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FDA’s foodborne illness risk factor stuDY COMING

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O f f i c i a l P u b l i c at i o n o f t h e F lo r i da R e s ta u r a n t & Lo d g i n g A s s o c i at i o n

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F rom t h e c e o

Restaurants Are Economic Bright Spot for Good-Paying, Reliable Jobs

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By Carol B. Dover hile Florida's unemployment rate ticks downward, the restaurant industry has been an economic bright spot for quite some time, by providing goodpaying, reliable jobs in our state. The industry employs more than 840,000 workers - keeping thousands of Florida families on solid financial ground and strengthening our state’s economy. What does the industry get in return for helping boost our economy? Critics distorting these jobs as less than valuable to our workforce and our communities. I am troubled by the recent, inaccurate attacks on our industry by special interest groups and for the harm they cause the hundreds of thousands of Floridians who should be valued for the work they do. The small business owners and workers who I meet in cities across this state are proud of their jobs and the contributions they make in their communities. More than 13 million Americans rely on the steady income and career growth oppor-

tunities through jobs in the restaurant industry. Many of us have done these jobs – it is the first job held by nearly one in three Americans. Let’s stop attacking and start valuing these workers. And let’s start with having a discussion based on facts. The fact is the restaurant industry pays a fair wage to employees based on their experience and skill-set. These jobs teach critical skills, like personal responsibility, teamwork, discipline, and accountability—providing workers with the resources and opportunities they need for successful careers. And many of them advance from their entry-level positions in the industry. In fact, nine out of ten salaried restaurant employees started in hourly positions. It is an industry that is vital to our economic growth and which has helped fuel the national recovery we are now experiencing. More than 10 percent of the U.S. workforce holds jobs in food service. And, while employment nationwide grew by just 1.5 percent in 2012, restaurant industry employment grew 2.4 percent—making

Florida Sets 100 Million Visitor Goal! During the Governor’s Conference on Tourism, Governor Scott announced Florida has set a goal of hosting 100 million visitors in 2014. This goal isn’t too much of a reach, as visitors to Florida were over 90 million last year. This number was used in a study conducted by Florida TaxWatch recently – “Investing in Tourism Analyzing the Economic Impact of Expanding Florida Tourism.” The study cites several benefits to the State’s economy if this “milestone” is reached. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

Carol B. Dover

More than 13 million Americans rely on the steady income and opportunities through jobs in the restaurant industry. Many of us have done these jobs – it is the first job held by nearly one in three Americans. 2012 the 13th consecutive year that the restaurant industry has outperformed overall U.S. employment growth. Most restaurant employees earn above the minimum wage. In fact, the majority of workers who are in minimum wage jobs work in other sectors – not the restaurant industry. Only five percent of restaurant employees earn minimum wage and those who do are mostly teenagers working part-time jobs. Many Americans rely on the additional income and flexibility restaurant jobs offer as they seek to balance their careers with family responsibilities, or as a way to remain involved in their communities. Most industry workers are students with irregular schedules, teenagers saving for school, or parents and caregivers who need a job that fits their busy lives. Part-time, entry-level jobs fill a critical need in our nation’s workforce. And the fact is, restaurant owners typically provide raises when an employee is

fully trained or prepared to take on more responsibility. Both part-time and full-time positions make the restaurant industry a versatile career option for a variety of workers. For people from all backgrounds, the restaurant industry provides a pathway to a middle class income, whether in the restaurant industry or as a bridge to new careers. Restaurant jobs are valuable for workers, their communities and our nation’s economy. Demeaning and devaluing these jobs is wrong. As our nation’s economy continues to recover, we should focus on preparing workers for high-growth positions, supporting our growth industries and respecting the hard work of millions of Americans.

Carol B. Dover, FMP President and CEO of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g  

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contents OCTOBER/NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013 • WWW.RESTAURANTANDLODGING.COM

24 Thinking Inside the Bun From the workingman’s lunch to the “better burgers” of today, the hamburger can be served an infinite number of ways. Read on to get a glimpse of some of Florida’s “better burgers” from members Burger 21, BurgerFi, Square 1 and Vertigo.

34 Ready. Set. Code! One of the biggest changes to the 2009 FDA Food Code is a new three-tier violation citation terminology system. The new terminology is used to assist regulatory organizations in prioritizing food safety interventions and inspections. By Jan Gentry and Jay Berglind

44 FDA’s Foodborne Illness Risk Factor Study Coming Your Way FDA Regional Retail Food Specialists will begin collecting data for the 2013-2023 Foodborne Illness Risk Factor study. Whether or not your facility is one of the randomly selected facilities participating, this here is some general information regarding the study, the data collection process, and how the data will be used.

Departments

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From the CEO Restaurants Are Economic Bright Spot for Jobs From the Chairman’s Desk Giving Back: Next Season Contribute Time to FRLA CEO Profile Chris Elliott, CEO, Beef ‘O’ Brady's® Business Climate Employer-Sponsored Benefits (Paid Leave) Task Force Chefs That Sizzle Chef Clay T. Conley, būccan, Imoto Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Show Floor, Golf, BIG Party Photo Highlights Movers & Shakers/Cool Web Page Drew Schlesinger • Skift.com Operations FRLA’s Young Operators Council; Endless Summer Music Series Cool Apps/Top Trends Travel+Leisure • Top 10 Food Violations A La Carte Ask Your Inspector, Buyers Guide Update, Follow RCS on Social Media Event Calendar 2014 FRLA Event Calendar Health Care UnitedHealthcare's PlanBien Serving Latino/Hispanic Workforce A La Carte DTI Expands Background Screening; FRLA Joins Share the Gulf Social Media What's Next? Google Keywords Go 100% (Not Provided) Employee Relations Customer Service Key to Successful Bars, Restaurants Member Spotlight Zenith Insurance, Preventing Slip and Fall Injuries Wine Tips Release the Beaujolais Nouveau! By Eddie Nickell Member Benefits BMI: Music and the DIning Experience! Membership 2014 Regional Directors’ Territories and Regional Managers ProStart Regional Workshops • What Has LMP Done for Me? By Lissette Albelo Food Safety It's That Time Again: FDA’s Foodborne Illness Risk Factor Study SafeStaff Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g A s soci at i on


F rom t h e c h a i r m a n ’ s de sk

Chairman

Andrew Reiss

Andrew’s Downtown, Tallahassee Chairman-Elect

Jim McManemon, Jr. The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island Secretary-Treasurer

Matt Halme

Outback Steakhouse Inc., Tampa

Dave Hadelman Twin Peaks, Orlando

Greg Nicklaus Sirata Beach Resort, St. Petersburg

Kevin Speidel

Hilton, Fort Lauderdale Immediate Past Chair

Bruce Craul

Legendary Inc. & Hospitality Inc., Destin President/CEO

Carol B. Dover, fmp EDITOR

Susie R. McKinley email: susie@mckinleyhome.com

M AG A ZINE

Publication Manager

John M. Baker

john@restaurantandlodging.com Advertising

Leslie L. Baker

850-545-5023 • leslie@restaurantandlodging.com Published By

DestinCom 1334 Timberlane Rd., Tallahassee, FL 32312 Phone: 850-545-1362 • Fax: 850-907-8245 Florida Restaurant & Lodging magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify, or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members, or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by e-mail. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

Publisher’s Address 1334 Timberlane Rd. Tallahassee, FL 32312 850/545-1362 Fax: 850/907-8245

Ad Rates and Submission Guidelines at www.RestaurantAndLodging.com Florida Restaurant & Lodging magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 104403640) is published bi-monthly. FRLA Members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Boyd Brothers Printing, Inc., Panama City, FL. Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, PO Box 1779, Tallahassee, FL 32302 or via email to susana@frla.org. Subscription address changes (digiw Mail, w w.Res ra at n twww.RestaurantAndLodging.com, A nd Lodgi ng.com tal or US can bet au made and click the Manage Subscription tab.

Giving Back Next Season, Think About How You Can Contribute Your Expertise and Time To Frla

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hope you are having a wonderful Fall – enjoying both the fall weather and football season. Here in Tallahassee that means FSU football and the beginning of the Legislative Committee meetings – both really good for my business. FRLA is having a productive Fall as well. I hope you had a chance to take advantage of all the opportunities available to FRLA members all around our State. The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show held in Orlando in late September was a great event offering so many opportunities to FRLA members and the Industry. FRLA’s Big Party and the NRA / FRLA Bob Leonard Golf Classic were awesome. Congratulations to our winners!  The Endless Summer Songwriting Festivals have been fantastic – showcasing many of those “behind-the-scenes” songwriters and bringing visitors to our State.  But the Hospitality Industry isn’t all events and glamour; it is also hard work.  We all know that. But just what is “hard work”?  Our daily business is hard work. Keeping our customers happy, making payroll, managing personnel, keeping up with new and current governmental mandates, and providing accurate and relevant training – is also hard work. Maintaining a successful industry and trade association such as FRLA is also hard work.  Many aspects of FRLA succeed, in part, due to the volunteer activism of our members. FRLA’s professional staff is the best in business, but FRLA can’t succeed unless we are all involved in the business of FRLA. We all need to work hard to guarantee the success of FRLA and the Industry.  So this fall, think about how you can contribute your expertise and time to FRLA. I’ve

Andy Reiss

heard it said “Giving back involves a certain amount of giving up.” FRLA offers so many opportunities to members to become involved in the business of our Industry. From governmental relations and growing our membership, to education, training and our own Educational Foundation, find some time to work alongside your peers, or mentor a student who is interested in the hospitality business. The time you put into your Industry, grows your Industry, and your business. So make some time, put in some effort, and find out how you can get involved with FRLA.

– ANDY REISS 2013 Chairman of the Board Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association

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F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g A s soci at i on


F L ORIDA RESTAU RANT & L OD GING ASSOCIATION

Chris Elliott

CEO, Beef ‘O’ Brady’s® Chris Elliott has 34 years of broad based food service experience that includes quick service, full service, delivery, cafeteria, as well as specialty retail in both domestic and international markets. Chris has successfully handled every level of general management responsibility rising to President and board member of a publicly traded company. Chris has spent the last 17 years at the COO and President/ CEO levels where he has managed every functional area, led strategy development in difficult turnaround situations, helped take Morrison’s Fresh Cooking public, led the strategic divestiture of Cinnabon, consulted for Private Equity and led the creation of Fiesta Brands. In addition, Chris was COO of Church’s Chicken, and spent 14 years in the Pizza Hut division of Pepsico, Inc. Chris holds a BBA in Accounting from the University of Georgia, Terry School of Business. (Go DAWGS!) He has completed the Center for Creative Leadership’s “Leadership Development Program” and “Leadership at the Peak.”

How did you get started in the hospitality industry? I graduated from college in the summer of 1977 with a BBA in Accounting. My intentions were to get into graduate school as soon as possible, but I was financing my own education so I needed to stop for a while and work. I took a job in the restaurant industry thinking it would only be a year but I never left – 36 years later I am still in the hospitality industry.

Early in your career, what was the most valuable lesson you learned? The truth is I learned lots of lessons. I grew up in a very small town (Tallapoosa, GA) and to say I was naïve early in my career

Chris Elliott

would be an understatement. I did not fully understand or appreciate how to manage my boss. I had a couple of lousy bosses and I made it pretty clear to them I thought they were lousy. That’s not a smart way to get ahead. I eventually learned to manage my boss as effectively as I did my job. That ultimately led to promotions.

Do you have any mentors who were instrumental in helping you achieve your goals? I don’t think I ever had a formal mentor in my entire career. However, I developed a habit of watching what successful people were doing to get results and move ahead. If I was impressed with their approach and style, I would find myself beginning to emulate some of their behavior. So from that standpoint I had lots of mentors. They just didn’t know it.

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Do you have any career related advice that you would like to pass on to FR&L readers? Any career advice I might give would tend to be specific for what a person’s career aspirations might be. That being said, if someone wants to be a CEO I’d recommend a few things: • be the first in and the last to leave; • take as many different assignments as possible to become broad based in your skillset; • focus on results, not process; • associate yourself with people smarter and more experienced than you are; • remember that how you treat people, no matter what their situation in life, says everything about your true character.

What is the single greatest factor in the success of your career? I would say my ambition and willingness to address my shortcomings have been factors in my success. I’ve made a lot of mistakes in my career but I only made them once. I wanted to lead and I was determined to learn how to do it effectively. I am still learning.

How has participation in FRLA positively affected your business? Being connected to FRLA helps us stay on top of what’s happening in our industry. FRLA has been a huge help in understanding the Affordable Care Act.

Is there anything you’d like to share with Florida’s hospitality industry members? Yes, please visit Beef 0’ Brady’s and The Brass Tap. Our owners would love to see you!

Hilton Sandestin Beach Donates $4,352 to Wounded Warriors Hilton Sandestin Beach Golf Resort & Spa (HSB), Destin, Florida, recently donated $4,352 to the Emerald Coast Wounded Warriors (ECWW). Above are: (left to right) Richard Ross, HSB VP of Marketing and Sales; Gary Brielmayer, HSB General Manager; Rob Vickers, ECWW Co-founder; Aaron Hale, ECWW Member/Warrior; Ken Gestring, ECWW Co-founder; Mike Petrucci, ECWW Board of Directors; Megan Harrison, HSB Marketing Manager; Jackson Cherry, HSB Director of Operations. 8  O CTO B ER / N OV EM B ER / D ECEM B ER

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Busi n e s s Cl i m at e

Employer-Sponsored Benefits Study (Paid Leave) Task Force Status

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ith Governor Scott’s signature of HB 655 earlier this year, Florida’s cities and counties were banned from requiring that local businesses offer paid leave to all employees. Along with this mandate, the Legislature was authorized to establish a task force to analyze employment benefits and the impact of state preemption of the regulation of such benefits, and develop a report that includes findings and recommendations for submission to the Governor, Senate President and Speaker of the House. Chairman of the Task Force is Chris Hart IV, President and CEO of Workforce Florida. Other members include Senator Rob Bradley, Orange Park; Jeff Clyne, President, Mid-State Machine and Fabricating Corporation, Lakeland; Art Kimbrough, President and CEO, The

Overstreet Company, Marianna; Andy Madtes, AFL-CIO, Miami; Walter N. Carpenter, Junior, MAI, CRE, Pinel & Carpenter, Inc., Orlando; Marcia Gonzalez, Florida Carpenters Regional Council, Hialeah; Randall Holcombe, DeVoe Moore, Professor of Economics, Florida State University, Tallahassee; Gregory R. Riehle, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, Saddlebrook Holdings, Inc., Wesley Chapel; and Representative John Wood, Winter Haven. Meeting date: December 17, 2013 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Webinar/teleconference

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For more about the Task Force, contact: Kim Yablonski, Executive Director, EmployerSponsored Benefits Study Task Force, 850-4148297, or email kyablonski@workforceflorida.com

Have You Notified Your Employees About Health Insurance Exchanges?

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ave you notified your employees about new government-run health insurance exchanges? The 2010 health care law requires most U.S. employers to give their employees written notice about new online marketplaces that are set to open in every state this fall. These exchanges will offer Americans new options for obtaining health insurance for 2014. Employers must have notified existing employees about exchanges by October 1, 2013 and thereafter to new employees at hire. Starting in 2014, employers must provide the notice to employees within 14 days of hiring. The notice requirement applies to all employers covered by the Fair Labor Standards Act. Among other information, the FLSA notice must tell employees how to access exchanges/marketplaces. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

The FLSA notice also must let employees know they may be eligible for federal tax help to buy health plans through exchanges and the difference in tax treatment between employer-sponsored coverage and Exchange coverage, according to Department of Labor guidance. The National Restaurant Association has created a member-exclusive tool to help restaurateurs satisfy the health care law’s requirement to notify all employees about the Exchanges. The NRA’s online Notification Tool, available at Restaurant.org/Notify, is an online solution that lets employers create a customized portal where they can direct employees for the FLSArequired notice. Employees who visit the portal view the forms and provide acknowledgement they’ve been notified. The tool allows employers to keep track of the specific employees who have been notified.

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F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g  

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Chef Clay T. Conley Chef/Owner Buccan, Imoto

In 2011, Chef Clay Conley partnered with Sam Slattery and Piper Quinn to open Buccan in Palm Beach, Florida. He wanted to create a casually sophisticated space that featured small plates with big flavors, and replicate the camaraderie that is felt when dining at a friend’s house. Little did they know they would craft the island’s most popular restaurant, which has become everyone’s home away from home and a favorite for special occasions or just a quick bite at the bar. The best part? The food at Buccan just gets better, resulting in two James Beard Award nominations for Best Chef: South, in 2012 and in 2013, and an expansion. In February 2012, the team opened Imoto (transl: little sister), an intimate, Asianfocused extension of Buccan. Clay takes his surroundings seriously. Each city and country that he visits or lived in influences his palate, style and techniques. The hallmarks of his favorite dishes are bright, fresh and balanced flavors, and it’s no surprise that Asian cuisine accentuates these points. While living and working in Tokyo, Clay was influenced by the clean flavors of traditional Japanese cooking.

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Subsequent travel in China, Thailand, and Singapore sharpened the chef’s palate and interest. Other travel and work in Europe, South America and Asia broadened his exposure to global gastronomy, ingredients and technique. His “progressive American” approach at Buccan blends the classic comfort of his New England childhood, the rustic of the boldness of Mediterranean, and the sensual influence of Latin America. Highlighting contrasting tastes, textures, and temperatures, Clay applies his flair and sense of balance to traditional flavor combinations and dishes. A native of rural Maine, Clay grew up tending his family’s orchard and livestock. In the extremes of the New England landscape, he was introduced to the logic of seasonality, the significance of origin and the beauty of fresh ingredients. At 13, the future chef got his first taste of the business, volunteering to work in the kitchen of a local restaurant. Pursuing his calling, he eventually became a protégé of Todd English, becoming his culinary director in 2003. In 2005, Mandarin Oriental, Miami, selected Conley to run the kitchen at its signature AAA Five Diamond Award restaurant, Azul. Under his helm, Robb Report named Azul one of America’s finest restaurants. Clay and his restaurants have has been recognized in national and international publications including Travel + Leisure, Conde Nast Traveler, Complot, USA Today, Wall Street Journal and NY Post, and listed as Esquire’s “Where to Eat in South FL Now.” Buccan restaurant is Forbes Travel Guide’s “hottest spot” in Palm Beach, and has received “Best Restaurant” honors from all area publications. Clay has also cooked on Emeril Florida, The Today Show and Fox and Friends.

HotChef? Are You Considered2013 Among Florida’s Hottest Chefs?

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Please describe your restaurant concept(s). Buccan is a progressive American grill that offers sophisticated cuisine and service in a casual, comfortable, approachable environment. The menu consists of mainly small plates, many wood-fire roasted or grilled, giving guests the opportunity to try many different tastes and encouraging the camaraderie of sharing.

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a bi-monthly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to susie@mckinleyhome.com. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. BeF lor surei datoRinclude restaurant and contact estau r a nt & Lod g i n g A s soci at i on information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle!


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What influences your cooking style? Travel greatly influences my cooking. Every place I visit – even locally - teaches me something. I particularly enjoy international travel though, and learning about new ingredients, tools and techniques.

Does South Florida inspire your menu? Absolutely. The Latin American culture and cuisine of Miami is a great inspiration that you will see all over my menu. Plus, there is amazing produce here in the winter that is always exciting to incorporate.

Please tell readers about the features of your American cuisine. We call it “progressive” American because that’s what it is, a modern, fresh take on the melting pot of culture that makes this country what it is. So, essentially, you’ll see ingredients and flavor profiles featured from all over the world, modified to be our own. That’s America!

Please describe some of your most popular menu items. While I rotate the menu often, we have had several things that have become signature items, per se. These include Hamachi Sashimi with Peruvian Chilies, Mojo and Crispy Lotus Root or the Squid Ink Orrechiette with Sausage, Conch, Basil and Chilies. The Hot Dog

Andy Ryan Photo

Panini with Sauerkraut, Gruyere, Mustard, and Chili was a surprise hit, too, that has stayed on the menu since we opened. One of my favorites is the Short Rib Empanada with Salsa Criolla and Aji Amarillo. We braise beef short rib in red wine, garlic, rosemary, thyme, and veal stock for three hours. The meat is folded in empanada dough and fried until crispy. The empanadas are garnished with three sauces. First, we use an aioli made with aji amarillo – a yellow Peruvian pepper paste - and lime. The second is a ‘salsa criolla,’ basically a salsa made with garlic, red onion, red pepper, extra virgin oil, cilantro and vinegar. The last sauce to be drizzled on the plate is the reduction of the cooking liquid from the short rib.

What is your “sizzle” … for example, cuisine and food that are your signature or “specialties,” unique food presentations or any new ideas you are using? Contrast and balance and are critical components in each of my dishes. This empanada dish that I just described is the perfect example of a taste balance, with its combination of richness and acidity, and just a touch of heat. The velvety short rib and crunchy dough creates a sharp textural contrast. I like to take familiar items, such as the empanada, and make it my own.

What is your favorite dish to eat that you’ve created? When cooking for myself I prefer simple, clean dishes … woodgrilled fish and meats, grilled veggies, salads, anything raw such as ceviches and tiraditios – typically, things on the lighter side.

Congratulations on your nomination of Best Chef: South 2012 AND 2013 from the James Beard Foundation. Were you really excited to receive this honor? Thank you. Absolutely. It was a total honor to be included amongst all that talent, current and years’ past.

I bet it was exciting to work with Chef Todd English. Please tell us about your experience with this celebrity chef? Todd was great. I learned so much from him. His bold, lusty flavors definitely make their way into my dishes.

To what do you attribute your success in the business? A great team. Hard work. Constant study.

Balsamic Caprese

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Andy Ryan Photo

Burrata with Walt’s heirloom tomatoes, and pesto

F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g A s soci at i on


2013

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show

Incoming FRLA Chairman, Jim McManemon, and current FRLA Chairman, Andy Reiss, enjoying the Trade Show.

Where Breakthrough Ideas Are Found! Let the Show begin!

* Food Trends Experience * Ferdinand Metz Foodservice Forum * New Product Gallery * Multi Unit Operator Alliance * ACF Culinary Competitions * Over 500 Leading Vendors * And, Much, More!

September 22–24, 2013 | Orange County Convention Center | Orlando, FL Presenting:

Sponsored by:

Produced & Managed by:

Featuring:

The Florida Restaurant and Lodging Show floor is great for checking out new products and services. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

GAIN A FRESH PERSPECTIVE ON YOUR BUSINESS® www.flrestaurantandlodgingshow.com

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NRA/FRLA Bob Leonard Golf Classic The tournament was well-attended despite the overcast skies. Thanks to all participants, co-chairs and steering committee members. VIPs and golfers all had a great time at the tournament! For more pictures, visit www.Facebook. com/FRLAnews

Winners National Course 1st Place: Austin Knipp, Louis Martorano, Jonathan Raz, Steve Miller – Cintas #2 Team 2nd Place: Brad Feller, Chris O’Brien, Mark Bonfanti, Hunter Liles – Monitor Liability Team Longest Drive: Jeff Bishop International Course 1st Place: Henry Mason, Chris Anoge, Bobby Thompson, George McNeilly – Bass Pro Shops Team 2nd Place: Teo Soderman, Ben Stoller, Derek Tomno – McNeilly Communications Team Longest Drive: Brad Gamble Closest to the Pin: Phil Lucado Straightest Drive (Female): Dina Russo Straightest Drive (Male): Louis Martorano

Dr. Joe West (center) of Brooklyn Water Bagels with the guys from Doorstep Delivery Tallahassee.

Tournament Co-Chairs: Robin Sorensen, Co-Founder, Firehouse Subs, Jacksonville Jeff Smith, President, Bloomin’ Brands, Inc., Tampa Kevin Speidel, Area Managing Director, Hilton Fort Lauderdale, Fort Lauderdale Russel Bond, General Manager, Vinoy Renaissance, St. Petersburg Jeff Grayson FRLA PAC Steering Committee Bruce Craul, Lengendary,Inc., Destin Jason Emmett, Duffy’s Sports Grill, Palm Beach Jason Fialkoff, VGM Client Rewards, Orlando

Jason Bogan and David Warriner (above) from The Port Inn getting ready to golf.

Incoming FRLA Chairman, Jim McManemon, and Darryl Adams of The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island.

Andy Gross, Sunshine Restaurant Corp., Orlando Dave Hadelman, La Cima Restaurants, LLC/Twin Peak Restaurants, Orlando Matt Halme, Strategy Holdings, LLC, Tampa John Horne, Anna Maria Oyster Bar, Bradenton Jim McManemon, The Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island Lino Maldonado, Wyndham Vacation Rentals North America, Fort Walton Beach Craig Miller, Miller’s Field, Orlando Chau Nguyen, Kobe Japanese Steakhouse, Orlando Jen Osgood, Cintas, Orlando Harry Price, Coca-Cola Refreshments, Orlando Dave Reid, Miller’s Ale House, Jupiter Doug Ridge, World Center Marriott Resort, Orlando Louis Robbins, Nickelodeon Suites Resort, Orlando David Warriner, Tapper & Company, Port St. Joe Michelle Wilson, Banyan Investment Group, Tallahassee Joe West, Brooklyn Water Bagels Franchise Co., Miami

Chilled Dills Pickle Flavored Vodka with the team from ChampionsGate Golf Club. 14  O CTO B ER / N OV EM B ER / D ECEM B ER

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Monique Yeager, Romacorp, Orlando F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g A s soci at i on


THANK YOU TO ALL WHO SUPPORTED THE 2013

BOB LEONARD GOLF CLASSIC

PLATINUM

GOLD

SILVER

BRONZE

BALL DROP SPONSOR

CORPORATE

ORLANDO

2-HOLE SPONSORS

CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS

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NRA / F R L A B ob L e on a r d G olf Cl a s sic

VIPs and golfers all had a great time at the tournament! For more pictures, visit www.Facebook.com/FRLAnews 16  O CTO B ER / N OV EM B ER / D ECEM B ER

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Mov e r s a n d Sh a k e r s

Cool Web Page

Schlesinger Named VP of Hotel Ops At Hollywood’s Seminole Hard Rock

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rew Schlesinger has recently been named Vice President of Hotel Operations at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. With over 34 years of experience, Schlesinger has served as general manager and director of operations in several major metropolitan cities that include New York City, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Miami, Atlanta and Sydney, Schlesinger Australia. Most recently, he served as General Manager of the Warwick Hotel in Manhattan. Schlesinger has also managed operations and openings for high profile properties such as The Darling in Australia; The Water Club at the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City, Kimpton Hotels in New York City and two major Ian Schrager Hotels - The Paramount in New York City and the Mondrian Hotel in West Hollywood, California. Schlesinger holds a bachelor of science and a bachelor of arts in Management Science & Business from Boston University.

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At a recent FRLA First Coast Chapter Breakfast meeting, Corkey Bergamo, FRLA Regional Director, presented Paul Renner (right) with a check for $250 toward the campaign fund for his run for the District 15 Seat, Florida House of Representatives. Paul has been involved with the Chapter for three years and for the past two years, has served as the Chairman of our Governmental Affairs Committee. For the past two years he has attended and participated in Lobby Day for FRLA. F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g  

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For more pictures from The BIG Party, please visit www.Facebook.com/FRLAnews 18  O CTO B ER / N OV EM B ER / D ECEM B ER

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OPERATIONS

FRLA’s Endless Summer Music Series Picks Up Some New Fans By Ashley Gholston

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t FRLA’s Endless Summer Music Series in Destin, two young country fans had a chance to meet the songwriters who wrote some of Nashville’s biggest hits. The eight year old twins, Hannah and Ashley Moran, called it a dream come true! Their parents attended the event last year and knew their daughters would love the Labor Day weekend festival. “They needed to be a part of the whole event. They have so many songs they love and can now say, ‘We met the songwriter of that song!’ Ashley is a huge Jason Aldean fan and loved meeting Bridgett (Tatum) and Danny (Myrick) as She’s Country is one of her favorite songs. Hannah aspires to be a songwriter and actually has lyrics she wrote a year ago,” said their mom, Jennifer Moran. When it came time to raffle the Fender acoustic guitar autographed by all of the songwriters at the festival, the girls’ parents knew it was going home with them, back to Cumming, Georgia! Proceeds from the raffle went to FRLA’s Educational Foundation. Their father Todd Moran said, “We would love to go to more of these events and look forward to Key West in May! The people are wonderful and it is such a well-run event. We will always return to Destin for the Endless Summer Music Series!”

FRLA’s Young Operators’ Council at Trade Show

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ormer FRLA Chairman and Executive Vice President of Operations for Ale House Restaurants, David Reid, was a speaker along with Joe Kefauver, Managing Partner at Parquet Public Affairs at FRLA’s Young Operators’ Council (YOC) at the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Trade Show. The meeting was well-attended and provided insight to attendees. This working group is targeted to up-and-coming restaurant and hotel owners, operators and managers. The Council will help FRLA engage this audience and provide insights when communicating with a new generation of leaders. When preparing for the event, David had a few thoughts… “When I got the call from Dan Murphy to be guest speaker at the FRLA’s Young Operators Council, the first thing I did was call my 16 year old daughter and asked her what I should speak about to this young audience. “That was my first mistake, because my 16 year does not talk on the phone; she texts. So, I left her a message and she promptly texted me back with her answer... ‘For the love of God, please go buy some new clothes first, Dad.’”

“It appeared I was off to a great start with this motivating and insightful advice. “So, I put on some old Dockers and attended the FRLA food show in Orlando where I was able to have a fun discussion with this fine young group of tomorrow’s leaders.” “It was an honor to share the stage with Joe Kefauver, who has over two decades of industry experience with government relations. We have such a wonderful industry that offers unlimited opportunity, and this is the target audience for that opportunity.” “I strongly support the FRLA’s initiative to create the Young Operators Council. It will prove to be a valuable resource for anyone who is starting a career in the hospitality business.” “Please make plans to attend the next meeting. I can guarantee you it will be time well spent just to be able to network with a room full of your industry peers,” Dave concluded. The YOC is on LinkedIn! Join us in the conversation: http://www.linkedin.com/ groups/FRLA-Young-Operators-6506105/

Ashley Gholston is a student at Florida State University’s Hospitality Management School. 20  O CTO B ER / N OV EM B ER / D ECEM B ER

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A L A CARTE

Cool Apps

FRLA's RCS Now On Social Media Follow Regulatory Compliance Services on Twitter @FRLA_RCS and Like Us on Facebook!

Travel + Leisure

by American Express Publishing and available for iPad, is a great app available on iTunes. It is filled with travel tips, ideas, itineraries and occasionally stories about FRLA members. It is a paid subscription, but well worth the money. In addition to the app, T+L offers free email newsletters. Don’t miss out on these!

Top 10 Food Violations

Top 10 Perennial Favorites Full-Service Restaurants 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Italian cuisine Hamburgers / cheeseburgers Egg dishes French toast Fruit desserts (e.g., cobbler, crisp, tart, pie) 6. Barbecue as a main dish 7. Grilling as a preparation method 8. Comfort foods (e.g., chicken pot pie, meatloaf, roasted chicken) 9. Milkshakes / malts 10. Mexican cuisine

Limited-Service Restaurants

DBPR Top 10 Food Service Violations Recorded by Inspectors for the Fiscal Year July 2012 – June 2013 CODES: 22 *Food Contact Surfaces Clean and Sanitized; 14 *Food Contact Surfaces Designed; 08A *Food Protection; 23 Non-food Contact Surfaces Clean; 36 Floors; 32 *Restrooms Clean; 08B *Food Protection/Cross Contamination; 03A *Cold food at proper

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Soft drinks Poultry items Iced tea French fries Chicken sandwiches Side salads Beef items Milk Hamburgers / cheeseburgers Soups

*Source: National Restaurant Association, “What’s Hot in 2013” Chef Survey, 2012, Restaurant Trends Survey, 2012.

temperature; 21 *Wiping Cloths; 31B *Handwashing Supplies and Signs w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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EMPLOYEE TRAINING The SafeStaff® Employee Foodhandler Training Program is available in the familiar book format or an online interactive training!

Onli

Pick the training delivery system that works best for you and your employees. Need assistance with your training? ne Tr ain

1.9 ing starts as low as $1

5*

WE CAN HELP! RCS Regional Trainers throughout Florida are available to come on premise and perform food safety and alcohol service training.

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A L A CARTE

Ask Your Inspector As any food service establishment manager knows, your state inspector “can make your day” or “break your day”. Just what is it that these hard-working folks are looking for when they inspect your operation? What do they use as guidelines to make decisions? Do you have a specific question that you’d like to ask your inspector? If so, please submit your question to susie@mckinleyhome. com, and FR&L will get an answer for you! Ask Your Inspector will be a permanent fixture in FR&L Magazine, and we are hoping that it will be a forum to help you understand what it takes to comply with food safety and lodging requirements in Florida.

“Why are some restaurants closed with an emergency closure action by the Division of Hotels and Restaurants?” “Emergency closures are reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the Division of Hotels and Restaurants, and are dependent upon the specific violations observed by the inspector. While violations such as lack of approved utilities or hot water, sewage backups or overflows, fire damage, pest infestation or inadequate refrigeration may warrant an emergency closure, there are many mitigating and aggravating factors that are considered before an emergency closure is issued. For example, if an infestation is found near food prep or handling areas, that would be an aggravating factor in deciding to issue an emergency closure. “Once the elevated risk is observed, the inspector will note the violation details and contact district management. Management then sends the report to the Director’s Office for review. Ultimately, the decision to issue an emergency closure is made by the Director and is on average made within 30 minutes. Upon approval to issue the closure, an order is generated and given to the operator and the establishment remains closed until the conditions are corrected.”

2013 FRLA Buyers Guide Now Available FRLA’s 2013 Buyers Guide is online at FRLA.org and available at http://www.frla.org/ membership/2013-buyers-guide. It is a resource for businesses and provides to users a complete listing of FRLA suppliers listed by both product and company. Don’t miss this great tool!

Out of Compliance?

Contact FRLA to solve compliance issues at 866-372-7233 or www.SafeStaff.org

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2014

Event Calendar

For more information: www.frla.org/events

n FRLA Winter Board Meeting & Installation Banquet January 6-8, 2014 Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island n The Americas Lodging Investment Summit (ALIS) January 27-29, 2014 Los Angeles, CA n Florida Tourism Day at the Captiol March 12, 2014 Tallahassee, FL n AH&LA Legislative Action Summit (LAS) March 18-19, 2014 Washington, DC n NRA Public Affairs Conference April 29-30, 2014 Washington, DC n NRA Show May 17-20, 2014 McCormick Place, Chicago, IL n FRLA Summer Board Meeting Date TBD n FRLA Marketing/ Operations Summit Date TBD n Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show September 7-9, 2013 Orange County Convention Center, Orlando n FRLA’s BIG PARTY September 8, 2014 BB Kings Blues Club n NRA/FRLA Bob Leonard Golf Classic September 10, 2014 ChampionsGate Golf Course

FRLA's RCS Now On Social Media To keep up with regulatory issues and matters of food safety be sure to friend RCS at FRLA's Regulatory Compliance Services on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @FRLA_RCS. You'll be glad you did! F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g  

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Compiled by SUSIE MCKINLEY

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t doesn’t matter what you are reading, or who you are talking to, the hamburger is America’s contribution to world-wide cuisine, although there are disagreements about the birthplace of and who actually invented the burger. Reportedly the hamburger was served as minced or chopped beef

in Hamburg, Germany as far back as the mid-nineteenth century. Placing it between two pieces of bread, however, could have been the innovation of any number of folks, in a variety of locations around the United States. From Wisconsin and Connecticut, to Ohio, Hamburg, New York, Texas and Tulsa, Oklahoma, all of these spots claim to be the birthplace of the hamburger. The “Father” of the hamburger is as disputed as the burger’s birthplace. We do know for certain, however, that the hamburger was definitely on the menu at the beginning of the last century. And it sure has come a long way! From the workingman’s lunch to the “better burgers” of today, the hamburger can be served an infinite number of ways. Read on to get a glimpse of some of Florida’s “better burgers”.

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Square 1 Barbecue Bacon Burger

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SQUARE 1

n Interview with Bill Shumate and Joanie Corneil Describe your burgers and the concepts behind their creation. Square 1 serves Meyer’s angus, chicken, pork, kobe, buffalo, lamb, duck, salmon, turkey for our main proteins. In addition, we frequently feature more exotic proteins such as elk, alligator, ostrich, and venison. All are 100% naturally raised and antibiotic free. We are vegetarian- and vegan-friendly, serving our own house-made vegan burger; a marinated and grilled portabella mushroom burger; and a killer grilled cheese, so good we call it ‘X-Rated.’ Burgers, being the favorite “American” food, we felt that they shouldn’t be limited to beef. Diners are always looking for something different and exciting. That’s Square 1.

Where did the idea come from for Square 1? In 1964 Bill Shumate opened his first restaurant, a burger joint called “Across the Street” (it was located across the street from his alma mater, the University of Oklahoma) in Norman, Oklahoma. Many years and restaurants later, he yearned to go back to the business he loved best: Burgers. In 2006, he and his partner, Joanie Corneil, began developing a new restaurant concept. As a nod to Bill’s history, they named their new venture “Square 1 Burgers & Bar.” The original location opened in Tampa, in 2008, with an edgy atmosphere and full service bar that set a new standard in casual dining.

steamed broccoli (kids love it); or you trade up to sweet potato fries, fried jalapeños, mac ‘n cheese or onion rings—you can’t go wrong!

Do you recommend pairing any beverages with this burger? You just can’t beat a burger and a beer. We feature an ever-changing assortment of domestic favorites along with up-andcoming craft beers. Every visit can bring new choices!

What is your favorite burger quote? “It is Americans who have managed to crown minced beef as hamburger, and to send it round the world.” – Julia Child

What’s special about your burger? The quality of the meat and the combinations of toppings. The Buffalo Bob, for instance, is ground buffalo with applewood-smoked bacon, onion rings and spicy beer cheese sauce.

What made you go into the burger business? Bill Shumate’s first restaurant was hamburgers. He’s had a liking for it ever since.

Seen any trends in burgers that have popped up recently? Customers are becoming more informed about their food which has led to an increase in the availability of allnatural proteins.

What’s your favorite burger? Bill Shumate: The one I like best is a medium-rare patty on a buttered bun. Tasting the superior flavor of Meyer’s beef without anything other than a toasted, buttered bun is the best there is. Joanie Corneil: The Poblano Peño: Meyer’s red angus topped with roasted poblano chiles, fresh jalapeños, Swiss cheese, curly leaf lettuce, beefsteak tomato and onion, served on brioche with a cilantro-lime cream sauce.

What is your most popular burger? The standard “All-American:” Meyer’s red angus with curly leaf lettuce, beefsteak tomato, red onion, mayonnaise, and American cheese.

What’s the best side item to order with this burger? Take your pick: Whether it’s our made-from-scratch cole slaw or baked beans; our skin-on french fries or

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VERTIGO

n Interview with David Gwynn, Chef and Co-owner Describe your burgers and the concepts behind their creation. We look to create by identifying ingredients that have a natural affinity for one another then we chef it up a bit. Take the Greak Out for example. It has the flavor profile of a Gyro but we’ve adapted the concept to the burger format. In addition, we recognize that people sometimes eat a certain way

either out of necessity or choice so we try to offer something for everyone – locallygrown, vegetarian, pescaterian, vegan, gluten-free and of course, a gut-bomb burger with everything on it!

the space dictated the place. I get Vertigo (inner ear) so that is how the name came about. We had fun with it. Vertigo Burgers and Fries, So good it’ll make your head spin!

Where did the idea come from for Vertigo?

Your most popular burger?

Elizabeth & I had been looking to create another restaurant for some time. We had a few concepts that we were interested in pursuing but essentially,

The Vertigo Burger.

What’s the best side item to order with this burger? We have a range of side items from the traditional hand-cut fries and hand battered onion rings to fried

Vertigo’s Burger Trio

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green tomatoes, sweet potato fries to Quinoa & Corn Salad or a side Garden Salad. People really dig our onion rings so I’ll suggest that.

Your favorite burger quote?

Do you recommend pairing any beverages with this burger?

From a customer as posted on FB: “Ohhhh Vertigo burgers & fries.... You stole my ambition for the day and filled my soul with joy. I am content”.

I do. Swamphead Brewing Stumpknocker Pale Ale or a classic chocolate shake…we make our own ice cream.

We are creative without being completely off-the-wall….and it

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What’s special about your burger?

helps that we do not take any shortcuts. We start with quality ingredients and put our creative chef touch on it.

What made you go into the burger business? When Elizabeth and I think of concepts, we look at what we like to eat and what can be improved upon in the market. We were look-

ing for a creative burger so we decided to go that route.

Have you seen any trends in burgers that have popped up recently? Swapping out the traditional bun for doughnuts, crispy ramen noodles, waffles, etc.

Your favorite burger? I order the Straight Up add mayo, griddled jalapenos and bacon and I get a small garden salad with it. It’s all about balance…pun intended! –

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BURGERFI

n Interview with Steve Lieber, Brand Ambassador Director of Franchise Sales

Describe your burgers and the concepts behind their creation.

were nearly 60% of total food sales.

Our burgers are all natural. Our Never Ever program means they are never ever given steroids, antibiotics or growth hormone by feed or by injection. Grass-fed and finished with corn, the meat is simply delicious and easy to digest, not greasy! The concept was started by John Rosatti, CEO and Founder, who noticed the need for an all natural burger and wanted to create a modern urban burger joint where families would want to gather.

Our most popular burger is the BurgerFi cheeseburger, it accounts for nearly 40% of BurgerFi food sales. It is two, all natural Angus patties, American cheese, BurgerFi secret sauce, iceberg lettuce, and a ripe tomato slice on a buttered and toasted Martin’s potato roll.

Where did the idea come from for BurgerFi? John Rosatti, CEO and founder, got the idea for BurgerFi after seeing the huge success of the CEO burger and Boss Burgers at his wildly popular The Office in Delray Beach, FL. Sales of these two delicious all natural burgers 28  O CTO B ER / N OV EM B ER / D ECEM B ER

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Your most popular burger?

What’s the best side item to order with this burger? The Cry and Fry is a full order of our hand-cut fries and three gigantic beer batter onion rings! Ask for a side of BurgerFi secret sauce for dipping!

Do you recommend pairing any beverages with this burger? We feature select craft beers in each BurgerFi location. This gives each store its unique personality. Florida serves Florida Swamp Ape and Monk in the Trunk. In

Georgia they serve Sweetwater 420 and in NYC we serve Brooklyn Lager. For the BurgerFi cheeseburger we suggest Sam Adams Lager or Sam Adams seasonal Oktoberfest now!

Your favorite burger quote? “It requires a certain kind of mind to see beauty in a hamburger bun.” – Ray Kroc, creator of the McDonald’s franchise

What’s special about your burger? Craveability – every day or two you want another BurgerFi burger, fries or onion rings! In addition, it is all natural, boasts the “Never Ever” program - no steroids, growth hormones or antibiotics, grass-fed finished with corn, certified “Humane”, approved by the American Heart Association heart check program, and is approved by the American Culinary Federation.

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What made you go into the burger business? John Rosatti asked me to help develop the brand DNA, concept, menu, and training systems. He told me “BurgerFi will take us to the moon” -- his belief that BurgerFi will become an international burger brand!

What’s trending for burgers recently? The VegeFi quinoa burger is the hottest burger trend now. Americans eat nearly 1 billion burgers each week. The love affair with the burger continues to grow in America and around the world. Chef Paul Griffin has created the VegeFi quinoa burger with quinoa, lentils, mushrooms, onions, carrots, zucchini, Fontina cheese and Parmesan cheese. The most delicious veggie burger has great appeal for women and health conscious individuals and an incredible one out of eight burgers we serve is the VegeFi burger! It is amazing!

Square 1’s 3 Mushroom Burger

Square 1’s Poblano Pensacola Burger

Your favorite burger? My special favorite burger is the Supreme Burger from our not so secret menu. It has American cheese, sautéed mushrooms and crispy bacon and can be made with one, two or three all natural Angus patties. It was selected as one of Florida’s top 100 must have food items in 2013! w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

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BURGER 21

n Interview with Chef Shane Schaibly, Corporate Chef for Front Burner Brands (restaurant management company for Burger 21) Describe your burgers and the concepts behind their creation. Burger 21 is all about variety and innovation. Our comprehensive and varied menu features 21 chef-inspired burger creations ranging from hand-crafted, freshly ground Certified Angus Beef to chicken, turkey, shrimp and tuna burgers, veggie burgers, made-to-order salads, allbeef hot dogs, hand-breaded chicken tenders and an extensive shake bar including hand-dipped floats, shakes and sundaes, as well as a gluten-free menu. The details make the difference. Some of Burger 21’s recipes include toasted brioche buns, pickled cucumbers, sweet potato fries with toasted marshmallow sauce, applewood-smoked bacon and numerous other premium ingredients and

tional burger lover. Leveraging more than 25 years of franchising experience, the owners, Mark, Bob, Mike and Arlene Johnston, recognized an opportunity to introduce a higher quality product in a rapidly growing foodservice category. The goal was to be different and go beyond the better burger, not to replicate what’s already out there.

Your most popular burger? Burger 21’s most popular burger is The Cheesy. It’s a fresh Certified Angus Beef burger, which features lettuce, tomato and American, Cheddar or Swiss cheese, on a toasted brioche bun.

What’s the best side item to order with this burger? All of our burgers pair well with our French fries and our sweet potato fries, which are both complemented by a variety of unique signature sauces, such as Toasted Marshmallow, Apple Cider and Thai Ketchup, available on our sauce bar.

Do you recommend pairing any beverages with this burger? Our burgers pair well with our signature shakes such as Bananas Foster and Strawberry Short Cake or our floats featuring Boylan sodas.

Your favorite burger quote? The phrase we coined to describe Burger 21: “beyond the better burger.” You can tell when you experience a Burger 21 burger that we are just one step ahead. combinations that elevate Burger 21 into a category of its own. Additionally, on the 21st of each month, Burger 21 introduces a different featured burger creation and signature shake available for an entire month, like the popular Gyro Lamb Burger and signature Baklava Shake.

Where did the idea come from for Burger 21? The owners of The Melting Pot Restaurants, Inc. fondue restaurant franchise founded Burger 21 in November 2009, envisioning a fast-casual, “beyond the better burger” concept that featured 21 chef-inspired burgers with appetite appeal from the gourmet to the tradi30  O CTO B ER / N OV EM B ER / D ECEM B ER

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What’s special about your burger? We have differentiated Burger 21 from other concepts with premium ingredients and a variety of unique recipes. Our chef-inspired burger creations range from hand-crafted, freshly ground Certified Angus Beef to chicken, turkey, shrimp and tuna burgers and veggie burgers. Offering a diverse menu is key to us providing our customers with a “beyond the better burger” experience that keeps them coming back for more. Of the established and emerging better burger franchised brands, Burger 21 offers 205 percent more non-beef burgers and 38 percent more beef burger choices. With sales of non-beef menu items representing approximately 69 percent of our

revenues, we clearly appeal to consumers who hunger for variety. Of the entrees ordered at Burger 21, approximately 40 percent of Burger 21 customers are ordering non-beef alternatives and 60 percent are choosing all-beef burgers, sliders and hot dogs. With so much variety, Burger 21’s offerings appeal to all audiences and ages, particularly to females who often cast the “veto vote” when selecting a restaurant.

What made you go into the burger business? Burger 21’s founders, the owners of The Melting Pot Restaurants, Inc., recognized an opportunity to introduce a higher-quality product in a rapidly-growing foodservice category and fill a void in the burger business. There are plenty of quick-service burger joints, a number of traditional-style “better burger” establishments and even upscale, full-service burger restaurants. The Burger 21 concept would define its own category – “beyond the better burger” – placing it in a position to grow rapidly across the U.S. To define this new category, our team created a restaurant that offers quality, premium ingredients, innovative recipes and a varied, comprehensive menu. Essentially, this gives customers a gourmet experience without the gourmet price.

Have you seen any trends in burgers that have popped up recently? Trends in non-beef burgers have really come to the forefront lately. At Burger 21, we have placed a significant focus on offering variety with plenty of non-beef burgers since day one and it is actually a big part of our business – 40 percent of our guests choose non-beef entrées and we offer 10 different non-beef burgers on our menu every day.

Your favorite burger? My favorite burger depends on the day of the week, the weather, my mood and any number of other factors! Lately, I have been on a Spicy Thai Shrimp Burger kick. We also have a new Patty Melt coming out as an LTO at the end of the year and that will certainly be one of my favorites! F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g A s soci at i on


Want to loWer your operating expenses? Our energy-efficiency rebates can help. Lower your expenses by increasing the energy efficiency of your hotel or restaurant. Duke Energy’s rebates make energy-saving, bill-lowering upgrades easier and more affordable than ever. save energy and mOney with Our energy-efficiency rebates. upgrade

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lighting

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To get the savings started, schedule a free Business Energy Check by calling 1.877.372.8477. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com ©2013 Duke Energy Corporation 13-0353LU 3/13

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missed the FLsA OctOber 1 deAdLine? You still need to take action. You still need to take action. The National Restaurant Association’s Notification Tool is an online solution to help restaurateurs provide the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) notification about exchanges to employees and keep track of those whom they’ve notified. This member-only tool gives employers: • An easy way to prove they’ve kept up with the law’s requirements to notify employees about the new government-run health care exchanges • Easy online registration that guides an employer through the ACA-required information process • Peace of mind that all employees can be properly notified when they access the site • Stored employee notifications for online employer tracking and proof of notification

REgiSTER now AT ReSTAuRANT.oRg/NoTiFy And TAkE AdvAnTAgE of ThiS membeR-excLuSive beNeFiT! for questions on the notification Tool, email healthcare@restaurant.org or contact Randy Spicer at rspicer@restaurant.org or (214) 448-4452. © 2013 national Restaurant Association. All rights reserved. The national Restaurant Association logo is a trademark of the national Restaurant Association.

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HEA LTH CARE

UnitedHealthcare’s PlanBien

Serving Members with Bilingual Excellence UnitedHealthcare’s Latino Health Solutions can help improve the health, wellness and productivity in your Latino / Hispanic workforce by meeting their unique needs.

D

By Dr. Jaime Gonzales, director, UnitedHealthcare Latino Health Solutions id you know that according to the U.S. Census Bureau, Hispanics accounted for 56% of the population growth of the entire U.S. population in the last decade (2000 – 2010)? This statistic alone makes this diverse group of individuals the largest ethnic minority group in the country representing 16.3% of the total U.S. population. That is, one out of every 6-people in the U.S. is of Hispanic ancestry; and, in states like California and Texas, Hispanics represent almost 40% of the overall population in these states, respectively. The U.S. Census also projects that in about 37-years, by the year 2050, Hispanics will account for almost 33% of the nation’s entire population and approximately 55% of the overall U.S. workforce. For these reasons, UnitedHealthcare has taken the lead in reaching-out to Hispanics/Latinos by creating a specialized division – UnitedHealthcare Latino Health Solutions (LHS) – focused on supporting the company’s goals related to the fastest segment of the U.S. population. Through our extensive research, the LHS Team has identified some of the chief barriers that make some Hispanics hesitant to enrolling in health care coverage plans. This research has lead us to design programs and services that will provide our Hispanic members and their dependents with tools and resources necessary to help them better understand how the health care system works and to better navigate, what can sometimes seem to them to be, a complicated health insurance program more effectively. One such program, UnitedHealthcare PlanBienSM, is a comprehensive offering of bilingual, culturally-relevant services, tools and resources especially designed for our clients with Hispanic/Latino employees.

PlanBienSM is focused on addressing the unique healthcare needs of the Hispanic/Latino workforce and provides our clients with an array of value-added materials, resources and services that help them to communicate effectively with their Hispanic/Latino employees and keep them engaged in their health insurance coverage programs. UnitedHealthcare PlanBienSM offers clients and their Hispanic/Latino employees some of their most popular health plans enhanced with an array of bilingual materials designed to provide a better health care experience for themselves and their families. Because UnitedHealthcare understands that Hispanic employees may prefer to manage their health care in Spanish, we give them the tools and resources they need to make informed decisions, including: • Access to dedicated, bilingual customer care professionals/health advisors trained to understand the common doubts and hesitations that some Hispanics have about enrolling and using their health care coverage and who help our Hispanic members to better navigate their healthcare coverage benefits. • Online provider directories that indicate to our members the offices that provide Spanish-speaking doctors and/or staff. • Bilingual websites with an array of useful bilingual educational health and wellness brochures especially designed for Hispanics which address common health issues of concerns to Hispanics. • Web-based bilingual tools and resources such as podcasts, interactive health modules and biometric health calculators. • myUHC.com in Spanish. • A bilingual mobile site at m.uhclatino.com.

For more information about UnitedHealthcare Latino Health Solutions, please visit our website at www.uhclatino.com and/or please contact any of the members of the LHS Team: Dr. Jaime González

National Director of Business Development

(817) 366-1248

jaime_g_gonzalez@uhc.com

Kimberlee Vandervoorn

Senior Director, Strategic Growth Initiatives, United Health Group, and FRLA’s liasion with UnitedHealth Care

(301) 865-7058

kvandervoorn@uhg.com

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ready. set. CODE!

Keeping up with new food safety guidelines

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By Jan Gentry and Jay Berglind

One of the biggest changes to the 2009 FDA Food Code is a new three-tier violation citation terminology system. The new terminology is used to assist regulatory organizations in prioritizing food safety interventions and inspections.

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estaurant and lodging operators strive to provide the best experience for every customer, every time. Keeping up with new food safety recommendations, like those in the 2009 FDA Food Code can consume a lot of time. Many states, including Florida, have adopted or modified the national guidelines, meaning foodservice operators have a whole new set of provisions with which to comply. Davidson’s Safest Choice® Pasteurized Shell Eggs developed a FDA Food Code Compliance Kit to help foodservice professionals understand the changes in the 2009 FDA Food Code. Available online at SafestChoiceEggs.com/fdafood-code the kit outlines the main components of the recommendations in a user-friendly format. Below are the key ingredients of the new food safety guidelines:

Q

What are some of the biggest changes contained in the 2009 FDA Food Code?

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The Food Code now designates provisions as a “Priority Item,” Priority Foundation Item” or a “Core Item,” as a means of prioritizing food safety interventions and inspections (from most critical to least). In the state of Florida, these violation designations are identified as “High Priority,” “Intermediate” and “Basic” items. • These designations replace “Critical” and “Non-Critical” items in previous versions. 34  O CTO B ER / N OV EM B ER / D ECEM B ER

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• Cut leafy greens are now included among the foods that require time and temperature control for safety (TCS). • Requirements have been added to improve food worker awareness of food allergens. • A new section provides a definition and criteria for the non-continuous cooking of foods comprised of raw animal products, to address the safety of this cooking method. • Operators cannot offer hamburgers and other ground (comminuted) meats in an undercooked form on a children’s menu. • Several requirements related to cleaning and sanitizing equipment and surfaces are enhanced or clarified. • Air-knife-type hand drying devices have been added as one of the acceptable hand-drying methods. • New provisional language clarifies that establishments are expected to be maintained free of pests.

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Do I have to follow everything in the FDA Food Code? The FDA Food Code provides recommended regulations but it is up to each state to determine whether to adopt, modify and/or enforce the national Food Code. You can learn about Florida’s adoption of the 2009 FDA Food Code at www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/2009FoodCode.html.

What are the factors that contribute to foodborne illness in foodservice and retail food establishments? According to the 2009 FDA Food Code, the top five contributors are: • Food from unsafe sources • Poor personal hygiene • Inadequate cooking • Improper holding/time and temperature • Contaminated equipment/equipment not protected from contamination

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How can I control the risks in my kitchen? Recognize foodservice workers have a direct impact on meeting FDA Food Code provisions that ensure the safety of your guests. Implement an employee protocol that includes: personal hygiene such as proper hand-washing techniques, the use of gloves, and reporting personal health issues that may compromise other people’s health and safety; safe food preparation practices to prevent the abuse of time and temperature controls to keep foods out of the “danger zone” of 41oF – 135oF, the temperature range in which bacteria can grow; proper cleaning and sanitizing of equipment, utensils and other food contact surfaces to avoid contamination and crosscontamination; and responsible handling of chemicals used for sanitation. Setting clear expectations and reminders for employees ensures safe food products and a healthy environment.

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How can I help my staff prevent foodborne illness? According to the Journal of Food Protection, roughly seven out of every ten foodborne illness outbreaks originate in foodservice operations. Your staff should understand that as food travels from “farm to fork” to reach customers, it can become tainted with harmful bacteria, viruses or other F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g A s soci at i on


is used to assist regulatory organizations in prioritizing food safety interventions and inspections.

OLD

The terms “Critical Violation” and “Noncritical Violation” will no longer be used by regulatory authorities to classify violations of the Food Code.

NEW

CRITICAL VIOLATION NONCRITICAL VIOLATION

Each provision in the 2009 FDA Food Code is now designated as a “Priority Item,” a “Priority Foundation Item” or a “Core Item.”

Note: In Florida, these designations are identified as “High Priority,” “Intermediate” and “Basic.”

3 Definitions

PRIORITY ITEM

PRIORITY FOUNDATION ITEM

(FL: HIGH PRIORITY ITEM) Contributes directly to the elimination, prevention, or reduction to an acceptable level, of hazards associated with foodborne illness or injury.

(FL: INTERMEDIATE ITEM) Supports, facilitates or enables one or more Priority Items. Examples: Personnel Training, Documentation, Equipment Calibration, Labeling

Examples: Items with a quantifiable measure to show control of hazards, such as Cooking, Reheating, Cooling, Hand Washing

cooking, storing, holding, cooling and reheating TCS food, • Hazards related to eating raw or undercooked meat, poultry, seafood and eggs.

CORE ITEM (FL: BASIC ITEM)

Any provision not designated a Priority Item or a Priority Foundation Item. Examples: General Sanitation, Operational Controls, General Maintenance, Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures

Egg Safety and the Food Code Did You Know? According to the Food Code, Pasteurized Shell Eggs are not a Potentially Hazardous Food (PHF) and are exempt from PHF time and temperature control requirements (TCS). Did You Know? The FDA’s “A Manual for the Voluntary Use of HACCP Principles” recommends using Pasteurized Shell Eggs as a basic control for the hazard of Salmonella entertidis bacteria in shell eggs. Did You Know? The FDA Food Code specifies use of Pasteurized Shell Eggs or Egg Products in the preparation of a variety of foods that will be served to clients classified as highly susceptible populations (HSPs). © 2013 National Pasteurized Eggs, Inc. • 1-800-410-7619 • SafeEggs.com/Foodservice

contaminants anywhere along the way. In fact, there are more than 200 foodborne pathogens that can cause illness – and the FDA says this count is climbing.

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How do I measure food safety success? One way is to equip your PIC – the Person In Charge – with the

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knowledge needed to safely meet his or her responsibilities to ensure food safety, as identified by the FDA. The PIC needs to demonstrate knowledge across wide-ranging food safety issues, some of which include: • Types of illnesses transmitted by food, • Major food allergens, • Safe times and temperatures for

Q A

Are there specific foods I need to worry about? There are a number of foods that the FDA Food Code considers a Potentially Hazardous Food (PHF), subject to Time and Temperature Controls for Safety (TCS). Among these foods are raw shell eggs, which carry the risk of foodborne illness caused by Salmonella if not properly handled and cooked – making egg safety an important component to your overall food safety measures. The FDA Food Code recommends the following as related to egg safety: 1. Throw Away Damaged Eggs. 2. Use Pasteurized Eggs in Recipes That Call For Raw or Undercooked Eggs. Pasteurized eggs provide an egg product that is free of pathogens and is a readyto-eat food. The pasteurized product should be substituted in a recipe that requires raw or undercooked eggs. 3. Notify Consumers of the Risks of SoftCooked Egg Preparation. 4. Pasteurized Shell Eggs are NOT a Time and Temperature Controlled Safety food or TCS - also known as a Potentially Hazardous Food (PHF) - and is exempt from the time and temperature controls that apply to ordinary eggs. You can safely serve a pasteurized shell egg undercooked or even raw, and know you are in full compliance. 5. The FDA Food Code Specifies Pasteurized Shell Eggs for highly susceptible populations (HSPs) in the preparation of foods such as Caesar salad, hollandaise or Béarnaise sauce, mayonnaise, meringue, eggnog, ice cream, and egg-fortified beverages. Jan Gentry & Jay Berglind are FRL Magazine contributors representing Davidson’s Safest Choice® Pasteurized Shell Egg.s F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g  

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A L A CARTE

Daon Trusted Identity Services Expands Background Screening By Melissa Lucken

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aon Trusted Identity Services, LLC (DTIS), operator of the nation’s largest civilian clearinghouse for fingerprint, biometric and biographic processing, announced recently that its 80 locations across Florida with LiveScan equipment are all photo enabled. You can now send your job applicants, volunteers and staff to a nearby The UPS Store® center for fingerprinting. The UPS

Store®, through an alliance with Daon Trusted Identity Services™ (DTIS), now offers electronic fingerprinting services at participating stores. “We are very excited to announce our expansion across Florida – to 80 locations – and our increased services to include photograph capabilities. We are now one of the leading providers of background screening services in the state of Florida,” said Carter Morris, COO, Daon Trusted Identity Services.

FRLA Joins Share the Gulf Coalition

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he Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association (FRLA) is proud to join the Share the Gulf coalition, formed to help ensure Gulf seafood continues to be shared fairly and sustainably for generations to come. The effort was initiated in part as a response to a proposal being vetted before members of the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council that may alter allocation of fresh gulf seafood and diminish the supply for restaurants and seafood markets. Every year, millions of Americans enjoy fresh seafood caught by local small businesses and supplied to restaurants and grocery stores across the country. These small businesses make up what is called the “commercial fishery” and they provide consumers the ability to enjoy Gulf seafood like red snapper, grouper and other reef fish without having to catch it themselves on deep sea boats. The coalition knows that if the resource is managed well, there are plenty of fish like red snapper and grouper to go around. The Share the Gulf coalition believes all Americans – sportsmen, restaurants, seafood lovers and commercial fishermen – deserve to enjoy the Gulf’s bounty. 36  O CTO B ER / N OV EM B ER / D ECEM B ER

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“This further validates our commitment to providing the very best services and customer support to our clients,” Morris added. In addition, DTIS is certified by the state of Florida and approved by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. This partnership offers a quick and easy process, including a zipcode locator online to assist in finding the closest location to you, that includes online scheduling and biographical data collection, electronic fingerprinting, competitive pricing, a low error rate, fingerprinting and background check expertise. DTIS operates the nation’s largest civilian clearinghouse for fingerprint, and biographic processing. DTOS has facilitated more than 5.1 million biometrically and 2.0 million biographical background checks and has processed in excess of $150 million in electronic funds transfers. DTIS has worldwide experience in biometric programs, and uses this knowledge to provide security and protection of personal data collected. Many Florida businesses look to DTIS as a trusted partner to process their fingerprinting requirements. Full-service background screening locations can be found by visiting www.daontis.com/fl or by contacting (303)931-5224. A zip code locator can pull the 5 closest UPS locations to you. Melissa Lucken is the Director of Business Development and Sales for Daon Trusted Identity Services.

“It is imperative the Gulf’s resources are shared fairly to ensure Florida’s commercial fisheries remain healthy and sustainable,” said Carol Dover, President and CEO of FRLA. “In the Sunshine State, fresh Gulf seafood is an essential part of our hospitality industry and we will continue to vigorously work with fishery leaders to safeguard our businesses and consumers.” The body responsible for managing these fisheries, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, held meetings in October and November in New Orleans. The Share the Gulf coalition plans to alert members of the restaurant and seafood communities, elected officials, and consumers of these plans and their dire economic consequences.

Culinary Test Kitchen to Open Late 2013/Early 2014 in Bonita Springs

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“state-of-the-art” culinary test kitchen is said to be a feature of a new 27,000 square foot facility that will add approximately 200 hospitality jobs to the Bonita Springs area. The Performing Arts Center will offer a variety of amenities, including two signature restaurants and a 650-seat dinner-theater. The facility will serve as a national manufacturers’ culinary test kitchen. Chefs from the around the world will be invited to test state-of-the-art equipment and learn the latest in cooking technology. The Center will be the new home of Off the Hook Comedy Club and will also be available for rental, to host banquets, weddings, corporate and group events. F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g A s soci at i on


SOCIA L MEDIA

What’s Next? Google Keywords Go 100% (Not Provided)

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ou have likely heard the buzz in the last week that Google has switched over to all secure encrypted searches using HTTPS. In English, this means traffic from Google will now show in your analytics as keyword = (not provided). Website metrics such as traffic, revenue, conversion rate and engagement will no longer be available at the keyword level. These metrics will be available about organic Google traffic overall, but no longer by keyword. Here are five things we believe resort marketers need to keep in mind as they listen to the uproar surrounding this development: 1) The Sky is Not Falling. While some are positioning it as a “sudden” change, this move by Google was neither abrupt nor unexpected. Google began encrypting search keywords two years ago and, as a company who frequently cites its commitment to user privacy, the writing was on the wall that this day was coming. We have all watched the (not provided) keywords in our analytics increase 200% – 300% over last year. As you can see from the chart below - based on Google Analytics data from a dozen resorts – this transition to 100% encryption actually began in late July had has been steadily rolled out since. 2) Your Site’s Keywords Are Still in Google Webmaster Tools. All is not lost. Your website’s top search terms are still available via Google Webmaster Tools. If you haven’t already, make sure to verify your site in Google Webmaster Tools and associate this data with your Google Analytics account. The limitations to Webmaster data are you can only see the top 2,000 keywords per day and only go back for 90 days. For now, if you want historic data for next year or six months from now, you are going to have to save out and store the data. Industry rumor has it that this time limit will be expanded to a full year in the (hopefully) near future. 3) Keyword Data Is Still in Google AdWords Keyword Planner. Having detailed, reliable data on what people are searching is critical for the operation of Google AdWords, so we can be confident that AdWords will remain a great resource for keyword insight. By analyzing your paid search campaign you can w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

see which of your keywords are most popular in terms of search volume. In addition, click through rates and conversion data will point to which terms are most likely to drive traffic and most valuable for your business. The Keyword Planner Tool will still allow you to research the search volume and competitiveness of any search term you can think of. 4) Don’t Write Off Yahoo and Bing. While they still represent a small percentage of the market, this change shouldn’t affect Yahoo/Bing keyword level traffic. For the time being, you will still be able to get some insight on user behavior here. The latest numbers from comScore show that Google has 67% market share, Yahoo has 11.3% and Bing has 17.9%. 5) Focus on Content, Not Keywords. This change is a great opportunity

for SEOs, and all marketers, to take a step back from being keyword-centric and really look at their efforts from a page-level content strategy. There is still more than enough data available to determine if “white water rafting” is more interesting to your customers than “segway tours.” Rather than looking at performance by keyword, we can focus on page performance – how much interest did a piece of content generate? Was it liked, shared, pinned, linked? Did visitors engage the rest of your site and did those visitors ultimately convert? Looking forward, these will be the metrics that matter for marketers. Kim Palmer is the Director of Online Marketing for Miles Media, Hospitality Division.

Emeril and FRLA’s ProStart kids demonstrated their skills at the 2013 Governor’s Conference on Tourism. Photo courtesy of Nigel Worrall, Florida Leisure Photography

F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g  

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EM PL OY EE RE L ATIONS

Customer Service is the Key to Successful Bars, Restaurants

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uccessful business begins and ends with customer service. Below are eight ways to provide excellent customer service in the restaurant and bar industries.

1

Make a positive, professional, first and lasting impression. On average, customers remember 7% of the words you speak, 38% of your tone of voice, and 55% of your body language. Use your tone of voice, facial expressions, and body language to make an impression that keeps customers engaged and happy they chose your establishment. We never forget the first impression.

2

Remember new business becomes repeat business. When customers enjoy their experience, they return, and your revenue increases.

direct, lead the customer to the restroom. When asked what your favorite menu item is, explain why.

same situation. Acknowledge the mistake or problem, and prepare to help in the most efficient, effective manner possible.

5

Value and nurture your customers. Be sure you and your employees are properly trained and certified in food safety. According to FRLA President/CEO Carol Dover, “Quality, cost control, and most important safety for customers all start with a rigorous shiftby-shift commitment to prepare and serve only food that meets the highest sanitation and safety standards.”

Be knowledgeable and confident in what you offer customers. “Feel like you own the world and make your customer feel like you are giving them the world.” (Noel Walsh, NW&A) Know the menus, specials, and drinks, and be able to answer questions and offer suggestions.

6

If a customer becomes angry or upset, immediately employ the ASAP technique: A – Apologize, S – Sympathize, A- Acknowledge, P – Prepare to help. Apologize to the customer for the situation that has angered or upset him. Sympathize or empathize with him. Ask yourself how you would feel if in the

7

8

Protect your customers. Make sure your establishment is in compliance with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act (F.S. 561.701-706). You and your employees should understand the responsible sale and service of alco-

holic beverages. Employees should have training in and knowledge of alcoholic beverage laws, the effects of alcohol on the body and mind, and how to avoid underage drinking and overservice. Remember, customer service can make or break a business. Call Christy Crump, Director of Operations at FRLA’s Regulatory Compliance Services, to discuss how RCS training and employee development programs can empower your staff to work in an efficient, effective manner and provide customer service that keeps your customers coming back. Regulatory Compliance Services is a subsidiary of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association and specializes in food manager certification, food safety training, responsible vendor training, and professional development training. Contact Christy Crump at 850-224-2250 or ccrump@frla. org for more information.

3

Make sure to “hook” your customers, because repeat business spreads the word. When customers leave your establishment feeling they are important and appreciated, they spread the word. The best advertising a business receives is positive, consistent word of mouth. Social media plays a major role in spreading the word today, so be sure customers have good things to say and appealing pictures to post.

4

Under-promise and overdeliver. When asked for something, gladly do what is asked, but go above and beyond by at least 10%. When asked for more bread, bring more butter, too. When asked where the restroom is, don’t point and

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Contact us today for your HOSPITALITY training needs! 800-537-9863

2013

F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g A s soci at i on


MEM BER SP OT L IGHT: Z e n i t h I ns u r a nc e

Preventing Slip and Fall Injuries Proper Floor Cleaning and Maintenance Can Help Prevent Slip-and-Fall Accidents

By Todd A. Vesely, ARM

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lips and falls are the most common cause of serious workplace injuries in restaurants* and can leave an employee with debilitating injuries. Slips and falls in the workplace can be costly and may result in decreased productivity and the possibility of increased workers’ compensation premiums.

Frequent Causes of Slip and Fall Injuries • • • • •

Spilled liquids Built-up grease Oil on the floor Condensation or ice in cooler/freezer Uneven surfaces

Reduce the Risk • Floor cleaning should be done on a regular and frequent basis. Different styles of restaurants, or locations in restaurants, may need to increase the cleaning frequency due to the type of cooking, volume of business, or equipment being used in certain areas of a kitchen such as fry stations. • Oil and grease should be removed using a deck brush and squeegee instead of a mop which tends to spread the oil rather than removing it. Rinse thoroughly to eliminate residue. w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

• Floor treatments can be used to further reduce coefficient of friction on floor surfaces. Ensure the manufacturer’s recommendations are followed for application. • Slip resistant shoes can help reduce the number of slip and fall incidents and should be worn by all employees. • Spill kits should be made available where needed. • Slip resistant mats should be placed in areas where frequent buildup of liquids, oils, or grease occurs. Hazards such as rain water tracked into the restaurant from outside should also be mitigated with slip-resistant mats. Make sure mats don’t slide and stay flat so they don’t become a tripping hazard. • Housekeeping is critical to ensure aisles and other passageways are well maintained to help prevent falls while employees are carrying loads. • Maintain equipment to ensure proper function, especially with coolers and freezers where both condensation and ice build-up can occur. • Floor surfaces are not created equal. Some floor surfaces fine when dry, but lose their slip-resistant quality when wet. Selecting appropriate floor surface from the start can help you to maintain a floor that provides employees a safer work surface. F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g  

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Effective Floor Maintenance Program • Replace broken, missing, or worn tiles and re-grout as needed. • Ensure floor drains are kept clear, covered with appropriate grates, and even with floor surfaces. • Use fans to help dry floors and reduce the length of time they are wet after a spill or following a floor cleaning. A crucial aspect of any safety program is training employees and holding them accountable for following proper floor cleaning procedures. Strict policies should be

put in place so that spills are attended to immediately. Without this, it will be difficult to achieve a high level of safety standards required to minimize the possibility of slip and fall injuries. Zenith Insurance Company specializes in helping a broad spectrum of restaurants and hotels with their workers compensation needs. Our safety, claims and medical management staff understand the unique challenges of the hospitality and dining industries. Todd A. Vesely, ARM, is a Safety and Health Manager with Zenith Insurance Company tvesely@thezenith.com. * Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2011.

OSHA Training Requirement Deadline Dec. 1, 2013

Notify employees of new elements on Safety Data Sheets

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he Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has revised Hazard Communication Standards (HCS) with regards to correct labeling of hazardous chemicals. Employees must be trained in these revisions, and the first deadline is Dec. 1, 2013. OSHA has adopted the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals – GHS. This standard has been adopted by countries all over the world. Hazard warnings for dangerous chemicals will all be the same worldwide.

Watch a YouTube Overview Want to understand this issue without having to read through multiple fact sheets? An OSHA YouTube video provides a quick overview. View it at http://youtu.be/uhxp-X6Eqts

How do I train my employees? To assist in employee training OSHA has a Fact Sheet on training requirements at https://www.osha.gov/Publications/ OSHA3642.pdf, and has created “Quick Cards” on the following topics (in both English and Spanish) that you can post in the workplace and/or distribute to employees: • LABELS • PICTOGRAMS • SAFETY DATA SHEETS Just download the OSHA Fact Sheet and click on the links to the Quick Cards you want to use. You may want to provide copies of the "Quick Cards" to your employees and discuss these changes. 40  O CTO B ER / N OV EM B ER / D ECEM B ER

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F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g A s soci at i on


W INE TI PS

Release the Beaujolais Nouveau! One of the most frivolous and animated rituals in the wine world begins By Eddie Nickell

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t is the holiday season again and all of the celebrations are on! November brings the month to be thankful and December brings festivities that last almost the entire month cumulating in the biggest party of all… New Year’s Eve! November also brings one of my favorite parties, the release of Beaujolais Nouveau! At one past midnight on the third Thursday of each November, from little villages and towns in France, over a million cases of Beaujolais Nouveau begin their journey through a sleeping France to Paris for immediate shipment to all parts of the world. Banners proclaim the good news: Le Beaujolais Nouveau est arrivé! “The New Beaujolais has arrived!” One of the most frivolous and animated rituals in the wine world has begun and by the time it is over, over 65 million bottles, nearly half of the region’s total annual production, will be distributed and consumed around the world. It has become a worldwide race to be the first to serve to this new wine of the harvest. This is a tradition that FMI Restaurant Group has celebrated each year for over five years now. It is amazing to realize that just weeks before this wine was a cluster of grapes in a growers vineyard. But by a speedy harvest, a rapid fermentation, and an immediate bottling, all is ready at the midnight hour. By French law, Beaujolais Nouveau is to be released no earlier than the third Thursday of November. Apart from the ordeal, what makes Beaujolais Nouveau so popular; especially in the U.S. where consumption of red wine is less than 35 percent. Beaujolais Nouveau is as about as close to white wine as a red wine can get. Due to the way it is made – the astringent tannins, normally found in red wines, isn’t there, leaving an easy to drink, fruity wine. Coupled with the fact that it tastes best when chilled, makes for a festive wine that we call a ‘patio pounder”, rather than a wine to be sipped. As a side note, it makes a great transitional wine for anyone wanting to move from white to red wines. The race from grape to glass may be silly, but half the fun is knowing that on the same night, in homes, cafes, restaurants, pubs, bars and bistros around the world, the same celebration is taking place. Beaujolais Nouveau will never be a classic wine, w w w.Res t au ra n t A nd Lodgi ng.com

but it is always good and a perfect choice for holiday dinners, parties or just to hang out with friends and family. So, from the FMI Restaurant Group family to you, enjoy a glass of Beaujolais Nouveau with your turkey dinner, cocktail party or even with a bag of popcorn while watching a movie! Cheers! Eddie Nickell is the owner and operator of Funky Monkey Wine Company in Orlando, Florida. F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g  

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M e m be r Be n e f i t s

Music and the Dining Experience

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2014 Regional Directors’ Territories Northwest Florida Regional Director– Ray Green Cell 850-545-5901 Fax 850-224-1590 Rgreen@frla.org Northeast Florida Regional Director – Corkey Bergamo Cell 904-993-6287 Fax 904-880-6964 Cbergamo@frla.org Central Florida Regional Manager – Lisa Howard Cell 407-375-6941 Lhoward@frla.org Tampa Bay/Southwest Florida Regional Director – Dannette Lynch Cell 727-642-3404 Fax 727-953-6803 Dannette@frla.org Hillsborough Regional Manager – Katie Bone Cell 813-293-2428 Kbone@frla.org South Florida Regional Director– Lynne Hernandez Office 305-598-FRLA (3752) Cell 305-710-3962 Fax 305-598-3753 Lhernandez@frla.org

usic plays a pivotal role in driving traffic and increasing profits in your restaurant or bar. According to a study in the Journal of Retailing, the decision to make a purchase or go to a restaurant is often driven by how we feel about the atmosphere of where we are. Along with the look of an establishment, music is probably one of the first things we notice. All you have to do is imagine walking into a restaurant that doesn’t play music. You’ll quickly know what’s missing because numerous studies have established that music is central to creating the proper atmosphere -- and driving profits. To cite a sampling: • A recent CNN article showed that people chewed food nearly a third faster when listening to highvolume, fast-tempo music, potentially increasing table turnover. Also according to CNN, a French study observed that as decibel levels increased, men not only consumed more drinks but also finished each drink in less time. • A study published by the Journal of Culinary Science & Technology determined that food tastes best to diners when 1) classical music is softly played, and 2) there’s the presence of subtle background “chatter.” The same study showed that the absence of music detracted significantly from the dining experience, with patrons describing something as innocuous as the “clink” of cutlery as unacceptably noisy. Music, of course, serves to mask such noise. • A Scottish study published by the Association for Consumer Research found that diners increased their expenditures by 23% when slow-tempo music was played. Most of the additional spending went toward the drink bill, which grew 51%. Because drinks are typically a high-margin item, the increase in profits was especially significant. Broadcast Music Inc.®, (BMI®) a leader in music rights management since 1939, is committed to promoting the value of music and ensuring its continued creation so that businesses and other organizations that play music publicly have an ongoing supply. BMI represents the music of more than 600,000 affiliated songwriters, composers and music publishers that have entrusted the Company to license their music in accordance with U.S. and global copyright laws. These laws require permission from copyright owners before their music is played publicly and act as an incentive for music creators to continue their livelihoods. In sum, BMI connects music users with music creators by cost-effectively providing access to more than 8.5 million musical works through a single BMI Music License. This license eliminates the need for music users to have to negotiate with individual copyright owners, while still allowing them to benefit from the use of music to enhance their establishments. Operating on a non-profit-making basis, the songwriters, composers and publishers BMI represents and protects are the smallest of small businesses; many of them are not performers so the royalties they receive from BMI are what allow them to live, feed their families and continue to create quality music that people want to play in their businesses. Because BMI wants to educate and not litigate, the Company makes great efforts to help music users understand the licensing requirements and need for copyright laws by embarking on a number of educational marketing initiatives including: distribution of educational materials, phone calls, web communications, correspondence and visits to businesses. BMI also partners with many state and national associations to help educate businesses that use music by sponsoring events and initiatives that help support and nurture our songwriters, as well as connect them with the people who use their copyrighted works. Some of these include showcases, workshops and events with licensing customers that generate partnerships between music creators and users to further facilitate the educational process. When a music user refuses to license their music use despite BMI’s efforts, the Company does sometimes file infringement suits but does not determine the amount of infringement damages if the court feels damages are warranted. Rather, penalties for copyright infringement are outlined in the federal copyright law. The judge presiding over a copyright infringement case is given wide discretion in awarding statutory damages. The fact that statutory damages can be so high — from $750 to $30,000 for each copyrighted song performed without a license, and up to $150,000 per work if the infringement is found to be willful — is a significant reason why BMI enters into legal action only as a last resort after explaining to business owners that the cost of a license is modest in comparison to the cost of performing unlicensed music. For more information on how BMI can help you license the music that has proved successful in increasing profits for the more than 650,000 BMI-licensed businesses, please visit www.bmi.com/licensing.

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F R L A’ s E duc at ion a l fou n dat ion

What Has LMP Done for Me? By LISSETTE ALBELO

C

ompletion of the Lodging Management Program (LMP) has really helped me, especially when it comes to college and work. The certifications that I received by reading the books and passing the class can knock out a couple of college classes and save you money in the long run! As I start my first year in college at Johnson and Wales University in North Miami, I realize that what I’m being taught in my Introduction to Hospitality class is just review. It is review because I learned so much from the LMP competitions, books and classes. Not only is it a review, but it is helping me to have a deeper understanding of the course and clarifies any questions I could possibly have. As I begin my first front desk position at the Winter Haven Hotel on Miami’s South Beach, I am prepared and putting to use knowledge that I gained from the LMP competitions. Remembering our project development and management and learning to think critically as a team, is helping me to think outside the box while trying to work as a team with my coworkers. All the case studies we performed throughout the competitions are helping me deal with real-life situations with guests that have Lissette Albelo occurred at my job. When I am trying to find a solution to a problem that a guest has, I analyze it the way I would analyze the role playing in the LMP competitions. Joining the academy and LMP team was probably the best thing I could have done during high school in preparation for college. Not only did it help me realize what I wanted to do in life, it also gave me a head start in that direction. Doing well in the LMP competitions, offers students the opportunity to earn scholarships from different sponsors. Personally for me, if it wasn’t for the scholarship money I received from Johnson and Wales University from winning states and placing third in the international competition, I wouldn’t be attending this university. Being part of LMP opened so many doors for me, and I took advantage of all of them. I am trying to use my skills learned to succeed in life. If you believe in yourself anything is possible. Lissette Albelo is a student in FRLA’s Lodging Management Program. T h i s e v e n t woul d n o t b e p o s s i bl e w i t hou t t h e s upp o r t o f t h e F R L AE F ’ s pa r t n e r s

ProStart Regional Workshops The FRLA Educational Foundation hosted eight ProStart Regional Workshops during October and November. Regional Workshops are an opportunity for students to learn from post-secondary instructors, enhancing skills and enthusiasm for the industry. Over 600 students and instructors will attend at least one of the eight events held in locations throughout the state, finishing up in January 2014 at Eastside High School in Gainesville. G L OB A L S P ONSORS

U NIVERSA L S P ONSOR

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FOOD SA F ET Y

It's That Time Again For

FDA’s Foodborne Illness Risk Factor Study By Commander Diane Kelsch

F

DA Regional Retail Food Specialists will begin collecting data for the 2013-2023 Foodborne Illness Risk Factor study this fall. Whether or not your facility is one of the randomly selected facilities identified to participate in the study, this article provides some general information regarding the study, the data collection process, and how the data will be used.

Background FDA is responsible for providing technical assistance to approximately 75 state and territorial agencies and more than 2,300 local departments that assume primary responsibility for working with the industry on preventing foodborne illnesses. The data collected from these studies provides FDA a solid foundation for developing a national retail food program model that can be used by federal, state, local, and tribal agencies to: • Identify essential food safety program performance measurements; • Assess strengths and gaps in the design, structure, and delivery of program services; • Establish program priorities and intervention strategies focused on reducing the occurrence of foodborne illness risk factors; and • Create a mechanism that justifies program resources and allocates them to program areas that will provide the most significant public health benefits. 44  O CTO B ER / N OV EM B ER / D ECEM B ER

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What is the FDA Foodborne Illness Risk Factor Study? In 1998, FDA’s National Retail Food Team initiated a ten-year voluntary study to measure trends in the occurrence of foodborne illness risk factors - preparation practices and employee behaviors most commonly reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as contributing factors to foodborne illness outbreaks at the retail level. Specifically, the study included data collection inspections of various types of retail and foodservice establishments at five-year intervals (1998, 2003, and 2008) in order to observe and document trends in the occurrence of the following foodborne illness risk factors: Food from Unsafe Sources Poor Personal Hygiene Inadequate Cooking Improper Holding/Time and Temperature • Contaminated Equipment/Protection from Contamination • • • •

Data from all three data collection periods were analyzed to detect trends in improvement or regression over time and to determine whether progress had been made toward the goal of reducing the occurrence of foodborne illness risk factors in selected retail and foodservice facility types. Previous research studies can be accessed and downloaded from the following web link: http://www.fda.gov/ Food/FoodSafety/RetailFoodProtection/ FoodborneIllnessandRiskFactorReduction/ RetailFoodRiskFactorStudies/default.htm

What types of retail food service facilities will be involved and when will data collections occur? The scope of the study includes three major segments of the retail and foodservice industries that account for over a million varied and diverse types of operations in the United States: • Restaurants – Fast food and Full service • Institutional Foodservice –Hospitals – Nursing Homes, and – Elementary schools (Kindergarten through 5th grade) • Retail Food Stores – Deli Departments/Stores – Meat & Poultry Departments/Markets – Seafood Departments/Stores – Produce Departments/Markets For the 2013-2023 study, FDA will begin collecting data in the fall of 2013, with the initial data collection for select restaurant facility types, followed by the initial data collection for select institutional facility types in 2014 and select retail food facility types in 2015. The results of the initial data collection for each of the facility types will serve as the baseline measurement from which trends will be analyzed. Two additional data collection periods for each of the facility types are planned at three-year intervals after the initial data collection for purposes of analyzing trends.

How are facilities selected? Facilities are randomly selected as part of a nationwide research project. A geographical F lor i da R estau r a nt & Lod g i n g A s soci at i on


information system (GIS) database containing a listing of businesses throughout the U.S. will be used as the establishment inventory for the data collection. The random selection of establishments from the GIS database will be performed by the FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN) Biostatistics Branch and the sample size allows for a broad sampling of facility types throughout the U.S.

Will I be notified, in advance, if my facility was selected for participation?

tion process or food safety issues in general are encouraged as part of the visit to your facility.

How will the data be used? The FDA will use this research for identifying best practices within the industry and directing limited resources to areas that will provide the most significant public health benefits. The project is designed to protect the privacy of participating establishments to the extent the

law permits. The data collected is tabulated using broad industry segments and is not associated with any specific establishment. Your facility’s name will not appear on any reports or public documents. If you have additional questions about the study, please feel free to contact Diane Kelsch, FDA Regional Retail Food Specialist at diane.keslch@fda.hhs.gov Commander Diane L. Kelsch is a Regional Retail Food Specialist with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Southeast Region, State Cooperative Programs.

Data collection visits will be unannounced. The intent of the data collection is to observe the operation in its normal mode, without special preparation to accommodate the data collection visit.

Is participation mandatory? No, your participation is voluntary.

Is the data collection considered a regulatory visit and how long will it take? This is not a regulatory visit; no inspection report will be left with your facility. The expected length of the data collection will be 90-120 minutes. Approximate 30 minutes of the data collection will focus on obtaining information on the nature of your operation. Should an observation be made of a food safety procedure or practice that poses a significant public health risk, every effort will be made to work with an operator to ensure that the appropriate corrective action is taken to alleviate the hazard. Should a situation arise where a significant public health risk cannot be resolved during the data collection, the regulatory authority that has issued your permit will be contacted to work with you to ensure corrective action is taken. An exit briefing will be provided at the end of the visit to discuss significant findings that may assist you in enhancing the effectiveness of your food safety system. If significant food safety issues are identified, they will be brought to the attention of the person-in-charge or responsible employee to determine the appropriate corrective action based on the current FDA Food Code. Your questions regarding the data collec-

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S a f e s ta ff

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule www.safestaff.org To register, call toll-free 1-866-372-SAFE (7233) or visit www.safestaff.org. Registration for training begins at 8:00 a.m. and for exam at 12:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted. City Altamonte Springs Brandon Clearwater Daytona Beach Deerfield Ft Lauderdale Ft Myers Ft Pierce Ft. Walton

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

7

4

4

8

6

3

Location Springhill Suites

22

26

26

30

28

25

Embassy Suites

6

3

3

7

5

2

22

12

12

16

4

18

7

5

5

2

7

4

14

17

11

8

15

10

Embassy Suites

9

13

6

10

8

12

Hilton Garden Inn

Tba Best Western Plus Tba

9

6

6

3

1

5

28

25

25

29

27

24

Holiday Inn Resort

Uf Indian River Research

Gainesville

21

18

5

29

20

24

Best Western Plus

Islamorada

23

18

20

14

20

19

Islander Resort

Jacksonville Jacksonville Beach

7

4

4

1

6

3

15

12

19

16

28

11

Wyndham Jacksonville Riverwalk Quality Suites Oceanfront

Key West

9

3

4

3

5

3

Doubletree Grand Key Resort

Kissimmee

6

10

10

7

5

9

Seralago Hotel & Suites

Lakeland

8

4

5

2

7

4

Mandarin

22

19

26

23

21

18

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

Melbourne

16

13

13

10

15

12

Holiday Inn Melbourne -Viera Conference Center

Miami

23

19

20

17

22

19

Homewood Suites - Mia Airport

Ramada Conference Center

Homewood Suites - Mia Airport

9

6

6

3

1

5

Naples

30

27

20

24

29

26

Ocala

14

11

11

22

13

10

Homewood Suites

Orlando English

13

17

24

21

12

16

Embassy Suites

Orlando Spanish

27

24

24

28

19

23

Embassy Suites

Panama City

15

13

12

9

7

11

Gulf Coast State College

Miami Spanish

Doubletree

Pensacola

7

4

25

1

6

10

Pensacola Bay Center

Port Richey

15

12

12

9

14

11

Days Inn & Suites

9

6

11

3

1

5

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

29

5

5

9

7

11

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

Sarasota St. Augustine

7

11

11

8

13

10

Sysco

Tallahassee

30

27

27

24

29

26

Four Points By Sheraton

Tampa

21

18

19

15

27

17

Embassy Suites Tampa Airport/ Westshore

6

3

10

14

5

2

Embassy Suites Tampa Airport/ Westshore Best Western Ambassador Suites

Sysco

Tampa Spanish Venice

13

10

10

7

12

9

West Palm Beach

27

24

24

21

19

30

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule.


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