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ISSN 1614-4600 · NOV · DEC £12.50 · US$  24.50 · €18

English Edition

Review of Architecture and Construction Details · Interiors and Lighting · Vol. 2014 · 6


∂ Review of Architecture Vol. 6, 2014 • Interiors and Lighting Editorial office: E-mail: redaktion@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89 38 16 20-57 Christian Schittich (editor-in-chief) Sabine Drey, Andreas Gabriel, Frank Kaltenbach, Julia Liese, Michaela Linder, Thomas Madlener, Peter Popp, Maria Remter, Edith Walter, Heide Wessely; Sophie Karst, Christa Schicker (freelance assistant) Dejanira Ornelas Bitterer, Marion Griese, Emese M. Köszegi, Simon Kramer (drawings) Product editors: Meike Regina Weber (editor-in-chief) Katja Reich, Hildegard Wänger, Tim Westphal, Jenny Clay Elise Feiersinger (pp. 674 – 678) Peter Green (pp. 662– 672, 680 –724) Marc Selway (pp. 726 –757) (English translations) Advertising: E-mail: anzeigen@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-48 UK representative advertising: Peter L. Townsend Email: plt.detail@gmx.de Tel.: +49 (0)157-85 05 95 32 Fax: +48 (0)89-38 16 20-99 Distribution and marketing: E-mail: mail@detail.de Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-0 Subscription contact and customer service: Vertriebsunion Meynen Grosse Hub 10 65344 Eltville, Germany E-mail: detailabo@vertriebsunion.de Tel.: +49 (0) 61-23 92 38-211 Fax: +49 (0) 61-23 92 38-212 Publisher and editorial office: Institut für internationale ArchitekturDokumentation GmbH & Co. KG Hackerbrücke 6 80335 Munich Germany Tel.: +49 (0) 89-38 16 20-0 Fax: +49 (0) 89-39 86 70 www.detail.de/english

The French and Italian translations are available for every issue and can be downloaded as PDF files: www.detail.de/translation


Discussion 664 Editorial 666 “The client is more important than the architect” – An Interview with Álvaro ­Siza Frank Kaltenbach

Reports 674 Long Museum in Schanghai Hubertus Adam 678 Books, Exhibitions

Documentation 680 House in Fukuoka Movedesign, Fukuoka 684 Parliament of the German-Speaking Community in Eupen Atelier Kempe Thill architects and planners, Rotterdam 690 Church and Parish Centre in Cologne Sauerbruch Hutton, Berlin 697 Redesign of an Office Building in Stuttgart Ippolito Fleitz Group, Stuttgart 702 Conservatory in Aix-en-Provence Kengo Kuma and Associates, Tokyo 707 New Reading Room of Berlin State Library hg merz architekten museumsgestalter, Berlin 712 State Museum of Archaeology Chemnitz ARGE Auer Weber, Stuttgart, with Knerer and Lang, Dresden

Technology 718 “Ideally, space itself should be the narrative medium” – An Interview with Uwe R. Brückner Christian Schittich

Products 726 Light & Lighting 734 Flooring 742 Health & Leisure 748 Interior Design 754 BAU 2015 Preview 758 Service 764 Persons and organizations involved in the planning • Contractors and suppliers 766 Programme • Photo credits • Editorial and publishing data


Editorial

Interiors and Lighting A certain aura, haptic surfaces, and the ergonomic ­qualities of a building are all things that go beyond basic matters like “core and shell”, the form of construction, ­circulation and the outer enclosure. They are the outcome of convincing concepts for internal space and lighting. In their church and community centre in Cologne, Sauer­bruch Hutton have succeeded in creating a “Gesamtkunstwerk” – from the urban planning level to the pendant lamp fittings. Ippolito Fleitz have transformed existing office spaces dating from the 1980s into a bright, “non-territorial” office landscape, while Atelier Brückner, in close collaboration with Auer Weber and Knerer and Lang, have staged an informative world of experiences in that icon of modernism, Erich Mendelsohn’s former Schocken department store in Chemnitz. These are just a few of the projects to be found in the current issue of DETAIL.


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“The client is more important than the ­architect” – An Interview with Álvaro ­Siza

www.detail.de Born in 1933, Álvaro Siza is internationally one of the best known architects of our day. Regarded as a pioneer and the most important representative of contemporary Portuguese architecture, he has received the highest awards of the profession: the Pritzker Prize, 1992, the Praemium Imperiale, 1998, and the Golden Lion of the Biennale in Venice, 2012, for lifetime achievement. DETAIL: Your career extends over many decades. Looking back, would you have done ­anything differently in any of your buildings? Álvaro Siza: It’s not easy to get back into one’s earlier designs again. The Boa Nova Teahouse, dating from 1963, stood empty for

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many years and grew more and more dilapidated as a result of vandalism. Today, it’s a listed building, however, and the Casa da ­Arquitectura of my home town, Matosinhos, took it in hand and contacted me with a view to restoring it. With structures of that kind, though, you can’t just alter a detail without affecting the overall composition. The building is so coherently designed that any change would shift the balance; and since it is listed, no one is allowed to modify it, not even I. The teahouse was reopened this spring as a gourmet restaurant with a starred chef. Are you often contacted in connection with long-finished building projects?

Some projects go on for decades, like the school of architecture in Oporto, which we have repeatedly extended. Not long ago, I received a strange call about a building I had designed in 1958. Back then, the civic authorities terminated my contract before the project was finished, and a different architect completed the scheme. Now the city was asking me if it may demolish my part of the building. You began your career with housing design in Portugal. In the meantime, your services are sought after throughout the world, regardless of the type of project. How did that come about? Originally, I wished to be a sculptor. At the school of art where I studied, painting, sculpture and architecture were taught parallel to each other in the first years. I was fascinated by architecture and wanted to build museums and other beautiful things. But until the end of the military dictatorship in Portugal in 1974, there were no commissions of that kind, and even afterwards, in the early years, the only thing that was required was public housing. Quite by chance, at the beginning of the 1980s, there was a big demand for participatory housing concepts in the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany, too. People believed I was a specialist in this field, and so I was invited to participate in competitions abroad. But it was many years before I won my first competition for a museum. Only since then have I been invited to take part in all sorts of schemes. My first building in China was opened in August this year – a sculpturally curved office and seminar complex in the middle of a lake. You’re known for your distinctive sketches. Hasn’t this sort of representation become redundant in an age of computer rendering? On the contrary. Of course we work in the office with computer models and animation, too, but a sketch is much more immediate and is less binding. A computer rendering always looks so final, and there’s a danger in that of not thinking things out fully. We prefer to work with models, sometimes


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Long Museum in Schanghai Hubertus Adam

Architects: Atelier Deshaus, Schanghai

Seen from the terrace of the Power Station of Art, a power plant converted to a museum for contemporary art, the grounds on which the world exposition was held in 2010 could give rise to disillusionment. The hosts claimed that the Expo Shanghai, as it was called at the time, would leave behind neither ruins nor wasteland. On the contrary, it would become the nucleus of new neighbourhoods. But the vast unfenced swathes of land tell another story: the post-expo u­ses barely function, or have yet to be ­introduced. The only signs that this land may one day be developed: both banks of the river Huangpu have been made ­accessible to pedestrians, and the post-­

industrial transformation continues upstream. West Bund Cultural Corridor (WBCC) is the name of the city administration’s ambitious project. Its goal is to revitalise seven square kilometres of former port and industrial sites that adjoin the Expo grounds to the south. This is an instance of putting one’s chips, as the saying goes, on culture as attractor, whereby the Chinese understanding of culture is defined correspondingly widely. The Chinese do not share Westerners’ reservations regarding commercialisation: one might very well encounter a Monet in a shopping mall. And the middle class, which is economically successful and has become oriented to the Western lifestyle, is interest-

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ed equally luxury goods and contemporary art. And the “Dream Center”, a Dream Works project, is to become one of WBCC’s most important attractions: the plans foresee a 2.4 billion dollar culture and entertainment complex complete with hotels, restaurants and a variety of sites for event. This spring not just one, but two large private museums were erected in the WBCC. Museums are an important topic in China, which has some catching-up to do following centuries of more or less explicit lack of interest in cultural heritage triggered by the Cultural Revolution. Reports state that 450 new museums opened in 2012 alone. The driving force: municipal or provincial

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administrations that want to make names for themselves in the competitive national “field”, but private investors and collectors are also interested in cementing their reputations with a museum building; cases in which a shell is erected that lacks a suitable collection are not isolated. For prestige buildings there is a tendency in China to bank on big-name foreign architects. One such example is the Yuz Museum in WBCC funded by the Sino-Indonesian businessman Budi Tek and designed by Sou Fujimoto. However, because the execution diverged considerably from the architect’s intention, he has, in the meantime, ­retracted his authorship.

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Auditorium Bridge Parking garage Courtyard

The Long Museum, located just a few hundred meters to the north on the river shore may be viewed, by contrast, as piece of good fortune. In 2012, the business partners Liu Yiqian and Wang Wei opened a first museum in Pudong, a district on the other side on the Huangpu. That a new branch has now been erected is a result of the city administration’s initiative: it wanted a further building block to animate the WBCC. The design stems from Atelier Deshaus, which – founded in 2001 – numbers among the most exciting contemporary architecture firms in China and has gained renown for its buildings in Qingpu and Jiading on the periphery of Shanghai. The great care with

which the two founders, Liu Yichun and Chen Yifeng, and their team design and realise projects is apparent not least of all in a standard of workmanship that is unusually high for China, and this is also true of the Long Museum. The museum building has two levels above ground and two below and is organised orthogonally. The two subterranean levels of the base are larger than the visible parts of the museum: their geometry follows that of the triangular parcel, which is bordered by Longteng Avenue, Ruining Road and the riverbank. The lowermost level serves as parking garage, while the level above it, with its stuccoed halls equipped with artificial light-


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Long Museum in Schanghai

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Axonometry

Hubertus Adam is a freelance art and architecture historian, as well as architecture critic. Since 2010 he has been the head of the S AM Swiss Architecture Museum in Basel.

ing, are primarily used for the presentation of the collection’s historical items. The museum’s visible building massing grows out of this plinth, which is based on the logic of the parking garage: it consists of space-­ defining T-shaped reinforced-concrete structures. These possess cavities in which the installations are concealed. The curves at their upper ends allow them to serve both as wall and as ceiling. When two of the elements abut, the result is a vaulted space that usually has a slit of light at its centre, comes about. Atelier Deshaus not only rotates individual units 90 degrees, but also alternately organises one-storey or two-­ storey units and in this way gives the museum its complexity. Among the varied spaces are vast, doubleheight halls, as well as the more intimate single-storey halls, also known as “kabinetts”. A visitor moving about in the museum is repeatedly afforded views to other parts of the museum and out to the surrounding landscape. This experience in reinforced by the museum’s outdoor terraces, which are integrated in the overall complex at the level of the upper storey. Interior and exterior are skilfully interlocked, and particularly noteworthy is the fact that Atelier Deshaus has incorporated fragments of the industrial past of the site. For example, the museum is interwoven with remnants of train tracks and a series of concrete coal-conveying platforms; the latter now support a viewing platform. Liu Yiqian, who was born in 1963, grew up in modest circumstances; he is the epitome of the Chinese self-made man. Yiqian heads several publicly traded companies and is considered the country’s most important private art collector. His extensive collection consists of traditional Chinese art, as well as contemporary Asian and European art. The opening presentation at his new museum shows a selection of its holdings: on the lower level, for example, historical scroll paintings and calligraphy are on display; on the upper two levels is a survey of current Chinese art production – including works that interact with the museum space.


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Parliament of the German-Speaking Community in Eupen Architects: Atelier Kempe Thill architects and planners, Rotterdam André Kempe, Oliver Thill Partner architects: Artau scrl d’architectures, Malmedy Luc Dutilleux, Fabienne Courtejoie Others involved in the project: see page 764

The German-speaking community of Belgium, which constitutes the smallest member state of the country, was acquired in 1919 as a result of the Treaty of Versailles. It has continually extended its autonomy and responsibilities and today has a population of roughly 75,000 as well as its own government and parliament. Founded in 1984, the parliament needed additional space. As the new location of the administration and the chamber of assembly, a stately structure was selected – formerly a sanatorium dating from the second decade of the 20th century and standing on a hill above Eupen. A complete refurbishment of the existing building was necessary, and the alterations and ad-

ditions that had been made in the 1960s and 70s had to be removed. In its form and layout, the building was a long way from the low-energy structure required. As well as inserting new windows and constructing an insulated roof, a heating and cooling system was installed in an elaborate process. The minimalist extension, containing the chamber of assembly and foyer, is half-buried in the slope of the extensive parkland site. With its axial, symmetrical layout, this structure forms a visual and ­symbolic plinth to the existing building. The planted roof and the facades, with sedum growing over them, transform the new volume into a landscaped object, and the “dis-

play window” in the long face of the hall establishes a direct link with the park. The foyer, with its spacious staircase layout, connects the existing building to the new structure, while enjoying views to the external realm as well. At the ends of the foyer, which is also used for exhibitions and receptions, rear-lighted showcases with works of art were installed instead of windows. Daylight enters at the centre of the foyer via roof lights over which people can walk. At the wish of the client, the assembly chamber, which forms the heart of the extension, was executed in oak. For this, ­Kempe Thill developed panels consisting of end-grain blocks. These were used not only


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Site plan scale 1:5000 Section • Floor plan scale 1:500 1 Assembly chamber 2 Public gallery 3 Mechanical services 4 Illuminated ­ showcase

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Foyer Translator’s cabin Media room Dispatch room Printing shop Cloakroom Caretaker Store Archives Public-access TV

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as a floor finish in the hall and foyer, but for the walls and tables. The result is a calm space with a unified appearance and a serious, concentrated atmosphere. A vital aspect of the panel design was the creation of optimum spatial acoustics in the chamber. (The translators’ cabins, on the other hand, are fully lined with carpeting.) The oak blocks were laid on perforated multiplex sheeting with a felt lining. The 3-mm-wide joints ensure good sound absorption as well as allowing a visually attractive integration of ventilation outlets, doors and technical appliances. In the evening, the brightly lit timber-panelled hall radiates in the darkness of the park like a chest of jewels.

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vegetation/sedum planting 20 mm planting mat 24 mm lightweight substrate layer 25 mm solid-matter drainage layer 3 mm moisture storage mat polythene roof seal 145–285 mm expanded polystyrene vapour barrier 950 mm double-T reinforced concrete slab 60 mm coffer system filled with substrate 100 mm aluminium rail 100 mm polyurethane-foamsprayed insulation 300 mm reinforced concrete


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8 mm reflecting toughened glass, adhesive fixed 75 mm insulated door with white sheet steel 2≈ 12 mm laminated safety glass 2≈ 6 mm laminated safety glass (2≈) + 20 mm cavity 22/45 mm oak end-grain block parquet grouting layer 5 mm rubber granules 36 mm gypsum-fibre-reinforced plasterboard 10/45 mm oak end-grain blocks 20 mm perfo­rated Multiplex board 100 mm steel Å-sections

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purpose-made unit with fresh-air inlet inbuilt display/touch screen 18 mm oak-veneered composite wood board 10/45 mm oak end-grain blocks 20 mm perforated Multiplex board acoustic mat 60 mm mineral-wool insulation carpet 2≈ 13 mm rigid plasterboard with 75 mm insulation between (43 dB sound insulation) sound-insulating glazing (48 dB) black linoleum surface to table black textile curtains carpet

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Vertical section: staircase linking existing building, foyer and chamber scale 1:20

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“Ideally, space itself should be the ­ arrative medium” – n An Interview with Uwe R. Brückner

1 Uwe R. Brückner 2– 4 BMW Museum in Munich, 2008 2–3 Sketches by Uwe R. Brückner for ramp system Uwe R. Brückner was interviewed by Christian ­Schittich on 1. Juli 2014 in Stuttgart.

Uwe R. Brückner: The purpose of scenography is to bring complex contents to life in a spatial form that can be physically experienced. In contrast to classical architecture, it has a strong narrative – a dramaturgic – element. Ideally, space itself should be the narrative medium. Using space, using light and other media, I can lend the relevant content a quite different expression from what would be possible with unbending architecture. Scenography is dynamic: change, interaction and participation are vital elements; the dimension of time plays a major role.

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Atelier Brückner is one of the leading offices in the world for scenography. Its projects range from classical exhibition design for museums to staging brand images and the planning of entire expo pavilions, as in Yeosu, South Korea, in 2012. The atelier is situated in a former industrial building designed by Rolf Gutbrod in Krefelder Strasse, Stuttgart. Its open workspace radiates the character of a creative environment, and the atmosphere is pronouncedly international. Not only are the projects undergoing development there intended for a variety of locations throughout the world; the team – numbering roughly 80 at present – comes from 18 different countries. More than half of the assistants are trained architects and interior designers. The remainder represent 15 different professions and include typographers, media designers and historians. Uwe R. Brückner, the creative head of the office, is a trained architect and stage designer. As Professor of Scenography in Basle (and Shanghai), he teaches with an interdisciplinary approach that embraces subjects ranging from architecture to dramaturgy. DETAIL spoke to him about the aims and scope of scenography as well as about the underlying concept and development of the State Museum of Archaeology Chemnitz (smac; see page 712), which opened in May 2014. DETAIL: What makes scenography such an exciting subject for you?

What are the distinguishing features of successful scenography? It should reflect the needs of the contents. A good example of this is the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, where the exhibition designers have staged – in a historical building – an experience of natural history that does not appear to be distinct from the architecture, but that actually embraces it. The birds are housed right at the top of the building in a large hall, for example, and the marine creatures right at the bottom. That may sound banal, but it is implemented in a very subtle way. On the entrance level, there’s a large train of stuffed animals that looks like the one entering Noah’s ark. It’s an injunction and a grand gesture. At the same time, it’s representative of the contents of the entire museum. There’s a congenial interplay between the space and everything in it – a successful example of a permanent exhibition that’s more than 20 years old, but which has lost none of its relevance. It’s good that there are still permanent exhibitions which have lost none of their relevance even after 20 years. Nevertheless, in this period of time, exhibition design has altered a lot. What are the biggest changes? One major change has certainly been the development from an additive to an integrated form. Integrated design means that visitors don’t have object descriptions, subject descriptions and perhaps a further text with scientific data that they have to read

consecutively just to keep up with things. In such cases, viewers are exhausted after 20 or 30 metres from having to add everything together. An integrated system combines all significant information, yet always focuses on the crucial aspect. Sometimes a scientific explanation will be more important, sometimes the quality of an exhibit’s aura. The exhibition is “staged”, so to speak, a word that was a term of abuse ten years ago, but which has an almost inflationary use today. Another major development has been the arrival of digital media in exhibition design. That has had a great influence on the form of depiction, as well as on our visual habits – and not always to the benefit of a project. As far as possible, we try to apply digital media as serving instruments that are scarcely evident. After all, there has been a real paradigm shift in terms of the shelf life of permanent exhibitions. In the past, they were programmed to last for at least 20 years; today, for only seven to ten years at most. Among other things, that’s the outcome of the changing perceptual behaviour of younger visitors, for whom the electronic media have become a natural part of everyday life. You have projects throughout the world – not just in other European countries, but in China, South Korea, Saudi Arabia. Do differences exist in the acceptance of electronic media? Yes and no. The younger the local target groups are, the closer their attitudes are to ours in the West. They listen to the same music and use the same electronic devices. Their perceptual behaviour is similar, too. The older generation, on the other hand, is usually more attached to tradition. That greatly affects what you may show and how it can be presented. In the Arab countries in particular, there’s still a strong division between the sexes which we have to take into account. Many topics are taboo there, of course, and museums have a different significance in terms of the cultural background. You don’t simply go to a museum for pleasure; you do it for didactic reasons – with the school or as part of your studies. But even there, the authori-


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ties have come to recognize the signs of the times, and they are increasingly investing in attractive venues for exhibitions with the purpose of securing their viability for the future and keeping skilled employees in the country. In Asia, the situation is somewhat different. In China, for example, museums offer not only cultural advancement; they also serve the purposes of prestige and propaganda. Not uncommonly, there is neither a collection nor a true content. Nevertheless, huge museums (by Western standards) are planned and erected. The number of visitors is at least as important as the actual contents. In South Korea, in contrast, the muse-

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um is more a location for the upper strata of society. But there, too, a great effort is ­being made to attract a broader range of people and target groups – so-called “nonvisitors” – to exhibitions, people who are ­familiar with them mainly from obligatory ­visits paid during their schooldays. How is the consistency you mentioned earlier in terms of content affected, when there are so many different themes – like an automobile museum, the CERN particle accelerator in Geneva or an archaeological exhibition? Part of the assignment for the redesign of the BMW Museum in Munich was to integrate the listed structure by Karl Schwanzer.

That’s why we followed his approach of continuing the road in the indoor space and adopted the ramp system of his existing building – a “key” work – in the converted west wing. Theoretically it would be possible to drive a car through the entire museum. What’s more, the joint concept of the designers and curators did not foresee the organization of the display in a chronological order, as in most other automobile museums, but following the individual brand values of the concern. These we grouped together in vertically accessible thematic realms along the system of ramps, which is altogether a kilometer in length. That ensures a constantly shifting perspective of


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“Ideally, space itself should be the narrative medium” – An Interview with Uwe R. Brückner

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18, 19 V  isitors’ centre at the European Centre for ­Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva: European particle accelerator, 2010; permanent exhibition, “Universe of Particles” 20, 21 German Clock Museum, Glashütte, 2008: ­kinetic-light installation “Time Is Turned to Space”

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With simple, subtle changes of light over a longer period, it’s possible to reflect the change in time. That functions even better with projections, because they have a narrative character. In the clock museum in the nearby Glashütte, for example, there’s a room where we have enacted a quotation from Richard Wagner’s Parsifal: “here, time is turned to space”. Three figures of different scale dance 360° around the space – one every few seconds, one every minute and the third every hour. It’s a lighting installation on the theme of time that everyone can immediately understand – and which people love. Sometimes you generate atmosphere by means of film, as in the natural history exhibition you’ve just planned for Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Yes, there we shall project spectacular films on to the enclosing walls of the Natural History Gallery, showing the different climatic zones and the fascinating and largely untouched landscapes of Saudi Arabia. Local inhabitants often know more about their own and foreign shopping malls than about the spectacular natural environment of their country. In order to shoot the films for this project, we had to bring in the media planners from iart and the film director Marc Tamschick and even organize a helicopter and a pilot from Switzerland who could fly through narrow canyons, for example.

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­ oncepts like that can also belong to the C tasks of a scenographer.

make their creativity accessible for people to move around in and to exhibit it as an experience in itself. In most cases, unfortunately, the Egon Eiermann rule prevails: namely, flat tables on Eiermann trestles, and plans fixed to the walls or on the tables with models plonked down next to them – literally plonked down in most cases. Other examples exist, though. Some years ago, OMA staged a big exhibition in the National Gallery in Berlin. They presented a huge spatial installation in the form of a creative itinerary, the theme of which could be experienced by visitors. In a sense, one could physically discover the architectural stance of Rem Koolhaas and his team simply by walking around in it. Or think of the Herzog & de Meuron exhibition ten years ago in the Schaulager, Basle. It was a bit of a hybrid, because there was a classical presentation on tables, as well as a spatial staging. Much more interesting, though, was the threedimensional approach by means of largescale models that visitors could literally take apart to gain a deeper understanding of the whole design process. As a rule, architectural exhibitions are far too didactic and oriented to conventional art exhibitions: hanging, placing and describing objects. I’m curious to see when an architectural colleague will approach me (and who it will be) to ask whether I wouldn’t like to stage his or her work.

In addition to the archaeological display in smac, there are exhibitions in the facade spaces with natural lighting. In the Mendelsohn-Schocken gallery, daylight is used quite deliberately. There’s a focus on this. That’s why all the Mendelsohn sketches on display there are kept in selfclosing drawers to minimize the amount of light to which they are exposed – protected from daylight and UV light, of course. The models are presented more openly, but also in an air-conditioned space that is screened off from the visitors’ area by a layer of glass. As a result, with the refurbishment of the facade by the architectural collaborative, we were able to restore it externally to its original condition as it looked when it formed part of the Schocken department store. Erich Mendelsohn’s concept, which is strongly oriented to the horizontal facade bands, is effectively brought out by day and by night. One question in conclusion concerning architectural exhibitions: when architects display their own work, the settings often look much alike. But you yourself are an architect as well as a scenographer. What tips would you give your colleagues? I’d certainly recommend architects to allow their work to be experienced spatially – to

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Products


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Lights & Lighting

Circular LED solutions offer elegant replacements in heritage buildings Spectral Lighting, part of the RIDI Group, has released the latest addition to its Stora range. Using an open, cylindrical shape, the textured, translucent fabric sides of the Stora-LK-Fabrik, above, add a new design component to the product offering from this company, which has a strong heritage of working with leading architects throughout Germany and is now positioning itself in the UK market. The new luminaire comes in a variety of materials to create a soft, decorative feel, yet is claimed to be both durable and efficient, so making it suitable for a range of applications. Its extruded aluminium body acts as a thermal control to the LEDs, keeping the temperature constant and the output optimised. Providing 6,150 lumens from its array of LED boards, it features continuous direct lighting from its uniform circular light channel and is described as one of the most powerful luminaires available for general and breakout spaces. The drop suspension wires of the chandelier integrate the power cabling so there is no snaking cable dropping from the ceiling, keeping the focus on the design. As with all the ranges, the new light is customisable for individual projects allowing dimensions and colours to be adapted to re-

quirements. The company says it is continuing to push the boundaries of luminaire design, fully embracing the possibilities that LED offers. One challenge, however, is making new technologies fit our heritage buildings, and overcoming this challenge was very much the focus of Spectral’s latest project at Bristol’s Central Library. The Grade 1 listed building dating from 1906 was designed by Charles Holden and this, together with his Edward VII wing at the Bristol Royal Infirmary, are highly regarded examples of Edwardian architecture in the city. The main reading room in the library, below, left, has a vast, tunnel-vaulted glass ceiling that was lit with candelabra-style chandeliers which, though beautiful, were more decorative than functional, and when the building was rewired the building managers looked at how they could make this area’s lighting scheme more efficient. “We needed a replacement for the existing GLS chandeliers,” said Andrew Boulton, senior engineer at Bristol City Council. “Our fittings’ inefficiency became hard to justify so we needed to find a low-energy, lowmaintenance alternative with functional light levels and high colour rendering, but equally important was the aesthetic: we would not compromise the heritage of the library.” Spectral offered CAD renderings of a proposed design that used its extruded H-Profil system. The aluminum profile can be suspended to any length using steel wires, finished in any colour and shaped to fit individual project requirements. The circular pendant ring design that has replaced the candelabras has been suspended under the glass ceiling using an anti-twisting cable suspension arrangement. The LEDs fitted inside the extrusion are covered by cylindrical acrylic glass to create a softer diffused light effect and the expanse of glass above meant there was no need for

an indirect light source. The aluminium extrusion acts as a heat sink for the SLM LED modules and only a minimal extra heat sink was inserted behind the LED fixtures. H-Profil has also been used on another recent project in Bristol, again replacing classic, candelabra-style chandeliers. Opened in 1842, the Victoria Rooms served for many years as an important centre for culture in the West of England, later becoming the University of Bristol’s Department of Music: they now house the university’s central library but still function as an auditorium. The new scheme uses 15 W point source LED modules combined with faceted aluminium Pablo reflectors to create the desired low-glare light effect. The extruded system has been crafted into a clean, minimal cylinder and finished in bronze to tie in with the decor and create a neo-classical look, as seen below. The heavy gauge extrusion also acts to thermally control the heat from the LED modules and ensure maximum performance. ¥ RIDI Lighting United Kingdom � +44 (0)1279 450882 www.ridi.co.uk


research

The time of utopias, urban visions and futuristic scenarios is over. Architectural, urban planning and building research will meet future challenges with concrete recommendations for action and solution-oriented approaches. DETAIL research’s „Building the Future“ forum will during BAU 2015, the world’s leading trade fair for architecture, materials and systems, provide an insight into practical international research projects focusing on future construction.

detail.de/research

Forum – Building the Future

19 to 24 January 2015 | BAU 2015, Munich Monday, January 19, 2015, 2:30 pm

Urban Sustainability

Thursday, January 22, 2015, 2:30 pm

Climatic Strategies

Utopias and Urban Development

Buildings and Climate Change: The Plus Energy House

Morgenstadt – Co-Evolution of Urban Systems

Zero-Emission-Architecture

Prof. Dr. Gerald Wood, University of Münster Steffen Braun, Fraunhofer IAO, Stuttgart

Densification

Hans-Dieter Hegner, BMUB, Berlin

Prof. Dr. Hansjürg Leibundgut, ETH Zürich

Design with Knowledge

Justus Pysall, Pysall Architekten, Berlin

Signe Kongebro, Henning Larsen Architects, Copenhagen

Activating Urban Wastelands

A Clear Vision – Liquid Crystal Window Technology

Jana Reichenbach-Behnisch, rb Architekten, Leipzig

Eric Höweler, Höweler + Yoon Architecture, Boston

New Mobility

Selva Gürdoğan, Gregers Tang Thomsen, Superpool, Istanbul

Friday, January 23, 2015, 2:30 pm Tuesday, January 20, 2015, 2:30 pm

Beyond Globalization

Digital Architecture Production Computational Design and Fabrication

Prof. Achim Menges, University of Stuttgart

The City and the Region

Digital Planning in Architecture

Disconnected? Peripheralization of Cities and Regions

What You Know Is What You Get

Spatial Pioneer in Rural Regions

Digital Building Site

Prof. Dr. Frank Eckardt, Bauhaus University Weimar Dr. Manfred Kühn, IRS Leibniz-Institute, Erkner

Kerstin Faber, Projektbüro Franz Faber, Leipzig

Arnold Walz, designtoproduction, Stuttgart Marc Hoppermann, UNStudio, Amsterdam

Prof. Dr.-Ing. André Borrmann, Technical University of Munich

Smart Communities in Times of Demographic Change

Thomas Bade, iF UNIVERSAL DESIGN + SERVICE GmbH, Munich

Saturday, January 24, 2015, 2:30 pm Wednesday, January 21, 2015, 2:30 pm

Lasting Building Quality Lasting Building Quality

Open Source Architecture Social Architecture

Anh-Linh Ngo, Arch+, Berlin

Top Down versus Bottom up? New Planning Paradigms

Dr. Robert Kaltenbrunner, BBSR, Bonn

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Philipp Misselwitz, Technical University of Berlin

Resource Architecture

Participative Architecture

Prof. Arno Brandlhuber, Academy of Fine Arts in Nuremberg, brandlhuber +architekten und stadtplaner, Berlin

Quality of Life through Refurbishment Ralf Werry, Luwoge GmbH, Ludwigshafen Lutz Schäfer, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Susanne Hofmann, TU Berlin, Die Baupiloten BDA, Berlin

Do-it-Yourself Architecture

Prof. Anne-Julchen Bernhardt, RWTH Aachen University, BeL Sozietät für Architektur, Cologne

Active Building – Reconstruction as a Plus Energy House

Prof. Joost Hartwig, Frankfurt UAS, ina Planungsgesellschaft mbH Ruben Lang, o5 Architekten bda raab hafke lang, Frankfurt am Main

Venue: Messe München, Hall A4 / 338. The event is free of charge. For more information visit www.detail-online.com Strategic partners:

Research partners:


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Flooring

Tread softly

Wood flooring for commercial and residential use

Gaïa is a new custom collection of luxury natural flooring from Flock. The rugs and wall-to-wall carpets are made in a rich diversity of ecologically sourced plant fibres, many of which are said to be new to the flooring industry. Hyacinth, kesav, rati, makai and okra provide soft and smooth surfaces underfoot. Each rug or carpet is made up of ribs of fibre, hand-plaited into a chunky 5 cm fishbone pattern and then hand-sewn together � this technique produces a strong surface texture, resilient to wear and tear, and makes the products suitable for both residential and commercial interior schemes.

The Reclaimed Flooring Company offers authentic reclaimed, replica reclaimed and specialised new solid and engineered wood for a variety of commercial and residential projects. An innovative range of patinas incorporates both antique and contemporary design concepts. Sources for the product range include American barns, French chateaux and Victorian factories – for example, the reclaimed flooring above is Prime Strip Wood Oak Flooring, and most of the goodquality strip wood oak comes from the USA, because of the size of the trees and the grain structure. Mostly between 70 and 90 years old, it particularly suits Art Deco style interiors, such as this London restaurant, with the recent trend away from wider boards to a more delicate appeal.

The fibre floor covering is available in several contemporary shades of grey and a pale cream option, in addition to a range of natural colours. All the rugs, as well as oversize rugs and carpets, are made to order. The hyacinth fibre comes in Peacock, Mushroom and Natural, kesav is available in Natural, rati in Steel, Natural and Mole, okra comes in Ocean and Natural, and finally makai is in Natural only. ¥ Flock United Kingdom � +44 (0)20 8440 8777 www.flock-living.com

The new wood collection is said to have been developed without the constraints of excessive manufacturing. Specialist patinas and natural surface custom colours are created through a variety of studied organic compositions that are exclusive to the company; these organic formulas are designed to react with the tannin that exists naturally within the timber allowing a ‘time capsule’ effect that speeds up the natural ageing process. This aesthetic is achieved as the wood structures organically react and

change colour within themselves rather than through the application of a flat wash of commercial stain. Rain Shadow solid oak flooring in mixed width, shown below, from the Tailor-Made Patina Range, displays subtle colour variation using soft blacks, greys and whites highlighted throughout the grain. The specification is: solid –160, 190, 200 and 220 mm at 20 mm thickness; engineered –185, 220, 240 and 280 mm at 16 and 21 mm thickness; hard wax oiled finish; micro-bevelled or hand-carved edges; and distressed or design (no distressing) surface texture. ‘Instant nostalgia’ can be created for brands and businesses with its weathered and textured painted colours range. By using bespoke colour combinations architects and designers are able to match company brand colours with a ‘reclaimed’ aesthetic for painted flooring and wall cladding. Over 1,000 colour combinations are available in several distressing techniques such as chipped, layered and splattered. ¥ Reclaimed Flooring Company United Kingdom � +44 (0)20 7250 1108 www.reclaimedflooringco.com


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London particular

Antique, modern, and a new use for old mooring posts

Domus Tiles has launched the Mews tile range by British designers Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby, who are based in London and are strongly influenced by the city: their collection is inspired by the variety of textures characterising its infrastructures, such as bricks, wooden floors and irregular geometrical patterns. In six colours � fog (seen above), pigeon (below), soot, chalk, lead and ink � the tiles are designed to capture the natural tones and variations in light that are present throughout London and shape the surroundings.

A wide range of attractive antique and newly quarried limestone floors is offered by Paris Ceramics, with some of the antique floors being quarried as long as 1,000 years ago. These have been given a new lease of life without the need to be processed using harmful solutions, making them eco-friendly as well as beautiful, says the company.

Domus Tiles’ showroom in Clerkenwell offers architects and designers a huge range of products for all types of residential and commercial projects. The samples library has thousands of porcelain, ceramic, glass, mosaic and stone samples, and the technical lab and CPD presentation room houses technical products, precision models, cutaways, floor substrates and adhesives, showing how they come together to create complete flooring solutions, swimming pool tanks and raised access floors. ¥ Domus Tiles United Kingdom � +44 (0)20 7458 4000 www.domustiles.com

In addition to reusing ancient materials, it has made a point of reinventing damaged and unusable off-cuts by restoring and crafting them into mosaics using long-established techniques, which are said to be ideal for a feature wall or splashbacks. Amongst the most popular reclaimed floors is Antique Blonde Barr (top, left), a stone quarried between 1820 and 1900 in the Languedoc region of France, and which was intended to be used as flooring in the grand country homes of this area. The flagstones are hand-sawn and shaped, and are commonly installed as coursed flagstones in random lengths. The time-worn look and natural, distinctive patina is equally at home in both modern and traditional interiors. A product offering the look of luxury at less cost is Pierre de Mont, a newly quarried stone that has been hand-distressed to rep-

licate the look of antique reclaimed stone (top, right). The elegant flagstones are available in a choice of four courses and can be arranged in a variety of ways to create different effects. As well as viewing these stones at the King’s Road showroom, which carries samples of most products, Paris Ceramics has set up an office and storage yard in Montpellier, France where the floors may be seen in their entirety. The company has recently made available an unusual reclaimed product for floors that is created out of mooring posts (known as briccole) from the canals of Venice. Utilising chestnut, and American and European oak, this recycled wood flooring has a unique patina and is available in panels featuring four designs, two of which are shown below: the star (left) and the double cross. For contrast, walnut can be added to give a more decorative effect. The square panels come in 500, 600, 700, 800, 1,000 and 1,200 mm sizes and are suitable for both residential and commercial flooring. ¥ Paris Ceramics United Kingdom � +44 (0)20 7371 7778 www.parisceramics.com


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BAU 2015 Preview

Business-focused and industry-wide information platform for professionals From 19 to 24 January 2015 the BAU trade fair in Munich will again take up all the ­available space at the Messe München ­exhibition centre. In a display covering 180,000 m2 of hall space, BAU showcases architecture, materials and systems for ­residential and commercial construction and interiors, both for new-build and for renovation and modernisation. More than 2,000 exhibitors from around 40 countries will take part, with the proportion from outside Germany expected to be the highest yet, at almost 30 %. The halls are arranged by construction material, product and theme, with fundamental topics such as sustainable building playing an important role in all sections. This show is a platform for premieres: exhibitors gear their new product development to the event cycle of BAU, and product innovations in windows, doors, floor coverings and new facade elements, for example, are regularly seen first at the Munich venue. And BAU is a meeting place, where exhibitors and visitors come together to do business. Attracting professionals from all parts of the design, planning and construction world, it styles itself as the number one information and communication platform for

planners, architects and construction engineers, boasting that no other event attracts so many representatives from this group, which the organisers say shows this sector holds BAU in very high regard. There are three key themes for 2015 � Intelligent Urbanisation, Energy and Resource Efficiency, and Buildings and Users. Many exhibitors are shaping their presentations to match and showcasing corresponding solutions. In the forums, industry professionals will explore and debate the themes from a range of perspectives. And in the special shows at BAU they will be illustrated through examples of products and projects. Expanding and ever-changing urban areas will have a decisive impact on development in the 21st century because the struggle to ensure an ecologically sustainable future is being fought mainly in cities. Almost twothirds of the world’s population will be concentrated in urban areas by 2025, whilst the latest extrapolations predict a rise in primary energy demand of around 50 % and thus a further rise in carbon emissions. For tomorrow’s city a host of concerns has to be taken into account at the planning and construction stages, including demographic

change, greater pressure on resources, a shift in traditional ideas on value creation and increasing climate fluctuation. These demands can only be met via an integrated approach by urban planning, architecture and building technology and systems. For companies as well as for private households innovative solutions are needed for using resources and energy: low-energy and passive buildings are already state of the art, and the trend towards the ‘efficiency house plus’ that produces more energy than it consumes is continuing apace. The development of new, integrated facade concepts and efficient energy-supply models for individual buildings, even entire urban areas, is a logical and necessary step on the road to the future of building. And, with people in Central Europe spending up to 80 % of their time in offices or other interior spaces, practical solutions for improving buildings and interiors will continue to gain ground; ventilation systems with integrated, automated controls to optimise comfort are seen as the way forward, alongside intelligent systems that use waste heat from one system to drive another. ¥ www.bau-muenchen.com


∂   2014 ¥ 6

BAU 2015 Preview

As of: 06/2012

World’s Leading Trade Fair for Architecture, Materials and Systems www.bau-muenchen.com

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As of: June 3, 2013 – Subject to change and modification –

Edition

Designing interior spaces – the construction of design Whether a train compartment, fashion boutique or library, we show how interior spaces are designed by international architects. The wide range of tasks and the variety of available materials is presented with the aid of se-

Interior Spaces Christian Schittich (Ed.), 2nd edition 2014, unchanged reprint 2002. 176 pages, with numerous drawings and photos. Format 23 × 29,7 cm. ISBN 978-3-7643-6630-8 Hardcover: € 49.95 / £ 40.– / US$ 70.– + postage/packing + VAT, if applicable

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(Extra)ordinary solutions for everyday and unexpected places

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1 untreated 15 mm steel angle vertical section leaning 10 mm inwards at the top 2 140/120 mm wood bearer 3 M 12 bonding anchor 4 8 mm steel plate screwed to wood bearer 5 48.3 mm dia. steel tube 7.1 mm thick pushed through and welded underneath 6 60 mm solid maple bench 7 57 mm dia. steel tube 8 mm thick pushed through and welded underneath 8 60 mm untreated solid maple table-top 9 60 mm untreated solid maple bookcase 10 100/100 mm wood bearer 11 100/10 mm steel angle 12 100/70 mm wood bearer 13 25 mm oriented-strand board with felt covering 14 stand structure made up of 50/50/5 mm steel SHS 15 19 mm plywood sheeting covered with felt 16 15 mm veneered plywood sheet with black plastic coating

Plasterboard, glass, metal curtain, wood panelling – a revealing glimpse beneath the outer surface

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Building the Future – DETAIL research’s event series and DETAIL research Lab The time of utopias, urban visions and futuristic scenarios is over. Architectural, urban planning and building research will meet future challenges with concrete recommendations for action and solution-oriented approaches. DETAIL research’s ‘Building the Future’ forum will, during BAU 2015, together with its partners BASF, Velux and Merck, provide an insight into practical international research projects focusing on ­future construction. Architecture, research, industry and politics address these complex structural change processes with interdisciplinary cooperation and cross-sectoral solution approaches. Amongst others, Arno Brandlhuber (brandlhuber+ architekten und stadtplaner, Berlin), Selva Gürdoğan (Superpool, Istanbul), Marc Hoppermann (UNStudio, Amsterdam), Signe Kongebro (Henning Larsen Architects, Copenhagen) and Jana Reichenbach-Behnisch (rb Architekten, Leipzig) will provide insights into their research activities: How can urban planners and architects create a basis for steadily growing urban social systems? What happens with rural regions if their inhabitants continue to migrate to the cities? How can we continue to build in a resource-friendly manner and feed demolition products back into the material cycle? How will serial production affect our built environment? And what influence do we as users have on the architecture of the future? 19/01/2015: Urban Sustainability

Life in the future will take place in cities � global population trends prove this. Green City, Smart City, Megacity, Eco-City, City of Tomorrow: there are currently a great many concepts for the city of the future. Urbanisation seems to be the only workable solution to the problem of a growing global population. This makes the system and structure of a city a field of research for all disciplines. Urban planning and architecture must provide the basis for the functioning social systems of the future.

20/01/2015: Beyond Globalisation

Globalisation currently finds itself confronted with strengthened regionalism. Booming cities are leading to shrinking regions and, as cities grow, the importance of rural areas is also increasing. Just as the metropolises are redefining themselves, a restructuring of suburban areas is also taking place. In the context of these glocalisation shifts, experts speak of the compression of intermediate cities and even of possible new cities being established. 21/01/2015: Lasting Building Quality

The treatment of existing buildings against the background of demographic change and population decline is increasing in importance. Renovation saves both energy and costs in the long term. Maintenance increases the comfort of users. Redensification harnesses urban potential and the upgrading of existing properties enhances the entire urban environment. 22/01/2015: Climatic Strategies

Climate change will become perceptible in the next 30 years. Scenarios predict significantly more summer days with higher temperatures and milder winters. This will be felt particularly strongly in urban areas. Various research projects are already focusing more strongly on the preparations for climatic change. The development of climate adaptation programmes and the testing of model regions is already in full swing, and future construction is arming itself for climate change. Day programme supported by content partner Stylepark. 23/01/2015: Digital Architecture Production

Digital design and manufacturing processes enable the serial manufacture of customised components for the entire construction process and building life-cycle. Computerbased implementation, from design through site logistics and building operation to recycling, holds new potential for prefabricated

components. The design work spans the gamut from robotics to system assembly. Technology transfer and new material technologies from other industries are opening up new perspectives for the construction ­industry. 24/01/2015: Open Source Architecture

The changing professions of architects and urban planners, new priorities and changing working methods mean that new communication and networking formats are required. Architecture, urban planning and interior design are increasingly seeking interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral and holistic solutions, with professional expertise becoming ever more relevant. Active members of the public too will get the chance to participate in the architectural discourse. Day programme supported by content partner Arch+. DETAIL research Lab

DETAIL research Lab 'Future Materials & Innovations’ presents the latest, unpublished innovations from the research departments of companies and universities. An exclusive, curated selection of innovative product developments, raw materials or semi-finished products in the form of prototypes, mockups and material samples will be shown. Alongside the forum topics, the focus will be on functional and structural materials, resource efficiency and digitalisation. DETAIL will link together manufacturers and architects and moderate the exclusive relationship by carrying out screened individual surveys. The DETAIL research Lab will be prominently located on the ground floor of the ICM International Congress Center Munich � with direct access to the BAU exhibition halls and the congress areas. The lab can only be visited by invitation from BAU and DETAIL. For more information, please see page 727 of this issue, or visit: ¥ www.detail-online.com ¥ www.messe-muenchen.com


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Programme for 2014 • Photos ∂ 2014   1

Materials and Surfaces

∂ 2014   2

Timber Construction

∂ 2014   3

Concept: Housing

∂ Green 2014 1 ∂ 2014   4

Refurbishment

∂ 2014   5

Facades

∂ 2014   6

Lighting and Interiors

∂ Review of Architecture + Construction Detail

DETAIL English appears in 2014 on 11 January, 1 March, 2 May, 1 July, 2 September, 4 November.

Published by: Institut für internationale ArchitekturDokumentation GmbH & Co. KG, Hackerbrücke 6, 80335 Munich, Germany Tel.: +49 (0)89-38 16 20-0 Fax: +49 (0)89-33 87 61 www.detail.de

Prices for DETAIL English (incl. 7 % VAT (EU)):

∂ Green 2014 2

PO Box: Postfach 20 10 54, 80010 Munich, Germany

Photo credits: Photos for which no credit is given were either provided by the respective architects or they are product photos from the DETAIL archives.

Limited partner: ATEC Business Information GmbH General partner: Institut für interna­tionale ArchitekturDokumentation Verwaltungs-GmbH, a 100 per cent subsidiary of ATEC Business Information GmbH.

pp. 664, 691, 692, 693, 694 bottom, 695, 696: Annette Kisling, D – Berlin pp. 665, 668 bottom, 669, 670, 671 top: Duccio Malagamba, E– Barcelona pp. 666 top, 671 bottom: FG + SG fotografia de arquitectura, P– Lissabon pp. 666 bottom, 667: Nelson Garrido/wwwngphotocom.pt pp. 668 top, 672, 725: Frank Kaltenbach, D – Munich pp. 673, 674: Su Shengliang pp. 675, 676: Xia Zhi p. 678 top left: Thomas Dix /Architekturphoto, Dusseldorf pp. 679, 702–706, 713 top, 721: Roland Halbe, D –Stuttgart pp. 680 – 683: Yousuke Harigane, J –Fukuoka pp. 684 – 689: Ulrich Schwarz, D –Berlin pp. 690, 694 top: Margot Gottschling, D –Overath pp. 697–701: Zooey Braun, D –Stuttgart p. 707: Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin PK / cinemadirekt.com pp. 708, 709: Udo Meinel, D–Berlin

pp. 710, 711: bpk I Jörg F. Müller pp. 712, 713 right, 714 top, 724 left: Michael Jungblut, D – Berlin pp. 714 bottom, 716, 717, 719, 722 bottom, 723: Christian Schittich, D – Munich p. 715: László Farkas, D – Chemnitz p. 718: Birgit Kadatz, D –Stuttgart p. 724 right: Wolfgang Günzel, D–Offenbach p. 732 top right: Andrew Penketh p. 732 bottom right: Ian Nolan p. 734 top left, top right, bottom middle, bottom right: Joe Clark p. 742 bottom left: Cutting Edge p. 742 top right: Florian Geserer, Foto Sexauer p. 742 bottom right: prpm Architekten+Stadtplaner GmbH p. 754: Messe München GmbH / BAU 2013 p. 756 top left, top right: Boris Storz, München p. 757 top left: Messe München GmbH / BAU 2013

Black-and-white photos introducing main sections: page 665: House in Pego Architects: Álvaro Siza Vieira, Oporto page 673: Long Museum in Shanghai Architects: Atelier Deshaus, Shanghai page 679: Conservatory in Aix-en-Provence Architects: Kengo Kuma and Associates, Tokyo page 717: State Museum of Archaeology Chemnitz Exhibition design: Atelier Brückner, Stuttgart Architects: ARGE Auer Weber, Stuttart, with Knerer and Lang, Dresden page 725: “Triangular Series” at Design Miami /Basel 2014 Artist: Jamie Zigelbaum, Brooklyn /New York

CAD drawings All CAD drawings contained in the “Documentation” section of the journal were ­produced with VectorWorks®.

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DETAIL English 06/2014 Interiors and Lighting  
DETAIL English 06/2014 Interiors and Lighting