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From

Playgrounds TO GRADUATION How schools are confronting

no. 2 | december 2011

devilsadvocatepaper.blogspot.com

the bullying ePIDEMIC By taylor galloway


devil’s advocate

no. 2 | december 2011

Official Publication of Stanton College Preparatory School

In This Issue 3 Campus Affairs: Tearing

6 Sports: In a League of

the School Apart

Their Own

10 Cover Story

3

From Playgrounds to Graduation

As bullying becomes a prominent issue, the Devil’s Advocate takes a look into the causes and effects it has, along with the steps people are taking against it.

17 Opinions: Where is the Line Drawn?

6

photo from Facebook

The Devil’s Advocate takes a look into the division among the classes at Stanton.

photo by Sarah Roberson

The Devil’s Advocate highlights the strides Duval County has made in providing sports programs for disabled students.

19 Student Life: That

Junior Elliott Beale discusses where the line should be drawn between friendly jokes and verbal bullying.

Awkward Moment When... All teenagers go through awkward moments. The Devil’s Advocate has compiled a list of some of the most memorable awkward moments that happen to everyone.

7 15 16

Athlete of the Issue Halos and Pitchforks Issue of the Issue

18 19

Reviews The Artists’ Corner The Playlist I Saw U

10

devilsadvocatepaper.blogspot.com

Letter From the Editor

Contributing Advocates The Devil’s Advocate is searching for contributing writers, photographers, and artists. Please submit your work via email to stantondevilsadvocate@gmail.com, or contact Greg Todaro at gregtodaro0@gmail.com, Katie Raymond at kaite.katith.raymond@gmail.com, or Mr. Knight at knightl1@duvalschools.org or room 204.

Become a Sponsor!

The Devil’s Advocate is dependent on our advertisers and our sponsors. When you purchase an ad with us, it reaches a diverse student population that can help your business. We can also design your ads. 1/4 page $25.00 1/2 page $50.00 Insert $75.00 Full Page $100.00 *10% discount for multiple runs

Production Staff Adviser Larry Knight

Editor-In-Chief Katie Raymond Greg Todaro

Senior Photographer Sarah Roberson

Section Editors Kia’ Cooper (Campus Affairs) Jonathan Kemp (Sports) Laura Gerbec (Features) Alexandra Morgante (Opinions) Leah Quisenberry (Student Life)

photo by Greg Todaro

In Every Issue

In this issue of the paper we are profiling on several rather controversial topics, however our main focus is the epidemic of bullying in our school and across the nation. The stories and columns in the issue provide just a small glimpse of the short term and long term effects of bullying, yet we at the Devil’s Advocate believe bullying is a serious problem in all cases. To those experiencing it, remember there is always help both privately and here at school. The paper is an ever-changing project and this issue has even more improvements from the last.You may notice the new format in the Features section which includes a longer and more detailed cover story and a personal testimony from a fellow Stanton student. With these extended pieces we hope to speak to our peers and push for an elimination of bullying at Stanton. Not only is the Devil’s Advocate always searching for contributing writers and artists but we are also searching for feedback. Have a suggestion? Let us know. Have an issue you would like us to address or report on? Please, let us know.

Reporters Hamza Ajmal Ishmail Dowridge Brandon George

Reporters/Photography Team Alexis Brown Taylor Galloway Kathryn McMullen Joc’lene Scarlett

Please Recycle

Printed at Florida Sun Printing, Callahan, Fla.


Tearing the School Apart

photos by Sarah Roberson

Class divisions at Stanton seem more prevalent lately. What is causing students with many obvious similarities to split?

photo by Sarah Roberson

By ADRIANNA TILTON, Reporter

One only has to scan the courtyard on a pep rally Friday to see the division within Stanton College Preparatory School. With the freshman class donned in white, the sophomores and juniors in red and black respectively and the seniors in blue, this is a visual representation of how the classes and the entire school are divided. However, once those “Friday night lights” beam down on the football field the classes are united in the Stanton bleachers with the 12th Man t-shirts and an unwavering support for their Blue Devils. The thin line between class division and school unity leads one to question which one holds the most significance within Stanton. Although some students are often encouraged to express their alliance to their specific class, they are also expected to display a united front within the school. With students being pulled in different directions, it is important to analyze the reasons for and effects of this “epidemic” within Stanton. The most obvious display of school division is during school pep rallies. During these events, each class wears their assigned colors and competes for the “spirit stick” by essentially creating as much noise as possible within the gym bleachers. The class that wins the pep rally, not only gains the “spirit stick” but bragging rights until the next one. Senior Ariana Rosa said, “Having different class colors is a lot of fun and, as a senior, I appreciate that wearing blue allows my classmates and I to represent our seniority.” To some extent the encouragement of different class colors and competition is the cause of the division within Stanton.Yet it seems that some effort has been made in promoting school unity during pep rallies. Rosa went on to say, “I have to admit that having all the classes wear blue and white during the last pep rally allowed us to become more

unified and recognize the fact that we’re all Stanton Blue Devils.” By encouraging students to wear blue and white instead of their typical class colors, this was an effort to promote unity with the school during the 2011 homecoming week. However, there were still some students that opposed this change, in reaction to wearing blue instead of her class’s signature red, sophomore Shameka Sapp said “ Why wouldn’t we wear our own colors to represent us?” Sapp’s statement correlates

“ Whether it is the belief that a class is “better” than another or the lack of intermingling between the classes, Stanton seems to be four separate classes instead of one unified school.” to the sentiments of many Stanton students and indicates that perhaps class unity is sometimes held in a higher regard than school unity. Another fixture within the school promotes the class divisions is the separation within the courtyards. With the senior class separated by the somewhat impenetrable “senior courtyard” most of the underclassmen follow the unwritten rule about not sitting there during lunch. The senior courtyard can potentially be a preventive force that stops classes from coming together, Senior Eunice Wanjiru said, “ I think the separation just makes the seniors feel that the senior courtyard in their last year. We are all united in the senior courtyard.”

While the majority of seniors feel that the senior courtyard is a deserved reward after spending three years at Stanton, underclassmen do not share the same beliefs. Sophomore Jaamilah Jones said, “Seniors think that they’re just better.” This sense of inequality indicates the level to which classes stay isolated from each other. Whether it is the belief that a class is “better” than another or the lack of intermingling between the classes, Stanton seems to be four separate classes instead of one unified school. Although the school seems to be divided, there have been efforts put forth by Stanton students to unify the school. IGNITE is a students run organization that combines student mentoring between all classes along with various philanthropic efforts. Senior and IGNITE club president Kevin Chang said, “Besides being a mentor program for the entire school, our mission is to promote student activism within the Stanton community. By holding activities, contests, and projects for students year round, it definitely helps to unite the school.” IGNITE is an example of how Stanton students work towards school unity through the various of activities it organizes such as free pizza meetings and numerous contests. The fact that students voluntarily work with students that may not speak to otherwise, ensures that Stanton students are willing to create an organized front within the school. While the classes within Stanton are not constantly interacting with each other, the school does unite when it matters. Whether it be at pep rallies or when a fellow student needs help, overall students here are willing to lend their support and at the end of the day this is what unites Stanton.

campus affairs / december 2011 / 3


Finding a Safe Space Back in the 1990s, a local organization called the Jacksonville Area Sexual Minority Youth Network (JASMYN) was founded by a Stanton College Preparatory School graduate who reached out to his community for support when responding to his suicidal and isolated thoughts. One of JASMYN’s first projects in 1993 was issuing Safe Space stickers, created in 1989, that ensured no bullying would take place in the classroom. In 1994, the organization was designated as a non-profit to help establish self-esteem for many students and to build a safe haven for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) minors ages 13 - 23. Stanton founded its own Gay Straight Alliance in 2007. Shortly after its founding, the club contacted the founder of JASMYN and received an order of Safe Space stickers in order to distribute to teachers who wanted to make their classrooms bully free. This supported Stanton’s similar cause and allowed teachers to express their intolerance for bullying in general. “Basically, [the stickers say that] homophobia is unacceptable,” said Joel Adams, Stanton teacher and co-sponsor of Stanton’s GSA Club. The GSA promotes the acceptance of people as opposed to tolerating them in their decision in order to reduce bullying. “You tolerate a crying baby on a five hour plane ride, but you accept people for who they are,” said Senior Deanna Schauben, Stanton student and president of Stanton’s GSA Club. The club meets once a week to discuss LGBTQ culture and issues as well as provide a safe and accepting meeting place for students who are dealing with drastic changes in their life. Though the purpose of the bumper sticker is to help students, few students know about them. “You can barely see them, there’s one in my drama class and I didn’t notice it for days,” said sophomore Jessica Momorie. The stickers are quite small and sometimes cannot be discerned from other things on the teacher’s desk or board. The teachers who have the stickers defend their decision in having the picture in their classroom. “Ms. Koehler shows [her support of freedom of sexuality]. She stands up for gay rights [and] if a student said something out of line, she’ll correct them,” said

photo by Kathryn McMullen

Research and Reporting By ALEXANDRA MORGANTE, Opinions Editor Story By KATHRYN McMULLEN, Reporter

BY THE NUMBERS • One survey revealed that 22 percent of gay youth skipped school in the past month because they felt unsafe. • Bullying affects a quarter of high school students. • Twenty-eight percent of freshmen reported being bullied at least once during the school year, compared to 1 in 5 seniors. • Among the students reported being bullied online, of those students bullied: 15 percent of students got into a physical fight and 17 percent avoided certain parts of school out of fear.

4 / devil’s advocate / campus affairs

senior and GSA member Elizabeth McGee. Although it may not be apparent, Stanton students still believe in homosexual acceptance and therefore become involved in the GSA. “I’ve always been empathetic towards the cause and I just wanted to be in a club where others share that empathy” said McGee. Safe Spaces is not just a movement in Jacksonville. Sierra College in Rocklin, California has a Safe Space program on their campus with their own stickers. A National School Climate Survey taken by Gay Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) in 2001 showed that LGBTQ students felt unsafe at schools and are likely to skip class for fear of personal safety. The participants also targeted supportive staff members or student groups as helpful sources. A unique service in their program is straight allies. These are people that are not LGBTQ, but they stand up for gay rights. However, Sierra College’s Safe Space program focuses mostly on LGBTQ students because bais towards them is most prominent in the classroom. At Stanton teachers act as straight allies for Stanton students. “I want people of all race, gender, and sexuality to know that they are free to be in the room and be able to speak their mind,” said Shirley Sacks, Stanton Drama teacher. “I am a supportive Stanton teacher and mother with a shoulder to cry on.” Students can also lend a supportive hand to their peers in need; however, many students do not because they don’t know enough about homosexuality. Attending GSA meetings, talking to a friend, or even being open-minded can help students become more knowledgeable. The GSA’s purpose is not only to protect and serve as support for confused and helpless students, it is also to gather support from straight people and educate them so they can help confused students as well as accept them for who they are. “People just need to know that gay people are just regular people too,” says senior Mitchell Sewell.


In a League of Their Own

Duval County is making strides to give kids with disabilities the chance to realize their sports dreams.

Stanton junior Palmer Wilsie plays soccer with his buddy at Greater Arlington Soccer Club’s TOPSoccer program.

Many athletes have come to Stanton looking for a chance to prove themselves in their chosen sport. Whether they are looking for a college scholarship, new friends, or the family atmosphere that comes with being on a close-knit team, it is thought that everyone has equal opportunity to join in. But these opportunities are not always open to everyone, according to a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It showed that of all the children born in the United States about 13 percent are born with a developmental disability ranging from speech and language impairments to cerebral palsy and autism. These children, from the time they are born until they reach adulthood, don’t normally get to join sports teams because of their physical and cognitive impairments; this difference from other kids makes it harder for many of these children to be on the same competitive level as their fellow athletes, making it almost impossible for them to join sports sponsored by schools. In the past these children would have never been allowed on high school sports teams or given the opportunity to play any sport competitively. However, in the past 50 years sports programs for disabled kids have made great strides. Established in 1969, the Special Olympics Duval County provides year round sports training and competition for children and adults with developmental disabilities. Likewise, the Down Syndrome Association of Jacksonville

6 / devil’s advocate / sports

(DSA) makes a variety of sports like golf, basketball, soccer, and baseball available for children with any sort of impairment, providing kids with a unique opportunity to play in a recreational league just like other kids their age. These opportunities offered to children with disabilities are very few and while they provide an outlet for the kids, many of them want to play with regular kids their age not just on a team for the disabled. This need was fulfilled by the DSA. Their soccer program now asks high school teams such as Providence, Episcopal, and Bolles to come out on Saturday mornings to volunteer with kids that participate in the program. These teams and other miscellaneous volunteers help set up the fields, play with the kids, and encourage them to become better athletes. Britney Watson, an alumnus of North Florida School of Special Education and a participant in Down Syndrome Soccer Association for three years, enjoys her time spent playing with others who also participate in the program. “The best part is you get to come out here and play and just hang out with your friends,” said Watson. Like the DSA, TOPSoccer is another program in Jacksonville dedicated to helping kids with disabilities play soccer. The program is located at the North Florida School of Special Education, one of the schools in the Jacksonville area that helps to educate disabled children in academics, social skills, and job placement.

The kids that participate are paired with a buddy who helps them with soccer drills and cheers them on during games. Stanton joined TOPSoccer last school year and many of the athletes were paired with kids in the program. Both programs have helped quite a few Stanton students to come to the conclusion that they can make a difference in the lives of some of these kids. In fact many of them realized the help they are giving can make a difference. Brad Matos, a sophomore at Stanton, participated in the TOPSoccer program, and came to find that “it was a rewarding experience and allows you to benefit from helping others.” Other students like sophomore Trevor Starling enjoyed the impact it had on them. “It was eye opening, you get to see how fortunate you are,” said Starling. Both Matos and Starling are not the only students who participated with the same results. This shows the community is making strides to allow children with disabilities to have a somewhat regular life in comparison to other kids, just with a little extra help along the way. Recently Duval County Public Schools allowed children with special needs to play sports representing their school. In October the Florida Times-Union featured an article about Jacob Martin, a Yulee High School football player with Down Syndrome. Martin plays wide receiver for the Hornets and while he may have bigger challenges as an athlete he is allowed to play just like any of the other kids on

photo from Facebook

By LEAH QUISENBERRY, Student Life Editor

the team. A video featured on the Florida Times-Union’s website highlights practices, games, and the reactions of Martin’s parents and fellow teammates to his participation on the team. There is a point in the video where Jack Martin, Martin’s father, is overcome with emotion as he talks about his son’s participation in the games. He said, “Fernandina kids [were] hugging him and taking him in and it was just you know that’s something not only he’s [Jacob Martin] gonna remember, and that’s, to me is really far more important.” What Jack Martin is talking about can sometimes be rare for children with disabilities in everyday life, not just on school sports teams. Many kids are bullied when no one is around to protect them, and many parents worry what will happen to their children when they are not around because that is when some is most vulnerable. Not all people who associate with children who have disabilities have their best interests at heart. Jack Martin’s experience with his son and Yulee High School is a rare one, but one with a powerful message. As time goes on the opportunities for kids with disabilities can only get better, kids can only become more accepting of people that are different than them and the community can only make longer strides to accommodate those with special needs. These steps in the right direction are the only way to make progress in the sports world as well as for these kids, whose future can be filled with uncertainty.


Spike! For the Love of the Game

My Side of the Story By LAUREN SLAVENS, Contributing Writer

By JONATHAN KEMP, Sports Editor

photo from Facebook

photo by Sarah Roberson

By JONATHAN KEMP, Sports Editor

It all started when I was 10. I saw my first college volleyball game and said to my mom “I wanna do that.” She was ecstatic; volleyball runs in our family, it is in my blood. I started at an FSCJ volleyball camp that summer and played with my parents throughout the year. When middle school started I continued at FSCJ and started attending open gym sessions at Jacksonville Indoor Sports with Jacksonville Junior Volleyball Association. In seventh grade when I made the school team at Darnell-Cookman I was so excited. My first year on the team was so fun that I was determined to continue to play. We won conference that year and only lost one game to our rival James Weldon Johnson. The following year we went undefeated and won the conference title again. Leaving my middle school team was bitter sweet, it was exciting to know I was going to able to try out for the high school team but I was so sad to leave the girls I had played with for two years already. The summer coming into my freshman year was a particularly painful summer, literally. I was going to three camps, playing with the Stanton summer league three days a week and going to JJVA skills sessions after playing league every Tuesday and Thursday. On Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday I was playing volleyball for over twelve hours. It was intense, crazy and one of the best summers I had until the unthinkable happened. I broke my leg. It was a Tuesday night and I had been playing nonstop all day. I jumped to attack a ball and I felt hot pain shooting down my left leg, heard a snap and knew before I landed that I had broken something. I was in tears when we reached the hospital. The pain had started to sink in and every little movement was excruciating. After setting my leg in a temporary cast the doctor told me I had a “green stick fracture” due to a bone cyst that had been in my left fibula. I was on crutches for almost two months and then in a walking boot for another month. I was not allowed to play for six months and I was going to miss my freshman season. I played my first season in JJVA travel ball to stay in shape and get ready for summer league. We played different club teams like ours in the Southeast Region. I made the JV team in my sophomore year and moved up to varsity at the beginning of tournament season. That year we won conference, placed second in district and played Nease High School for Regionals. My junior year was my first full season on varsity as the setter, and it was vastly different playing field than JV was. Practice was every day for up to three hours and our games started an hour after the JV game. Out matches were the best three out of five games. That season I learned the true art of being a Stanton IB Athlete. It’s hard and very demanding, but not impossible. Being an IB athlete taught me time management and prioritizing. Making time for homework and studying while balancing games two or three times a week and weekend-long tournaments that are exhausting is a true art that any athlete can attest to. But with the encouragement of my teammates I got through it. This past season, I was a co-captain with Blair Geissmann. We played a larger conference and district, which involved driving to St. Augustine and Lake City. We came in second in conference and second in our district, which qualified us for Regionals in Tallahassee. My years playing have been marked with great triumph and pain. I broke my leg, missing my freshman season, developed snapping hip syndrome (yes it actually is real I am not making that name up) and developed weakness in my rotator cuffs. But to me injuries are worth the triumph of winning and the fun of being with my team and I would not trade it for anything.

The International Baccalaureate program is not only known for its rigidity in the classroom, but for how much homework is consistently given to every student on a daily basis. Those students who participate in the program usually have little to no time to do extracurricular activities if they want to maintain good grades. Lauren Slavens, however, is not your average IB student. She has maintained a 4.1 GPA and has been on the varsity volleyball team since moving up from junior varsity at the end of her sophomore season. Sports and school are her life, and volleyball is something that has been a major part of her life for a very long time. Slavens was determined to make playing volleyball work, and was not willing to give up something she loves just to make her workload easier. “I did not want to be defined as just an IB student and IB wasn’t going to stop my passion of playing volleyball,” said Slavens. The key, she says, to balancing school life and sports life is making small goals for herself. Stanton students learn right away the value of time management. Slavens focuses on one thing at a time and keeps plodding through each assignment or sports goal. Many IB students find it very hard to do, especially with how overwhelming the workload can be at times. “I love volleyball and I did not want to stop playing just because of school. I have always been good at time management and this improved that even more,” said Slavens. Not only is Slavens able to balance school and athletics exceptionally well, but she excels at both. For most athletes there is always the issue of how much time to spend on school work and how much time to spend on playing and perfecting your sport. The balance between the two is very important, and one that every student athlete has to learn right away. Without a balance between the two both will not be as good as they could be. That means is a fine line that student athletes have to walk in order to make sure they do well at school and in their sport. Slavens has been playing volleyball since the fifth grade and quickly accumulated a great love for the game. She lettered twice at the varsity level, which means on her varsity jacket she has two letters on it for playing two full years at the varsity level.Volleyball has long been one of the most successful sports at Stanton, and Slavens definitely brings a lot to the team each time she steps out onto the court.Volleyball is a sport where one player can make or break the team, so it is always important

to have superb athletes as well as players who get along with each other. Slavens has made a lasting impression on Stanton volleyball and all the coaches and players, throughout her four years of playing volleyball at the school. “She is hardworking and dedicated to the program,” says Coach Sherrene Benedict. “It was a pleasure to have her in my whole program for all four years.” Going into Slavens’ freshman year at Stanton she was invited to play for the school’s summer league. She got to play with many of the current players at the time as well as some other upcoming players, and got to compete at the high school level. But during the summer league every athlete’s nightmare occurred. She was playing in a game when she hurt her leg. They took her to the hospital and they determined she had broken her leg. The break was not career ending, but it is something that ended her summer league and made her sit out her entire freshman season. The next year she was right back out there playing the game she loves, but was a little hesitant to play at first. “I was really afraid to go back to playing after I broke my leg,” said Slavens. “I was afraid that I was going to get hurt again. That was the first time I had broken a bone so it messed with my psyche for a while.” She of course went back to playing volleyball and was just as good as she was before the injury. A lot of times athletes even come back from injury playing better than they did before. She said however, that the injury was always in the back of her head and was still worried sometimes about reinjuring the leg. Another thing that did not help in getting the injury out of her mind was that the pain was still there for awhile when she played. “The first time I was able to go an entire tournament without being in a lot of pain was a huge accomplishment that I wasn’t afraid anymore,” she said. Slavens believes volleyball will be a part of her life even after she leaves Stanton for college at the end of this year. Many students play sports in high school but never play it again after their four years in school, but Slavens does not plan on letting that happen. “I love it too much to stop playing,” says Slavens. “I want to play at an intramural or club team through whatever university I end up going to.” Right now Slavens is still considering what college she wants to go to, but whatever happens she know volleyball will be apart of her life even after Stanton.

sports / december 2011 / 7


Stereotypes in Sports By HAMZA AJMAL, Reporter From generalizations to racism, stereotypes of athletes have been widespread in the sports realm for decades; in fact these stereotypes even remain a problem for today’s student athlete. Athletes and generalization go hand in hand. The most common stereotypes of athletes are related to their intelligence and physique. Sports that require physical contact, such as football or lacrosse, are seen as tough sports and their players are seen as physically imposing. Other sports such as golf, which have little to no physical contact are perceived as soft, and their athletes reserved and determined. Stereotypes such as these have only become even more prominent by society and athletes who feel they must live up to stereotypes and it’s because of this that generalizations are so prominent today. “Stereotypes are prevelant in sports today, I have been stereotyped simply because of my race and the foods I eat,” said freshmen and junior varsity soccer player Andrew Heckel. “Stereotypes are a problem, but if you just try your hardest and play your best [it doesnt matter].” A contributing factor to this overwhelming urge to act a different way than one usually does is that people expect, and sometimes even encourage this alternate personality. Though athletes cannot control what others say about them, they do have the power to control their actions and their perception among others. A common stereotype associated with athletes is that they are over confident. People sometimes think football players perceive themselves as being above school, that they should not lower themselves to performing menial assignments and tasks. This is not the case, especially for athletes at Stanton, where school is far from easy and requires a lot of effort and dedication. Athletes at Stanton have to balance their athletic, academic and social lives, and in order to maintain a position in a sport, students must maintain a GPA of 2.0 or higher. People think football players are dumb and that all they have to do is just run and catch, but as other stereotypes, it is far from the truth. “Football players actually have to be pretty smart in order to remember the numerous plays. It takes good understanding [of the game] and how certain plays work effectively,” said sophomore Joseph Dioso, linebacker for the junior varsity football team. Dioso also felt that “football players, at least at Stanton, aren’t dumb,” and that for him, academics come before athletics. Racism, one of the most notorious aspects associated with stereotypes is also one of the most commonplace. Skin color has historically been a great dividing barrier in this country, and although it is not as widespread as it once was, racism still exists. Certain sports have been more affected by racism than others. Baseball, for example, had at one time the Negro Leagues, which was a separate league for African-Americans. At that time, the notion of an AfricanAmerican player in the MLB was unheard of, mostly due to the stereotypes of the time. As America became more integrated over time, so did America’s favorite pastime. Racism still persists through jokes, but for the most part, it has largely been reduced. “There’s not much racism in sports, there are little jokes here and there, but they [coaches] don’t look at your race when selecting players,” said junior and varsity football player Troy MacGregor. Today, the athletic world is less concerned with race and instead more concerned with merit; however, shades of prejudice still persist through jokes and insults. Ridiculing an athlete, or even a person, because of their race can be offensive and distasteful and history has taught us that skin or race is not important when it comes to sports. For example, Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier when he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. As a result of his efforts African-Americans were not only being accepted in the sports world but also in everyday life in the early 1950s and 60s. Robinson is a prime example of how someone can not only influence sports life, but also everyday life. Stereotypes are not just limited to athletics, but they do persist in the athletic realm. Stereotypes can be insulting and disrespectful and it is wrong to stereotype and it should be avoided as it only causes problems. Stereotyping and generalizing a person before you even know them does not promote healthy interactions between people and it can lead to an unhealthy athletic environment which can cause alienation among players.

8 / devil’s advocate / sports

Shared Suffering By BRANDON GEORGE, Reporter

Win or lose, a team is a team. A team is a perfect machine of guys, or girls, working together. If one breaks down, the entire team takes a hit. Throughout the 2011-2012 season, the Stanton Blue Devil varsity football team faced criticism for having a losing season, yet they persevered and worked hard to win the most important game of the season: the game against Paxon. Former Stanton Varsity Football Coach Joseph Siegfried said, “Shared experiences create bonding. Shared suffering is even greater.” One cannot win unless they have tasted defeat. The team is a family, no matter the score.

photo by Sarah Roberson

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From Playgrounds to Graduation Bullying, intimidation, harassment, aggression, abuse and the steps Stanton administrators are taking to prevent it. By TAYLOR GALLOWAY, Reporter

Principals, teachers, staff members and even her aunt knew to an extent what was going on, but they did nothing to stop it. Phoebe Prince, 15, attended South Hadley High School in South Hadley, Mass., and was a victim of bullying. Prince, raised in Ireland, had just emigrated to the United States where she would start her freshman year of high school. Not long after, she started dating Sean Mulveyhill, the captain of the football team. This new relationship didn’t go over well with his former girlfriend and her five friends. Little by little, a series of text messages and verbal abuse from these “mean girls” and their two male friends broke her down. On Jan.14, 2010 Prince finally reached her breaking point. She was walking home when the girls drove by and threw cans at her. Not long after, she walked into her house and hanged herself. That night, after learning about Prince’s suicide, one of the “mean girls” wrote “accomplished” on Prince’s Facebook wall. These bullies were eventually charged with assault to human rights resulting in injury. According to foxnews.com their parents said this wasn’t a big deal, adding that all kids call each other names. As a result of the crime, the Massachusetts State Legislature passed anti-bullying legislation in March 2010, just two months after her death. Although an incident like this one seems as though it would be uncommon and would never directly affect anyone here at Stanton, in today’s world, it is a common reality for many. According to bullystatstics.org about 30 percent of teenage students are involved with bullying, and suicide is the third most common cause of death among teenagers about 4,400 deaths per year. For every suicide there are 100 attempts and more than half are a result of bullying. Although many people would read this and think no one close to them has ever thought about suicide, according to teendepression.org roughly one out of 12 teenage students have attempted or thought about it. If these numbers are true, around 132 Stanton students have either attempted or thought about taking their life. WHAT’S GOING ON AROUND STANTON Administrators and teachers don’t see half of the bullying that goes on in their schools, considering most of the cases aren’t reported. Stanton’s Principal Mrs. Nongongoma Majova said she encounters an average of two cases of bullying a month. Although the situations may be out of her control they still require her to mediate when they are brought to the school’s attention. But Mrs. Majova isn’t the only one dealing with bullying issues around Stanton, every other administrator deals with it as well. “We [the administrative staff] prevent bullying as much as possible. Our kids here take a stance against the few bullies and don’t let it take place,” said Dr. Norma Hayward, Stanton’s Assistant Principal. “I mostly deal with bullying cases that have to do with cyber bullying or something related to the boy’s locker room.” These days, bullying can follow a student long after high school, meaning if they are harmful enough towards another student, it can be on their permanent record for everyone to see. “A kid was bullying another kid, most of it was very minor things, but then it escalated to a fight so the bully got suspended,” said Stanton’s School Resource Officer Veronica Harper.

“ “Then it was discovered that the bully said the fight was coming on Facebook so the bully victim was able to press charges and the bully was eventually seen in Juvenile Justice Court, which is now on his record forever.” According to Officer Harper, students can also be suspended for up to ten days if found bullying another student. “We’ve really cracked down on the bullying issue because of how many kids are now committing suicide,” said Officer Harper. She went on to add that if a student is reported for bullying numerous times or the one bullying incident is egregious enough, they can be required to sit through a bullying class and tour a jail with their parents, as well as write a discipline essay. If the parent fails to comply they themselves can end up going to jail. This means not only does the child endure the consequences, the parent does as well. Despite the infrequency of reported bullying cases, it goes on every day, reported or not. Although it normally starts with name calling, it can gradually escalate to more harmful things. Labels like “Dumb-Blonde,” “Dirty Mexican,” “Ginger,” “Jew,” “Mega-Mind,” and “Fat-Boy” are all things students at Stanton have called each other.Yet 70 percent of Stanton students still have the impression that bullying doesn’t go on here, but that’s just it, bullying is everywhere. Many kids feel as though these words are just a harmless form of teasing when in actuality it is considered bullying. To most students, words hurt, even when they aren’t intended to. Quite often students try to make themselves look tough and say the name calling doesn’t bother them, when in fact no one is invincible. People are often bullied because they are different in some way, such as their sexual preference, religious beliefs, race, and hair color. Hearing “faggot” numerous times a day and being thrown to the ground isn’t an unknown circumstance for sophomore Adrian Morris. “People would always throw food at me during lunch, and then scream ‘faggot’ once it hit me,” said Morris. “I started cutting myself a couple months ago as a result, and if I wouldn’t have found the great friends that I have now I don’t know where I would be today.” He even admitted to his suicidal thoughts and attempt. “People made me feel like crap,” said Morris. “I ended up taking a bunch of different pills trying to kill myself but I couldn’t keep them down, it made me realize that I obviously shouldn’t try anymore.” Being able to open up to his mom and talk to her about the things he was going through helped Morris to get through these tough times. “I was finally able to tell her that I’m gay, even though she already knew it,” said Morris. “It helped me because I no longer had to pretend to like girls.” According to makebeatsnotbeatdowns.org, 86 percent of homosexual students say they experienced harassment throughout the previous school year. The site goes on to add that homosexual students are more likely to take their life than heterosexual students. While Morris faces harassment because of his lifestyle choice, other students face peer persecution because of their beliefs. One student, among many who has experienced bullying because of her religious beliefs is freshman Sophie Higdon. “This one kid saw a penny on the ground and told me to pick it up since I’m Jewish,” said Higdon. “He would always tell me to just buy my way to an ‘A,’ and ask about the Holocaust

features / december 2011 / 11


From Playgrounds to Graduation Bullying, intimidation, harassment, aggression, abuse and the steps Stanton administrators are taking to prevent it. By TAYLOR GALLOWAY, Reporter

Principals, teachers, staff members and even her aunt knew to an extent what was going on, but they did nothing to stop it. Phoebe Prince, 15, attended South Hadley High School in South Hadley, Mass., and was a victim of bullying. Prince, raised in Ireland, had just emigrated to the United States where she would start her freshman year of high school. Not long after, she started dating Sean Mulveyhill, the captain of the football team. This new relationship didn’t go over well with his former girlfriend and her five friends. Little by little, a series of text messages and verbal abuse from these “mean girls” and their two male friends broke her down. On Jan.14, 2010 Prince finally reached her breaking point. She was walking home when the girls drove by and threw cans at her. Not long after, she walked into her house and hanged herself. That night, after learning about Prince’s suicide, one of the “mean girls” wrote “accomplished” on Prince’s Facebook wall. These bullies were eventually charged with assault to human rights resulting in injury. According to foxnews.com their parents said this wasn’t a big deal, adding that all kids call each other names. As a result of the crime, the Massachusetts State Legislature passed anti-bullying legislation in March 2010, just two months after her death. Although an incident like this one seems as though it would be uncommon and would never directly affect anyone here at Stanton, in today’s world, it is a common reality for many. According to bullystatstics.org about 30 percent of teenage students are involved with bullying, and suicide is the third most common cause of death among teenagers about 4,400 deaths per year. For every suicide there are 100 attempts and more than half are a result of bullying. Although many people would read this and think no one close to them has ever thought about suicide, according to teendepression.org roughly one out of 12 teenage students have attempted or thought about it. If these numbers are true, around 132 Stanton students have either attempted or thought about taking their life. WHAT’S GOING ON AROUND STANTON Administrators and teachers don’t see half of the bullying that goes on in their schools, considering most of the cases aren’t reported. Stanton’s Principal Mrs. Nongongoma Majova said she encounters an average of two cases of bullying a month. Although the situations may be out of her control they still require her to mediate when they are brought to the school’s attention. But Mrs. Majova isn’t the only one dealing with bullying issues around Stanton, every other administrator deals with it as well. “We [the administrative staff] prevent bullying as much as possible. Our kids here take a stance against the few bullies and don’t let it take place,” said Dr. Norma Hayward, Stanton’s Assistant Principal. “I mostly deal with bullying cases that have to do with cyber bullying or something related to the boy’s locker room.” These days, bullying can follow a student long after high school, meaning if they are harmful enough towards another student, it can be on their permanent record for everyone to see. “A kid was bullying another kid, most of it was very minor things, but then it escalated to a fight so the bully got suspended,” said Stanton’s School Resource Officer Veronica Harper.

“ “Then it was discovered that the bully said the fight was coming on Facebook so the bully victim was able to press charges and the bully was eventually seen in Juvenile Justice Court, which is now on his record forever.” According to Officer Harper, students can also be suspended for up to ten days if found bullying another student. “We’ve really cracked down on the bullying issue because of how many kids are now committing suicide,” said Officer Harper. She went on to add that if a student is reported for bullying numerous times or the one bullying incident is egregious enough, they can be required to sit through a bullying class and tour a jail with their parents, as well as write a discipline essay. If the parent fails to comply they themselves can end up going to jail. This means not only does the child endure the consequences, the parent does as well. Despite the infrequency of reported bullying cases, it goes on every day, reported or not. Although it normally starts with name calling, it can gradually escalate to more harmful things. Labels like “Dumb-Blonde,” “Dirty Mexican,” “Ginger,” “Jew,” “Mega-Mind,” and “Fat-Boy” are all things students at Stanton have called each other.Yet 70 percent of Stanton students still have the impression that bullying doesn’t go on here, but that’s just it, bullying is everywhere. Many kids feel as though these words are just a harmless form of teasing when in actuality it is considered bullying. To most students, words hurt, even when they aren’t intended to. Quite often students try to make themselves look tough and say the name calling doesn’t bother them, when in fact no one is invincible. People are often bullied because they are different in some way, such as their sexual preference, religious beliefs, race, and hair color. Hearing “faggot” numerous times a day and being thrown to the ground isn’t an unknown circumstance for sophomore Adrian Morris. “People would always throw food at me during lunch, and then scream ‘faggot’ once it hit me,” said Morris. “I started cutting myself a couple months ago as a result, and if I wouldn’t have found the great friends that I have now I don’t know where I would be today.” He even admitted to his suicidal thoughts and attempt. “People made me feel like crap,” said Morris. “I ended up taking a bunch of different pills trying to kill myself but I couldn’t keep them down, it made me realize that I obviously shouldn’t try anymore.” Being able to open up to his mom and talk to her about the things he was going through helped Morris to get through these tough times. “I was finally able to tell her that I’m gay, even though she already knew it,” said Morris. “It helped me because I no longer had to pretend to like girls.” According to makebeatsnotbeatdowns.org, 86 percent of homosexual students say they experienced harassment throughout the previous school year. The site goes on to add that homosexual students are more likely to take their life than heterosexual students. While Morris faces harassment because of his lifestyle choice, other students face peer persecution because of their beliefs. One student, among many who has experienced bullying because of her religious beliefs is freshman Sophie Higdon. “This one kid saw a penny on the ground and told me to pick it up since I’m Jewish,” said Higdon. “He would always tell me to just buy my way to an ‘A,’ and ask about the Holocaust

features / december 2011 / 11


in history and then turn to me and laugh.” But Higdon isn’t the only one that has endured bullying because of her religion. Most Muslims experience bullying as well. From being referred to as “towel head” to being labeled as terrorists, these occurrences illustrate that world events can place a target on certain religious groups or even a whole race. Stanton has the most diverse school in all of Duval County Public Schools, but students still face intolerance and harassment because of their ethnicity. “I have been bullied about my race because I am darker than some African Americans,” said junior Brandi Green. According to bullysolutions.com dealing with racist bullying is much different than other forms. This form of bullying requires students to be taught from a young age to celebrate diversity as well as not making racist remarks at home. Today, high school students harass one another for a number of reasons, some serious, but some seemingly nonsensical. The term “ginger” is heard at Stanton on a day-to-day basis. This term, which refers to hair color, is just one of the many things said by those who belittle their peers. “I’ve gotten kicked, verbally assaulted and even cyber bullied because of my hair color,” said senior Brad Scull. Scull’s experience, along with the others illustrate one thing: people say and do things every day that are very detrimental to others. But why? “I think people bully others because they are jealous, so they use bullying as a way to try and downgrade you,” said Mrs. Majova. While her perspective is a valid one, television personality Dr. Phil McGraw has a more scientific opinion. “Most of the time it is modeled in the home, there are aggressive behaviors, either verbally or physically, and that becomes the norm,” said Dr. Phil in a 2011 cnn.com interview. Although these aggressive behaviors might be modeled in the home, it has been proven the bully can change the way they deal with these emotions. Time and time again sophomore Nick Kirby was called into the office at James Weldon Johnson Middle School, not because he was being checked out early or because he forgot his lunch, it was because he was a bully. Most people who didn’t know him in middle school would never guess that he walked the halls of JWJ bullying other kids. Kirby says he used to be made fun of all the time, so he gradually started to make fun of other students in hopes of stopping what was being done to him. “I had so many aggressive emotions that I took it out on others because I thought it would make me feel better,” said Kirby. “I got in trouble a handful of times, and I eventually realized that being mean to other people wasn’t solving any of my problems.” While Kirby and other former bullies have changed, many have not. Some students face repeated harassment in classrooms and on school campuses all across the country. PREVENTION AT STANTON After experiencing bullying firsthand, Gabrielle Lewis, a Stanton sophomore decided to raise awareness in hopes of helping other people. She is now the president of the Psychology Club, which was originally going to be called “Project Seven-Seventeen,” a club dedicated to preventing self-harm. At a glance, this name appears to just be a few numbers, but it means much more. Lewis first cut herself on July 17 because of bullying.

12 / devil’s advocate / features

“My purpose for this club is to help others, I saw statistics on self harm and it was baffling, self harm occurs way too often to go unnoticed,” said Lewis. According to the club’s sponsor, Stanton Guidance Counselor Joe Siegfried, self harm isn’t the organization’s only focus. “We are partnering with IGNITE to talk to students who are being bullied in order to give them an outlet that can help them,” said Siegfried who is also a member of Stanton’s Foundation Team which was started by Duval Country Public Schools 10 years ago to run schools safely and civilly. There are a number of students like Lewis who have experienced bullying to a great extent and Stanton’s administration is taking numerous steps in the right direction; they try to show students how harmful their words can be, and that there are people there to help them. One initiative introduced by the Stanton administration to help combat bullying is Challenge Day. This national movement dedicated to preventing bullying in schools, was introduced in Jacksonville through Fletcher High School, and was conducted at Stanton during the 2010-2011 school year. It is one event that was ultimately started in hopes of reducing bullying. “It was to let students know that you can speak out, you don’t have to just take it, it’s not something you deserve,” said Mrs. Majova. People were truly changed because of this event; many students realized they could finally speak out to their peers and teachers about the things that were going on in their lives. “I realized that both children and adults have so much baggage that they carry around, and when they are given a platform to say it, they do and it does a lot for them,” said Mrs. Majova. Many of the students that attended Challenge Day had a number of positive things to say about it. “It was a very eye-opening experience, it showed me that the people that I encounter everyday are more than what they appear to be,” said sophomore Isis Simmons. “People had no fear of putting themselves out there or being rejected.” Sophomore Kenneth Arnold had a similar perspective on this event. “It made me think about how much people go through,” said Arnold. “It was cool that we all were able to come out of our comfort zone to people that we didn’t even know, and learn that you shouldn’t give people a hard time because you never know what they could be going through.” HELP BEYOND STANTON There are many other things being done not only at Stanton, but on a national level as well. These organizations and clubs specifically hone in on bullying related to race and sexual preference, as well as the constant battle between girls. Though not as widespread as it was decades ago, racism still exists among today’s teen population. While racism at Stanton may not be as prevalent as Brandi Green’s experience, many students across Jacksonville do face this issue. Nationally, there is an organization called “Not in Our Town” that promotes the prevention of racist bullying. According to its website, “Not in Our Town” is an organization working together for safe, inclusive communities. This is also part of “Not in Our School,” which is like Challenge Day, but instead it dedicates a whole week to stopping hatred.

My Story

One student shares her experience and advice. By ANONYMOUS, a Stanton student

“Yeah, I hope that just made you cry, you stupid b----. I know you’re crying right now. I hope you burn in hell. I’ve hated you since my birthday, so don’t think I have no heart to say this, but after all the s--- you’ve done, you deserve every bit of it. Go drug yourself up with Advil again, no one will miss you.” This was the ending to a long hate message I received over Facebook. The girl who sent it to me used to be my best friend; she watched me go through many things in my life, including my struggle with depression and suicide. She knew my weak spot, so she attacked me there, and for a while I almost listened to her. It’s a wonder so many people have the audacity to say bullying is not an issue when an average of sixteen teenagers a day are committing suicide because of it. Bullying is not just when one kid beats up another, nor is it calling someone mean names, it is a blend of both physical or mental attacks that cause harm to the victim. Sometimes, all the harm is mental. Some people have been through worse, and in no way do I attempt to tell them that it will get better in the blink of an eye. Perhaps some people out there feel like no one understands the extent of the bullying they have gone through, and maybe we don’t. However, we do know if you give it time, it gets better, just like any other problem in life. People may read this column and think what I went through was not “real bullying” since I didn’t suffer any serious physical beatings, but bullying is more than that. By definition, a bully is ‘a person who habitually badgers and intimidates smaller or weaker people.’ In my opinion, they should change it to someone who ‘intimidates to make people feel smaller or weaker.’ Bullying is so much more than physical harm. It’s the emotional toll it takes on the person as well. I already have very low self-esteem, so when I was called those names it felt like the final straw. There are so many expectations that society expects us to meet. Today, girls are pressured to be thin, have clear skin, be tan, be smart, and nice. This pressure, along with the constant badgering of a peer, can be too much for someone to handle. I made it through, stronger than ever. Many kids think it doesn’t affect them, but it does. Subconsciously, those comments linger, and you forever judge yourself, even if you know they are not true. Just because mean, hurtful comments are said does not mean that you have to live by them. The first step to healing is to accept that it is not true. When you realize that you are better than what that person said, you also realize you are better than a label that millions of others are called. As an individual you cannot be labeled and that person has no right to label you. After all, it is proven that people point out the things in others that they dislike about themselves.

Remember there is always someone to talk to. If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts please call.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255 or visit

www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org


Stanton has their own type of club that supports homosexuals, the GSA club (or the Gay Straight Alliance.) “The GSA is an official chapter of an international network of over 4000 similar clubs that seek to provide a safe, accepting, and welcoming environment to all students regardless of sexual orientation, gender, or gender identity,” said co-sponsor of the GSA, Dr. Joel Adams. “GSA works with teachers around the campus on the ‘Safe Space’ project. Which visually indicates to students that our school is an accepting and welcoming place for all.” Bullying is something that is way too familiar to today’s teens; they have to witness it almost every day whether it be in the hallways of Stanton or in the chat rooms and social networking spaces on the Internet. The most common place for bullies to lurk is a place that is supposed to be safe, and feel as comfortable as a second home: school. Constantly torn down, harassed, and threatened is the life story of many teen students. It’s normally caused by jealousy or a lot of pent up emotions they don’t know how to deal with, and sooner or later, they are bullying. Their actions leave their victims feeling unloved, or even worse, feeling worthless. While it may not be easy to put the experience of being bullied in the past, it’s always possible. There are plenty of national, state, and local organizations, as well as people at Stanton that are more than willing to help. But according to senior Sydney Walton the best way to overcome bullying starts with a simple act. “Stand up for yourself, tell them that they can’t hurt you,” said Walton.

photo by Sarah Roberson

Bullying within a particular gender is also a big problem among today’s teens. Like the girls in the Phoebe Prince case, some girls are known for their rumor spreading, backstabbing and purposely making other girls feel bad about themselves. This phenomenon is not just found at a national level, but at Stanton as well. “She would call me ugly, and make fun of the way I dressed. She got girls and even the boy I had a crush on to torment me,” said senior Kwintara Jordan. “I started wearing big jackets so people wouldn’t see what I wore. It made me feel really upset because I was already chubby and self-conscious.” While Jordan was bullied in person, there are many students who have been bullied via the Internet, such as freshman Madeline Coleman. “This one girl that I didn’t even know messaged me calling me a rude name because I didn’t like her friend,” said Coleman. “At first it made me mad, but then I was scared because I thought they were going to confront me at school the next day, which they didn’t. They think they are cool online but won’t confront you in person.” There are many national organizations that have been set up to help girls like Jordan and Coleman. The Ophelia Project is an organization founded in hopes of creating a positive change in the environment by helping girls gain a strong sense of self. According to their website, one of their main focuses is preventing aggression, teasing, and bullying among girls. But the strides taken to try to stop bullying doesn’t stop with girls, there are also many organizations set up in order to help homosexual students. Globalgiving.org is a national organization against homophobic bullying in schools. They create a bias-free classroom by providing a teacher training program to build inclusive learning environments for students dealing with homophobia.

Devil’s Statistics In a survey conducted by the Devil’s Adovcate about bullying, a total of 400 students completed 10 questions about their experiences with bullying.

Is Bullying at Stanton an Issue?

Have You Ever Bullied Anybody?

26%

Verbally

52% No

16%

Physically

6%

Both

70% No

30% Yes

Have You Ever Felt Personally Targeted? Luckily, a majority of the answers were ‘no.’ The second highest, however, was verbally. Even calling your friend a name, jokingly, can be taken as bullying.

Out of the 44% who said they have bullied someone themselves, the majority said that they had verbally bullied. The other 56% said they have never bullied anyone this is with the considersation that calling someone a name jokingly is considered bullying.

33%

With Certain Adults

27%

No

40% Yes

28%

Verbally

56%

Never Bullied Physically

9%

7%

Tech.

Do You Feel You Could Find Help?

The amount of help available to Stanton students is ample, yet many are not comfortable enough with the staff to go to them. Remember, every staff member is here to help.

features / december 2011 / 13


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Editorial Staff 2011-2012 Katie Raymond, Editor-in-Chief Greg Todaro, Editor-in-Chief Leah Quisenberry, Student Life Editor Alexandra Morgante, Opinions Editor Kia Cooper, Campus Affairs Editor Laura Gerbec, Features Editor Jonathan Kemp, Sports Editor The Devil’s Advocate serves as the official newspaper of Stanton College Preparatory School. It is produced monthly by members of the Journalism class. The editors reserve the right to edit any material submitted to the paper for content, grammar, length, and accuracy. The Devil’s Advocate is a public forum for student expression, which encourages free exchanges of opinions concerning controversial and non-controversial community and school related issues. The ideas and advertisements expressed within the newspaper are not necessarily those of the newspaper adviser, school administration, or the Duval County Public School Board. The Devil’s Advocate accepts advertisements from all businesses in the Stanton community. The ad format can be given to the staff or the adviser, Mr. Larry Knight. Students, faculty, and parents may contact the staff and adviser at (904) 630-6760 ext. 143 or at knightl1@duvalschools.org.

Online Bullying While the advancement of the Internet has connected the world in more ways than imaginable, it brought with it an aspect of real life that people want to avoid; bullying has started to move out of school hallways and playgrounds and onto Facebook and chat rooms. With the way the Internet works, it is not hard to see how online bullying has thrived. Cyber bullying has been made easier for teens to do because without having to deal with a direct face-to-face confrontation, bullies don’t have to muster up the strength it usually takes to go through with traditional bullying. Bullying through the Internet doesn’t involve direct contact and fear of immediate repercussions, with bullies hiding behind usernames and anonymity. Take the social networking site Tumblr for example. On Tumblr, people are allowed to ask anonymous questions, and some take that as an opportunity to openly bash others. This is made even worse by Tumblr’s lack of privacy; anyone can look at anyone else’s blog without any kind of approval and send offensive and harassing private messages. Tumblr does have one safeguard however, allowing users to block certain people who they don’t want to communicate with. Other websites also allow anonymous questioning; for example, Formspring is a popular site whose main purpose is for people to submit anonymous questions about the page owner where personal questions are answered quite often. Online bullying takes on many forms beyond the stereotypical verbal attack that most people think of. For example, posting embarrassing pictures without the person’s permission is also a form of bullying. If someone is in a picture they don’t want posted for any reason, it should not be posted online. Sometimes photos are taken secretly, and they show something about someone that was both personal and private. Not only is this morally wrong, it also causes severe emotional damage to the victims. Some people find ways to justify their online actions. Some claim that comments over the Internet do not hurt anyone. An Associated Press and MTV joint poll conducted in 2009 looked at 1,247 people from ages 14-24 and found that 8 percent of cyber bullying victims have considered suicide and that over half of the students surveyed were “very” or “extremely” upset after being bullied online. The poll also shows that students who have been bullied are twice as likely to receive treatment from a mental health professional. To solve this epidemic, it is up to the everyday Internet user to help prevent online bullying. The most important thing to do is protect yourself by making sure security settings are set properly; this makes sure that people who you don’t know or that you don’t want to share information with can’t see you. Seeing online bullying happening in any way (from a harassing wall post, a whole page cruelly dedicated to making fun of someone, and everything in between), and not doing anything about it is making the problem worse. Online bullies cannot be allowed to think their actions are not noticed and not harmful. It’s up to Internet users to stand up for someone, and not let this epidemic of online bullying go unopposed.

Private vs. Public

The quality of public education has been a major topic of concern since the first private school was formed in 1852. This controversy is summarized in the question, which type of education, private or public, provides the better academic program and best opportunity to excel? We feel public schools provide a high quality education, excellent academic and athletic opportunities, and thus no annual tuition, making it superior to a private education. Stanton College Preparatory School and the Bolles School are on different levels when compared. Bolles, an independent college preparatory school, enrolls students from kindergarten through grade 12 and has more than enough money to buy state-of-the-art equipment and provide all kinds of opportunities. Likewise, Episcopal School of Jacksonville provides a superior college preparatory education for students in grades six through twelve while providing a Christian atmosphere. However, Stanton, even with a lack of private funding, is able to provide a comparable high quality education and excellent opportunities to a diverse student body. In academics, certain public schools such as Stanton surpass many local private schools. When comparing both types of schools, Stanton students have accomplished a variety of academic achievements, including many National Merit Scholars, IB diplomas, and National Hispanic Scholars. Private schools supposedly provide a better education, however, that education is usually funded by an expensive annual tuition. The U.S. Education Department reported in 2011 that children in public schools generally performed as well or better in reading and mathematics than children in private schools. Private schools like Bolles and Episcopal provide a better education to its students in comparison with Raines and Robert E. Lee High School and other lower achieving public schools. However, Stanton’s recent achievements, including being ranked number four according to Newsweek magazine, suggest that private funding and the title of private school are not needed for its students to perform, excel, and achieve academic and athletic goals. In athletics, The Bolles School’s athletic program is the ninth best in the country. The 20112012 Stanton Blue Devil’s Varsity football team (1-9) has a single win, while the Bolles Bulldogs Varsity team (11-1) lost only to Raines High School, an academically low achieving public school. Private schools also tend to dominate in club sports, such as crew and golf. Since both private and public schools offer similar sports, the opportunities are equal. Private schools have higher quality equipment that caters to every sport that student athletes participate in; therefore, private schools have certain advantages, making it an unfair comparison, with their advanced, privately-funded equipment. Even though private schools have funding, public schools have equal opportunities to excel, as seen by Raines’s win over the Bolles football team this season and other public school victories over local private schools. In extracurricular activities, the Bolles School and other private schools are able to provide students with a well funded extracurricular program while Stanton College Preparatory School only gets money from fundraising within clubs and activities. Stanton however has a relatively strong extracurricular program with 62 clubs and activities, whereas the Bolles School has 91 clubs and activities, significantly more than most public schools have. Episcopal, another private school, has a mere 42 clubs and activities, an insignificant number when compared to Stanton and Bolles. Many clubs and activities offered at local private schools are also offered at Stanton College Preparatory and other public schools. Although private schools have funding, Stanton is able to provide students with more than enough clubs and activities, which are comparable to a private school’s provision of clubs and activities. The specific aspects of education show that public schools are better than private schools. In academics, certain public schools outperform private schools, but the annual tuition suggests that privately educated children get a better education. Most private schools do outperform the majority of public schools, but Stanton’s achievements suggest otherwise. The annual tutition required to attend private schools provide athletes with the superior atheletic program. In extracurricular activities, both public and private schools have equal opportunities, around the same amount of clubs and activities, and are therefore equal.

Halos

Pitchforks

We award a halo to everyone who took the PSAT test. Sitting in the same seat for three hours straight takes great dedication... or a lot of guessing.

Steve Jobs’ recent death is unexpected and undoubtedly sad. We give cancer a pitchfork for taking another life.

We give a halo to the Stanton Blue Devil football team for beating the Paxon Eagles, with a score of 36-11! Good job guys!

We give a pitchfork to the tardy system.You can now get a tardy for lingering in school during your lunch period. How can you be late to lunch? Ridiculous.

opinions / december 2011 / 15


Issue of the Issue: Should Gay Marriage be Legalized? The views of columnists do not reflect the views of the Devil’s Advocate staff or the Stanton administration.

photos by Sarah Roberson

Many social conservatives have stated that the legalization of same-sex marriage is an attempt to destroy the institution of marriage.Yet, its legalization shows a pattern similar to civil rights movements. In 1996, 25 percent of America, and in 2011, more than 50 percent supported same-sex marriage (Gallup). Support for it is increasing quicker than ever. Social conservatives who follow dogmatic beliefs are using hypocrisy as support. Those who oppose same-sex marriage state that our government should serve the interests of the majority while ignoring the minority. Yet a majority of Americans support the legalization of gay marriage. Should we cater to this majority? After all, it is not hypocrisy to say that law should support all humans regardless of religion, sexuality, etc. According to Conservapedia (Wikipedia with systematic conservative bias), a person’s sexual orientation is chosen rationally. But if instincts are governed by the frontal lobes (involved with rational and creative thought) as they say, are our instincts like fear processed logically? Can a human being control instincts such as fear? The answer to this is no.Yet conservatives have expanded on this “base” stating that homosexuals are destroying traditions concerning marriage by creating new genders and altering the definition of marriage. This statement is rather interesting since sexuality is not chosen, genders are based upon physical characteristics, and marriage could simply be a union between two humans. Since the listed arguments that social conservatives use to oppose gay marriage are invalid, they have resorted to incoherent logic and questionable scholarship. They state that a child’s psychology is harmed by living under gay marriage and its legalization could create a slippery slope of polygamy and animal marriages (Conservapedia and “The Homosexual Agenda”). Even Pope John Paul II said, “Gay marriage is one of the most insidious and dangerous threats to the common good today.” Did children living under interracial marriages have more psychological insecurity? Even if they did, do these rates not decrease, as civil rights becomes the norm? No, because children are generally well-adjusted for legalized gay marriages and same-sex couples are proven to be as fit to care of children as heterosexuals. The legalization of gay marriage may help the children psychologically by counteracting their views of a homophobic world. In the past, equal rights movements did not lead to the idea that minorities are superior. None have proposed to (excluding “political fringe groups”) give minorities more political rights, legalize polygamy, and recognize animal marriages (it is impossible to marry an animal since it cannot give its consent). Conservapedia states that marriage is a unity between two humans of the opposite gender because of the Constitution. Even if all the words in the original document implied that marriage should only be between one man and one woman, the original document did not include the idea of women’s rights. Should we call for an end to women’s suffrage to preserve its original implications? Apparently the opposition towards same-sex marriage is founded upon invalid arguments blaming our society’s woes on homosexuality. Brainwashing children to believe that same-sex marriage is evil will revive prejudice and religious fanaticism leading to a lack of intellectual growth and increased violence. By ANHVINH DOANVO, Contributing Writer

Humorist Dave Barry once wrote “in a move that outrages traditionalists, Massachusetts legalizes gay marriage. California, not to be outdone, outlaws marriage between heterosexuals.” He was, of course, making a joke, but that joke does bring up an interesting point. Traditionalists and progressives have argued, and will continue to argue, over the legalization of same sex marriage. Marriage is considered sacred to most religions; it is even a sacrament in the Roman Catholic Church. The definition of marriage is, for several people, a religious issue. This is why attempts to define marriage are inherently flawed. The First Amendment to the United States Constitution: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…” Thomas Jefferson wrote in a letter to a church years later that that sentence means that there should be a “wall of separation” between church and state. The state cannot mandate what faith one practices or how they practice whichever they choose. That was a revolutionary concept, the epitome of freedom. Therefore, if marriage is a religious issue, then the state, by that principle, should not have the power to define it. The main argument against this point is that the state gives benefits to married couples, therefore if the states agreed to stop recognizing marriage, these benefits would need to be stopped. That is not necessarily true. As the government is a civil organization, it is reasonable that the government be able to issue licenses of civil union. These civil unions could provide couples with benefits and obligations now associated with state-recognized marriage, such as joint tax filings or hospital visitation rights. Rhode Island recently passed a bill that embraced this “wall of separation” by establishing civil unions, but allowing religious organizations to recognize or refuse these unions as marriages. None of the government’s functions serve as the arbitrator on any issue on which the people themselves cannot agree. The differences in ideas and cacophony of voices and opinions are what make the United States of America great. Winston Churchill said “if you have ten thousand regulations, you destroy all respect for the law.” A limited government allows the capacity for self governance. Marriage has survived through the years, even after attempts by various governments, as was the case under ancient Roman law, to destroy it. This was not because it was safeguarded by a government or governments. It is because marriage has been continually preserved by the people and by religions. However, marriage has survived in different strains. The definition of marriage has, though, been continuously defined by the religious groups to which the people choose to belong, and differs from religion to religion. If a religion decides to not recognize same-sex unions, that is their prerogative. If the state cannot mandate how the people of various religions practice their faiths, a constitutionally-supported viewpoint, and we accept that marriage is basically a religious partnership, then the state cannot recognize or define marriage. The legalization of same-sex marriage would represent the culmination of government attempts to tear down the wall of separation that the founders felt so necessary to construct. I feel that the definition of marriage should return to being a religious issue, and I feel that the states should keep in mind the First Amendment. By PATRICK RICKERT, Contributing Writer

Students Speak “It is between you and the man upstairs, and if you’re happy, you’re happy. We should not judge someone by their opinion of love. Love has no gender.” -La’Mika Jackson, 11th

“Personally, I’m not for it but it’s really anybody’s life and they can do whatever they want with it. I respect anybody who feels they should be gay.” -Jonah Perrin, 9th

“People disagree and they will petition for it. It is also not fair for religious people.” -Candace Walker, 11th

“Yes, because it shouldn’t matter. Straight people can get married.” -Jacy Reed, 10th

“I think that it should because you can’t tell people who they can or can’t be with.” -Shameka Sapp, 10th

“God made marriage for a man and a woman. It’s Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve.” -Emily Walker, 11th

16 / devil’s advocate / opinions


Where is the Line Drawn?

photos by Sarah Roberson

According to the website bullyingstatistics.org, verbal bullying is defined as “using demeaning language to tear down another’s self-image; bullies who use verbal techniques to excessively tease others, say belittling things and use a great deal of sarcasm with the intent to hurt the other person’s feelings or humiliate the other teen in front of others.” Bullying can have long lasting negative effects on teenagers. According to a study completed by Dr. Nestor Lopez-Duran of the University of Michigan, being a victim of bullying during adolescence and teenage years can lead to late psychological problems and to an increase in risk for psychiatric hospitalization and use of medication. It is hard to find someone that isn’t guilty of one the above actions. I cannot think of one person who has never teased or at least said one thing sarcastic to me or to one of my friends. Most of the time these people aren’t trying to bully the people they are messing around with, they are just trying to be funny. Teenagers have a tendency to take things too far and often times the teasing can become endless. When this happens, the victims of their punch lines can begin to feel like they are no longer laughing with their friends, but rather being laughed at. But when do friendly jokes turn into actual bullying? There is not, unfortunately, an easy answer to this question. Some people are sensitive, some have thick skin, some tease back, some hide their emotions. Everyone reacts to teasingdifferently, so teenagers must observe how their friends respond. Often, it is easy to tell when someone’s feelings have been hurt. It may become evident by their facial expression and they may become quiet and withdrawn. They may defend themselves or tell the person that they are upset but most likely they will try not to say anything. They may not want others to know they are insulted, in fear of more harassment. Because of this, everyone must gauge other’s behavior in order to know when to stop. One of the worst types of verbal bullying is sarcasm. Knowing whether something is meant sarcastically or not is hinged on interpreting tone of voice. If your friend misses the voice inflection that implies the statement is meant as a joke, it can be perceived as rude or as making fun of them. Sarcasm has become very much a commonplace in the English language. I think it is safe to say that a vast majority of people are sarcastic, but we have to watch how far we take it. Let us say there are two people: Person A and Person B. If every time Person B asks a question, Person A answers with sarcastic comments, chances are Person B is going to get offended. Person B is probably going to get their feelings hurt and is not going to like Person A very much. This is a prime example of why we must make sure not to over use sarcasm. Also, tearing someone down repeatedly can turn into bullying. For example, using the Persons A and B scenario again, every time Person A asks a question in math class Person B whispers to them “you’re dumb.” At first this might be funny, but after a while it will most likely start to annoy Person A and they may even start to believe it. Constantly being put down can have drastic effects on a person, including low self-esteem and no self-respect. Next time you catch yourself saying something negative to a friend, remember the effects that even a joke could have on someone. We must realize that what one person thinks is funny might be insulting to another. By ELLIOTT BEALE, Contributing Writer

The views of columnists do not reflect the views of the Devil’s Advocate staff or the Stanton administration.

College Applications With early application deadlines creeping up on students, many seniors have begun to delve into the long and strenuous search for college acceptance. This search has greatly evolved over the past decade, specifically in regards to how colleges view applications and the shift in emphasis on certain factors of those that they admit. Due to these modifications, both universities and undergraduates have altered how they accomplish the rigorous task of college admissions. Amongst these changes include the increase in the amount of total applications, which is shown through the ever-growing popularity of the use of the Common Application. This program is a single online process that involves basic information of students, and is sent to multiple colleges at once, effectively minimizing the amount of work put into college admissions by applicants. Although credited by the New York Times for the recent growth in college enrollment, the Common Application has only succeeded in increasing the number of applicants, not the amount of accepted students at these colleges, which benefits universities with an increase in the revenue rather than a larger student body. The students who use this procedure do not realize these intentions, and therefore only consider the accessibility of it and contribute to its growth. It has decreased the level of motivation put into admissions for many students, and has made the application process much less personal. While some enjoy the simplicity of the Common Application, it seems as though it limits what students are able to do in order to ensure their acceptance, providing an obstacle for many students. As for the applications themselves, preferences concerning the various aspects of undergraduate admissions have altered. Because of the heightened number of applicants, colleges must span the increase over the same quantity of employees to determine those accepted into the universities. Based on information from a recent study, the average amount of time that each is inspected is about 15 minutes, which provides very little opportunity for an applicant to prove their worth to colleges. Due to this, colleges have put higher emphasis on components like college essays and individual schedules and courses, and less emphasis on things like class rank and recommendations. In a sense, these shifts are good, as they allow students to relate more personal characteristics of themselves to these colleges, as well as to indicate to evaluators their potential in life. These changes should be praised as they create a more accurate way of depicting a student’s high school career and will hopefully continue to do so in the years to come. Students should remain aware that other changes are certainly possible, making it imperative to be up to date with what colleges look for as they continue with their applications. With this in mind, it is essential for applicants to remember that colleges will always be searching for those students who show the initiative and ability to succeed, and that the best way to get accepted into a choice college is to show these characteristics in any way possible. By ANDREW RENFRO, Contributing Writer

The Flipside of Television As of 2010, adolescents ages eight to 18 spend a minimum of seven hours and 38 minutes a day looking at media and entertainment; according to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s survey, teens spend their time surfing the Internet, watching television, talking or texting on cell phones, listening to music, and playing video games. The sad truth is that adolescents have become quite oblivious to events that impact them on a global level, let alone on a local one. Teens have opportunities to read or watch news networks like MSNBC, CNN, and FOX on the Internet, on mobile devices, and on television but choose to spend those seven and a half hours dulling their senses to the nonsense on television or online. In recent years, some television networks have geared their programs to educate teenage viewers. For example, Comedy Central airs television programs that involve a parody or satire. Even though South Park follows the lives of four third graders, it is meant to impact teenagers politically. The show depicts the imaginary town of South Park. Terry Parker and Matt Stone, parody controversies that include pro-choice, the First Amendment, environmental and economic concerns, tolerance and acceptance of homosexuality, the war on terror, and religion. In addition, the show touches upon political issues like the election of President Barack Obama and his presidency from both sides of the political spectrum. Other Comedy Central shows with the same themes are The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and The Colbert Report. These two programs spin the news to create laughter from the audience who in the process are learning about real world events. Currently, these two shows are focusing on the Republican presidential race, the first free open election in Egypt since its revolution and new status as a democracy, the Occupy Wall Street movement, and the Penn State sex and child abuse scandals. An alternative to satirized news is the regular news feed channels, which, while providing more information, lacks the comedic appeal provided by these shows. While Comedy Central utilizes satire to gain younger viewers, traditional television networks like the National Geographic and History Channels teach history. The American Revolution mini-series highlights the key wars through reenactments as the colonists fought for independence from the British. A more prominent show on the History Channel, Ancient Technology, focuses on the roots of modern technology. Aside from the History Channel and National Geographic, viewers can find networks that feature a range of programs from science and nature to religion and toddler development. Even with more modern technology educating teens, television still receives a lot of negative hype from concerned parents and older individuals about television and its influence on the younger generation. However, the recent decades of programming have brought plenty of benefits to equal or even outweigh the concerns. By ISHMAIL DOWRIDGE, Reporter

opinions / december 2011 / 17


The Artist’s Corner

The Artist: George Abraham “Pen, sometimes Pencil” nothing else but mind soul and paper and pen, sometimes pencil if I feel the desire. my heart exists in undefined Words, and my pen, sometimes my pencil, is the dictionary to unlock Truth.

“Her Chemical Romance” that Mirror she Gazes into Obsessively that Phone she Texts on so Frequently that Mole she cannot Hide; Imperfection frightens her. Narcissism written all over her Facejust a Side-effect of her Dependency

As a pianist for 10 years, poetry editor for the IB Mag, and member of The Expressionists, people constantly ask me how I maintain my sanity with all this on my plate on top of being in IB. Truth be told, I would not nearly be successful in any of my academic pursuits without the arts. There have been days when everything piles on me at one time, and I cannot do anything but sit and panic at the massive amounts of work. On days like these, I can always find solace in Debussy’s piano works. I have developed this bond with Impressionism that cannot be surpassed by any other form of music. There have been days when my emotions run wild, and they impede me from finishing my work (or starting it, for that matter). Days when I feel crushed by judgmental ignorance and nothing anyone can say or do will make me feel better. That’s when I get my journal out and write. I write without plan, without censor, without hesitation. I write for the sake of being heard. I write to be free, and to spread truths to set others free. I do not write with the intention of gaining attention, or pity, or praise. I write purely to make a statement. As for inspiration, I generally write about random thoughts, the deaths in my family, or events I pick up on throughout the day. I tend to sit around and think a lot, and often, these thoughts are great inspirations for some of my greatest poems. I experienced a series of deaths in my family at a young age, and I often find myself dwelling on loss. However, my greatest source of inspiration is the world around me, and random occurrences that happen throughout the day. I am in a constant mission to seek meaning, and understand the world, and this is exactly “the secret to my success” as a writer.

RESTAURANT REVIEW

Milano’s Pizza is an Italian sports bar located on the Southside of Jacksonville. At first, it may seem you are only going to see people at the bar watching the game, or seeing several televisions around, but it is much more than that. Upon walking in the restaurant, the space may be a little overwhelming. There is plenty of space to choose your own seating, and the arrangements are enough to seat a family of ten at a time. Towards the back of the restaurant, there is an open front kitchen to allow you to see all the cooking that is going on. About five minutes after you are seated, the server will come and greet you with fresh garlic breadsticks. The menus presented have three different sections, including drinks, entrees, and deserts. There are vague descriptions on the menu, but it is enough to get the gist of what your

Local

food will look like. The prices are more than reasonable, which is why it is a good eatery for everybody. After receiving your food, the first thing that may catch your attention would be the decoration of the plate. All of the herbs used to decorate the plate make it more appealing to your senses. The Chicken Marsala looks like it came from a five star restaurant. There are noodles covered with mushrooms and chicken with gravy, sprinkled with pieces of cilantro. After the first bite into the entrée, the flavors are mixed with sweet spices and smothered in mushrooms. The zeppolis, which is a famous Italian dessert, are like mini pieces of funnel cake with chocolate drizzle. Once eating the first bite of this classic dessert, it feels like you are suddenly tasting the festivities of Italy and its culture. Milano’s is not only a place

18 / devil’s advocate / student life

By ALEXIS BROWN, Reporter to eat, it is also a great place to enjoy a game with family and friends. The busiest days are always on a Saturday, Sunday, or Monday, when most games are aired on television. The bar is separated from the rest of the restaurant so people can enjoy their food and the game. From the food to the atmosphere, Milano’s is a great place to enjoy a nice get Key together or a   Jaguars’ game. 

Walking into what seems to be a little Italian cottage, the spices and mixtures of herbs rush into your nose as you realize the right decision was made. As the greeter escorts you to your seat, the feeling of being in Italy becomes real. Carrabba’s, a chain restaurant, has many locations around Jacksonville, Jacksonville Beach, and the Orange Park - Horrible area. This franchise - Okay - Good first opened on Dec. Great ��� 26, 1986, in Houston,  - Exceptional ‘ - Inexpensive Texas. Later in 1993, ‘‘ - Moderately pricey

‘‘‘

photo from the internet

- Costly

Rating: Price:‘ ‘ Location:12620 Beach Blvd. Telephone: (904) 646-9119

Rating: Price:‘ Location: 1750 Wells Rd. Telephone: (904) 278-1077

Chain

Carrabba’s joined the OSI Restaurant Partners, and opened ten new locations in Texas and Florida. The Italian setting gives a warm feeling where it feels like you are more than welcome. The staff is alert and happy to meet your every need. All of the waitresses wear a white oxford shirt with long black slacks, with their hair in a ponytail. The waiters are usually in the back, also wearing a white oxford with black slacks, and with nicely groomed hair. As you are seated, the warm loaf of bread, oil and herbs, and your drink of choice come in less than a minute after you’re seated. The menu may be a bit hard to read because of the plethora of Italian words and sayings, not to mention the mix of English and Italian may be confusing, but the servers are more than helpful with providing a clear understanding of

the items. The variety of food offered correlates with prices and choices of your selection. The written description is exactly what you will see on your plate. One of the most popular choices on the menu, the Chicken Marsala, is a dish that has a very distinct flavor. The meat is sautéed with a mushroom based marsala gravy over it. As a side you can choose soup, salad, broccoli, rice pilaf, or pasta. The flavors are balanced with a variety of herbs and spices such as, garlic, egg wash, Italian breadcrumbs, and arugula. After eating you would want to leave a tip, and schedule to come back because of the general hospitality received.


NConfess

That Awkward Moment When...

S

By ALEXIS BROWN, Reporter

The student body at Stanton is used to seeing the I Saw You’s conveying the secret attractions of the opposite sex, the Devil’s Advocate decided to do this from a bullies perspective, highlighting the reasons for a person’s teasing ways. Scared 2 Say Srry

Life is a series of random and planned events; some are funny, some are serious.The Devil’s Advocate decided to make a list of the top five most awkward moments that happen to everyone...(well, almost everyone).

Afraid 2 B Me

You: The nerdy girl on my bus who spends all her time studying; I tease you on a daily basis for your lack of friends and your intelligence.

You: Confident in your ways, with an awesome sense of style, your confidence makes me wish I could be who I really am.

Me: The jerk who could use a friend himself, but lets his pride get in the way. Tutor me?

Me: The super pumped up jock I could never show how really insecure I am about the way I feel about you.

Your Kicks Make Me Jelly

The Shadow to Your Shine

You: The smart kid with the funny glasses and the cool Nike shoes, your mom’s peanut butter & jelly is my favorite sandwich that’s why I steal it everyday.

You: The kid with a learning disability and the supportive parents whose star-like qualities on the piano make me want to succeed.

Me: The bully with an alcoholic father and the donated Nike shoes, I wish my parents could afford what you have.

Me: The girl wishing for some attention I may be better at expressing myself but the brighter you shine the more I want to put you down.

If you are interested in submitting an I Saw You please deliver them to Room 204 or email them to stantondevilsadvocate@gmail.com

1.

That awkward moment when you’re singing and dancing to a hot new song, and your mother walks in your room only to find you playing air guitar and “dropping it like it’s hot.”

2.

That awkward moment when you see your friends talking to your mortal enemy, but they don’t know you’re enemies so they try to get your attention, and you act like you didn’t hear them, so then you have to act like the person you hate is not standing two feet away from you.

3.

That awkward moment when you send the “love of your life” a three page expressing the feelings that you have felt for the last three years, and they reply back saying “K,” or “I like someone,” and you go to school the next day and avoid them all day.

4.

That awkward moment when you’re watching a provocative scene in a movie with your parents, and you whip out your phone like you were really texting your “bff Jill,” but your parents know you were really watching the movie from the corner of your eye.

5.

That awkward moment when you’re talking loud in a movie because it’s an action flick, and then it goes silent during that suspenseful part right before an explosion, and everyone starts to look at you.

²THE Playlist

Motivational Song of the Issue:

Name

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Dear Prudence Stereo Hearts (feat. A... Burn it Down Domino Barbie Girl (Radio... Rolling in the Deep Ashin’ Kusher Lights Please How to Hate (f... Downfall of Us All Lies Breathe Me Nobody’s Perfect I Do It Sexy and I Know It The Only Exception Cigaro Breaking Down War of My Life

22

I’m Breaking Down War of My Life

Time

#2 / Motivational Playlist Artist

3:55 3:31 2:45 3:51 3:17 3:48 3:48 3:28 4:38 3:29 3:17 4:36 3:20 3:35 3:19

The Beatles Gym Class H... AWOLNATION Jessie J Aqua ADELE Kid Cudi J Cole Lil Wayne A Day to Rem... Fenech-Soler Sia Hannah Montana Big Sean LMFAO

4:39 4:15

Brinson John Mayer

4:27 Paramore 2:11 System of a Down

Album

The Beatles (White... Stereo Hearts (feat... Megalithic Symphony

Domino-Single

Aquarium 21 Man On the Moon, Vol. I... Cole World-The Si... Tha Carter IV Homesick Demons-EP Breathe-Me-Single Hannah Montana 2... Finally Famous Sorry for Party Rock Brand New Eyes

Mezmerize Holy Hip Hop, Vol. 10 Battle Studies

Genre

Rock Rock Rock Pop Pop Pop Hip Hop/Rap Hip Hop/Rap Hip Hop/Rap Rock Alternative Pop

Student

Peyton Maclay (11th grade) Elsa Bengu (10th grade) Alexandra Powers (12th grade) Avery McCall (10th grade) Joshua Davis (9th grade) Gigi Lescoufloir (10th grade) Rondai Jerido (10th grade) Chanelle Glover (12th grade) Josh Burrus (9th grade) Vanessa Glomo (10th grade) Marco Lopez (11th grade) Meagan Griffith (11th grade) Christian Carter (11th grade) Teen Pop Hip Hop/Rap Krestina Merko (9th grade) Pop Jilliah Rivera (9th grade) Alternative Gisela Henderson (9th grade) Rock Jasmine Mason (12th grade) Christian & Gospel Gerald Wright (11th grade) Rock Amanda Nelson (12th grade)

Up

Youth of the Nation by P.O.D.

ïW

To listen to this song visit our blogsite: www.devilsadvocatepaper.blogspot.com

student life / december 2011 / 19



Devil's Advocate Issue 2 (2011-2012)