Detroit Mercy Law Docket-2020

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DOCKET

FA L L 2020

THE UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT MERCY SCHOOL OF LAW MAGAZINE

EDUCATING THE COMPLETE LAWYER & CELEBRATING OUR COMMUNITY INSIDE

Reflections on the Pandemic

Alumni Adjuncts

Class of 2020


TABLE OF

CONTENTS  FALL 2020 IC

Antoine M. Garibaldi, PhD University President

Stay Connected

1

Message from the Dean

2

Feature: Reflections on the Pandemic

6

Alumni Adjuncts

12

Law Clinics

14

Meet the Dean’s Fellows

Communications Specialist Docket Editor

16

Celebrating our Students

Jennifer Rumschlag

20

Class of 2019 Employment Outcomes

22

Alumni State House Representatives

Director of Alumni Relations

24

Welcome New Faculty & Administrators

Sam Kojiro

26

Recent Faculty Publications

28

Donor Spotlights and Thank You Notes

30

Year in Review

32

Alumni Association & ABLA Presidents’ Messages

34

Class Notes/Remembrance

BC

Upcoming Events

Phyllis L. Crocker Dean

Grace Henning

Associate Dean of Enrollment and Communications

April Ellison

Publication Design

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU!

We welcome press releases, photos and updates about Detroit Mercy Law alumni.

Please send information to: Communications Office University of Detroit Mercy School of Law 651 E. Jefferson Avenue Detroit, MI 48226-4386 law@udmercy.edu

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MESS AG E F ROM THE D E A N

"Educating the complete lawyer takes an entire community of people working together. At Detroit Mercy Law, we are fortunate to have so many people dedicated to educating the next generation of complete lawyers." IN THIS ISSUE OF THE DOCKET, WE CELEBRATE ALL ASPECTS OF OUR COMMUNITY AND REMEMBER THAT THE STRENGTH OF OUR COMMUNITY IS OUR PEOPLE. I

am proud of how the Detroit Mercy Law community came together when we were first faced with the COVID-19 pandemic. We faced, and continue to face, challenges head on by working together. Alumni and friends reached out to offer support. Faculty and administrators put the best interest of our students first. Our students adapted and worked hard to succeed in their courses, clinics, and job placements. We recognize our alumni adjunct professors in this issue. Our adjunct professors are experts in their field and allow us to offer a wider array of courses. We are delighted alumni from both our US and Canadian & American Dual JD Programs come back to teach our students. We also highlight current students in this issue: their impressive work as 1Ls in mini-clinics that help those in need and give them hands-on experience

early in their legal education, their leadership roles in student organizations, and their recognition from outside the law school for the social justice work they do, all of which makes us so proud. This past year, we built on our strengths and grew as a community. We welcomed new students and new faculty and administrators. We celebrated new scholarships in honor of alumni that make such a difference for our students. We recognized graduates securing meaningful employment and opportunities to serve. We came together for events throughout the year, some familiar like Red Mass, and others new like the Expungement Clinic at the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe Reservation. Through it all, we stayed true to our mission to serve others, to work for justice. You will see all of this celebrated in this issue of the Docket. Throughout my time as dean I have begun my remarks in any setting by saying “I have the privilege of being the dean at Detroit Mercy Law.” It is true. This is a welcoming, inclusive, diverse, and caring community. I am honored to be a part of it. Next summer you will welcome a new dean (I am stepping down as dean and retiring in June 2021). I know you will embrace that person and together you will continue the school’s mission to educate the complete lawyer.

Phyllis L. Crocker

Dean and Professor of Law

DETR OIT MERCY LAW 1


REFLECTIONS ON THE PANDEMIC THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC BROUGHT DETROIT MERCY LAW TOGETHER IN WAYS WE NEVER IMAGINED WOULD BE NECESSARY. We are proud of our building and location in the heart of

Downtown Detroit, so it was difficult in mid-March of 2020 when we came to the realization that we could no longer gather together safely in our building. We were quickly reminded, however, that our true strength lies not in our building, but in the people that make up our community. Alumni, faculty, administration, staff, students, and friends came together in unprecedented ways to help one another and support our community.

STUDENT EMERGENCY RELIEF FUND The Detroit Mercy Law community helped students facing unforeseen financial emergencies due to COVID-19 through the creation and funding of the Student Emergency Relief Fund. Generous donations from alumni, faculty, staff, and friends, along with a $25,000 grant from Access Lex, helped to ensure students had the necessary financial support to focus on succeeding in their courses. The fund helped students cover emergency housing expenses, avoid eviction, pay utilities, support dependents, avoid food insecurity, and upgrade technology so they could participate in online classes during the pandemic. We continue to accept donations to the fund as part of an ongoing initiative to ensure we have resources on hand to support students who unexpectedly face financial emergencies during their legal studies.

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PARTNERSHIP WITH POPE FRANCIS CENTER AND CITY OF DETROIT During the pandemic, the Detroit Mercy Law student parking lot on Larned Street gained a new purpose. With tents up and heaters on, the parking lot became a space for Detroit’s homeless population to receive services while practicing social distancing through a partnership with the Pope Francis Center and the City of Detroit.

The Pope Francis Center, which operates next door to Detroit Mercy Law’s downtown building, is dedicated to serving the city’s homeless population. The week of March 16, the Center closed its doors to protect the health of guests and volunteers in light of the COVID-19 crisis. Still dedicated to serving hot meals and providing a safe place of rest, the Center began serving out of a small tent on the sidewalk. However, this tent did not provide the space necessary for social distancing. This led Fr. Tim McCabe, Executive Director of the Center, to call Dean Crocker to ask if they could use the law school’s student parking lot. Dean Crocker immediately said yes, which allowed for meals to be served and medical checks to take place in the parking lot, all while keeping proper social distance. Additionally, at the request of the Mayor of Detroit, Mike Duggan, a truck equipped with showers and restrooms was provided by a company used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and parked in the student lot, allowing for these services to also continue with social distancing for the Center’s guests.


HANDS-ON LAWYERING Social distancing did not stop our students from Many Detroit Mercy Law students extern in judicial chambers gaining hands-on lawyering experiences through during the summer after their first year of law school. This year, like clinics, externships, and summer associate positions. prior years, students continued to secure these highly-competitive Like the rest of the legal community, student placements. Invir Dhanoa Dual ˈ22 worked as an intern for Judge clinicians and externs embraced technology and Victoria Roberts of the United States District Court for the Eastern continued providing legal services to clients and District of Michigan. employers. Similar to practicing attorneys, student “The judicial community has adapted clinicians used video conferences to connect with clients and supervising attorneys. Externs worked effortlessly to the pandemic. I’ve seen remotely to support judicial chambers, government that the legal community is willing offices, and public interest organizations. to adapt to make sure we can all Many Detroit Mercy Law students joined Lakeshore Legal Aid to help those in need during keep working through a crisis. This the pandemic, such as the unemployed seeking resilience and creativity shown by the benefits, tenants facing evictions, and survivors of domestic violence. Through Zoom, these legal community leads me to believe students were sworn in as student clerks by Chief that we can make things work, no Justice Bridget Mary McCormack of the Michigan matter what comes at us.” Invir Dhanoa Dual '22 Supreme Court. Cherish Lott ˈ22 reflected on Prior to the pandemic, many students the experience: secured summer associate positions with law firms and corporations. Their summer experiences, although not what they “In full courtroom had originally envisioned, provided them with the opportunity to attire, at my experience firsthand how lawyers and the legal profession would bedroom desk, adapt during the pandemic.

coffee nearby, puppy at my feet— I took an oath. Not only to uphold the

Cherish Lott '22

U.S. and Michigan Constitutions, but to aid

“What I’ve learned working through this pandemic is that you never stop growing, learning, and developing as a communicator. With online video conferencing replacing traditional in-person meetings, you have to learn

those seeking our legal aid services with the

to adapt to make sure that you are

knowledge I currently hold, and to do so with

effectively conveying your message

the utmost confidence, integrity, and respect.

over the virtual platform.”

While not the most conventional time in

— Joseph Kuzmiak, ˈ21, Butzel Long

our society, I feel so blessed to

“The biggest thing that I have learned while

be given this opportunity and

working through this pandemic is that

hope to be an asset to the

excellent representation of a client cannot

team and staff attorneys of

be halted by physical separation. It is

Lakeshore, even remotely.

paramount to adapt and communicate and

I cannot wait to be an

ensure that clients are receiving the help

advocate for those who need

and representation they are entitled to.”

one. This is the reason I came to law school.”

Joseph Kuzmiak '21

Stephanie Stavrou ˈ21, Honigman

Stephanie Stavrou '21

DETR OIT MERCY LAW 3


RECOG N IZ I NG

THE

C L A SS OF 2020

THE COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY CELEBRATING THE DETROIT MERCY LAW CLASS OF 2020 should have

been on Friday, May 8, 2020. We are proud of all that our graduating students have accomplished. We could not let this milestone pass unrecognized. Our faculty, administration, and staff put together a special video to celebrate our graduates.

John Luke Brithinee and Amanda Obrycki Brithinee celebrate their graduation from Detroit Mercy Law from their home.

Sukriti Saxena celebrated her graduation from Detroit Mercy Law at home with her dog, Saber, and fiancé. Though her parents and brother could not be there, Saxena was still able to celebrate with her fiancé doing her hooding.

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Shannon Brown, pictured with her fiancé, celebrates becoming the second Detroit Mercy Law graduate in her family. Her mother, Angela Medley graduated in 2014.


VIVIERE EX MISSIONE AWARD VERONICA BELTRAN Veronica Beltran at the University of Mississippi School of Law, where she represented Detroit Mercy Law co-leading a two-hour Continuing Legal Education (CLE) about asylum, immigration law enforcement and current changes to immigration law under this administration. Beltran spoke to attendees about her experiences working with the Detroit Mercy Immigration Law Clinic and serving as a volunteer researcher with the ACLU of Michigan.

THE VIVERE EX MISSIONE AWARD — LATIN FOR “TO LIVE OUT THE MISSION” — is presented annually to graduating

students who best exemplify the mission of Detroit Mercy. Typically, this award is presented to the recipient as a surprise at the commencement ceremony. The 2020 recipient of the award for the School of Law is Veronica Beltran. As a staff member at Detroit Mercy Law’s Immigration Law

Alyssa Minnec celebrates her graduation from her home.

Clinic, Beltran supports the professors and students as they help people seeking asylum in the United States. Her work Arrielle Hall celebrates her graduation with her dog Beary from Detroit Mercy Law, wearing a traditional Thai money lei.

with immigrants continues as an executive board member of the Hispanic and Latino/a Law Student Association. She also volunteers and recruits other students to volunteer at immigrant and refugee legal clinics in Detroit.

Keyontay Humphries celebrates her graduation from home with her family via Zoom. DETR OIT MERCY LAW 5


A L U MNI A DJU NCT S

EDUC AT I NG

THE

COM PLE TE L AW YER

Adam Wenner `11: Judicial Clerkship Seminar Adam Wenner `11, adjunct professor and partner at Honigman, interviewed with Judge Julian Abele Cook, Jr. of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan three times before becoming a judicial intern. “Persistence is critical,” Wenner commented. Wenner said that becoming a judicial intern was not something he considered before it was suggested by Detroit Mercy Law faculty members. “They said if you’re interested in writing and learning how judges think there’s no better way.” “I was fortunate to ultimately accept a judicial internship position with Judge Cook,” stated Wenner. “The skills I learned while interning with him said to me that clerking was really something worth pursuing and putting a lot of effort into.” After graduating, Wenner went on to secure two judicial clerkships, one with Judge Cook, followed by one with Judge Nancy G. Edmunds of the United States District Court to the Eastern District of Michigan, though the path was not easier than when he decided to become an intern. “I remember the process; I remember the setbacks,” he said. “I interviewed multiple times for a clerkship before I landed one.” Wenner says that being a judicial clerk helped his career in private practice. “Clients and senior partners want to know what it’s like on the ‘inside,’” he commented. “After spending nearly four years clerking for two judges, I have the ability to shed some light on those issues. That perspective has led to numerous opportunities to run large cases for highly-sophisticated entities.” In 2015, Wenner began teaching the judicial clerkship seminar at Detroit Mercy Law. “Securing a federal clerkship is extremely

competitive. The purpose of the seminar is to simulate the clerkship experience so students are equipped to hit the ground running,” Wenner explained.

“Teaching at the law school has been tremendously rewarding. It is refreshing, particularly after a long day of being on the phone and dealing with the handwringing that is a lot of litigation, to walk into a room of students that are energized and excited to learn.” “I like to look back on the first and the last piece of writing students submit to see the growth in their style, tone, and confidence,” Wenner said. “I’m always amazed by the level of talent, ambition, and intellectual curiosity displayed by the students, and it’s an honor to be part of their journey.” Each year, Wenner invites a federal judge to speak with his seminar students and partners with the Career Services Office to open the conversation up to all Detroit Mercy Law students. This conversation allows students the opportunity to hear the perspective of a federal judge on intern and clerk hiring in federal courts. The opportunity to hear directly from a judge before even applying is invaluable for students and has inspired many to pursue the clerkship experience.

JUDICIAL CLERKSHIPS Lindsay Lane ‘19 Hon. Joel D. Applebaum, United States Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Michigan

Kory Steen ‘18 Hon. Avern Cohn, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan, 2018 -2019

Michelle Shember ‘19 Magistrate Judge Patricia T. Morris, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan

Celeste Kinney ‘18 Hon. Victoria A. Roberts, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan

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Nadia Maraachli ‘17 Magistrate Judge Stephanie Dawkins Davis, United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan, 2017-2019


AL UM NI ADJUN CTS

Charity Dean `15: Professional Responsibility When Charity Dean `15 entered law school, she knew she was going to be a prosecutor. “I only visited one school. I’m a Detroiter through and through. When I visited [Detroit Mercy Law], I could sense that it was very much Detroit. The commitment to social justice and service made it a no brainer for me,” Dean explained. In 2014, Dean had the opportunity to hear then newly elected Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan speak at the school. She described how, at the end of his talk, the mayor appealed to the students. “He said we’re starting the Detroit Land Bank and we want law clerks.” Dean did not think much of it at the time. “I didn’t really even know what a Land Bank was. I’m very much vocal. I thought I’m going to be a court room. Also, I already had another job.” At the urging of Professor Richard Krisciunas, a former adjunct professor, Dean decided to go work for the Land Bank one day a week. “I was just inspired. Eventually, I quit my other job and I started working at the Land Bank full time...Back then the mayor would come over every week and meet with the staff. The staff was so small that everyone would go in [to the meeting], the receptionist, the interns, everyone.” Since graduating in 2015, Dean was able to grow in city government and is now the Director of Civil Rights, Inclusion, and Opportunity for the City of Detroit. Though she is not a prosecutor as she was once sure she would be, Dean says “it has been just an amazing experience and it happened because of Detroit Mercy Law.” In addition to working for the city, Dean now teaches Professional Responsibility as an adjunct. “I get to bring a

inspired to teach Professional Responsibility. I wanted to help students to understand the ethical responsibility of what it means to be a lawyer.” “I think it’s important for lawyers to know, once you’re sworn in, it doesn’t change whether or not you’re on the clock.” Dean explained.

“Whether you work at a law firm or you are a public servant working for the city, as an attorney, you hold a great privilege and responsibility. I want to make sure my students understand this and are prepared for the real world.” In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, Dean notes that “there are going to be new concerns as it relates to privilege and confidentiality when you cannot be present with your client. How do you respond as an attorney during an emergency? When you’re in a global pandemic but you need to be able to offer your client the opportunity to talk to you in a confidential way and you can’t go to the prison, how do you do that and keep your professional responsibility of confidentiality? Those are the questions we are going to explore in my class that we would not have anticipated needing to have a conversation about.” Dean is grateful for the opportunity to be back at Detroit Mercy Law. “I really did miss the law school. It really is a joy and privilege to be able to do what I do.”

different type of real-world experience. A lot of [other adjuncts] are in firms, but there are so many lawyers who work in public service, so, as an adjunct, I get to bring that additional perspective to the classroom,” Dean explained. Though she passed the bar on the first try, Dean had a long character and fitness journey. “I represented myself to the Board of Bar Examiners and I got through. Immediately afterwards I started helping people that had the same issue. I began to learn about what it meant to be a lawyer from the professional side. I really was

DETR OIT MERCY LAW 7


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EDUC AT I NG

THE

COM PLE TE L AW YER

Jennifer Dukarski `10: Emerging Mobility Technology When Jennifer Dukarski BME `96, JD `10, adjunct professor and shareholder at Butzel Long, entered law school, she had already been working as an engineer for about a decade. Having graduated from University of Detroit Mercy College of Science and Engineering, she knew that Detroit Mercy Law would be the right fit for her. “I knew the core values of Detroit Mercy Law would support my academic interests while challenging me to both be good and do good,” Dukarski commented. Transitioning from one field to another is never easy, which is why Dukarski now dedicates time to helping others through the transition. “I’m always ready to help those with an engineering or science background contemplate a transition to law,” she said.

“Often our conversations bring to light what excites them about the law, makes them uncertain about a change, and what they need to do to set the course for success when they start law school.” Dukarski focuses her practice at the intersection of law, technology, and communications with an emphasis on the legal issues arising from emerging and disruptive innovation. Beyond her practice, Dukarski brings her background as an engineer directly to students in the classroom as an adjunct professor, teaching Emerging Mobility Technology. “I’ve been impressed by the passion for the topic and the thoughtfulness of the students in the concepts of integrating mobility into our communities without abandoning the most vulnerable stakeholders,” she commented. “Serving as an adjunct has inspired me and challenged me to make sure I’m keeping social justice on my radar in my practice.” In her class, Dukarski focuses on how every student has experiences that will help them be successful as lawyers. “I’m able to show students the intersection of the law with other paths they may have travelled,” she said. “By showing them, in a practical manner with real-life examples, how a job, an internship, or even past coursework can help build a connection with a client, I’m giving them a differentiator that will help them shine.” 8  D O C KE T | FA L L 202 0


PATENT DRAFTING COMPETITION

Yafeez Fatabhoy `18: Intellectual Property Law Frim Program Yafeez Fatabhoy `18, adjunct professor and associate at Dickinson Wright, wanted to attend a smaller law school after completing his undergraduate degree in neuroscience at a large public university. “I had a great experience in undergrad, but I felt like a number in the whole system,” he explained. “I went for a tour at Detroit Mercy Law and I remember people in the office already knew my name. That was one of the things that sealed it for me.” The personal touch that Fatabhoy felt at Detroit Mercy Law is something he brings to his intellectual property practice. “I get to know the inventor’s story,” Fatabhoy explained.

“Being able to help someone on that frontline and make sure their rights are protected with something so important, especially when they’re vulnerable, has been hugely important to me in my practice.” Since graduating, Fatabhoy has stayed involved at Detroit Mercy Law. He served as a mentor to an Intellectual Property Law Fellow and is also a member of the newly formed Alumni Council, which works to serve new Detroit Mercy Law alumni. “I love the law school, every chance I can get back there, I try to,” he said. In January 2020, Fatabhoy began teaching the Intellectual Property Law Firm Program. The Law Firm Program is a simulated experience that gives students the opportunity to put their lawyering skills to work. In a Law Firm Program course, students work as a team of junior attorneys under the direction of the professor who approaches the class as the supervising senior attorney. Students are given assignments that are representative of the type of work new attorneys are expected to perform, such as drafting and negotiating contracts, taking depositions, and writing motions and arbitration agreements.

DETROIT MERCY LAW COHOSTED THE MIDWEST REGIONAL PATENT DRAFTING COMPETITION for

the fifth consecutive year on March 13-14, 2020 in partnership with Windsor Law. Detroit Mercy Law’s close proximity to the Midwest Regional U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), which is also located in downtown Detroit, helped to develop the connections that ultimately led to the competition partnership. Additionally, the Midwest regional office is under the leadership of Damian Porcari ’84, who has served as the Regional Director since 2018. Deanna Kossaras `13, intellectual property counsel at Harman International, and Shannon Smith `13, shareholder at Reising Ethington, who have been friends since law school, coached the 2020 Detroit Mercy Law competition team: Chandler Dorris `20, Jeremiah Foley `21, Fadi Abuzir `22, and Catherine Mitchell `21. This year the competition took place virtually due to the global pandemic. The Midwest regional office had the technology that allowed for this. Teams competed via WebEx, while judges and USPTO staff were at the USPTO offices. A special thanks to Kelly Burris of Burris Law, who has been the title sponsor every year, for her generosity and support of our mission of educating the complete lawyer.

Drawing on his own experience, Fatabhoy creates assignments he thinks will benefit students in the long run. “As a lawyer, writing is the most important thing you do. In the program, I have students submit drafts to me every week.” Fatabhoy believes that creating multiple drafts improves writing skills and also “simulates real law firm life, because you have to do that with your partners, you have to check in with them and tell them what you’re doing, what direction you’re going in.” While teaching means that Fatabhoy is often dealing with legal theory, he says that sometimes doing what is best for your client means moving beyond theory. “Being a complete lawyer means realizing that just because you can make the argument theoretically, doesn’t mean it’s a good solution. You have to create options that your clients can live with.” DETR OIT MERCY LAW 9


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Joyce Reasonover `92: Criminal Trial Clinic Joyce Reasonover `92, adjunct professor and criminal defense attorney, always had the goal of becoming an attorney. “I came from a very oppressed area and I saw how people were being taken advantage of– from the police or from attorneys who were just trying to get their money or weren’t guiding them,” she explained. “I wanted to start advocating on behalf of people.” Reasonover has practiced criminal defense for over 15 years. “The neighborhood I came from is what made me go into criminal law. I was somebody who could understand clients and where they came from.”

“Everyone has a story and you need to take your time and listen to that story. You can’t judge anyone. You would be surprised why people do the things that they do. The people who have been called criminals aren’t necessarily criminals.” Since 2016, Reasonover has been an adjunct professor in the Criminal Trial Clinic. In the clinic, students represent misdemeanor defendants in the 32A District Court in Harper Woods and the 36th District Court in Detroit. Students interview clients, review discovery, prepare motions, conduct plea negotiations, and appear on the record. Over the course of a semester, students spend over 100 hours working in the clinic. “I worked in the clinic while in law school,” Reasonover said. “I was able to represent clients there and that was an invaluable experience for me.” For the former kindergarten teacher who also taught reformed gang members, teaching in the clinic was the perfect opportunity to combine her skills.

“I think we should be getting students into clinics as soon as possible. Because you can sit in a classroom and you can try to grasp it, but it doesn’t really hit you. You get into that clinic and you can say ‘I get it.’” The first thing Reasonover wants her students to understand is that “these are real people you’re representing. It’s not about you at all. It’s all about them and your job is to advocate for them the best you can.” “Everything you do as an attorney is a conversation and a story. You have to have a conversation with the judge; your client is telling you a story,” Reasonover explained. “It’s not about your pride or how much you know; you’re advocating the best you can for your client. You didn’t create the circumstances – you’re just trying to make sure justice is served on behalf of your client.”

“And it’s all about being ethical. I can’t stress that enough with my students.”

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AL UM NI ADJUN CTS

David Campbell `04: Torts David Campbell Dual JD `04, adjunct professor and partner at Bowman and Brooke, knows what it’s like to study law in a time of unforeseen crisis. “I started classes at Detroit Mercy Law in August of 2001,” Campbell explained. “After only a few weeks, we were thrown into the chaos of 9/11.” Campbell, who applied to several Ontario law schools, planned to practice law in Canada. After learning about the Canadian & American Dual JD Program, “I jumped at the opportunity to study law on both sides of the border and never looked back,” stated Campbell. However, 9/11 changed the ease in which Campbell and his fellow Dual JD classmates lived during the first few weeks of the semester. “We sat in the tunnel for hours, trying to cross the border, and remote lectures weren’t an option. It was very different from what students are currently facing, but there are some interesting parallels between the experiences.” The world changed overnight after 9/11. Much like how students today are dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic, Campbell and his classmates had to learn to adapt to what everyone was calling the new normal. After graduating from the program, Campbell put his two law degrees to work at Bowman and Brooke, a nationally recognized trial firm with one of the largest product liability practices in the US. Campbell’s practice focuses on defending American companies being sued in Canada. “I’ve been able to create a real unique niche transnational law practice,” Campbell explained. “My ability to translate some of the legalese between Canada and the US has been a real asset and comes directly from the Dual JD program.” In 2010, after receiving his LL.M. from Osgoode Hall Law School, he received an unexpected call from Windsor’s then Associate Dean, Christopher Waters. “He wanted to interview me for my dream job – an adjunct position teaching tort law in the Dual JD program.” Campbell has been teaching for almost a decade now and also serves on the Dual JD Advisory Board. “It’s been great to see my students in the field, and I’ve even had a few show up on the other side of litigation files,” he commented. “I spend a lot of time informally mentoring Dual JD students on cross-border employment and practice issues,” Campbell said. “In the classroom, I often compare my experiences with Canadian and American tort litigation, teasing out the nuanced differences. Adjuncts can bring theoretical discussions new life by infusing their classes with the practical application that students so often crave.”

“We’re in an unprecedented time, but one thing that I’ve found about law students, particularly the ones that I’ve taught in the Dual JD program, is they’re extremely resilient. I have no doubt they’ll persevere and come through this even stronger, and they’ll be exceptional transnational lawyers.” DETR OIT MERCY LAW 11


L AW CLINICS

FIRST-YEAR CLINICS: EDUC ATING DETROIT MERCY LAW IS A LEADER IN PREPARING STUDENTS FOR THE PRACTICE OF LAW. Our clinical program is an important

curricular component of how we educate the complete lawyer. Founded in 1965, it is among the first clinical programs in the nation. We now offer twelve clinics for our upper-level students to gain hands-on lawyering skills while advocating for those who otherwise may not have access to legal services. In 2015, we launched mini-clinics for firstyear students as part of our commitment to providing hands-on lawyering experiences for our students from day one. Our mini-clinics, rooted in the Law School’s Jesuit and Mercy traditions of caring for those with the least resources and greatest need, help our students develop legal, leadership, and community service skills. Our first-year students are passionate about helping others and eager to gain these skills. In mini-clinics, first-year students are trained and supervised by attorneys in the community and help clients with a variety of matters.

THE

COMPLETE L AW YER

POPE FRANCIS CENTER LEGAL CLINIC Students work with attorneys from Kitch, Dickinson Wright, Wilson Elser, Bodman, and Butzel Long to provide legal assistance to guests of the Pope Francis Center. The Pope Francis Center is located adjacent to the law school and provides a variety of services to people experiencing homelessness in Detroit. In the legal clinic, students learn how to research court records to help attorneys provide the most comprehensive services possible to the guests at the Center.

“This experience helps future lawyers gain an appreciation and understanding of the barriers to access across populations and could motivate students to consider public need and social policy in their various interests in the law. This clinic provided a great preview of how I can use my skills as a licensed clinical social worker in my future work as a lawyer.” — Brandon Alford, ˈ23

“Helping people is really what practicing law is all about, and the mini-clinics helped me understand how important pro bono work is for the community.” — Sydney Fontanilla, ˈ22

“I learned that no matter what area of law you specialize in, there are many opportunities to help individuals outside your chosen career path. Law school is a challenge, and participating in the miniclinic was re-motivating. The hands-on experience in the mini-clinic of advocating for someone in need played a significant role in refocusing my goals.” — Christopher Le, Dual ˈ22

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WORK WITH OUR CLINICS!

Alumni support of the clinics, including time and talent or financial support, is always needed. To learn more, please contact Rebecca Simkins Nowak, Director of Clinical Operations and Outreach, at 313.596.9409 or simkinrg@udmercy.edu


DE T RO I T MERC Y L AW C L I N I CS • APPELLATE VETERANS LAW •C RIMINAL TRIAL CLINIC (TAUGHT by JOYCE REASONOVER ‘92) • ENVIRONMENTAL LAW CLINIC Carley Kavanaugh ’22 at the Crime Stoppers Mini-Clinic

• FAMILY LAW CLINIC

DRIVER’S LICENSE RESTORATION CLINIC

• F EDERAL PRO SE LEGAL ASSISTANCE CLINIC

Students assist veterans with finding outstanding warrants or tickets that are infringing on their ability to hold a license and help the veterans take the necessary steps to reinstate their license.

“The clinic was a great opportunity to learn by helping real people with real problems. The clinic gave me hands-on experience that I would have never read about in books or learned by sitting in a classroom. Working in this clinic helped me remember why I wanted to go to law school in the first place, which is to help others.” — Nour Alaouie, ˈ22

• HOUSING LAW CLINIC • IMMIGRATION LAW CLINIC • INTERNATIONAL PATENT LAW CLINIC • J UVENILE APPELLATE CLINIC (TAUGHT by BILL LADD ‘79) •S TATE APPELLATE DEFENDERS OFFICE CRIMINAL ADVOCACY CLINIC • T RADEMARK AND ENTREPENEUR CLINIC (TAUGHT by TIMOTHY KRONINGER ‘85) • VETERANS LAW CLINIC

WAYNE COUNTY TAX FORECLOSURE HEARING Students assist attorneys and non-attorney foreclosure experts from the United Community Housing Coalition and Michigan Legal Services. Every January, the Wayne County Treasurer’s Office has Show Cause Hearings for thousands of Wayne County residents who are facing tax foreclosure on their residential property. Students observe and support attorneys as well as review documents to make sure they are complete and do other administrative tasks to allow attorneys to work with more clients.

“This clinic developed my interest in real estate, property and business in the context of legal rights and community development. When I look back to this experience in light of the current events unfolding across the nation, I realize how important it is, now more than ever, to use my privilege to support those who are most vulnerable to systemic forms of racial, social and economic injustice.”

Students additionally have had the opportunity to work with Crime Stoppers, a non-profit agency that assists the public in solving crimes through various tools and seeks to empower people to anonymously report crime. Students supported the Crime Stoppers team by reviewing cold case files and strategizing further steps in criminal investigations. Students also worked with Greening of Detroit, a non-profit that serves Detroit through planting trees and other beautification projects, that also offers a job training program that creates job opportunities, some of which require a commercial driver’s license (CDL). Students in the clinic provided information to trainees with civil issues or misdemeanors on how to resolve the matters so that they could pursue their CDL and improve their employment opportunities.

— Sarah Elsayed, ˈ22 DETR OIT MERCY LAW 13


D E A N ' S FE LLOWS

MEE T

THE

DE A N ' S FELLOWS

ADMITTED STUDENTS WHO HAVE DEMONSTRATED EXCELLENCE prior to law

school through academics, leadership, professionalism, and service are invited to interview for fellowship consideration. Dean’s Fellows receive full-tuition scholarship support and alumni mentors, as well as leadership, networking, and service opportunities throughout law school.

Mark Adamaszek ,

Cassidy Capoferri, Dean’s Fellow

Mark holds a BSE in Chemical Engineering with a concentration in Biopharmaceutical Engineering from the University of Michigan. He is interested in exploring how law adapts to changing technologies. Prior to law school, he worked as an engineer and volunteered with Habitat for Humanity.

Cassidy holds a BA in English and Journalism, with a concentration in Broadcast and Digital Journalism, as well as a minor in Anthropology from Wayne State University. As a future lawyer, her goal is to better the lives of others. Cassidy serves as the assistant coach to the Varsity Field Hockey team at her alma mater, Regina High School.

Intellectual Property Law Fellow

Matthew Chess,

Intellectual Property Law Fellow Matt holds a BSE in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan. He looks forward to merging his experience in the engineering field with his legal studies and pursuing a career in patent law.

Davis Bowers,

Transnational Law Fellow

Emily Elmer, Dean’s Fellow Emily holds a certificate in Paralegal Studies. She is completing her BA through our 3+3 program with Oakland University. Through the 3+3 program, a student’s first year of law school also serves as the final year of undergraduate studies. Prior to law school, Emily worked as a paralegal and supported litigation.

Davis holds a BA in Criminal Justice from Tiffin University. Originally from Belle Center, Ohio, he chose the Canadian & American Dual JD program to further explore transnational criminal legal matters. He plans to use his US JD and Canadian JD to help individuals wrongfully accused on both sides of the border.

William Frush, Dean’s Fellow

Lauren Bolt , Dean’s Fellow

Brandon Hayes, Dean’s Fellow

Lauren holds a BA in Psychology with a minor in Law, Justice, and Public Policy, and a minor in Spanish from Michigan State University. Prior to law school, she served as a Research Assistant to the Political Science department at Michigan State University where she researched psychological influences in Supreme Court cases.

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William holds a BA in Political Science from the University of Michigan. He is pursuing a law degree at Detroit Mercy Law to develop critical thinking and complex analysis skills, as well as a strong moral and ethical background, as he works toward his career goal of serving as an FBI agent.

Brandon holds a BS in Law and Economics and Philosophy from Central Michigan University. Brandon, the son of a pastor, learned the importance of faith and working for change at a young age. Whatever direction his career takes him, he plans to use his legal education to make a difference and hopes to inspire and create new pathways for the next generation.


Olutemitope Fadayomi, Dean’s Fellow Temi holds a BA in English with a minor in Psychology from Albion College, where he was a member of the Gerald R. Ford Institute for Leadership in Public Policy and Service. Prior to law school, he was published by the American Lawyer Media (ALM) while interning as a staff writer. His career goal is to advance public policy through legal journalism.

Macy Murasky, Dean’s Fellow Macy holds a BS in Political Science from The Ohio State University. She is interested in exploring criminal defense and disability rights. As a future attorney, she hopes to work for an Innocence Project.

Kaila Pelczarski, Dean’s Fellow Kaila graduated summa cum laude from Oakland University with a BA in Political Science. She is passionate about social justice and plans to use her law degree to serve others as an appellate attorney.

THANK YOU TO THE ALUMNI WHO SERVED AS MENTORS to our 2019

Fellows for contributing your time and talent to support our mission of educating the complete lawyer.

MORIAM AIGORO ‘18 STEVEN EATHERLY ‘16

Savanna Polimeni, Dean’s Fellow Savanna holds a BA in Criminal Justice with a minor in Psychology and a certificate in Addiction Studies from Oakland University. Prior to law school, she worked as a police cadet and as a juvenile social service specialist. She is interested in exploring careers in criminal law, family law, and litigation.

Nicholas Prys, Dean’s Fellow Nick holds a BA in Psychology from Duke University, where he was a four-year varsity letterman on the Men’s Soccer Team. He is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with experience in the behavioral health care industry and a record of community service that includes coaching youth soccer.

DeAndre Robbins, Dean’s Fellow DeAndre holds a BA in Psychology from Wayne State University. As a Licensed Practical Nurse with experiencing providing patient care at rehabilitation centers, he is interested in exploring healthcare law. He is also an advocate for civil rights, justice, and equal access under the law.

Christos Strubakos, Dean’s Fellow

Christos holds a BA in Classical Studies and Psychology, a M.Div., and a Ph.D. in Physiology. Prior to law school, his research and experience focused on neurophysiology and neuroimaging and he taught as a sessional university instructor. He is fluent in Greek and knowledgeable of Latin and French.

YAFEEZ FATABHOY ‘18 NINA GAVRILOVIC ‘16 D’ANTAE GOODEN ‘18 JEWEL HAJI ‘19 MATT KEANE ‘19 CELESTE KINNEY ‘18 JONATHAN KIRKLAND ‘15 AHNDIA MANSOORI ‘18 ELLIE MOSKO ‘09 MARIAH MUMFORD ‘15 TANYA MURRAY ‘17 JESSICA PASK ‘17 JENNIFER POPE ‘18 CHRIS STONE ‘19 HANNAH TREPPA ‘16 RYAN VANOVER ‘17

If you are interested in helping recruit and mentor future students, please contact Jennifer Rumschlag, Associate Dean of Enrollment Management & Communications, at rumschjl@udmercy.edu.

DETR OIT MERCY LAW 15


ST U D ENT AWA RDS & R E C OGNIT ION

C ELEB R AT I NG

OUR

ST UDEN T S

L AW REVIEW E-BOARD

EDITOR- IN - CHIEF

JOSEPH KUZMIAK

EXECUTIVE EDITOR OF INSIDE ARTICLES

EMILY HESSENTHALER

MANAGING EDITOR

KATHRYN DONALDSON

EXECUTIVE EDITOR OF OUTSIDE ARTICLES

KATHERINE GANICK

ONLINE EDITOR

NADINE DABAJA

SYMPOSIUM DIREC TOR

MARTA MAZUR

MOOT COURT E-BOARD

DEJA DAVIS

16  D O C KE T | FA L L 20 2 0

PETER LOCHBILER

MARIAH NATZKE


BLSA SCHOL ARSHIP RECIPIENTS

BL ACK L AW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION (BLSA) E-BOARD

DUE TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC , BLSA’s annual

Vegas Night Fundraiser had to be canceled in March. At Vegas Night, BLSA would have presented four scholarships to Detroit Mercy Law students. Each scholarship is awarded which the hope of offsetting costs associated with law school and admission to the bar. Each recipient demonstrates a deep understanding and commitment to the mission and goals of BLSA.

PRESIDENT

DEJA DAVIS

1L DENISE L ANGFORD MORRIS SCHOL ARSHIP

DANIELLE ANDERSON

VICE PRESIDENT

NADINE DABAJA

TREASURER

SOLOMON LUWOYE

DANIELLE ANDERSON

SHELBY STALLWORTH

BRANDON WILSON

2L /3L TUITION SCHOL ARSHIP

SECRETARY

1L BOOK SCHOL ARSHIP

3L BAR SCHOL ARSHIP

BRITTANY MACKIE

PARLIMENTARIAN

SHANICE LEACH

DETR OIT MERCY LAW 17


ST U D ENT AWA RDS & R E C OGNIT ION

AWA RDS

FOR

I NCOM I N G ST UDEN T S

HENRY H. TARRANT AWARD FOR BLACK STUDENT EXCELLENCE: This is the first year the Henry H. Tarrant Award for Black Student Excellence has been awarded. The award recognizes incoming black students for their achievements prior to law school and for

Brittany Crego '23

Brandon Hayes '23

their potential as future leaders who will advance justice, equality, civil rights, and service. In addition to financial assistance, award recipients will receive mentorship.

DeAndre Robbins '23

E X TE R N A L AWA RDS Ayat Nazim Dual ‘21 was elected the National Chair of the American Bar Association Student Division.

Nathan Wilson ‘20 was one of four recipients, and only law student, of the West Michigan Chapter of Air & Waste Management Association Scholarship.

The Women Lawyers Association of Michigan Foundation awarded scholarships to Veronica Beltran ‘20, Chandler Dorris ‘20, and Rebecca Zarras ‘21.

Women's Law Caucus of Detroit Mercy Law won the first Women's Law Student Association Award from the National Conference of Women's Bar Associations for their Feminine Hygiene Donation Drive.

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STUDENT AWARD S & RECOGNITIO N

The Michigan Chapter of the Association of Corporate Counsel awarded a scholarship to Chandler Dorris ‘20.

Lauren Parrottino ‘21 was chosen to serve on the Editorial Board of the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy symposium edition.

Aaron Martinez ‘22 co-authored an article in the Michigan Bar Journal, “Driving Legally in the World of Recreational Marijuana.”

The Women’s Bar Association-Oakland Region awarded Katherine Ganick ‘21 the Sarah Killgore Wertman Scholarship.

Nara Gonczigsuren ‘21 was awarded the 2020 Voice for Justice Fellowship. Gonczigusren worked at the Detroit Office of the ACLU of Michigan over the summer.

DETR OIT MERCY LAW 19


C A R E E R SE RV ICE S

CLASS

OF

2019 EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES

DETROIT MERCY LAW GRADUATES FROM THE CLASS OF 2019 landed roles at top law firms, competitive judicial clerkships and positions in government, business and public interest organizations across the U.S. and Canada. Each year, Detroit Mercy Law supports graduates with securing employment and is required to report the employment outcomes of graduates as of ten months following graduation to the American Bar Association (ABA). The Detroit Mercy Law graduating class of 2019 secured an overall employment rate of 82% in legal and professional positions. As an employer, Joe Vernon, a 2005 alumnus of the school’s Canadian & American Dual JD Program and a senior principal and resident director at Miller Canfield’s Detroit office, says he has been impressed with Detroit Mercy Law graduates.

“The school gives students a real taste of what it’s like to practice. The clinical offerings, moot requirements, and Law Firm Programs all build practical skills and, along with the course load, force students to develop a strong work ethic and invaluable time management skills,” Vernon said. “Recent grads come in prepared and ready to work hard, and it’s not surprising that they are landing and doing well at top law firms in big markets like New York, Detroit, and Toronto.” The Detroit Mercy Law employment outcomes include graduates of the Canadian & American Dual JD Program, offered in partnership with University of Windsor Faculty of Law. Detroit Mercy Law is the only ABA-accredited law school that offers a three-year, cross-border, comparative Dual JD program in which graduates earn both a U.S. and Canadian JD and are eligible to pursue licensure in both the U.S. and Canada. Graduates pursuing licensure in Canada are required to complete post-graduation experiential training, which is similar to an apprenticeship, before they are admitted to practice law. Of the 2019 Detroit Mercy Law and Windsor Law Dual JD graduates, 88% secured articling and Law Practice Program positions to fulfill this training requirement, and some will pursue licensure on both sides of the border.

LOOKING TO HIRE A 2020 GRADUATE OR A STUDENT CLERK? Direct opportunities to the CSO at 313.596.0223 or cso@udmercy.edu 20  D O C KE T | FA L L 20 2 0

LAW FIRM (2-50 ATTORNEYS) 51% Most law school graduates nationally and from Detroit Mercy Law work in small and mid-size law firms. “The Dual JD program taught me to think about the practice of law with a global perspective. Having this perspective has been invaluable, as much of my practice comprises of disputes involving multi-national parties and multi-national counsel. Practicing construction law has been nothing but rewarding and I could not be happier.” — Myles Rosenthal, Associate, Glaholt Bowles, Toronto

BUSINESS & INDUSTRY: 9% Detroit Mercy Law graduates secure high-level positions outside of the traditional law practice. “I apply the skills I learned at Detroit Mercy Law on a daily basis. My role is fast-paced and requires a thoughtful and reasoned approach to supporting our people and our business. My law school education prepared me to succeed in this type of role by enhancing my critical thinking and ability to synthesize information such as company policies and employment law in order to make sound decisions.” — Christopher Stone, Human Resources Lead, Boston Consulting Group, Detroit

JUDICIAL CLERKSHIP: 6% Detroit Mercy Law graduates secure competitive judicial clerkships at both the state and federal levels. “I knew I wanted to be a law clerk after my first summer in law school when I interned in the US District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan. Detroit Mercy Law’s focus on legal writing prepared me for being a clerk; I am especially grateful for the Judicial Clerkship Course. After taking this course, I felt prepared to work in a court and for a judge.” — Michelle Shember, Judicial Clerk, Magistrate Judge Patricia T. Morris, U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan


LAW FIRM (50+) 22% Detroit Mercy Law graduates secure positions with large law firms, often prior to graduation through on-campus interviews. Students typically interview the summer before their second year of law school, work as a summer associate between their second and third years of law school, and join the firm as an associate following graduation. This year, due to the pandemic, the on-campus interview program at Detroit Mercy Law and nationally has been pushed back to the winter term. “I always wanted to be a litigator. The incredible people in the Career Services Office do a wonderful job of championing Detroit Mercy Law students, and I would not have secured this position without their support.” — Matthew Keane, Associate, Dickinson Wright, Detroit

GOVERNMENT 8% Detroit Mercy Law graduates secure government positions at the local, state, and national levels. “Being an Asylum Officer, I hear the often-devastating stories of applicants from all over the world, many of whom are telling their stories for the first time, and can be the person that grants them a safer, new start in America. When I interview asylum applicants, I’m able to be more attentive to their individual journeys and stories because of the previous hands-on experience that I gained at Detroit Mercy Law.” — Kourtney Lovett, Asylum Officer, United States Citizenships and Immigration Services, Chicago

PUBLIC INTEREST: 3% Detroit Mercy Law graduates continue the tradition of service through securing public interest positions.

Sarah Elhelou, Staff Attorney, Lakeshore Legal Aid

EDUCATION: 1% Each year, Detroit Mercy Law selects one graduate to serve as the French Scholar at the University d’ Auvergne in Clermont Ferrand, France. The French Scholar teaches several American law courses over two semesters.

Jamicia Willingham, 2019 French Scholar DETR OIT MERCY LAW 21


A L U MNI SP OTLIGHT

ALUM N I STATE HOUSE RE PRESEN TAT I VES THE MICHIGAN STATE LEGISLATURE IS AT A HISTORIC LOW IN NUMBER OF

Of the 148 legislators serving in the 100th legislature, there are only 15 lawyers across the House and the Senate with four of them having graduated from Detroit Mercy Law—the most from a single law school. ATTORNEYS.

Kyra Harris Bolden ’14

35th House District

During her term, Bolden has contributed to legislation offering greater protection and justice for seniors, domestic violence victims, and wrongfully incarcerated individuals. Bolden says that being a lawyer has helped her be a better legislator.

“I know how the laws will affect people and my community. And I think that perspective is incredibly important and I’m grateful I get to represent that in the legislature.” Staying in touch with constituents remained a top priority for Bolden during the pandemic. “We added to our list making phone calls to seniors and doing senior care packages,” commented Bolden about her team’s initiatives to reach seniors who may be facing pandemic related isolation. Bolden also partnered with Lyft to provide free rides to residents who otherwise would not have transportation to temporary shelter sites and emergency food distribution locations.

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“The pandemic exacerbated inequities that exist in our society. Now more than ever, we need reform in our health care system, our criminal justice system, as well as our education system,” Bolden said. “Obviously, there’s much more we need to address, I don’t think those things are it, but those things are incredibly pressing. And I’m happy to have a voice in those conversations to serve my community.”


Graham Filler ’11 93rd House District

Vanessa Guerra ’16 95th House District

Guerra was elected to serve her district in 2014 and remains committed to bringing positive change to the community she grew up in. Guerra completed law school and passed the bar exam while serving her first term in the House.

“Detroit Mercy Law is a fantastic school that trains the legal brain to be concise, relevant in argument, and interested in making life better for others,” Filler said. “As a legislator, when I take an initial meeting about an issue, I quickly cycle through a list of questions evaluating what’s been put in front of me. The training of the brain to quickly review all elements, I learned in Civil Procedure and Constitutional Law and now carry out in the State House.” Filler has been a leader in creating legislation that expands access to justice. Filler’s first bill signed into law focused on increasing e-filing to give more individuals access to the courts. “I was proud to champion the expungement reform bills that will make Michigan a national leader in expungement,” commented Filler. “This is reform that helps people get jobs and opportunities for education and doesn’t harm the public safety.” During the pandemic, Filler has hosted Facebook Lives every week to stay in touch with his constituents and encourage conversation around key issues that are affecting them. Filler and his team have also made thousands of phone calls to check in and provide assistance where they can. “We wanted to tell them we were advocating for them in the midst of these remarkably difficult times,” Filler explained. “Hearing people’s stories, it just makes me want to fight for the people and stop at nothing to help them."

Tenisha Yancey ’13

1st House District

Yancey is committed to being a voice for the most vulnerable in our society. Through the pandemic, Yancey has been supporting the Eviction Diversion Program to Michigan residents who cannot pay their rent due to COVID-19. DETR OIT MERCY LAW 23


L AW SCHOOL T E AM

WELCOME NEW FACULTY & ADMINISTRATORS N E W FACULT Y David C. Berry

Assistant Professor and Director of the International Intellectual Property Clinic A.B., University of Michigan, J.D., University of Michigan Law School David Berry is a nationally recognized expert on patent and intellectual property law issues. He was previously the Chair of the State Bar of Michigan Intellectual Property Law Section and is the Chair of the Steering Committee of the Michigan Patent Pro Bono Project, which provides pro bono patent legal services to low-income inventors in Michigan. Prior to joining the Detroit Mercy Law faculty, Berry was an adjunct professor and clinic director at Wayne State University School of Law and was named Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Western Michigan University Cooley Law School. Additionally, he worked in private practice as Of Counsel at Brooks Kushman P.C. and as Partner at Testa, Hurwitz, & Thibeault LLP.

Melissa Eckhause

Visiting Assistant Professor B.B.A., University of WisconsinMadison, J.D., University of Detroit School of Law, LL.M., University of California Berkeley Melissa Eckhause is an intellectual property attorney, specializing in copyright and trademark law. Before joining Detroit Mercy Law, Eckhause worked as a lecturer at University of Southern California, an adjunct professor at Golden Gate University School of Law, and an adjunct professor at Texas A&M University. Prior to entering academia, for over ten years, Eckhause represented music and film producers, Fortune 500 companies, start-ups, entertainment professionals, and professional athletes. Eckhause’s research lies at the intersection of technology, intellectual property law, and art, and focuses on the rights of visual artists, musicians, and other creators in the digital age.

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Elizabeth Sherowski

Visiting Assistant Professor B.A., University of Notre Dame, J.D., The Ohio State University, Moritz College of Law Elizabeth Sherowski comes to Detroit Mercy Law following visiting professorships at Mercer University School of Law and University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, School of Law. Prior to working at UNC, Sherowski spent seven years teaching at The Ohio State University, Moritz College of Law, where she directed the College’s nationally-ranked Moot Court & Lawyering Skills program. Sherowski is a nationally recognized expert in learner-focused pedagogy, and has written and presented extensively on making legal education more transparent, accessible, and accountable to students. She has been a leader in implementing learner-focused syllabi in legal education. Before she began teaching, Sherowski was an Assistant Prosecuting Attorney for Franklin County, Ohio, working on felony, juvenile, and appellate cases. She also ran her own law practice which focused on juvenile, disability, and special education law.

Daniel Rosenbaum

Visiting Assistant Professor B.A., Washington University in St. Louis, J.D., Harvard Law School Daniel Rosenbaum joins Detroit Mercy Law after serving as the Executive Director at Wayne County Land Bank. Rosenbaum is a graduate of Harvard Law School, where he was an editor on the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review. Prior to moving to Michigan, Rosenbaum practiced local government law in the public and private sectors and clerked for Judge Nanette K. Laughrey of the United States District Court. Rosenbaum specializes in Property Law, Local Government Law, and Estates & Trusts.


FACULT Y P ROM OT I O NS Michelle Richards

Associate Professor of Law B.A., Michigan State University, J.D., University of Detroit Mercy School of Law Richards joined the faculty in 2002 and was promoted to Associate Professor of Law. She teaches Advanced Advocacy, Applied Legal Theory and Analysis, Civil Procedure, Pre-Trial Litigation, and Torts.

Erin Archerd

Associate Professor of Law B.A., Stanford University, J.D., Harvard Law School Archerd joined the faculty in 2015 and was granted tenure in 2020. She teaches Alternative Dispute Resolution, Contracts, Designing Deals, Dispute Resolution in Employment Mediation, Negotiation and Mediation Advocacy, and Sales.

Cara Cunningham Warren

Associate Professor of Law B.A., Michigan State University, J.D., University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, LL.M., University of Toronto Faculty of Law Cunningham Warren began teaching at Detroit Mercy Law in 2000 and was granted tenure in 2020. She teaches Public International Law, Comparative Legal Writing and Analysis, Intenational Advocacy, Advanced Advocacy, and Applied Legal Theory and Analysis.

N E W STA FF Kurt Godfryd

Assistant Dean for Administration B.S., University of Detroit, M.B.A., University of Detroit, M.A., University of Detroit, M.A., Sacred Heart Major Seminary Godfryd joined Detroit Mercy Law in February 2020. He joined the Law School from Cranbrook Schools, where he was Director of Business Operations for nearly 20 years. Prior to Cranbrook, he held financial roles at IBM and EDS Corporations. In 2008, he was ordained a permanent deacon for the Archdiocese of Detroit and is assigned to St. Clement of Rome parish in Romeo.

N E W STA FF Julie Hein

Director of Development B.A., University of Minnesota Hein joined Detroit Mercy Law with 35 years of fundraising experience. She previously worked at the Karmanos Cancer Institute and Cranbrook Schools.

Grace Henning

Communications Specialist B.A., Fordham University Henning joined Detroit Mercy Law in March 2020 after working in advancement at a Catholic school.

Connor Salanger

Assistant Director, Career Services & Outreach B.A., Binghamton University, M.A., Binghamton University, M.A., George Washington University Salanger has been working in higher education for over five years. He joined Detroit Mercy Law in March 2020 after working for Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in the Registrar’s Office.

Tonisha Williams

Clinical Administrative Support B.A., Davenport University, M.S., Southern New Hampshire University Williams joined the Detroit Mercy Law clinical staff in March 2020 after serving as the Secretary for the Dean’s Office at Wayne State University School of Law for four years.

Kimberly Koscielniak

Head of Public Service, Kresge Law Library B.A. University of Michigan-Dearborn, AMLS, University of Michigan, J.D. Wayne State University Koscielniak joined Detroit Mercy’s Law Library Staff in March 2020 after most recently serving as the Lead Librarian in the State Law Library, a division of the Library of Michigan.

DETR OIT MERCY LAW 25


L AW SCHOOL T E AM

FACULTY PUBLICATIONS Erin Archerd

Associate Professor of Law Evaluating Mediation’s Future, Dispute R esolution Journal (2020)

Catherine Archibald

Associate Professor of Law Transgender and Intersex Sports Rights, 25 Viginia Journal of Social Policy & the L aw 246 (2019)

J. Richard Broughton

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs & Professor of Law Constitutional Discourse and the Rhetoric of Treason, 47 H astings Constitutional L aw Quarter 303 (2020)

Jelani Jefferson Exum

Philip J. McElroy Professor of Law Sentencing Disparities and the Dangerous Perpetuation of Racial Violence, 26 Washington & L ee Journal of Civil R ights & Social Justice 491 (2020) What’s The Point?: The Missing Piece of Criminal Justice Reform Through Consensus and Compromise, 32 Federal Sentencing R eporter 65 (December 2019)

Karen McDonald Henning

Patrick Meyer

Associate Professor of Law & Director, Kresge Law Library Adding Legal Research to the Bar Exam: What Would the Exercise Look Like?, 53 A kron L aw R eview 109 (2019)

Michelle Richards

Associate Professor of Law Pills, Public Nuisance, and Parens Patriae: Questioning the Propriety of the Posture of the Opioid Litigation, 54 University of R ichmond L aw R eview 405 (2020)

Nicholas Schroeck

Associate Dean of Experiential Education & Associate Professor of Law The Flint Water Crisis, Drinking Water Regulations and Gaps in Lead, Copper, and Legionella Protections, 98 University of Detroit M ercy L aw R eview (forthcoming 2020) The Flint Water Crisis and Legionella: Harm to Public Health from Failure to Warn, 18 Journal of L aw in Society 155 (2018)

Leslie Scott

Assistant Professor of Law Federal Prosecutorial Overreach in the Age of Opioids: The Statutory and Constitutional Case Against Duplicitous Drug Indictments, 51 University of Toledo L aw R eview 491 (2020)

Associate Professor of Law M astering Criminal P rocedure (3d ed. Carolina Press, forthcoming 2020) (with Ellen Podgor, Peter Henning, Cynthia Jones & Sanjay Chhablani)

Cara Cunningham Warren

Cristina Lockwood

Associate Professor of Law The Reimagined Schoolyard: Social Participation, Hegemony, and Cryptocurrency’s Adoption in Tomorrow’s International Monetary Order, M astering Criminal P rocedure I ntellectual P roperty & Technology Forum (2020)

Associate Professor of Law Chapter 22, in ICLE, Michigan Basic Practitioner Handbook (7th ed. 2019) (with Lawrence Dubin)

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Associate Professor of Law Outing Otherization: A Means to Enable Cooperation in a Post-Truth Era, 58 Washburn L aw Journal 609 (2019)

Stephen Wilks


Professor Emeritus Howard Abrams: 4 3 YE A R S OF SERV I C E

Professor Howard Abrams joined the faculty at Detroit Mercy Law in 1977 and earned the rank of Professor of Law in 1986. Over his 43 years of teaching, he taught 16 different courses, ranging from the first-year Contracts course to upper level courses in the commercial law and entertainment law curriculums. He received the James T. Barnes, Sr. Award in both 1984 and 1992, which is voted on by faculty and students, and recognizes one professor for their outstanding teaching, scholarship, and service.

Professor Abrams passed away on January 27, 2020. He was posthumously named Professor Emeritus. Professor Abrams was an internationally recognized expert on copyright law. He authored The Law of Copyright, a regularly updated treatise that is one of the most influential in its field. His numerous articles have been cited hundreds of times in law reviews and judicial opinions.

TO

DE T RO I T ME RC Y L AW

“Howard was an incredibly smart man who fought passionately for the things that mattered to him,” stated Professor Michelle Richards ‘94. “If you didn’t come away from an interaction with Howard learning something more or different about whatever topic was the basis for that exchange, then you weren’t listening.” Professor Richards met Professor Abrams in 1992 when she was a second-year student at Detroit Mercy Law. They remained close after she graduated. When she joined the Detroit Mercy Law faculty in 2002, Professor Abrams became her mentor and friend.

Professor Abrams dedicated much of his life to teaching and training new lawyers, including working with young musicians sharing his knowledge of copyright and the music business. He will be missed by all in the Detroit Mercy Law and legal communities.

DETR OIT MERCY LAW 27


SC H O LA RSHIP S & T H AN K YOU NOT E S

SUPPORTING

THE

COMPLETE LAWYER

OUR COMMUNITIES NEED MORE LAWYERS WHO, LIKE YOU, ARE DRIVEN TO SERVE.

Scholarship support from alumni donors empowers our students as they pursue their goals and seek to make a difference in their communities. We thank all of our donors for helping students thrive in law school and beyond.

INTERESTED IN GIVING BACK?

Visit udmercy.edu/giving/donate/law or connect with Julie Hein, Director of Development, heinja@udmercy.edu or 248.514.4696

“I am honored to be a recipient of the Ven Johnson Scholarship Award. Growing up, I wasn’t the student who earned scholarships, but I have found my place in law school. I have found that this field is what I am truly passionate about and that my hard work and perseverance have led me to a place where I can excel.” — Zachary Glazer, Dual ˈ20

MARY AND BRUCE NEWMAN CLASS OF 1969

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP THE MARY AND BRUCE NEWMAN CLASS OF 1969 ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP WAS CREATED LAST YEAR in memory of Hon.

Bruce Newman ˈ69 to serve students who demonstrate financial need or academic merit.

“It was the Jesuit philosophy that gave Bruce his strong code of ethics. Because of all the support from the University of Detroit and the School of Law, Bruce was able to help his family, the underprivileged, and community throughout his lifetime.” — Mary T. Newman

DAVID WILLIAMS II ‘82 AND GAIL CARR WILLIAMS ‘83 ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP

THE DAVID WILLIAMS II ‘82 AND GAIL CARR WILLIAMS ‘83 ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP was created to ensure that future black law students are able to attend and thrive at Detroit Mercy Law.

“This is an enduring way to extend and enhance community scholarship. It is truly my sincere hope that many will support the ABLA with contributions to the scholarship with gifts of any size, deepening the legacy for the generations of Detroit Mercy Law black alumni to come.” — Gail Carr Williams ‘83

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SCHOL ARSHI P S & THANK YOU NOTE S

“I am honored to be the recipient of the Detroit Mercy Law Legacy of Excellence Scholarship. As a non-traditional student, this scholarship makes my load lighter. Thank you so much for your generous contribution to me and other students past and future.” — Treasure Thomas, ˈ21

“I am a first-generation American and my parents have always taught me the value of hard work. I was proud to inform them that my hard work is being recognized in the form of the prestigious Honorable Lawrence Paul Zatkoff Memorial Scholarship.” — Brandon Kastaw, ˈ20

“I am extremely thankful to be the recipient of the Margaret V. Rose Endowed Law Scholarship. I came to law school because I wanted to help people and your scholarship is going to allow me to continue to serve my community to the best of my ability.” — Narmada Gunawardana, Dual ˈ21

PROFESSOR RICHARD A. SEID MEMORIAL

CHILD ADVOCACY SCHOLARSHIP IN HONOR OF THEIR FATHER PROFESSOR RICHARD A. SEID, Lenora Seid and Dr. Jerome Seid created the Professor Richard A. Seid Memorial Child Advocacy Scholarship to support students studying child advocacy. Professor Seid was Dean of Detroit Mercy Law from 1976 to 1979.

“As a deeply committed father himself, our dad believed passionately in the promise of our Constitution and rule of law to assure justice for families and children. We established the Professor Richard A. Seid Memorial Child Advocacy Endowed Scholarship Fund in our dad’s honor to support Detroit Mercy Law students who, like our dad, wish to devote their professional skills and compassion to protect the rights of vulnerable and often voiceless clients. We are very proud of our dad’s legacy of advocacy and grateful to Detroit Mercy Law for enthusiastically helping us maintain its vigor for the law school community, facilitating learning and principled work that he would so fulsomely endorse.”

EDWARD A. KHOURY

— Lenora Seid and Dr. Jerome Seid

‘51

ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIP FUND The Edward A. Khoury ˈ51 Endowed Scholarship Fund was established with the intent to assist Detroit Mercy Law in maintaining affordability and the quality of its programs by offering greater financial resources to students. Edward A. Khoury leaves a legacy as one of the top defense attorneys in the Detroit area.

“Ed loved the law and the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law--they both were highly cherished throughout his life. I can’t help but to think, that if Ed was with us today, how proud he would be to receive this recognition.” — Stephen Kassab, Executor of the Estate

DETR OIT MERCY LAW 29


YE AR IN RE V IE W

CLINIC FOR

TRIBAL COMMUNIT Y

ON SEPTEMBER 23, 2019, DETROIT MERCY LAW HELD AN EXPUNGEMENT CLINIC for the Saginaw Chippewa Phyllis L. Crocker, Dean, Gregory Thiess, ‘79, Dr. Antoine Garibaldi, President, Mark Wisniewski, ‘90, Hon. Denise Langford Morris '82

HOMECOMING GOLF EVENT On September 20, 2019, Detroit Mercy Law hosted its fourth annual Homecoming Golf Outing and Awards Dinner. More than 170 golfers participated and raised more than $40,000 in support of the Detroit Mercy Law Bar Preparation Fund. Judge Terrance A. Keith ˈ84 and Kelly R. Houk, ˈ13, were honored with alumni awards.

Tribe in Mount Pleasant. With guidance from clinical program directors and Tribal Court Chief Judge Patrick M. Shannon ˈ78, five Detroit Mercy Law students spent the afternoon assisting eligible tribe members convicted of petty offenses with the expungement process.

RED MASS DETROIT MERCY LAW CELEBRATED ITS 107TH ANNUAL RED MASS on September 24, 2019. Red

Mass is an occasion for judges, attorneys, and community members of all faiths to pray together for guidance at the beginning of a new judicial

Hon. Terrence Berg leading the Renewal of the Lawyer’s Oath of Commitment

term. The Hon. Terrence Berg of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan led the Renewal of the Lawyers' Oath of Commitment and Fr. Timothy McCabe, SJ, celebrated the Mass.

Photo: Fr. Tim McCabe celebrating the Mass

30  D O C KE T | FA L L 20 2 0

Sr. Judith Mouch, R.S.M, Phyllis L. Crocker, Dean, Fr. Tim McCabe, SJ, Hon. Terrence Berg, and Pamela Zarkowski, Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs.


PORTRAIT UNVEILING OF

HENRY H. TARR ANT, ‘22

Cheryl Mitchell, ‘20, Jailah Emerson, ‘20, Deja Davis, ‘21, Nadine Dabaja, ‘21, and Hon. Terrance Keith, ‘84

John Brithinee ’20, Amanda Obrycki Brithinee ’20, Hon. Denise K. Langford Morris ’82, Hon. Helene N. White, Hon. Brian K. Zahra ’87, Phyllis L. Crocker, Dean, Paulina Kennedy ’20, and Aaron Pattison ’20

KEENAN COMPETITION

The Patrick A. Keenan Memorial Appellate Advocacy Competition is an annual tournament administered by Detroit Mercy Law’s Moot Court Board of Advocates. This year’s champions were Paulina Kennedy and Aaron Pattinson, with finalists John Brithinee and Amanda Obrycki Brithinee. The Keenan family attended the competition and Michigan Supreme Court Justice Brian K. Zahra ˈ87, Oakland County Circuit Court Judge Denise K. Langford Morris ˈ82, and U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Helene N. White judged the final round.

ON JANUARY 30, 2020, DETROIT MERCY LAW HOSTED A PORTRAIT UNVEILING CEREMONY

of Henry H. Tarrant ˈ22, the first known African American graduate of Detroit Mercy Law. The program included remarks by Godfrey J. Dillard, a civil rights trailblazer and one of the lawyers who represented the Black Law Students Association in its lawsuit against the university in the early 1980s; the launch of the new Henry H. Tarrant Award for Black Student Excellence; and an introduction to the Association of Black Law Alumni, led by Judge Terrance A. Keith ˈ84, and ABLA’s new scholarship for African American students, the David Williams II and Gail Carr Williams Endowed Scholarship Fund. The portrait was painted by Richard Lewis, framed by Eric Vaughn, and will be displayed on the first floor of the law school.

CONNECTED COMMERCE PANEL

The Canadian & American Dual JD Program, in partnership with the Consulate General of Canada in Detroit hosted Connected Commerce: Self-Driving Trucks and Their Impact on Cross-Border Trade on March 11, 2020. This panel discussion was moderated by Consul General of Canada in Detroit Joe Comartin (center) with Laurie Tannous (second from right) of the Cross-Border Institute and Jennifer Dukarski (second from left), ˈ10, of Butzel Long as panelists. They are pictured here with Dean Phyllis L. Crocker (far left) of Detroit Mercy Law and Dean Christopher Waters (far right) of Windsor Law.

DEWITT C. HOLBROOK SOCIAL JUSTICE LECTURE

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson (left) delivered the 2nd Annual DeWitt C. Holbrook Lecture on Social Justice. Secretary Benson discussed the history of voting rights and new and future reforms to expand voting access across Michigan. She is pictured with Richard Broughton, Professor and Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.

WELCOMING THE INCOMING CLASS OF 2020

AMID THE PANDEMIC, THE DETROIT MERCY LAW COMMUNITY

continued to welcome and support the incoming class of future lawyers. After in-person events were suspended, the admissions team coordinated a Community Call Day. On March 20, 2020, 81 members of the Detroit Mercy Law community made over 250 calls to future students welcoming them to Detroit Mercy Law. In May, at the Dean’s Receptions for Incoming Students, alumni from around the U.S. and Canada, faculty, administrators, and current students welcomed incoming students via Zoom. The 240 participants at the virtual receptions far surpassed the in-person turnouts of prior years. DETR OIT MERCY LAW 31


A L U MNI A SSOCIAT ION P R E SIDE NT ’ S M E SSAGE

THE IGNATIAN PEDAGOGICAL PARADIGM IS ROOTED IN THE PRINCIPLE THAT EDUCATION MUST BE MORE than

the mere transference of information from professors to students. Thus, the emphasis in the Jesuit educational process is upon both the practical along with the development of a sense of morality and mission within each student. As Detroit Mercy Law Professor Andrew Moore writes in his article Contact and Concepts: Educating Students at Jesuit Law Schools, 43 Gonzaga Law Rev. 460 (2007), “legal education at a Jesuit law school goes beyond the ordinary law school objective of developing competent and ethical practitioners.” While the objective of developing competent practitioners absolutely is important, it is equally as important Jesuit institutions strive to graduate “men and women for others.” This, Professor Moore says, entails “educating the whole person.”

Judge Riordan (left) with Gary Priestap BS ’66, JD ’71, MBA ’98 at the 2019 Meet the Judges Reception

Over the life of Detroit Mercy Law, the men and women who have served as members of its faculty, administration, and support staff have done this exceedingly well. And we, the over 8,000 alumni of the law school, and the society within which we live, are the beneficiaries of their dedication to this mission. As I am sure many of you have done over the span of your careers, I often have thought back with great gratitude to those at Detroit Mercy Law who embodied daily the highest standards of legal ethics, morality and civility, and who were shining intellectual examples of men and women for others. Among many others from my time as a student, and afterward, I am forever grateful to Professors Jacqueline Hand, Pat Keenan, Byron Cooper, Fr. Joe Daoust, S.J., Lee Goldman, Joan Hollinger, Nick Kyser, Rich Krisciunas, Leon Lysaght, Larry Dubin, Steve Mazurak, Howard Abrams, Bob Brown, Don Jolliffe, Bernie Dobranski, Richard Seid, Alan Saltzman, James 32  D O C KE T | FA L L 20 2 0

Barnes, Len Niehoff, Michael Morgan, Gary Maveal, Patricia Patterson, Daniel Misteravich, Anne Patton, Mark Gordon, Lloyd Semple, Phyllis Crocker, Michael Bryce, and Gil Donahue, and to those in support roles such as Loretta Lewins-Peck, Sr. Colleen Hickey, Charles Harte, Leon Wiley, Denise Hickey, Kathy Falk, Katy Cooper, Mary Barden, Joe Daly, Tom Fante, Mary Hayes, Carrie Sparks, Mrs. Russell, Kathleen Caprio, and Gene, Bill and Sally Moy. While they came from a variety of faith backgrounds, their commonality was that they lived the Jesuit charism of service to students of all faiths and backgrounds, and inculcated in each student not only a love for the law, but a deep appreciation of how the law impacts others at a personal level and how it impacts our world at a societal level. It is because of this dedication, that the law school effectively continues to educate the complete lawyer. Detroit Mercy Law lives its Jesuit and Mercy mission providing an excellent student-centered legal education in an urban context while integrating the intellectual, spiritual, ethical and social development of our students so that they may grow in service to their fellow human beings. We, as alumni, are integral to this mission and to the continued success of our law school in its education of the complete lawyer and person. Like those who have gone before us, as lawyers, judges, and other professionals, we must strive to aid, foster, and assist our present-day students to fully realize the pedagogical goals and ideals that our law school has held for the past 107 years. While in these unprecedented times of pandemic it may be difficult to gather to socialize, collaborate, and celebrate as alumni, we still have the ability and the means to be part of the Detroit Mercy Law tradition of service by giving professional guidance and mentoring to our students and recent graduates, by providing support, financial and otherwise, to the law school and, perhaps most importantly, by continuing to live our lives, both personally and professionally, as men and women for others. By doing these things, we each are contributing to the tradition of “educating the whole person” along with showing our appreciation for all who have gone before us and who gave so graciously and selflessly to the betterment of our lives and our world.

The Honorable Michael J. Riordan ’90 President University of Detroit Mercy Law Alumni Association Judge, Michigan Court of Appeals


ABLA PRES IDEN T’S MES SAG E

2020 -2021

DETROIT MERCY LAW ASSOCIATION OF BLACK LAW ALUMNI BOARD OF DIREC TORS

JUDGE TERRANCE A. KEITH ‘84 PRESIDENT Judge Terrance A. Keith `84 officially introduces the Association of Black Law Alumni at Bending the Arc Toward Justice on January 30, 2020.

JUDGE KRISTINE ROBINSON GARRETT ‘10 VICE PRESIDENT

NEARLY 100 YEARS IN THE MAKING, the Association of Black Law

JESSICA HOLMES ‘15 SECRETARY

Alumni (ABLA) is chartered as the first affiliate alumni group of the Detroit Mercy Law Alumni Board. ABLA is charged with the preservation, protection and defense of the opportunity to recruit, enroll and ensure the success of future generations of black Detroit Mercy Law graduates. While fully charged to aid in the success of black students and alumni, as an affiliate of the Alumni Board, our broader mission transcends the success of black alumni. Our overarching purpose is also to aid in the fulfillment of a vision that began six years ago when Dean Phyllis L. Crocker sought to create a community of alumni, students and faculty committed to diversity and inclusion. With that vision, the law school is positioned to also provide new soil in which to create a community garden to infuse the legal profession with seedlings of hope, opportunity and equality to bloom in seasons of manifest social, economic and racial inequality. For the nearly thirty-five years I had driven by the law school, each time devoid of any personal attachment and the land on which the law school sat appearing desolate and devoid of spirit for me. As a gardener, I know that soil can be enhanced to enable plants to grow. For me, the soil began to change when, within months of her arrival, Dean Crocker called to meet for lunch. The following years, the land I had known to be barren and devoid of spirit has become enriched and an assortment of new plantings of diversity and inclusion have taken root. The ABLA is among those new plantings; as it matures, and is viewed together with the growth of the other seedlings, its vivid blooms will confirm that the law school’s commitment and vision to a diverse and inclusive legal community were not misplaced. The ABLA looks forward to the continued support of the law school, the community and of all alumni of Detroit Mercy Law. Together we can do great things and beam with pride in full expectation of the yield from our labors.

Hon. Terrance A. Keith ’84 President Association of Black Law Alumni

DESIREE MARKS ‘13 TREASURER MIKYIA AARON ‘15 JUDGE MARYLIN ATKINS '80 ERICA POWELL-BELL '08 KYRA BOLDEN '14 FALLON BOOTH '14 JOSEPH BROWN '62 PONCE CLAY '15 MICHELE HALL‘84 DARWYN FAIR '79 ROBBIE GAINES ‘15 JUDGE SHANNON A. HOLMES '98 DEREK HURT ‘84 MARCEL HURT '92 RYAN JACKSON ‘17 EDWINA KING '10 JONATHAN KIRKLAND '15 MELISSA KOPRIVA ‘16 ASHLEY MCBRIDE'16 JAMEL NELSON '09 MYLIKA RADFORD '13 KYMBERLY KINCHEN REEVES '09 NISHAWN SPILLER ‘17 CLARENCE TUCKER '87 MACIE TUIASOSOPO ‘13

DETR OIT MERCY LAW 33


C L ASS NOT E S

1970s

1990s

David J. Cooper ‘71 principal attorney at

Laurence C. Begin ‘95 joined Wood, Herron,

Cooper & Bender PC, was inducted into the State Bar of Michigan Workers’ Compensation Hall of Fame.

Hon. Mona K. Majzoub ‘76 retired

on January 5, 2020 after serving 16 years on the federal bench. She plans to open a mediation practice.

and Evans LLP as senior patent counsel.

John T. Below ‘93 joined Bodman PLC as a

member specializing in litigation and alternative dispute resolution and workplace law.

Peter DeBoer Dual ‘95 was named the head coach for the Las Vegas Golden Knights.

Julie M. Hirsch ‘96 joined Dawda Mann

1980s Gail Alpert ‘81 was appointed by Gov.

Gretchen Whitmer to the Michigan Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education Advisory Council.

Shari Ferber Kaufman ‘88 joined

The Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute Board of Directors.

Matthew J. Stanczyk ‘86 became the chair

Mulcahy & Sadler as a senior attorney.

David W. Jones ‘97 was appointed to the Michigan Indigent Defense Commission by Gov. Whitmer.

Jonathan Lauderbach ‘94 was appointed by the Michigan Supreme Court as Chairperson to the Michigan Attorney Discipline Board.

Eric M. Weaver ‘97 was appointed Vice

President, Human Resources at Universities Space Research Association.

of ALFA International’s Product Liability & Complex Torts Practice Group.

Claudia Rast ‘86 was reappointed to serve on the ABA Cybersecurity Legal Task Force for the fourth year.

Thomas Tomko ‘87 was named the first

administrator of Macomb County’s new Office of Public Defenders. Adam Wenner ’11 with Judge Gershwin Drain from the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan 34  D O C KE T | FA L L 20 2 0

Class of 1969 Reunion


CL ASS NOTE S

2000s

PROFESSOR GILBERT A. DONOHUE ‘63

Andrea M. Badalucco ‘06 was elected as a

shareholder at Foster Swift Collins & Smith PC in Southfield, MI.

Susan Dabaja ‘04 was appointed by Gov. Whitmer to Local Community Stabilization Authority Council.

January Dragich ‘01 joined the Dragich Law Firm.

Gregory R. Grant ‘05 was named partner in the Traverse City office of Cummings, McClorey, Davis & Acho PLC.

Brian Hartwell ‘08 was reelected for his third

Professor Donohue (right) with his daughter Diane ’81 (left) celebrating his granddaughter Katherine’s ’03 graduation

term as Mayor of Madison Heights. In June 2020, Hartwell was nominated by Gov. Whitmer to the 43rd District Court in Hazel Park.

Professor Gilbert A. Donohue ‘63 passed away on April

Kenny Hemler ‘07 joined General Motors as

community for his dedication to teaching and seeking

in-house counsel.

29, 2020. He is remembered by the Detroit Mercy Law justice for his clients. Professor Donohue joined the law school’s Urban

2010s Ashley Aldea ‘15 joined Butzel Long as

Law Clinic in 1966 as a staff attorney. He served as director of the clinic from 1969 to 1970 and again from 1974 until his retirement in 1999. In 2005, Professor Donohue was honored at the 40 th Anniversary

an associate specializing is real estate and corporate transactions.

celebration of the Urban Law Clinic.

Daniel Bonnucchi ‘13 joined Warner

attorney, the clinic received the Bill of Rights Award

While Professor Donohue worked as a staff

Norcorss & Judd as an associate specializing in mergers and acquisitions.

from the American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan

Javon R. David ‘13 joined Butzel Long as

the 1967 Detroit Riots. 500 riot-related cases were

an associate specializing in Commerical and Business Tort Litigation.

Steven Eatherly ‘16 joined Butzel Long as an associate in the firm’s Business and Commerical Litigation Group.

for representing people who were arrested during dismissed because of the efforts of students and attorneys in the clinic. Professor Donohue believed in giving students the opportunity to learn in the courtroom. In the 1980s, under his direction, the clinic shifted focus to defending clients in misdemeanor cases at the 32A District Court in Harper Woods, where the Criminal Trial Clinic continues to defend clients.

DETR OIT MERCY LAW 35


C L ASS NOT E S

2010s Bradley A. Fowler ‘10 was elected as a member at Mika Meyers PLC in Grand Rapids, MI.

Hon. Kristina Robinson Garrett ‘10 was appointed to the Michigan Indigent Defense Commission by Gov. Whitmer.

William Jackman Dual ‘11 was elected a shareholder at Rogers Towers in Jacksonville, FL.

Rojin Jazayeri Dual ‘18 joined Gardiner

Roberts LLP as an associate in the Litigation and Dispute Resolution Group.

Christine Jubian Dual ‘18 joined Gardiner Roberts LLP as an associate in the Business Law Group.

JUDGE PATRICK J. DUGGAN ‘58

Judge Patrick J. Duggan ˈ58, passed away on March 18, 2020. In 1977, Judge Duggan became a Wayne County Circuit Court Judge. In 1986, President Reagan appointed him to the federal court where he served until he retired in 2015. Judge Duggan joined the University of Detroit Mercy School of Law Inn of Court 36  D O C KE T | FA L L 20 2 0

Jamie Lynn McCutcheon ‘10 joined Plunkett Cooney Transportation Law Practice Group.

Brian K. Mitzel ‘16 joined Maddin Hauser Roth & Keller as an associate and member of the firm’s Defense and Insurance Coverage Practice Group Michael D. Solt ‘16 was named shareholder at Howard & Howard.

Abril Valdes Siewert ‘13 was appointed by

Gov. Whitmer as Commissioner on the Hispanic Latino Commission of Michigan.

Javon L. Williams ‘10 received the 2020

Michigan Defense Trial Counsel’s Golden Gavel Award, given to an MDTC Young Lawyer’s section member who exemplifies significant contribution to professionalism and courtesy in the practice of law and by promoting the image and honorable reputation of the profession.

in 1986 as a Master of the Bench. He became President of the Inn in 1999. In 2014, the Inn conferred Judge Duggan the title of Master of the Bench-Emeritus. Emeritus Professor Gary Maveal ˈ81, former Inn administrator, recalls Judge Duggan’s dedication to the Inn of Court program. “Judge Duggan knew our Inn of Court was a unique opportunity and touted its formative value to our students,” Maveal commented. The Inn of Court program provides young lawyers and students an opportunity to learn how the court system works while forming meaningful professional relationships with experienced legal professionals. “At our opening sessions each fall, his remarks helped put the students at ease in the spacious and impressive courtroom at the Theodore Levin U.S. Courthouse,” Maveal recalled. “Judge Duggan told them how he had seen first-hand how the experience had enabled students to develop their voices as oral advocates. He appreciated that the program was a rewarding one for all involved, from Masters of the Bench to Barristers.” Judge Duggan was awarded the Law Alumnus of the Year Award in 2008. His dedication and service to the law school will be remembered.


REMEMBRANCE With deepest sympathy to the family and friends of Alumni who passed away from July 25, 2019 to August 10, 2020 PAUL C. APAP ‘90 GEORGE B. BAILEY ‘56 JAMES R. BANDY ‘76

2019 -2020

DETROIT MERCY LAW ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIREC TORS

GEORGE R. BEACH ‘52 LAMOT C. BEGOLE ‘52 THOMAS P. BRADY ‘80 MARTHA M. CHAMPINE ‘92 RICHARD T. COE ‘65 J.R. COLBECK ‘66 FRANK CONDINO’ 54

HON. MICHAEL J. RIORDAN ‘90 PRESIDENT EDWARD G. LENNON ‘88 PRESIDENT EMERITUS KYLE R. DUFRANE ‘98 VICE PRESIDENT KELLY HOUK ‘13 VICE PRESIDENT SARAH SIMMONS ‘11 SECRETARY GEROGRY G. THIESS ‘79 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

MOLLY A. COOKE ‘66 BRYAN C. DANDENAULT ‘66 GILBERT A. DONOHUE ‘63 THOMAS M DOOLEY ‘63 DONALD G. DUCEY ‘60 PATRICK J. DUGGAN ‘58 LOUIS E. FAIRBROTHER ‘54 GEORGE J. FULKERSON ‘52 WILLIAM M. FURY ‘62 JOHN A. GALLAGHER ‘64 GERALD R. GASE ‘59 PHILIP A. GILLIS ‘49 GARY M. GOLDEN ‘76

MIKYIA AARON ‘15 HON. MICHAEL J. BEAL ‘90 CAMILLLA BARKOVIC ‘13 KRISTOFFER BUTLER ‘19 PONCE CLAY ‘15 DENNIS L. DABNEY ‘00 BERNARD J. FUHS ‘06 KENNETH HEMLER J.D./MBA ‘07 HON. TERRANCE A. KEITH ‘84 LORI MIRELES-SMITH ‘18 PATRICK C. LANNEN ‘09

MAROUN J. HAKIM ‘72 DONALD R. HALSTEAD ‘67 JOHN R. HAND ‘64 JOHN M. HILL ‘78 JAMES J. HOARE ‘78 THOMAS A. KAMM ‘57 ELIZABETH A. KULESZ ‘64 STANELY J. LATRIELLE ‘69 PATRICIA A. LINDLAUF ‘90 MARTIN T. MAHER ‘74 RICHARD C. MCKNIGHT ‘69 L.B. PATTERSON ‘67 ANNE T. PATTON ‘76

SCOTT K. LITES ‘85

GERALD P. PEPLOWSKI ‘67

CHRISTINA NASSAR ‘10

CHESTER PODGORNY ‘52

MYLIKA RADFORD J.D./MBA ‘13 JAMES E. TAMM ‘85 MACIE TUIASOSOPO ‘13

KEITH E. PRESTON ‘99 RUBEN O. ROGERS ‘80 DANEIL J. RUST ‘79 DANIEL P. SHANOWSKI ‘77

MATTHEW L. VICARI ‘90

GEORGE J. STAUCH ‘81

MARK A. WISNIEWSKI ‘90

JAMES R. STERLING ‘’54

JUSTIN ZATKOFF ‘14

JAMES W. STUART ‘77


University of Detroit Mercy School of Law Alumni Relations 651 East Jefferson Avenue Detroit, MI 48226-4349

UPCOMING EVENTS Detroit Mercy Law will still be hosting many of our events virtually until it is safe to gather as a community again. SEPTEMBER 22, 2020 - 108th Annual Red Mass. Live Streamed. A Mass to celebrate the judges, lawyers, law students, and those who work in our justice system in the city of Detroit. OCTOBER 27, 2020 - McElroy Lecture on Law and Religion Presented Virtually. Professor Cathleen Kaveny, Boston College Law School, Live Stream. A forum for prominent thinkers and leaders to address fundamental issues of law and religion.

Be on the lookout for more details for the following events: 105th Annual Law Review Symposium Dewitt C. Holbrook Lecture on Social Justice Jesuit Day of Service Erin Go Law Networking Reception Dual J.D. Alumni & Awards Reception in Toronto