opposed to a half an hour. In no way am I saying that social networking is bad, but what I am saying is the amount of time we spend on it is usually pretty detrimental to our scholastic health. We all know this, but yet we all continue to fall back into the same old trap of social media. Blame Zuckerberg, blame the Internet, blame whomever or whatever you want, but in the end, most of us know that our social media predicament was devised all on our own. Imagine what would happen if we could all control our insatiable urges to spend hours and hours on Facebook and instead channel that time and energy into getting our homework done at a decent hour. Not only would we get a normal amount of sleep, but more than likely we would end up having more time to do whatever we wanted. Social media is basically this big black hole that we have all been sucked into, and it is one we are all seemingly getting pulled deeper and deeper into every day, but we need to find some way to get out of it. Trust me, all of our grades will thank us if we spend less time on social media.

As the leaves turn and the temperature drops to a crisp 75 degrees, new and old relationships are found in Stanton’s hallways. Every high school seems to be a hub for hormones and broken hearts. But what is love anyway? Romance has gradually turned from sonnets to tweets, intimate letters to Facebook statuses. Is this informal response to love due to modernization? Or just apathy amongst this generation? Women constantly pine for a time when men courted ladies atop gilded carriages with roses, poems and chocolates in tow. Now, with the swift click of a button, two people can efficiently alert everyone of their marriage, relationship, or pre breakup status, which is convenient because everyone really does care. Within the last fifteen years, even the romance factors in movies and television has either capitalized on sagas of generations prior, or adapted to the eagerness of this generation with messy films like Mila Kunis and Justin Timberlake’s “Friends with Benefits.” Before erupting into a bitter rant, it must be noted that some couples still hold true to various elements of a time long gone. A junior at Stanton admits to, “[sending] his girlfriend a small poem every week.” Alas, all the blame of a cavalier regard towards love cannot be pinned on the boys alone. Although once carrying the traditional role as the dominant romancer, shifting gender roles challenges this position. If women are no longer expected to fulfill customary feminine duties such as child rearing and food preparation, how can men be criticized for discontinuing their outdated expositions of love? It is true that many high schoolers have little understanding of real love, but the confusion surrounding this four letter word stretches beyond the young adults of this generation and perhaps into the age group of their parents. With a shockingly high divorce rate, it is no wonder that young adults of this generation may not associate as much significance to the word “love”. The social laws of an old era are no longer in play, leading to a more lax regard to things customarily sanctified. This inevitably lowers the bar for younger generations, leaving them behind in a dismal heap of technology, indifference and impatience, when it comes to many traditional ideals. Blaming the lack of genuine romance on this generation is unjust. This age group’s indifference is simply a by-product of this social media and technology infused era. Traditional ideals in almost every sector are running to keep up with modernization, but the exhausting race is being sorely lost. What is perceived as love has a different meaning than it did 100 years ago due to a change in context. This natural order of progression is one to be expected, not mourned. So for now, the romantics of this generation will just have to make do with re-watching Gone with the Wind and listening to Frank Sinatra’s velvety rifts on repeat.

By JONATHAN KEMP, Contributing Writer

By ELLIOTT BEALE, Contributing Writer

14 / devil’s advocate / opinions

photo by Kathryn McMullen

I Love You, JK, Lol

By RACHEL JAFFE, Contributing Writer

Honors vs. I.B. Staying up until one o’clock in the morning every night can be pretty tiring. Internal assessments can be pretty stressful. Trying to figure out how to get 150 CAS hours can be pretty frustrating. These are all struggles that are typical to the average IB student. We, or at least I, have been confronting these everyday battles since I entered the International Baccalaureate program my freshman year. Going through this program has definitely been one of the hardest things I have ever had to do. There have been many times during the past four years that I have thrown my pencil down and screamed that I wanted to drop out but continuing on has been one of the best decisions I have ever made, or that my parents have ever made. The Honors program here at Stanton is great. It offers a challenging curriculum in a competitive environment and allows students to take more advanced classes than most other schools in Duval County. There’s something missing though. There is a different feel in Honors’ classes than there is in IB classes. Each grade level only has about 150 IB students. This means the students are able to develop a better relationship with each other than the Honors students are. The members spend more time together because they have more classes together. They also spend quite a few more late nights talking about homework and projects and comparing notes. Most IB students would describe their fellow peers as part of their family. Everyone in the program tends to think similarly and has big goals set, so it is very easy to relate to each other. The brotherhood in the program is one that is unparalleled. At no other time in my life have I felt so at home as I do when I am in the presence of other Stanton IB students. While I know there are great relationships built among those in the Honors Program, I just do not see the same depth but then again I have never been in an Honors class. Not only does the IB program offer a great sense of community, though, it is also much more beneficial to the student than the Honors curriculum is. While both are college preparatory courses of study, the International Baccalaureate program challenges the student more and allows the members to experience first hand what a real college atmosphere will be like. The kids are given much more responsibility and have longer papers and projects. While it is very stressful at the time to have to complete these challenging assignments, it definitely pays off when the student enters college. They are much more likely to be assigned a 2,000 word paper rather than a five paragraph essay. After attending the IB program at Stanton, a 2,000-word paper would seem like almost nothing. The opportunities this program offers people our age are unlike any others. I do not understand how or why any individual would turn down the chance to challenge and push himself or herself like this program challenges those in it. While one must sacrifice some things, such as a fraction of their social life, the benefits that are received at the end are without equal. photo by Alexandra Morgante

photo by Kathryn McMullen

Social Networking


Liberal vs. Conservative: Which Side are You on?

The views of columnists do not reflect the views of the Devil’s Advocate staff or the Stanton administration.

As the American people vote today they are faced with the fundamental decision as to whether they want to continue moving forward, or reverse the progress that has been made in the last four years. Americans will either give President Obama a mandate for another four years, or elect Former Governor Mitt Romney as their new leader. This is a critical point in this nation’s history for all Americans but particularly us, America’s next generation. Who wins this election will decide what path America takes in the next four years, and what kind of nation we will inherit. Before long we are all going to be looking for jobs, and it will be crucial that there is an America waiting for us that values our skills. President Barack Obama has begun the task of putting America on the path of secure economic footing once again. When he took the Oath of Office in 2009  America was losing over 700,000 jobs a month according to politifact.org. Today we have had 32 straight months of job growth with 4.5 million private sector jobs created. On the other hand, when Governor Romney was in office in Massachusetts, his state ranked 47th in job creation according to Bureau of Labor Statistics. Because of the President, we will all have a greater chance of finding the jobs that we want once we’ve graduated college. Many of us are looking forward to driving to school in the near future. Being able to buy a car made in America is a privilege we should all take advantage of. In 2009 when General Motors and Chrysler nearly bankrupt, President Obama provided the support to help those companies rebound.  Since June 2009, 57,000 jobs have been added to the Michigan economy. Mitt Romney’s position was to “Let Detroit Go Bankrupt” as was the title of the article he wrote in the Wall Street Journal. Because Barack Obama stood with the auto companies we will all have the opportunity to buy cars American made.   You don’t have to look hard to realize that America is a safer place, for everyone than it was four years ago. When Barack Obama took office in 2009, we were embroiled in two wars and Al Qaeda leader Osama Bin Laden was still at large, and our nation was being drained of its resources at a time when we needed them the most.  Today we have since left Iraq and are scheduled to be out of Afghanistan by 2014 as planned by the Obama administration, Al Qaeda and other terrorist groups have been devastated and, Osama Bin Laden will never threaten our nation or the world again.  The past few years have not been easy for America; however, it has never been in the American spirit to give up when things have gotten tough. Because of his leadership America is better nation going into the 21st century for all of us. Barack Obama is the leader that understands that our generation is going to need an America that values our talents and abilities. In the face of challenges, he has made the decisions which have moved America onto a path where we can all succeed and grow. America has come a long way in the last four years, and we will continue on this forward path when Americans make the choice to re-elect President Barack Obama.

As Americans, we can all agree that the federal government needs to shrink the gap between revenues and outlays. Its largest source of revenue is taxation, and its largest outlay is social welfare spending. We also know that any proposed solution to our financial troubles must be designed with an eye on the economy. The Republican Party’s nominee, Gov. Mitt Romney, plans to cut one-fifth off of everyone’s income tax rate. Now, imagine the Obama alternative in which taxes on the wealthy are increased. High-earning business owners would find themselves owing more of their profit to the federal government. Naturally upset, they would balk at the idea of losing money they would have had without the tax increases and, instead of taking the hit, would pass along the difference by hiring fewer workers, cutting employee pay, and increasing the price of their product. Romney’s plan avoids this, and creates an environment favorable for economic growth. Now, the Tax Policy Center reached the conclusion that taxes on the middle class would have to be raised in order to pay for Romney’s tax cuts. However, the study did not take two massive tax deductions—those regarding interest on municipal bonds and life insurance savings—into account. These deductions largely benefit the non-business-owning wealthy, and Romney plans to make up for his revenue gap by limiting or removing such deductions. Removing these two deductions alone, according to the White House’s published data, would fill this revenue gap. Romney’s plan for Social Security and Medicare will not affect those at or nearing retirement. With current policy, the White House projects that the Social Security trust fund will be empty in twenty-one years. To prevent this, Romney wants to slowly increase the retirement age because we are living longer. To create some perspective, know that when President Roosevelt created Social Security in 1935 the average lifespan was 62 while Social Security only kicked in at 65. Today, our life expectancy is 78 years while 62 is the age at which benefits begin. As for Medicare, Romney wants to give seniors the option to either choose the government’s current plan or use that money to acquire their own private insurance that must cover at least as much as today’s Medicare. If they want a plan that is more expensive, they cover the difference. If they select a less expensive plan, seniors can then use that leftover money to cover other medical expenses. This free market competition would force insurance providers, including the government, to increase coverage and reduce costs in order to attract customers. If seniors have to make their own decisions regarding nursing homes, hospitals, and forms of medical treatment, can they not select their own insurance plan? Overall, Romney’s plans for the next four years demonstrate an understanding of the economy. Those of us that can vote must not sit idly by the sidelines and allow others to make the decision this Election Day. It is too important. Mitt Romney is the right choice.

By MATTHEW MCKETTY, Contributing Writer

By MENDEL GOLDSTEIN, Contributing Writer

photo by Alexandra Morgante

Mitt Romney

photo by Kathryn McMullen

Barack Obama

Students Speak “Democrat because I believe gay marriage should be legal.” -Logan Mullens, 9th

“Independent because neither party’s policies reflect my moral values.” -Cole Timmer, 11th

“Romney’s economic paln will help me out in the long run. I believe that Obama hasn’t done a decent job thus far. Someone else should have a chance.” -Katie Baughman, 12th

“Obama because I agree with his policies. Especially his economic and social policies.” Nicholas Pointdexter, 10th

“Independent, because once you affilite yourslef with a party, you only have the choice of always voting with that party.” -Misha Chalkey, 11th

“Republican because it reflects my values and beliefs on both social and economic issues.” -Emily Bradford, 10th

opinions / november 2012 / 15


Stanton College Preparatory School

The Benefits of a $5 Student PTSA Membership: • • • • • • • • • • • •

An entry for the drawing of a monthly senior lot parking pass 15% OFF your total at Tropical Smoothie 10% OFF your total at Pizza Palace 10% OFF your total at the Sun Deli Subs Restaurant located on 11011 South 3rd Street in Jacksonville Beach (904-270-1040) Peterbrooke Chocolates - During the month of March, get 25% OFF at the Oakleaf Town Center Location Visit www.apple.com/edu/duval for details on a special discount program for Apple computers PTA Game Day Discounts with the Jacksonville Jaguars to ANY HOME GAME this season! Jacksonville Axemen Rugby - 50% OFF - Date TBD Latitude30 - Free bowling shoes (up to 6 pairs) with the purchase of a bowling lane OR a $5 game card for every adult entree for the month of April The Jacksonville Zoo - 50% off the general admission price during the month of January Free admission to The Cummer Museum on Jan. 19 and Jan. 20 Annual PTA Night at the Jacksonville Suns game in Spring 2013!

Come be a part of the fun! Download a membership form to join at stantonptsa.org


Devil's Advocate (Issue 1 | 2012-2013)  

The Devil's Advocate is the award-winning newspaper published by student journalists attending Stanton College Preparatory School in Jackson...

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