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DESIRE LUBWAMA W159420 Studio 3


CONTENTS Site Analysis Cultural mile Textile production and history Concept and Diverse Fabrics Concept Collage Concept Models Concept Development Development model (interior) Development model (exterior) Final Model Detail Design Study Basement floor plan Ground floor plan First floor plan Second floor plan Third floor plan Section 1:200 Section/Elevation 1:200 Section 1:200 Perspective Section 1:50 Isonometric drawing Isometric of proposal on site


LOOK AND FEEL STRATEGY What is cultural mile? Culture Mile is a new home for contemporary culture in the ancient heart of London. Comprised of the Barbican, Guildhall School of Music & Drama, London Symphony Orchestra and Museum of London — and led by the City of London Corporation — Culture Mile is creating a new exchange in the capital’s business district that thrives on creative prosperity, not just finance. https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/ A Brand Strategy was completed by Jane Wentworth Associates and Pentagram which sets out four clear values for the Culture Mile, these are: JOINED-UP, GENEROUS, AGILE, EXPERIMENTAL The Look and Feel Strategy builds upon these values to provide an approach for creating an unrivalled visitor experience. It describes how the area can best capitalise on major new developments, such as the future Museum of London at West Smithfield and the increased footfall anticipated through the arrival of Crossrail. Issues • Great institutions but little evidence of culture • Vehicle-dominated streets • Notoriously difficult wayfinding • Underused spaces and frontages dominated by car parks

ANNUAL SHEEP FAIR 2017, led by Mary Berry

Opportunities • Diverse culture and activity • Green DNA that offers space for exploration and discovery • Rich history, social life and architecture • Proximity to attractions and enhanced transport

https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/

SHEEP GOING TO THE SLAUGHTER HOUSE, NEAR CALEDONIAN ROAD, LONDON Don Mc Cullin

THE CULTURAL MILE


327 B.C. -Alexander the Great was amazed at the beautiful printed cotton being produced in India 300 B.C. -Ancient Greeks and Romans developed an enormous trade in textiles 75 B.C. -Silk became the luxury cloth in Rome 63 B.C. -Cotton awnings were used in Rome at the Colosseum

1667 - English law required all persons to be buried in wooven cloth, more cloth was being produced than being sold 1764 -Jmes Hargreaves invented the spinning jenny, the first machine to spin more than one piece of yarn at a time 1769- Richard Arkwright patented the water frame, a spinning machine that ran on water power

320 - 60 B.C

1700

6300 - 2500 B.C

1200 A.D

6300 B.C. -Archaeological discovery of fine woven cloth fragments in Turkey (30-38 threads per inch) 3000 B.C. -Cotton was being grown in Pakistan, Western India and perhaps the Americas 2700 B.C. -Chinese cultivated silkworms and developed special looms to weave silk cloth 2500 B.C. -Linen was found on Egyptian mummies woven at 540 threads per inch

1900 -The Industrial Revolution completed sweeping, spinning and weaving from the home workplace to the factories and mills 1910 -Chardonnet’s fiber first produced in the U.S under the name of artificial silk, now known as rayon 1935 -Wallace C. Carrothers developed nylon

768 A.D. -Charlemagne established a silk weaving industry at Lyons and imported wool from England 1153 A.D -The first annual cloth fair was held in England 1200 A.D -The spinning wheel was a common tool used 1589 -William Lee invented a machine to knit hosiery

1935

1800

1793 - Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin 1800 - Ireland exported 25 million yards of woven line 1884 -Hilaire Chardonnet developed the first manufactured fibre, a form of rayon

1980

1940-1950 -Polyester, acrylic and other artificial fibers were introduced 1970 -Knitting machines controlled by computers produced fabrics with high complex patterns at tremendous speeds 1980 -Robots were introduced into the textile industry

TEXTILE TIMELINE

WOOL Wool was the chief raw fibre for textiles in medieval England. The fleece was usually the most expensive item in making of a cloth. In the monasteries, which were major suppliers of wool, fleece was sorted into three grades, good, medium and locks or clippings. Processes for fleece to be turned into finished cloth include; willowing, woolcombing, washing, dyeing, bleeding, warping, sizing, weaving, shearing and calendering. HAIR Textiles were also produced from the hairs of other animals. Those identified from medieval deposits in London are goat and a species of mustelid, possibly weasel or soat. Goat hair lacks crimp and therefore, to produce a thread sufficiently strong for weaving, the yarn was plied. Mustelid hairs were used in felt making however combined with wool to give a shiny surface. This was however forbidden in some cloth industries

FIBER PRODUCTION

LINEN The earliest textiles were produced from plant fibres. Flax (Linum usitatissimum) was the principal bast fibre used in the textile industry of medieval Europe. It is obtained from the stem which has to be pulled before the seeds are fully ripe. Processing includes; soaking, drying the stems, beating, and combing to remove any wooden materials. SILK Silk manufacture demanded skilled labour. As a the first step the silk filament had to be freed from the cocoon of the silkworm. They were then heated in water, loosened ends which floated on the surface could then be grasped and the raw silk unravelled. Fibre was traded to Italy because they had water powered throwing mills unlike Europe until later. It was then boiled and washed in clear water and dried usually dyed, or bleached if it was to be pure white

SPINING

WEAVING PREPARATION

KNITTING

DYES Dying played a vital part in textile production. Natural dyes were obtained from plants, lichens, insects and molluscs but only a few were used on a commercial scale and most of these had to be important from England.

WEAVING

LOOMS Changes in cloth production in the medieval period were not confined to spinning and finishing. New looms were introduced, but exactly when and how they came to be accepted remains uncertain. The earliest loom known from England is the warp-weighted loom - prepared by weaving. Also in England during the Anglo-Saxon period was the upright twobeamed loom which was probably introduced in Britain by Romans. Pulleys and Shafts were then introduced into looms, this type of look was also made from wood but a few components from it, including pulley blaocks, treadles and heddle horses, have been indentified. Different other looms were then later introduced including the draw loom, damask loom, box loom, velvet loom and low warp tapestry loom

YARN DYEING

KNIT PROCESSING

GARMENT MANUFACTURING

WASHING AND DYEING

Sketch of box loom in use

TEXTILE PRODUCTION Techniques


INDIA Gandhi united the country by encouraging the production of khadi in local villages and cities. The fabric is cool in the summer, warm in the winter and—more importantly—helped start to pull much of India out of poverty due to Gandhi’s urgings.

GHANA The folk fable passed down with kente cloth says that, in the 18th century, two Ashanti men—in Ghana—were hunting when they met a spider that was weaving a web. Inspired by the beauty of the web, they went home and produced the first kente cloth and presented it to their king. The king asked that the black and white fabric be woven out of colorful silk.

TURKEY AND PERSIAN The production of quality Turkish and Persian rugs came to a heyday between 1800 and 1910 during what collectors and experts call the “Second Golden Age of Persian Weaving.” Rugs created in this period—and predating this period—were created with natural dyes from plants, and some of the most opulent Persian rugs even used gold and silver threads.

NATIVE AMERICAN When early settlers came to the U.S. and found Native American tribes throughout the Southwest, the Navajo were noted then for weaving blankets, but by the early 1900s, the Navajo had started creating rugs in favor of blankets to trade with the incoming settlers.

Patchwork combining material structure (grids) and material surface

JAPAN Back to the Edo period of Japanese history, between the late 17th and late 19th century, the kimono was a way to express creativity and fashion sense. After being treated as only a formal garment in much of the 20th century, the kimono is enjoying a renaissance in women’s fashion as young people reach for yukatas, or “summer kimonos,” in addition to the traditional kimonos worn at important ceremonies

IRELAND Linen has a long history in Ireland, dating back hundreds of years in daily use as military uniforms and in more luxury wares like tablecloths and other home goods.Linen home goods are still widely used, embellished with traditional Celtic symbols and knots. Belfast—still rebuilding after of years of conflict—was one of the main production points during the peak period of Irish linen.

Exploiting singular meanings of forms and structure with African fabric from Ghana

CONCEPT

Experimenting with fabric from different cultures


CONCEPT MODEL PLAYING WITH SHADOWS

CONCEPT MODEL PLAYING FLUIDITY IN FABRIC

CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT

Experimenting with the fluidity in fabric.


Wooven facade and Solid concrete facade with facbric casted within

PRECEDENTS

GUY’S HOSPITAL At the centre of the scheme is the Boiler Suit, a unique façade designed to encase the boiler house which powers Guy’s Hospital. The Boiler Suit is made up of 108 undulating tiles of woven stainless steel braid. I will experiment further with the facade can create a function in my project.

Study models on facade (fluidity and solidity)

Hierarchy - Testing heights

Social Hierarchy with levels and

YSL MUSEUM A lace-like brickwork facade and an interior inspired by a couture jacket lining are some of the fashion-inspired features of Studio KO’s Musée Yves Saint Laurent in Marrakech. I am particularly interested in how bricks are solid but have been designed to created motion which I will continue to experiment with further in my design.

These study models test out the different aspects in fashion and textiles. As fashion is forever changing, I want the facade of the museum to reflect that, either with different facades or activity going through the facade itself.

Outdoor displayss/ markets

EXTERIOR SKETCH

STUDY MODEL 1 Fluidity and solidity


2

PRECEDENT

De Stijl

Study models experimenting with layout of masses in response to patchwork.

3

Sketch elevation of patchwork

“De Stijl was a circle of Dutch abstract artists who promoted a style of art based on a strict geometry of horizontals and verticals” https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artterms/d/de-stijl

Sketch Plan of grid and patchworkon site Study model experimenting with grid geometry

STUDYMODELS 2, 3

Experimenting with grid (surface)


Fabric display Fashion exhibition space

Livestock, sheep fair

Scanned with CamScanner

Cloth market

location of model on site

This was a study model experimenting with the fluidity and continuity in fabric coming from the earlier models, The model works well as an entrance due to the shadows it creates and I think this would be a great experience for the users.

I think the model works well as a market stand. This could be an area where the Cloth fair is revived and people can use this space to trade and sell clothing. this can also work as an enclosure for the sheep

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT Interior


Scanned with CamScanner

Effective punblic movement through the site

GRID Fabric display

Outdoor public greenspace

Main Entrance through market

Cloth fair and Wool fair (Market) Light through facade creates shadows/shade which will help with cooling of the glass as well as protecting people from too much sunlight as they view the fabric Studios Library Archives Fashion show space Exhition rooms

Collage showing fabric flow through the different spaces with in the grid

Interior collage showing the studios which will be on the top floor for maximum light mainly because I want natural light for fabric natural colours to be observed as users make it.

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT Interior

N


Scanned with CamScanner

Scanned with CamScanner

I decided to make a detailed section on the facade that exhibits the fabric as well as the details that connect from the facade to the steel framework. The detail is on the second floor next to the facade where the users will print fabric and send it to the roof over a pulley system and then to the facade.

Scanned with CamScanner

with CamScanner DETATAILScanned DESIGN STUDY OF FACADE AND STRUCTURE


Exterior collage, final model on site

Interior collage, final model on site

FiINAL MODEL MOMENTS


ROOF PLAN 1:500


1

1 Archives/working space 2 Storage

0

5M

BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN 1:200


6

5

7

4

8 3

1

2

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Wool fair and livestock Clothing fair Reception Gift shop Fashion In 100 objects exhibiton Library/viewing platform Fabric shop Multicultural Textiles gallery

0

5M

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1:200


3

1

2

4

1 2 3 4

Fashion In 100 objects exhibitIon Mezanine level Mezanine level Multicultural Textiles gallery

0

5M

FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1:200


3

1

4

2

5

1 2 3 4 5

Temporary displays Cafe Halls Auditorium Fabric display facade

0

5M

SECOND FLOOR PLAN 1:200


2

1 3

4

5

1 2 3 4 5

Offices/Meeting rooms Fashion runway Fashion Backstage Printing rooms Studios

0

5M

THIRD FLOOR PLAN 1:200


NORTH ELEVATION 1:200


SECTION/ELEVATION 1:200


LONG SECTION 1:200


THIRD FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

STEEL FRAMING

FIRST FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR

OCCUPATION ON SITE

BASEMENT

ISONOMETRIC DRAWING

Profile for David Lubwama

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