designing lighting October 2021

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ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS HEADQUARTERS  UP CLOSE WITH WILD’S KELLY ROBERTS  40 UNDER 40 FOR 2020

VOLUME II

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THE LIGHTFAIR ISSUE

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designing lighting's insightful newsletter bringing you updated, fresh new content to nurture your passion for all things lighting.

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CONTENTS 12 16

ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS HEADQUARTERS  UP CLOSE WITH WILD’S KELLY ROBERTS  40 UNDER 40 FOR 2020

table of

VOLUME II

ISSUE 2

THE LIGHTFAIR ISSUE

THE MAGIC Experience AT THE ACADEMY MUSEUM OF MOTION PICTURES

OCTOBER 2021

DAWN OF THE INVISIBLE LIGHT UV AND IR  THE BUSINESS OF LIGHTING DESIGN™ WITH MARCO STIGNANI designing lighting

Editorial Director’s Notepad Benya’s Art & Science

Spectral Wars 5: The Dawn of the Invisible Light By James R, Benya, PE, FIES, FIALD

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ON THE COVER Amphibian Man in The Shape of Water Academy Museum of Motion Pictures Photo Credit: JWPictures

CONTRIBUTORS

The Wise Ones' discovery of invisible light and its implementation in modern day.

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Jim Benya

Cover Story

Experience the Magic

Jennifer Brons

By Randy Reid Lighting the artifacts of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures to celebrate the movies of the past, present and future. Juan Davila

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The Health and Lighting Research Center

UV Disinfection Technologies: Rarely Specified?

Antonija Fonović

By Jennifer Brons Lighting designers discuss the difficulties of specifying UV systems.

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The Business of Lighting Design™️

Not Lost in Transition By Randy Reid An Interview with Italian lighting designer Marco Stignani

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Don Peifer

How Long Can We Go? By Randy Reid

Stefanie Schwalb

Kyle Wheeler

The Ontario Association of Architects Headquarters’ Daylighting Challenge

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LightFair 2021 Floor Plan

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Jacob Wright


Do what other lighting controls cannot.

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Be seen in the best light.

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Residential

A River Runs Through It By Jacob Wright Living in nature without sacrificing modern conveniences.

48 50

Just In Hospitality

Viva Las Vegas By Stef Schwalb Hospitality is alive and well at Virgin Hotel’s new property in Sin City.

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European Lighting

Street Lighting: The Future is Smart By Juan Davila Smart lighting is the key to sustainability, and cities should start with street lighting.

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Manufacturer Representative's Column

Promote a Smoother Installation and Commissioning Process for Lighting Control Systems By Kyle Wheeler

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Understanding TM-30 By Don Peifer CRI out, TM-30 in?

67 68 69 70

People on the Move Upcoming Shows Advertisers’ Index 40 under 40 By Antonija Fonović The 40 most talented and promising individuals working in the lighting design industry under the age of 40 in 2020.

76 10

Up Close with Kelly Roberts

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Photo credit: River House


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EDITORIAL DIRECTOR’S NOTEPAD

LightFair 2021: WTF

Editorial Director: Randy Reid

Publisher: Cliff Smith

Director of Audience Development: Angie Hullfish

Contributing Writers: James Benya PE, FIES, FIALD Principal at Design Services, Inc. and The Benya Burnett Consultancy Juan Davila European Lighting Contributor Global Business Development Director CASTAN Lighting Stefanie Schwalb Hospitality Lighting Contributor Interim Managing Editor at Boston Magazine Staff Writers: Malia Hullfish Olivia Lagomarsino Jacob Wright Published by EdisonReport 1726C General George Patton Dr. Brentwood, TN 37027 Phone: 615-371-0961 designinglighting.com

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LightFair will be held Wednesday, Thursday, Friday (WTF). This is the second time the show will have occurred on these days of the week and I still run into people who think it is Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday (TWT). It will be a different fair and show management has done a good job of setting expectations. In a major concession to large exhibitors, LightFair allowed them to downsize and rollover those funds to 2022. Many did. Normally we receive invites for 10 to 15 social events. This year we have received one. EdisonReport usually hosts its Lifetime Achievement Awards in person the evening before the kick-off. This year, it will be held virtually in November. The expectations for this WTF show are so low, we all might be pleasantly surprised. The smaller booths force exhibitors to showcase their best products, making the journey more efficient for attendees. From the products that were submitted for EdisonReport’s Top 10 MUST SEE list, there will not be a lack of new, unique, and specifiable products. If the crowd of lighting designers at the O’Blaney Rinker ‘Homecoming on the Hangar’ is any indication, there will be top talent at LightFair who are eager to learn about new products. One of the most important elements of the show is the social aspect. I need to see people, shake hands, and give hugs (being very careful not to channel the former New York Governor). LightFair friends can be cast into four buckets: Type 1: These are your best friends in the industry, and when you see them, you will stop what you are doing to spend a few minutes catching up. (Paul Tarricone, Jim Benya, Megan Carroll, Jean Jacques, Bill Attardi, Charles Stone)

designing lighting is focused on the Business of Lighting Design™ and provides business information to the lighting design community. In addition to the website, designing lighting publishes bi-monthly online magazines featuring original content, interviews within the community and highlights successful award winning lighting designs. While designing lighting is based in the U.S., it has contributors from Europe and is developing a global presence. (ISSN 2693-9223)

Type 2: These are people you don’t know well, and you want to know better. They are the future leaders of the industry, and smart as hell. (Ilva Dodaj, Sam Koerbel, Kelly Roberts,)

Statements and opinions expressed in articles and editorials in dl are the expressions of contributors and do not necessarily represent the policies or opinions of the EdisonReport. Advertisements appearing in the publication are the sole responsibility of the advertiser.

With LightFair 2021, you will get to spend time with all types, and it will be a lot harder to avoid Type 4. Pandemics change people and who knows, some of those Type 4’s may move to Type 3.

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Type 3. These are people that you have been close to in a prior job or you knew well many years ago and with whom you don't keep up, but you sincerely want to spend more time with them. (Mike Berens, Joe Damiani, Lance Bennet, Edward Bartholomew) Type 4. There are a few people that you just don’t enjoy. You typically run from these people.

Here is to a successful LightFair 2021. (Thanks to Joey Basile for the idea of the title.)


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The IALD International Lighting Design Awards, the longest running international lighting design awards program, is the highest honor in the profession recognizing work that reaches new heights and represents excellence in aesthetic and technical achievement. Since 1983, the awards program has supported the mission and vision of IALD—raising the profile of the profession and demonstrating the visible success of lighting design. Submissions for the 39th Annual IALD International Lighting Design Awards are now open. ELIGIBILITY This is an award for architectural lighting design. Entrants must be lighting designers – and awards will be granted only to the team or teams that performed the design of the architectural lighting for the project that was submitted. The project must be a permanent architectural lighting design solution for which construction was completed on or after 01 June 2020. To be considered permanent, projects must be intended to be in place for at least two years when they are submitted. The IALD encourages the submission of all sizes of lighting design projects. A project that has been previously submitted for an award with IALD may be resubmitted, as long as 1) it did not previously win an award and 2) it adheres to the date requirements. DEADLINE October 14, 2021 2022 IALD Awards Call for Entries To learn more about the submission process, judging and requirements for images/ video, go to IALD.com.

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Episode 5: T he Dawn of th e in v isibl e L ig h t By JAMES R. BENYA, PE, FIES, FIALD Phot Credit: Staci McWilliams

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In

eons long past, the inhabitants of the planet Tellus experienced an amazing discovery. With the aid of a prism, the light of the sun was separated into the colors of the rainbow. A Wise One named Hershel assumed that one of the colors carried the heat of the sun, and moving a thermometer from color to color he tried to determine which one. None of the colors made much impact, but when he placed the thermometer into the darkened void adjacent to the color red, he finally discovered the heat source; located within the darkened void he could not see with his eyes! We know i t today as infrared (which means “below red”). A few years later another Wise One named Ritter theorized that there might also be an invisible light adjacent to the blue violet color. On the theory that chemical oxidation could also be caused by the invisible light he exposed silver chloride, a chemical known to oxidize in the presence of blue and violet light, into the darkened area next to the blue and violet light and observed that oxidation was much faster. We know this invisible light today as ultraviolet (which means “above violet”). The Society of Wise Ones proclaimed that sunlight consisted of visible light and invisible light, and that the two types of invisible light had different powers. One seemed to warm the planet, and one seemed to cause chemical reactions. It was not long before they also realized that light was also the catalyst for biological response for every living being on their planet.

BENYA’S ART & SCIENCE market, they failed to fully research the mutual reciprocity and complexities of the natural combination of the three natural light energies. Eventually, medical researchers discovered that a specialized connective tissue cell, known as a fibroblast, was damaged and rendered dysfunctional by the artificially combined light. Fibroblast is vitally important for cellular regeneration and play a major role in wound healing and stopping the progression of cancer, pulmonary disease and renal disease. The Wise Ones finally realized that there was more to the challenge of creating a “healthy light” indoors than what they assumed.

The Potential of “Natural Light” Natural light on the surface of the blue planet is plainly essential to life and health. Having the ability to control the spectrum of solar light and to generate a very specific intensity and spectrum of light, from IR to visible and UV, mankind now possesses tools to potentially do it right only presumed to be safe with judicious research. In horticulture, for example, by converting sunlight to electricity, vertical indoor farming can increase crop density, substantially reduce water use and eliminate pests and pesticides from the food chain while eliminating carbon emissions to the atmosphere. Emulated natural light combining factors of the earths atmosphere and the solar spectrum

can replicate the photosynthetic conditions matching natural light. Similar emulations of natural light are used daily in a variety of critical environments, such as the International Space Station, where 24-hour periods of light and darkness are critical in maintaining the health of the crew. As our society presses towards 24-hour life cycles contrary to nature, better tools will be needed to ensure a person’s daily cycle of wake and sleep are synchronized to their individual cycle. Natural light has been studied carefully for these and many other reasons. Sunlight travels through outer space (yellow); it is filtered by the atmostphere as water and oxygen molecules in air absorb some of the solar radiation in specific wavelengths, and the ozone layer of the lower stratosphere interconverts UV into thermal energy, heating the atmosphere and preventing the most potentially harmful UV wavelengths from reaching the planet’s surface. Of the solar energy making it to the planet’s surface on a clear day, about 45% is visible light, 50% IR, and 5% UV1. These percentages vary depending on time of day, season, and orbit variations. Most importantly, the intensity and distribution of daylight varies constantly with the weather. For horticulture, all of these factors play a major role in the photosynthetic process necessary for plants to thrive, produce and feed other living beings.

Thus began a period of great enlightenment in which other Wise Ones like Maxwell and Hertz theorized an entire electromagnetic spectrum that included the three types of light and other phenomena. Soon all three types of natural light could be artificially created by electricity and managed using principles of optics. Thus started an era of scientific and business in which the Wise Ones became increasingly knowledgeable and worked for companies to make lighting products. Members of one such company theorized that they could create an indoor appliance known as the Triple Sun which produced a combination of visible, UV and IR light with the promise of improving the health and wellbeing of their fellow Tellurions that recreated the light they presumed to be found in nature. But with the rush to bring “indoor triple source natural light” to

Figure 1 Solar Radiation Spectrum. Source: Wikipedia Commons

1

IES Lighting Handbook, 10th Edition.

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IR: The Invisible Heat Source

UV: The Invisible Reactive Source

Infrared light (IR) is the portion of the solar spectrum with wavelengths between 780 nanometers and 1,000,000 nanometers (1 millimeter). It is categorized as IR-A, also known as near-IR (780 nm-1400 nm), IR-B (1400-3000 nm) and IR-C, also known as far-IR (3,000 -1,000,000 nm). Most recognize IR as radiant heat, often observed in conjunction with long wave red light. It has many modern uses ranging from night vision and motion sensors to medical therapy, digital communications and weapons. LiFi, for example, employs light (typically IR) to provide high-speed data communications, but it is limited to line-of-sight because it is after all, light! Specialty medical therapies and procedures employ man-made IR and NIR, and there are numerous over-the-counter consumer products that use IR to apply soothing heat to a host of ailments from aching joints to receding hairlines.

In nature the human exposure to UV is limited by 5 variables, including time, atmosphere, latitude, altitude, and clothing. Mountain climbers and skiers know that altitude increases solar and UV exposure, and swimmers and boaters know the sunburn risk that is increased by reflected light off the water on sunny days.

Architecturally, IR presents challenges. As a heat source, IR can be useful, especially for warming building occupants during winter months. But IR and visible light easily pass through ordinary window glass, and although the visible light is generally useful, the IR contributes to heating interior spaces that most of year need air conditioning. Modern building glass called low-emissivity (“low-e”) employs coatings that reflect the IR energy back towards the sun and sky; by removing most of the infrared energy and limiting the amount of entering light, buildings become much more thermally efficient. Low-e coatings on window glass reduce solar heat gain as much as almost 75% with little impact on visible light. In winter, the same window layers reduce radiant heat transfer out of the building. Choosing and specifying glazing, especially with consideration of its spectral transmission characteristics, is a critical important part of daylighting design and overall building energy efficiency.

Photo Credit: hunterpic2013 | Adobe Stock

UV light is the portion of the spectrum of wavelengths classified in 1958 to range from 400 nm to 100 nm. Historically divided into three bands: UVA (315-400 nm) UVB (280-315 nm) UVC (100-280 nm) medical researchers are now beginning to consider expanding the boundaries to include 405 given the noted biological response in this region. As an example, 95% of UV at the planet’s surface is UVA, which was once thought to be minimally impactful to humans but is now recognized as a major contributor to skin cancer development and other negative health impacts. Since UV-B is mostly filtered out by the atmosphere, it can have serious impacts including skin cancer and corneal damage if skin barrier protection methods are not properly applied. UV-C does not penetrate the atmosphere, but it can be generated using certain electrical techniques like xenon and carbon arc lamps and welding arcs. It is seriously damaging to most life forms and can kill organisms in water and in the air. Accidental exposure to UVC risks serious skin and eye damage, and long-term exposure for indirect exposure has not been fully researched. In occupied buildings UV exposure is rare and typically caused in equipment for which safely controls are bypassed or not working properly. Because of this danger, UV has largely been relegated to specific uses that are closely regulated for safety such as UV purification and sterilization. Fluorescent lamps, for example, employ a mercury arc discharge that creates UV, but the glass tube of the lamp prevents UV radiation into the environment. Purification and sterilization equipment is required to have interlocks that prevent operation of the UV source unless the equipment enclosure is sealed to prevent exposure. In science and modern practice, UV has been used for decades but only in controlled applications to prevent visual exposure. Blacklight UV lamps are typically fluorescent or LED lamps employing a special type of cover that transmits visible light and UV-A. Sterilization and purification light sources, on the other

Hudson L, Birch-Machin MA. (2020) Individual And Combined Effects Of The Infrared, Visible, And Ultraviolet Light Components Of Solar Radiation On Damage Biomarkers In Human Skin Cells. FASEB Journal: 34:3874–3883. https ://doi.org/10.1096/fj.20190 2351R

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hand, generate broad band UV but are only allowed to be used in interlocked enclosures. But the Covid-19 pandemic changed the stakes. The comparative ease of constructing new LED luminaires encouraged the application of a new generation of UVLEDs with different wavelengths from UV-A to UV-C, each having been tested for its ability to kill viruses with specific nanometer radiation with minimum side effects when concealed from visual exposure. In most applications lighting controls are used to automatically detect human presence and ensure that UV is turned off. Research findings, marketing and intellectual property protection have caused an interesting marketplace of creative solutions.

Back to the Future In terms of scientific discovery, the understanding of the connection between biology and modern lighting is still in its infancy. Although hundreds of theories have since been presented and conferences held to attempt to capitalize on these discoveries, many challenges remain. But are we rushing too fast before understanding the full depth of the biological consequences? For instance, in a leading-edge 2020 study of viable human skin biopsies 2researchers used a solar simulator to recreate a combined UV, IR and visible light (“Vis”) dose equivalent to a 2- and 7- hour Mediterranean sun exposures, respectively. They found that the artificially combined light reacted differently than that combined in nature. Their research demonstrated that skin exposed to the artificially produced combined light had increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased DNA damage, and more importantly, the engineered combined light caused greater damage to the biologically critical fibroblasts than UV exposure alone. These groundbreaking findings run contrary to previously held expectations of the lighting industry currently dependent upon single light source studies examining UV, Vis, and IR exposure. Given the results of this study, there remains a great many questions to be addressed and medical research conducted to be completed done before our industry assumes we can recreate the perfect combined light – visible and invisible – for indoor spaces. Paraphrasing the researchers of this seminal paper, “Solar radiation is polychromatic and its effects on the body are not only the result of the separate actions of each wavelength on human biology but rather the result of the interaction of the numerous wavelengths combined”. By rushing headlong into developing products for occupied spaces which combine light sources, like the Tellurions, we will risk discovering that duplicating what nature provides is not that simple as it appears. P


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EXPERIENCE THE By RANDY REID

PHOTO CREDIT: JWPICTURES

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COVER STORY

…certain curators … would actually judge the lighting design using their phone camera first. ―Steven Rosen

H

ave you ever dreamed of meeting your favorite movie characters in person? You can do that now at the newly opened Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, located in Los Angeles, which contains over 50,000 square feet of exhibits and 822 artifacts, celebrating the art and science of movies of the past, present and future. Lighting a museum to transcend a movie experience is difficult. In a theater, the audience views a movie totally in the dark with the light only from the screen. Since total darkness is not practical in a museum, how do you replicate the theater feel without the absence of light? Easy, you hire the team at Available Light.

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Lead Designer Ted Mather, John Delfino, Alex Fabozzi, and colleague Dawn Hollingsworth accepted the challenge of lighting this one-of-a kind museum. I discussed this incredible project with Ted and John and later met Steven Rosen, President and Creative Director of Available Light, in Los Angeles for an in-person tour. During our walk-thorough Steven explained the importance of light and color to give the museum that Academy feel. Due to significant artifact conservation requirements, the galleries have relatively low lumen levels; puddles of light aimed at the floor provide ambient circulation lighting while enhancing the Oscar’s celebratory theme. Blue curtains adorn the walls in many of the galleries, and those curtains are grazed with track lights from Lighting Services Inc outfitted with deep blue gels. The team specified 3000K for the artifacts

vision. Unlike typical lighting projects where designers spend most of their time off site, this trio spent close to 600 person-hours in the space thoughtfully crafting the lighting for each individual artifact. The stunning exhibits speak to this dedication and intentionality. WHY Architects handled the exhibit design and Ted pointed out that curators needed a flexible space to be able to update and rotate content constantly. Similarly, John commented that they needed to specify lighting kits that were “extremely modular” so that they could be flexible and reconfigured on site as new temporary exhibits were added. In the Emmanuel Lubezki exhibition, one of the first temporary exhibits, there are six portraits lit with 3000K projectors with 4000K booster blue gels with a small hole cut in the center. The result is 3000K on the portrait faces and 4000K on the frames. Striking! John said that some artifacts were reconfigured many times throughout the lighting design process until the story being told was just what the curators had in mind. Several curators were involved with lighting Dorothy’s famous ruby slippers in The Wizard of Oz. During the filming of the landmark movie, George Cukor, one of four directors, wanted the toes of the famous ruby slippers to almost glow red and the museum design did just that. Available Light used 3000K for the middle and back of the slippers with red LEDs aimed precisely on the toes and none of the red lumens slipped into the 80+ year old slippers.

Stories of Cinema Gallery, Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by designing lighting

"A lot of the

light is meant

to be felt, and

not specifically noticed"

―Steven Rosen

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designing lighting

and boosted that to 4000K for the circulation path which provides a visually exciting contrast. Orange gels are occasionally used in some areas to warm up the audience a bit. Steven explained, “A lot of the light is meant to be felt, and not specifically noticed.” Academy Museum directors and curators participated in the lighting at a high level; the client managed every detail. The team spent a great deal of time in the construction administration phase, working closely with the client to fulfil their

John discussed the light fixtures, lamps and controls that the team used for the project, remarking that when lighting a museum, they tend to have a very limited selection of fixtures they trust. The manufacturers that they knew would perform at the high level they require were Lighting Services, Inc, Soraa, and Luxam. John continued about how the track heads allowed for the customization of each exhibit, saying, “Almost every Lighting Services, Inc single track light and every Luxam spotlight has a built-in dimmer so we were able to sculpt with every fixture as an individual paintbrush.” Ted then highlighted the ETC control systems that they utilized throughout the project. The main system, Paradigm, is an architectural lighting processor that has user interface buttons to address macro-level switches. The second, Mosaic, was used for more specialized control, including pulsing and UV special effects. The team was highly specific and detail oriented in their design, with the goal of bringing each individual artifact to life. In a display case where a typical design would use just two lights, Available Light may use 15 or more, each with a specific purpose. Rather than lighting each object evenly, the group utilized a theatrical lighting approach in a way that looked natural and dramatic. Ted also emphasized, “Things are meant to be seen naturally, with many different kinds of light hitting them at any given time.” Ted described a constant tension between conservators and designers, who come from a more theatrical background. The job of the conservator is to safeguard the artifact for the ages by limiting the amount of light on any object. Each of these individual artifacts had extremely strict lighting requirements based on their age, material and fragility and many were limited to only 5 or less footcandles (50 lux). At that level, color acuity


"Things are

meant to be seen naturally, with

many different kinds of light

hitting them at

any given time." ―Steven Rosen

begins to wane and at 3 footcandles, objects can appear monochromatic. In addition, museums used to be lit in the 10 to 12 watts per square foot and today they are under 3. Title 24 did come into play and Steven said that museum exhibition lighting used to be exempt from energy codes but now the codes are catching up to the technology. Available Light took advantage of color theory by manipulating color temperature and chroma in subliminal ways, with the intention of changing the way the audience perceived the objects. Steven added,

Photo by Joshua White, JWPictures ©Academy Museum Foundation

“Direction and color are substituted for intensity.” John said that the techniques were meant to evoke internal feelings that some people may not even recognize which is a great definition of brilliant lighting. Ted continued, “Generate an emotional response if you really want people to tell their friends to come back, and maybe donate!” One exhibit titled Imaginary Worlds, contains roughly 30 glass cases of all your favorites, from Star Wars’ C-3PO to our alien friend E.T. Steven described that 90% of the lighting was built into these cases using miniature 1.2 watt sources by Luxam mounted on vertically oriented tracks. For example, the costume used in the movie The Shape of Water had ultraviolet-sensitive paint built into it to

mimic bioluminescence on set. To highlight this effect and reveal these points of light throughout the extraordinary costume, the team strategically placed 32 luminaires, some of them ultraviolet, inside the glass case. The UV “blacklights” operate on a programmed dimming cycle so the luminescent patterns continually appear and disappear as visitors look into the case. The result is a remarkable display that closely resembles its appearance in the movie. When it comes to the number of luminaires lighting a display, Steven jokes that the Available Light motto has always been, “More is not enough.” Objects weren't the only things the team were tasked to light. Have you ever wondered how to light music? You borrow an idea from Stanley Kubrick. The Gallery Talk exhibit features music from Hildur

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by designing lighting

Guðnadóttir, who recently won a Grammy award for her score in the 2019 psychological thriller film Joker. Her plan for the gallery was a multichannel audio system where guests listen to music spatially without visual noise or distractions, but total darkness wasn’t practical or safe. She needed a visual hook for the eyes to land and enough light for people to enter and exit. Guðnadóttir took an unusual inspiration from the lens of Hal in 2001: A Space Odyssey. The design team created a crystal orb with an integral red LED that pulses at about the same rate as your breath. The music, combined with the pulsing red sphere is both multidimensional and mesmerizing as the pulsing red orb appears to float in midair. Add a halo of dim red light oozing out from beneath a circular platform/ bench and it is just enough light for people to move, but not enough to distract.

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For the almost 30 foot tall painted backdrop from Hitchcock’s North by Northwest, Steven explained that this was the one area where uniformity was critical. Wide floods mounted closest to the backdrop illuminate the top of the drop, medium floods a distance further light the middle and narrow spots illuminate the bottom. Other times, lighting was manipulated to resemble a particular scene in a film. For example, the exhibit featuring Cobblepot Manor from Batman Returns was lit with slightly cooler hues to recall a moonlit scene. The designers, with the permission of the conservator, took liberties in going a bit more theatrical with this display adjusting light to fade in some places and accentuate edges in others.

Credit: Backdrop: An Invisible Art, Hurd Gallery, Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Photo by Available Light

During our conversation, John made an interesting point about lighting a space for more than just the present viewer, but also for the camera. He said, “There is an ongoing relationship between an experience in a space, and the photo that will be taken with a phone and then shared on social media.” He continued, “The photo is what visitors will take home with them.” John commented that certain curators would judge the lighting design using their phone camera first. These realities forced the team to pivot and create a valuable experience while leaving visitors with a similarly valuable memento. You may see snapshots of these stunning exhibits on the Internet but the live experience, the magic of the design, is worth the in-person visit! P

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UV Disinfection Technologies: Rarely Specified? By JENNIFER BRONS

There has been a lot of interest recently in ultraviolet (UV) disinfection technologies; no doubt your clients have sought your recommendations. In 2020, the LRC research group summarized key points specifiers should consider with UV disinfection technologies. That publication explains the differences between various UV wavebands generated by several different technologies. Despite recent interest, only a few lighting designers are specifying UV for projects. I spoke to several lighting designers about the impediments of UV systems to fight microbial pathogens.

Cost and Scope C. Brooke Silber of Borealis Lighting Studio, BR+A Consulting Engineers shared her perspective. For their large health care and lab-type projects, Silber said, “UV is an obvious choice, but the barrier is cost. The cost is way too high for our clients.” Matt Caraway of Renfro Design Group pointed out that budgets are challenging for just the visible lighting needs. Caraway explained, “Typically, we handle just the visible light side of things, and even then it can be a stretch as far as getting everything done within budget.” Lisa Wong of Lam Partners agrees that UV is not typically in their scope, saying, “We are happy to work with our clients to understand pros and cons of UV disinfection, but we

do not currently recommend them in our designs; UV disinfection technology is related, but separate, from architectural lighting, at this stage.”

Complexity and Controls Caitlin Toczko of Lightcraft explained, “Many clients are curious, but then once they understand that it’s not a simple, quick cure for the current COVID-19 virus, they aren’t as excited.” Angie Ohman of Renfro Design Group pointed out “UV has issues with shadows, dosing, controls, and safety that are not easily designed around.” Brooke Silber explained when considering UV-C in hospital patient bathrooms, design of controls can be complicated, saying, “You have to make sure you have a seamless occupancy sensor that immediately turns off without delay. If you put the sensor on the outside (of the bathroom), the door has

Light & Health Research Center

to stay shut. We’ve considered 405 nm technologies, but if the patient or the family gets up in the middle of the night, we’re concerned that the blue light will conflict with circadian stimulus.” (For more information on visible disinfection strategies offered by 405 nm products, see our 2020 publication.)

Safety Concerns Lisa Wong pointed out, “As lighting designers, we can schedule light fixtures to be used in the space and can recommend control schedules for the facilities and maintenance staff, but we cannot oversee its proper use on a day-to-day basis.” Issues can arrive when new staff members are not properly trained on how and when to use UV disinfection technology. Maggie Golden, also of Lam Partners, avoids shining UV-C directly into occupied space. She stated, “Disinfecting surfaces is not as critical

Figure 1: Upper-room UVGI (image created by CDC)

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for an airborne disease and thus we would not recommend direct UV lighting currently unless we could always ensure there would be no crossover between an occupant and the UV light.”

Finishes: Damage and Appearance David Cyr of Lilker Lighting Group, Lilker Associates Consulting Engineers, commented about damage, “Our clients in the education sector have expressed concerns about material finish degradation with UV.” In hospital lighting design, Silber has considered visible disinfection technologies (e.g., 405 nm) that are safe for occupancy. However, she explained, “While surgeons are working in the operating room, they don’t want colored lighting impacting the appearance of patient skin tone or the visibility of screens.” Silber says she has been impressed by the sophisticated questions from collaborators, stating, “Interior designers ask how UV affects finishes. It would be nice to be able to provide them information about yellowing of lenses, and color rendering of materials.” Matt Caraway added, for their museum and gallery projects, “UV is one of the last things the curators want in their space.”

Time Duration Brooke Silber pointed out that in some health care spaces, it is critical that exposure time be minimized. “There’s not a lot of pushing for 405 nm in hospital operating rooms because turnaround time must be so fast,” she said. Longer wavelengths such as 405 nm take much longer to disinfect compared to UV-C. Silber also pointed out, “In the OR, our clients prefer UV disinfection robots because they can clean fast.” (For a comparison of disinfection technologies, see our 2020 publication.)

UV vs. Air Filtration While UV technologies offer several approaches for disinfection, many clients are instead opting for

Figure 2: Hybrid UV-C and visible light pendants; even with conventional low pressure discharge mercury sources, attractive pendants are available on the North American market (images courtesy The Lighting Quotient/elliptipar)

improvements in their air filtration systems. David Cyr explained, “For New York City public schools, my colleagues collaborated to inspect over 100 schools. The improvements they recommended were mechanical HVAC solutions, with 2-3 air changes per hour (ACH) and Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value, MERV 13 filters.”

Good application: Upper-room UVGI One application that has a wellestablished track record is upper-room ultraviolet germicidal irradiation (UVGI). The U.S. CDC has a well-illustrated factsheet explaining how upper-room UVGI works (Figure 1). Silber explained, “The few times we’ve used UV was in upper-room applications. These are known technologies with long term field studies I can point to, not merely manufacturer claims.” When considering UV systems in HVAC systems and upper-room UVGI, Maggie Golden agrees, “There’s potential now for these units to be used more frequently in public spaces like restaurants and large meeting spaces for disinfecting air.” Angie Ohman added, “It seems most productive to do upper-room UV rather than surface UV, both from a safety perspective and the complexity of controls.”

Aesthetics of UV Products David Cyr is concerned with aesthetics, stating, “The really effective UV-C products, they don’t look good. They look like a big ugly bug zapper box on the wall.” Lisa Wong added, “The UV disinfection technologies that Lam Partners has seen through virtual table-tops have not particularly caught our aesthetic attention.” This has led some lighting manufacturers to develop UV products featuring a more refined architectural appearance and scale. Several hang as pendants, which can incorporate white light as well. Figure 2 shows some products recently introduced to the North American market that deliver direct/indirect illumination, while conventional 254 nm low pressure mercury lamps create upper-room UVGI. The availability and quantum efficiency of UV LEDs are increasing; LED products that emit 275 nm UV-C wavelengths are minimal in size and could be more easily hidden in architectural features, such as with upper-room UVGI (Figure 3). (For a comparison of sources that generate UV-C, see our 2020 publication.)

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Figure 3: Newer 275 nm LED technologies offer options for smaller housings that easily integrate with the architecture, as viewed in this recent example of upper-room UVGI (Photo courtesy Purifii by Luminii)

Figure 5: For upper-room UVGI, more aesthetic form factors are becoming available with products using LEDs that emit 275 nm UV-C. This example uses a fan to actively circulate room air into the upper room disinfection zone. (Images courtesy Air-Lume, UK)

Figure 4: In addition to white downlight, conventional low pressure discharge mercury UV-C sources can be hidden in attractive pendants; this example uses a fan to actively circulate room air. (Images courtesy Air-Lume, UK)

There are some products that are designed to actively move air through a hidden UV disinfection chamber. On the UK market, either conventional low pressure mercury discharge sources (Figure 4) or UV-C LED sources (Figure 5) are used in pendants that use fans to actively move air through a disinfection zone; some also incorporate white light sources.

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What’s the Prognosis for UV Disinfection Technologies? As new UV technologies mature, lighting designers need to continuously address these kinds of concerns. The COVID pandemic is not the last one we will face; even now, antibiotic-resistant

strains of pathogenic bacteria and fungi cause illness and mortality, as well as billions of dollars of annual loss. All sectors in the lighting industry--lighting designers, engineers, manufacturers, installers, and maintenance personnel-will increasingly contribute to fighting microbial pathogens with UV disinfection technologies.


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2021

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS Congratulations to this year's award recipients. We applaud

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Danny Lewis (posthumous)

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THANK YOU TO THIS YEAR'S JUDGES: PAUL POMPEO, NANCY CLANTON, AND DONNY WALL.

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in Translation

Not Lost

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An Interview with Italian Designer Marco Stignani By RANDY REID

In the United States, the lighting designer is the first person after the architect. Not in Italy. ― Marco Stignani


THE BUSINESS OF LIGHTING DESIGN™

Photo: Copyright © Moreno Maggi

Last month, I met Marco Stignani for lunch—he took the train up from Rome to meet me in Milan. Despite my inability to speak Italian and Stignani’s limited English, we were able to have an in-depth conversation about his lighting career with the help of Google Translate and our exceptional waiter.

Stignani also credited his early career success to courses he took at these companies saying, “I took in-depth courses and refresher courses at the best Italian manufacturers and foreign companies. I’d travel to companies like ERCO, Artemide, FLOS and spend a few weeks just learning and absorbing everything.”

Stignani found his passion for lighting at a young age, helping out in his family’s workshop, founded just over a decade before he born with the initial goal of distributing the best lighting fixtures in Italy. As he spent his time disassembling and reassembling these fixtures, he came to appreciate the complexity of their mechanics, eagerly rejoining the family business as an adult after completing military service.

By the early 2000s, Stignani and his brother Luciano were ready to make their mark on the family business. Stignani became Director of Stignani Illuminazione in partnership with his brother, and the two worked together to make a name for the company in the Roman and Italian lighting market. Under their leadership, the business increasingly focused on lighting design, initially designing for free. Their first big job was for Montedison, an Italian chemical company. Stignani noted, “At the time, lighting software did not exist, so I was designing only with drawings and mathematical equations.”

With a few more years of experience under his belt—and the invention of the first lighting calculation programs—Stignani began offering his design services to various architecture and engineering firms. He first took on internships with Italian manufacturers and eventually went on to support world-class companies like ERCO, Trilux, and Zumtobel.

In 2010 as Italy was hit by a recession, the two brothers began to consider halting their lighting distribution business. Three years later, they followed through and Stignani dedicated himself

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designers on projects. He explained, “In the United States, the lighting designer is the first person after the architect. Not in Italy. The engineer has the final say on electrical, which includes lighting, so the lighting designer is not necessarily needed.” He went on to say, “Even more, lighting is looked at first when they want to reduce costs.. If they need to make cuts or substitutes, they aren’t going to touch the other materials, for example, travertine." Stignani also explained that the certification process in Europe is not as strict as in the United States, “I was designing a luminaire for a special project and used a company for the LED components. Since the LED was already certified, the engineer just needed to get approval for the electrical system and not the complete luminaire.”

wholly to the lighting design profession. Since then, he has worked on several international projects, spoken at conferences and workshops all over Italy, and continued to grow his passion for lighting. With his lengthy career and work spanning across the globe, Stignani has seen firsthand the international differences in how lighting design is managed as a business. For example, one of his latest projects, a BGI Castel Headquarters, exposed him to the normalities of the lighting design business in Ethiopia. The building construction began before the design was done--a practice that would be unheard of in the EU. The project was a truly global effort. All of the materials for the project were designed in Rome then transported to the construction site in Addis Ababa. As a result, the delivery of these materials

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lengthened the project, as transit time required one month by boat and two weeks by truck. Stignani also had to deal with currency conversion from Euros to Ethiopian birr. Despite these obstacles, only four of the 2600 luminaires used for the project had issues and those issues were attributed to an incorrect mounting. “We got luminaires from four different sites. I visited all four sites to check on production and shipping. Once everything arrived at the project, you have to work with what you have”, said Stignani. He added that he was relieved when he visited the construction site just a month before the opening and found that everything was assembled according to the design. At the end of the project, Stignani worked with the team installer on the Dali control system. Another cultural difference Stignani noted in the lighting design business is the lack of prioritization of lighting

Italian lighting designers have similar billing structures to their US counterparts, the main difference being the timing of the final payment. Stignani said he usually divides the project into four phases and a typical pay structure consists of 25% each after the first and second phase, and 30% for the third phase, with 20% at the end. “The difference,” he added, “is that the Italian manufacturing companies often give away the lighting project taking away professionalism and work from professional lighting designer.” As we concluded our lunch, we discussed color trends and I asked if he was seeing warmer color temperatures. He explained that Northern Italy does have different CCT trends, and he prefers 3000K for indoors, and uses 4000K for gardens. Stignani also noted that 4000K is best for travertine; and 2700 for Roman brick. I made a new friend and learned a little about Italian lighting design, and the waiter earned a very nice tip! P


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How Low Can We Go?

The Ontario Association of Architects HQ Daylighting Challenge By RANDY REID

I

magine creating a lighting design for an association whose 7000 members all know a little something about lighting. The team at Gottesman Associates did just that for the Ontario Association of Architects’ headquarters building.

The OAA was founded in 1889 as a regulatory body for architects in the province of Ontario, Canada. This organization is dedicated to regulate, promote and educate its membership, who include 4300 architects, 1716 international architects, and 819 students, licensed technologists, and retired and honorary members.

Original Architect: Ruth Cawker Renew and Refresh Architect: David Fujiwara Architect Electrical Engineering: WSP Toronto Photography: Michael Tenaglia, Michael T Photography and Design

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In 1989, the OAA organized an international juried competition that was won by a young, local architect, Ruth Cawker. Her six million (Canadian) dollar design was completed in 1992. Two decades later the building needed significant work and there was discussion about whether they should sell, relocate or renovate the building. After intensive investigation, the OAA made


the decision to renew and refresh the existing headquarters. The original design of the building has a high window to wall ratio of 60%, providing ample daylight and beautiful views of the adjacent greenbelt. The structure appears to float in air as parking is on the first floor and the building is occupied on the second and third floors above. The main work spaces consisted of private offices around the perimeter, anchored by a central day-lit atrium, and meeting rooms. While architecturally pleasing, the high window to wall ratio and exposure on all six sides made thermal control challenging. The headquarters had no sun control

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“The task lights at the desks supplement the light level sufficiently at night to suit paper tasks, if required.” ― Deborah Gottesman

or redirecting strategies except for some roller shades. Most of the shades were permanently closed and workers were dependent on end-of-life fluorescent and CFL luminaires for their light. Around the perimeter of the atrium, direct sunlight exposure created glare and heat. Resourceful employees installed commercial outdoor-umbrellas above their desks to block the uncomfortable effects of sunlight. The OAA’s “Renew and Refresh” initiative was a complete renovation that was targeting net zero as part of The 2030 Challenge, by 2020. They would make the process completely transparent to their membership, including full access to financial and design documents. As part of the major renovation, the OAA hired Gottesman Associates for the daylight study and lighting design, with the following objectives: •

To leverage daylight and mitigate glare,

To create a quality visual environment for enhanced uses of space,

To honor the existing architecture, and

To be a benchmark for design.

“As if this wasn’t a big enough mandate, there was the added pressure of working

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for all the architects in the province of Ontario!”, said Deborah Gottesman, Principal of Gottesman Associates. The team at Gottesman began an integrated, iterative and collaborative process working with the client and members of the design team. First, the study was to explore how much free light from the sun was available, modelling different configurations. For example, they had to find the optimal balance of window Visual Transmission (VT). Higher optical transmission depends on higher VT, which means more light can penetrate the glass but so can heat. Thermally, they wanted lower VT, but for lighting, they wanted higher VT. Ultimately, the study revealed that the desired lower VT windows had a minimal effect on the daylight factors, meaning there was no material effect on the delivered lumens. Architectural interventions would also impact daylight penetration. Different interior space layouts were modelled, as was the configuration of the new photovoltaic (PV) panels stretching across the roof. The PV could be arranged in different configurations, each with a unique effect on the available daylight. A PV array with gaps between panels was preferred to a fully opaque layout, allowing partial daylighting autonomy in affected spaces. With the amount of available daylight established, the modelling then focused on finding the sources of glare so they could be mitigated. Shading and glazing


are effective options to overcome this problem, as the best approach is to stop the heat before it enters the building, particularly during summer months. Since the sun is at a lower angle in the winter, there is deeper penetration; that was not a problem as the sunlight is usually welcomed on cold, dark, winter days. But what to do in the summer? Natural shading, like using Hops (a climbing seasonal plant), was considered. Hops can grow to 40 ‘ tall in a season, with large, thick foliage it is able to shield direct daylight in summer months, and then dies back in winter allowing the light inside. Ultimately, adding any shading to the exterior of the building was abandoned

for many reasons, including the severe architectural impact of exterior shielding, that forced the search for solutions in other directions. The team then considered less visually intrusive solutions: interior redirecting devices, windows with internal diffusing materials or louvres, window films, and electrochromic and electrothermic windows. Ultimately, a mix of electrochromic windows, daylight redirecting film, and fritted window provided the right blend of solutions to meet the project objectives. With the seven rounds of daylight modelling completed, what impact did it

have on electrical lighting design? First, with the sun providing ample usable light around the building perimeter, the quantity of luminaires required was dramatically reduced, saving 10% of the luminaire budget. “That savings alone paid for our design fees, and the icing on the cake is that the client has ongoing savings in operations and maintenance from fixtures that were never needed, purchased or installed,” explained Deborah. “The task lights at the desks supplement the light level sufficiently at night to suit paper tasks, if required.” Vacancy sensors under the desks ensure tasks lights are only used when the occupant is at their desk.

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"Staff and the membership have seen a dramatic improvement in their use of the space, where the lighting matches the functionality. Now, the OAA has an upgraded low maintenance system that is easy to operate." ― Deborah Gottesman

Mindful of accessibility for future maintenance, the new lighting design optimized the complicated structure, revealing interesting features and characteristics. Many luminaires are integrated and concealed from view providing glare-free, magical lighting effects. Indirect lighting is a theme used throughout. It floats the building above the ground floor parking, exposes the volume of the 30’ high atrium, provides flexibility in meeting and council rooms, and delivers comfortable, glare free, ambient light in offices and at reception. Where visible, a strong rectilinear fixture vocabulary is used, with the exception of the arced luminaires designed to fit perfectly in the curved glass feature stair. Pendant luminaires harmoniously reinforce the building form and create a beautiful ambiance. RGB lighting drapes the edge of the ceiling on the 2nd floor that brighten the ceilings for a voluminous and playful effect.

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Lighting controls include daylight harvesting, vacancy sensing, and light level tuning. After rigorous commissioning, resulting average operating lighting load is ~.1W/sf, ~75% reduction in consumption compared to pre-renovation, and well below applicable local codes. There are other more qualitative results that Deborah pointed out. “The aesthetic improvements are dramatic, and jive with the architecture; one member repeatedly comments that the interior fit out completes the building! Staff and the membership have seen a dramatic improvement in their use of the space, where the lighting matches the functionality. Now, the OAA has an upgraded low maintenance system that is easy to operate.” Overall, this has been a leadership project, that the design team and the entire membership of the OAA can be proud of. P


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ALEDDRA LED LIGHTING

2247

SHINETOO LIGHTING USA LLC.

2257

LEDTURE INC

2261

CENTRSVET

2267

LightFair Live, Booth #2274

2341

LTF, LLC

EARTHTRONICS, INC.

2343

ABSOLUME LLC

2440

REEVES EXTRUDED PRODUCTS, INC.

2442

CARCLO TECHNICAL PLASTICS

2347

CARL STAHL ARC GMBH

2357

RAAT

2363

YML SHANGHAI YUANMING LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY CO., L

2441

METRUE, INC.

2445

LED'S MAGAZINE

2449

ASSOCIATION OF ENERGY ENGINEERS (AEE)

2451

LED LIGHTING CONCEPTS LLC

2455

Designing Lighting

2457

2459

GENESIS PLASTICS TECHNOLOGIES

2463

BUILDING SERVICES MANAGEMENT MAGAZINE

2465

NALMCO

2467

2469

LightFair 2021 Exhibitor Booth Layout


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FOCUS INDUSTRIES, INC.

1340

ENVOY LIGHTING, INC.

1344

INDATECH LIGHTING

1348

OXYGEN

1321

The Designery, Booth 1329

LFI Cafe, Booth #1339

MODULAR INTERNATIONAL, INC.

1347

BOCK LIGHTING

1534

JESCO LIGHTING GROUP, LLC

1528

ARTIKA

1421

ACCESS LIGHTING

1429

Custom Contract Lighting

BLACKJACK LIGHTING 1532

1433

PUREEDGE LIGHTING

COOPER LIGHTING SOLUTIONS

UL

1628

BENDER & WIRTH, INC.

1630

1632

MODERN FORMS

1521 WAC LIGHTING

1620

RAGNI JASCO LIGHTING PRODUCTS

1529

SEBCO INDUSTRIES, INC.

1531

EVERLAST LIGHTING, INC.

1533

LUMEFFICIENT

1732

CABLE GRIPPERS, INC.

LT holding

1720

CRESTRON ELECTRONICS

1722

COOLTRON INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY INC.

1728

LEDRA BRANDS

1605

FC LIGHTING

1609

Headshot Booth #1705, Sponsored by Seoul Semiconduc

SEOUL SEMICONDUCTOR

1613

GE CURRENT, A DAINTREE COMPANY

1621

TASK LIGHTING

1623

RAYON LIGHTING GROUP

1629

B-K LIGHTING 1730

1631

LEHIGH ELECTRIC PRODUCTS CO.

1635

TE CONNECTIVITY

1639

1647

1547

SAMSUNG ELECTRONICS

1538

SIGNIFY

1447

GIGAHERTZ-OPTIK INC.

1822

NORA LIGHTING

1824

ETC

1828

INTERTEK

1832

KEYSTONE TECHNOLOGIES

1804

BRANDON INDUSTRIES

1713

RAB LIGHTING INC.

LEDVANCE 1820

1721

SGM LIGHTING INC.

1725

ALPHALITE, INC.

1729

INTELLIGENT LIGHTING CONTROLS, INC.

1733

VIRIBRIGHT LIGHTING, INC.

1739

VISION3 LIGHTING

1747 RLR INDUSTRIES, INC.

1948

LIGHT EFFICIENT DESIGN

1805

SOLERA SOLAR LIGHTING

1807

A.L.P.

1920

SPORTSBEAMS LED LIGHTING

1922

SLP LIGHTING

1928

LTI OPTICS, LLC

1932

SEAL & DESIGN

1938

KOPP GLASS, INC.

1940

APOGEE LIGHTING

1942

T-1 LIGHTING, INC

2038

TUV SUD AMERICA, INC.

2042

NERI NORTH AMERICA, INC.

2010

STARTEK LIGHTING AMERICA, LLC

2012

BARTCO LIGHTING

2014

ALUZ LIGHTING

1921

GREEN PLANET LED

1929

BIOS

1939

ABOVE ALL LIGHTING INC.

1943

EDISON PRICE LIGHTING

1947

IKIO LED LIGHTING

1905

EIKO GLOBAL, LLC

1811

METEOR LIGHTING

1821

TCP

1823

PLASKOLITE

1829

SPJ LIGHTING

1833

OPTICOLOR, INC.

1839

ENERGY FOCUS

HONYA LIGHTING, 1946 LLC

1847 NICHIA AMERICA CORPORATION

2148

DALI ALLIANCE (DIIA)

2140

2142

GREENAPSIS SMART CITIES LLC

2114

SOL

2120

CRUCIAL POWER PRODUCTS

2122

PACLIGHTS

2124

TRASTAR, INC.

2128

VODE LIGHTING, LLC.

2109

BOCA FLASHER

2111

TECHKO KOBOT, INC

2108

THE LIGHTING 2112 QUOTIENT

2113

HEVI LITE, INC.

2021

LED SMART

2023

WAGNER ARCHITECTURAL SYSTEMS

2029

JARVIS LIGHTING

2031

ABLE POWER PRODUCTS, INC

2035

GKOLED

2041

HI-LITE MFG.

SATCO PRODUCTS, 2146 INC.

2047

2224

MCWONG INTERNATIONAL, INC.

2228

2230

EELP, INC

2220

VITREK

2222

PERKS @ NEP Booth #2208

GILLINDER GLASS

2214

SIGNAL TRANSFORMER

2121

AMAX LIGHTING, INC.

2123

MAVERICK SUNPARK ENERGY ELECTRONICS SOLUTION INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION

2125

RED SKY LIGHTING, LLC.

2129

LANDSCAPE COMMUNICATIONS

2131

ORIGAMX BY THE BLACK TANK

2133

LIA Awards, Booth #2139

IGLO LLC

2147

2334

SELF ELECTRONICS CO., LTD

2338

LIGHTING, INC.

TIOSL TECHNOLOGY (SHENZHEN) CO., LTD.

2332

HEALTHE, INC.

2209

HIDE-A-TRIM

2211

CONCEALITE LIFE SAFETY PRODUCTS

2213

LIGHTSTANZA

2215

WILGER TESTING CO., INC.

2221

PERFECT POWER SYSTEMS

2225

STEINEL AMERICA, INC.

2229

WAVE LIGHTING

2308

BENJAMIN ELECTRIC COMPANY

2310

2312

GLINT LIGHTING

2314

TOGGLED

2320

VISTA PROFESSIONAL OUTDOOR LIGHTING

2324

SYNAPSE WIRELESS, INC.

2328

TELINK SEMICONDUCTOR

AMBIENTECH 2330

2231

IR-TEC INTERNATIONAL LUMENBUILDER LTD.

2235

DSPM INC.

2239

B PLUS L TECHNOLOGIES, INC.

2241

2340

KONICA MINOLTA SENSING AMERICAS AMERICAN

2243

ALEDDRA LED LIGHTING

2247

LTF, LLC

BEELIGHTING INC

2420

2424

AUTANI

2428

SPRING LIGHTING GROUP INC

2313

BRIGHT LED

2321

ZHAGA CONSORTIUM

2325

AVNET

2329

VERIZON

2430

ENVISION LED LIGHTING, INC.

2438

ABSOLUME LLC

2440

REEVES EXTRUDED PRODUCTS, INC.

2442

SENSORWORX

2331

AVI-ON LABS, INC

2333

ILLUMRA

2232 2339

2341

EARTHTRONICS, INC.

2343

CARCLO TECHNICAL PLASTICS

2347

ATG ELECTRONICS, INC.

2407

Lytei

2409

2411

2413

SAVANT

2415

LUX DYNAMICS

2421

SENTRY ELECTRIC LLC.

2423

GREEN BUILDING & DESIGN

2425

ENOCEAN ALLIANCE

2429

CABA

2433

EEMA LIGHTING GROUP

2439

YML SHANGHAI YUANMING LIGHTING TECHNOLOGY CO., L

2441

METRUE, INC.

2445

LED'S MAGAZINE

2449


RESIDENTIAL

A RIVER RUNS

The River House in Valle de Bravo, Mexico incorporates nature in a highly unique way — a river literally divides the two spaces.

By JACOB WRIGHT

A view of the exterior of River House at nighttime illustrates the pivotal role lighting plays in showcasing the vaulted ceilings and bathing the living areas in soft light. Photo credit: Hector Velasco Facio

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RESIDENTIAL

THROUGH IT The picturesque town of Valle de Bravo is not what international visitors envision when they think of Mexican terrain. Situated on Lake Avándaro, approximately 2.5 hours west of Mexico City, it boasts mountainous forests and a quaint city center of cobblestone streets and colonial buildings that date back to the 17th century. The location, which draws tourists who enjoy hiking and water sports, is known for its upscale residential community. The architectural firm of Luciano Gerbilsky Arquitectos, headquartered

in Mexico City, was presented with a unique situation for a 12,000-sq.ft. residence to be built in a wooded area of Valle de Bravo. It is composed of two spaces, one private and one open, divided by an artificial river (that connects to a natural one) at the main entrance and surrounds the entire house. The house was built with steel framing, which allows for wide areas with large windows and double-height ceilings. Earth tone-colored stones on the façade and glazed tiles on the ceiling

maintain the rustic ambiance, while a steel and glass bridge connects the two spaces and allows views of the natural surroundings as well as the architecture. The goal was to make the residence feel as if it were a part of the landscape. Dubbed the River House project, the home also features an underground wine cellar with a capacity for 400 bottles that need to be kept at an ideal temperature. With such a grand space, proper lighting to show it off was a must. Next to the wine cellar is the underground high-tech multimedia room..

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Just as the architects utilized the area below ground, there are several upper levels, with vaulted ceilings that meet at a central point. The top level has five private bedrooms, baths, and private family areas, each with its own balcony facing the river. Great care went into lighting the outdoor columns on the front of the house. Each LED luminaire was precisely mounted to ensure the light travel up the beam with no spillage on the house. The second level contains the larger, social areas such as the interior living and dining room, which are adjacent to an exterior living and dining area on an outdoor terrace. The pool is deliberately located in this area to visually make the transition between the house and the exterior landscape. Illuminating this central space are two custom chandeliers composed of interconnected horseshoes suspended from the vaulted ceiling and visible from the two levels; one measure 29.5 feet high, and the other is 19.5 feet high. On the terrace is an exterior kitchen equipped with a stone oven, Viking grill, and Teppanyaki iron griddle facing a dining table with seating for 14, lounge areas, a pool, and a gas chimney. The interior kitchen is close to the breakfast room – which is surrounded by a steel and glass structure facing the garden, river, and surrounding forest – and the interior dining room. The interior living room is situated alongside the double-height main entrance with a wood fireplace that warms the whole house on chilly evenings.

On the lower level, there is a full spa with sauna, Hamman (Turkish bath) room and massage area. Adding to the spa feeling are interior gardens that intertwine among the open and closed spaces. Alongside the river sits a Jacuzzi tub next to a fire pit surrounded by comfy chairs wrapped in warm sheepskin. This exterior lounging area has a full bathroom conveniently located nearby. Through Luciano Gerbilsky Arquitectos’ work, River House is the epitome of living comfortably in nature without sacrificing any conveniences of today’s modern, affluent lifestyles. P

PROJECT SPECS Project: River House Location: Valle de Bravo, Mexico Architects: Luciano Gerbilsky Arquitectos Photographers: Héctor Velazco Facio/José Margaleff

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Let The Drywall Be Your Canvas TruLine: The Original 5/8” Recessed Linear Lighting System PureEdge is the original designer of the ground-breaking plaster-in 5/8” drywall recessed lighting system. TruLine stuns with glare-free lines of light in ceilings and walls creating subtle ambient lighting or unique focal points. TruLine was used above to replicate an airline flight pattern by joining multiple segments together into X’s, Ts, and custom angles. This installation is a perfect example of TruLine’s design possibilities! TruLine recesses into 5/8” thick drywall without any stud or joist modification for extremely easy and cost effective installation and is customizable to your design. For even more flexibility in creating a unique space, it is now available in Tunable White allowing for the ultimate luxury in lighting within commercial spaces. Tune the color temperature down to 2700K for a relaxed atmosphere or up to 6500K to promote alertness and productivity.

We engineer lighting solutions to help cultivate your creativity. For more information, contact us at design@pureedgelighting.com or visit our website at www.pureedgelighting.com.

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JUST IN

TOP 10 MUST SEE These are the Top 10 Must See products and services exhibited at LightFair.

BIOS, Booth 1939, launches the first wellness table light of its kind, The SkyView Wellness Table Lamp, combines form and function with BIOS SkyBlue® circadian technology. SkyView was specifically designed to address circadian biology and automatically cycles through sunrise, daytime, sunset, and nighttime modes to provide industry-leading daytime melanopic content for maximum daytime circadian stimulus.

Gillinder Glass, Booth 2214, has developed the IQ Linear, a family of flat optical elements with very fine microrelief surface structures offering highdefinition light distribution achieved by a single flat piece of optics. These finely calculated nanostructures are designed for optimum functionality and are replicated by direct embossing into the PMMA substrate. Readily available in a broad range of light distributions and material dimensions. 4848

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Perceive is a new fixture launched online by Cooper Lighting Solutions, Booth 1547 Using patent pending Perceive™ Technology based on cognitive science, Perceive creates the illusion of depth and adds dimensionality to any space. Perceive blends subtle styling with an innovative optical system to create visual interest and provide comfortable illumination.

Meteor Lighting, Booth 1821 launches the REIZEN, a contemporary, indirect asymmetric luminaire that uses the latest in light shaping prismatic technology for a high lumen package and smooth distribution. It has a 40,850 lumen option that is rated both for outdoor and natatorium use. Meteor will conduct a never-beforeseen W+RGB color tuning option for indoors at their booth.

AmbienTech, Booth 2231, will exhibit the ZeroX2-Tone, a two slider wall switch with two 0-10V control channels for Tunable White and Dimming control. It is compatible with two channel LED Drivers and controllers, eliminating the need of two separate dimmers reducing cost and installation time. The ZeroX2-Tone offers adjustable Color Mixing Curves for optimal performance. With a built-in relay, it requires no additional safety devices.


The new EnFocus™ enabled Suncycle™ Human-Centric Lighting (HCL) from Energy Focus, Inc.. Booth 1946, affords both residential and commercial customers the ability to implement a fully automated circadian lighting system, without requiring wireless or 0-10v controls. The system leverages our EnFocus™ powerline communication technology, in a simple to use switch paired with Suncycle™ lamps, that was designed using the latest circadian stimulus model to maximize well-being.

Nichia, Booth 2148, will demonstrate the H6 Series of LEDs, delivering the highest multi-level boost in color rendition and efficacy while maintaining the outstanding lifetime expected from NICHIA. The H6 Series takes advantage of a unique red narrow band phosphor technology, among other semiconductor processes and packaging techniques to deliver a color rendering index (CRI) of 90+ while maintaining a level of efficacy seen in standard CRI 80 LEDs.

Keystone Technologies, Booth 1804, wins the award for a service with their Keystone Live! On Tours is a fully outfitted mobile experience allowing customers and clients to get hands-on with Keystone's full line of products. Distributors benefit from having a Keystone representative on site to showcase the variety of the company’s innovations. Electrical contractors can work with the products first-hand. In fact, no matter who’s interested -- manufacturers, facility managers, electricians, end-users – Keystone brings its customized trailers directly to the customer’s preferred location.

UltraSmall Profile Upper Air Germicidal Hybrid Luminaires for Disinfection and Illumination from The Lighting Quotient will be displayed at Booth 2113. This new line of wall-mounted and suspended luminaires utilizes upper air germicidal technology. Utilizing 254nm UV-C, uplight modules perform continuous upper air disinfection in occupied spaces.

The Tbar Ceiling FreeForm from PureEdge Lighting, Booth 1647 solves a known issue with lighting a grid ceiling...having to design lighting AROUND the main Tbar runner. FreeForm allows designers to create a unique lighting layout without restrictions! The Tbar Ceiling FreeForm System offers clean, uninterrupted geometric shapes.

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LAS VEGAS By STEF SCHWALB

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HOSPITALITY

Hospitality is Alive and Well at Virgin Hotels’ New Property in Sin City PHOTO CREDIT: VIRGIN HOTELS LAS VEGAS

Known affectionately as America’s playground, Las Vegas is celebrated for its wide range of entertainment and top-notch hospitality venues. High-end hotels that feature renowned restaurants, a host of casinos, and plenty of entertainment options are part of what makes Sin City a sizzling experience. One of the latest additions (post pandemic) is Virgin Hotels Las Vegas, part of Hilton’s Curio Collection. Located approximately 5 minutes from the Las Vegas Airport and the Strip, this property—which opened at the end of March 2021—features 12 food and beverage spots (including Nobu and Todd English’s Olives); 13,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor meeting and conference spaces; a 60,000-squarefoot, state-of-the-art Mohegan Sun

Casino; multiple entertainment venues, including a theater with 4,500-person capacity; a fitness room; a spa; and more than 1,500 guestrooms spanning across three towers. It also offers a fiveacre desert pool area complete with the Élia Beach Club and a multi-functional event lawn. The hotel’s reimagined and reconceptualized design combined the efforts of New York-based Rockwell Group; Las Vegas-based Kali Juba Wald Architecture & Interiors; and Californiabased Studio Collective. We spoke with Matt Winter from the Rockwell Group, which also worked on Virgin Hotels’ inaugural Chicago property in 2015, about the firm’s work on the majority of the Vegas property’s interior spaces— including the Junction check-in area, The Bar and The Kitchen at Commons Club (a signature Virgin Hotels offering), Nobu, and The Shag Room lounge—as well as the exterior spaces such as the porte-cochere and entry areas. “The hotel itself is built in Las Vegas, which is obviously known for its strong sun, and most of the buildings [within the city] are built very inward with no windows,” explains Winter. “So one of the most interesting things we tried to do with the project is to change those design parameters and bring natural light into the space, which was kind of unheard of.” He cites a couple of zones across the property as examples, including the area near the front of the gaming space where there are two big walls carved open with forced views to exterior elements. And because the gaming space itself is a major showcase, lighting that area also came with unusual challenges. “There are a couple different things going on that we didn't realize at first,” says Winter. “Casinos are constantly in a state of flux. They put certain games in different places. If they don't work, they move, shift, and transition them, so you've got to be able to have

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“The hotel itself is built in Las Vegas, which is obviously known for its strong sun, and most of the buildings [within the city] are built very inward with no windows,” explains Winter. “So one of the most interesting things we tried to do with the project is to change those design parameters and bring natural light into the space, which was kind of unheard of.” ― Matt Winter

flexibility everywhere to have different levels of light for different types of gaming in case they decide to move where the slot machines are and switch them out with the blackjack tables.” Because casinos can do this at any point in time, the design teams had to rely on their lighting designers to present solutions that use a range of light. “We had to use different pin lights, and we had to make sure that they could work for a bunch of different angles. We also had to use globe lights, to give an overall general glow to the space,” adds Winter. “Also, to be working in three separate buildings (that had been built over different periods), our ceiling heights changed throughout so ceiling tactics had to change throughout as well.” Meanwhile for food and beverage outlets, custom fixtures often played a big role in creating the atmosphere of each space. “We were trying to create a bunch of different unique spaces that appealed to different people and the kind of experience they wanted,” notes Winter. For example, in The Shag Room—which showcases a lush luxurious vibe, vibrant rich colors of reds and purples, and mooddefining lighting—they tried to create a zone in which guests felt transported to a completely different place, which was basically a scene inside another space. Then for The Kitchen at Commons Club, the goal was to go a bit lighter. “We wanted it to be bright and rosy hues,” he says. “The

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previous restaurant faded out into the casino and we didn't really want that blend between the two because we wanted to make sure that sound and lighting were controlled as completely separate, and you can't really do that if you stay open to the gaming floor.” It’s important to note as well that this property was previously a Hard Rock Hotel for approximately 20 years—which is very different aesthetically from the Virgin Hotels’ portfolio—so overall, the team strived to create a lighter, more natural feel to each space as opposed to the darker-hued, more metallic surrounds from before. “I think the lighting fixtures design that we did tended to be a little bit more feminine, and the other idea was to really try to blend the interior and exterior,” says Winter, “the idea is to make it feel like Las Vegas (the desert and its natural landscape) is invading a little bit into the casino, blurring the lines between the two so it doesn't feel like indoors versus outdoors.” Lighting, of course, played an integral part in the Virgin Hotels Las Vegas project, and as Winter summed up, it’s crucial for setting the scene and defining each space in much of the hospitality work. He concludes, “Lighting is a huge, important component [to design], within every aspect of what we do.” P


(718) 361-9150 @sdalighting SDA Lighting StanDeutschAssociates

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Push boundaries with STENOS by Luminii, the most customizable microlinear track and downlight system to ever hit the market. Lighting design and architecture professionals can illuminate a wide variety of applications with flexibility and ease thanks to the system’s uniquely small size, high efficacy, and superior optics and beam control. The architectural grade micro-linear track and downlight systems also produce the highest efficacy of any micro-linear directional product available, delivering 96 lumens per watt and a CRI value exceeding 90. Specs at a Glance

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T

he EU wants Europe to become the first climate-neutral continent, cutting greenhouse-gas emissions by 55% in 2030 from 1990 levels, and reaching net zero by mid-century. To achieve that, it plans to spend 1 trillion euros ($1.17 trillion) in sustainable investments over the next decade, as well as at least 100 billion euros through 2027 to support workers in regions most affected by the green transition. Analysts predict that as much as 89% of the planet’s 363 million streetlights will have adopted LED technology by 2027. It makes financial sense. The switch to LED represents an effective reduction in costs, maintenance, and environmental degradation. Updating to more robust and resilient technology seems innocuous enough, but LED installation represents a golden opportunity for smart city planners. What many local authorities are missing, however, is that the switch to LED bulbs offers the opportunity to jointly transition to a smart street lighting system. Analysts reports posit that just 29% of the global total of LED bulbs will have installed smart lighting features within the next decade. Bright street lighting improves road safety, helps to reduce crime, and makes cities more vibrant and attractive places for both businesses and communities. Traditional street lights, however, are a massive drain on public finances and a major contributor towards climate change. To save money and meet a growing public demand for energy efficiency, cities around the world are in the process of replacing old street lights with low-power LEDs. But this upgrade can’t be the end of the story for 21st century lighting systems. Even if modern cities never sleep, the people who live in them do, and lights don’t need to shine at the same intensity throughout the night. In the smart cities of the future, we need a way to manage when – and how brightly – public lights shine.

Photo Credit: Jesse Martini

Street Lighting: The Future is Smart By JUAN DAVILA

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Electrical lighting is possibly the single most underrated technological advancement - Those of us living today, or at least most of us, just do not comprehend just how massive electrical lighting was, back when it was invented. Humans as a species are just not anywhere close to effective when our sense of vision is taken out of the equation. When man freed himself from the gigantic constraint of being tied to the sun’s schedule, practically everything about human life changed over the next century. Today, the entire world, even those parts of it that are hamstrung by abject poverty, have come to take public


lighting for granted. Sure they may not be as thoroughly distributed or even continuously powered, but the point is they are an indispensable part of modern human life. Not many of us spare much of a thought for the humble streetlight. Chances are, you never really knew that even today, street lighting represents a huge chunk of practically any municipality or local council’s budget - The idea here is to bring our attention to something that nearly everyone of us takes for granted. When we think “innovation”, “disruption”, “optimisation” - let’s face it - street lights are not what come to our minds. That’s exactly what we’re trying to do through this post. When we talk about making human civilization more sustainable and more efficient, it’s got everything to do with making the things around us a little better. Sure, this may not sound as cool or be as moving as impassioned speeches made in front of famous gatherings about how we’re being irresponsible as a race - But, the only way we actually make a difference is by looking at the little things around us that could be made better and actually finding ways to do that. To us, if we haven’t said it ad nauseam already, wireless sensing is where it’s at. Wireless sensing remains the best hope we’ve got in being able to design the systems of the future. In a nutshell, the problem wireless sensing aims to solve is this - there are a lot of gaping inefficiencies in the way we’ve organised things around us. That’s all too understandable though - we just made them up on the go and kept doing our best to not let things crash. Wireless sensing and IoT technology make systems less haphazard and more

connected, by facilitating a free flow of information all throughout the system. IoT based systems encourage efficiency, minimalism and elegance. Moreover, these systems can progressively get better over time, by implementing incremental improvements based on accrued feedback. Here, we thought we’d focus on one of these everyday aspects of human life that can be made infinitely more efficient using wireless sensing technology - In this post, we’ll go over some of the most difficult challenges involved in the seemingly mundane enterprise of lighting up our streets and how IoT, like it does with everything else, is disrupting this space like nobody’s business. Lighting up entire cities, throughout nights, every night, must cost serious money. After all, there are times when just our personal electricity bill is a bit too steep for our comfort - forget about entire cities, highway systems - well, you get the gist. So, that brings us to our first major problem with “dumb” street lighting. The traditional model of street lighting is one of the biggest expenditures in any local body’s budget. Hundreds if not thousands of bulbs

that are just left to do their business through the long nights. You’d have to agree that this model sounds like it’s pretty wasteful. It doesn’t take a genius to figure out that there’s got to be some way to make this more efficient. To make matters worse, there’s not that much energy going around to begin with. The math is pretty simple to be fair - Rampant industrial growth + exploding population = energy crisis. If we don’t get our act together, the future might very possibly be dark. Literally dark. Not having enough energy means what energy is available comes at a premium. Today, there are more instances of renewable energy sources being used, especially in wealthy countries. But no, this doesn’t solve the problem that we highlighted. First of all, alternative energy sources are not nearly as widespread as most people think. Secondly, they’re very expensive - it’s not a coincidence that you don’t hear about how Chad or Somalia just decided to go coal-free from 2030. Thirdly, and possibly most importantly, the problem of inefficiency still remains. Fixing where and how we get the energy is just one part of the riddle - the part where leaving all the streetlights on all of the time is egregiously wasteful is quite another. In addition to being very expensive, which is no small problem, regular streetlights are also quite environmentally costly - According to the United Nations, over 68% of the

Photo Credit: Telha on Unsplash

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Photo Credit: Zhang Kaiyy

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global population will have moved to urban conurbations by the year 2050. Streetlighting is another major contributor to CO2 emissions - because there are so many of them dotting highways, tunnels etc etc, and traditionally, they are just on through nights, they are a major emissions culprit. We’ll leave the intricacies and finer details of this for another post. For now, suffice it to say that the way we’ve been lighting up our streets is not just expensive and wasteful, it is also not very ecologically sensible. It’s very clear then there’s a lot that can be improved about the way we light up our public spaces. So, where does wireless sensing fit into all of this? Let’s dive right into the world of connected street lighting. The internet keeps all of us and our things connected all of the time. Or at least, that’s where things are headed. And streetlights are no exception.

catch up with the idea, but today it would seem we are there. A reputed research firm estimates that there will be over 100 million LED streetlights deployed all over the world in the next couple of years. So, the jury is out - this nutty sounding idea is not only real but is also a winner.

The foundational premise for smart streetlights is to optimise electricity consumption. That was the idea behind “smart” streetlights when people first started working on them. It’s based on a fairly simple idea - what if all the streetlights in a system were connected to each other and could actively exchange information in order to optimise their consumption to match real-time demand? It took a while for technology to

Here is a quick list of what these systems could realistically be capable of: air pollution monitoring, traffic regulation, public internet access, surveillance, crime monitoring etc. The last one is considerable in fact - There is understandably a huge link between street lighting and incidence of crime - this one’s fairly obvious. Smart streetlighting systems could account for a 10% drop in crime rate, according to Silver Spring Networks.

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Well, for starters, even though such systems are expensive to install, the payoffs are massive - Smart street lighting systems could account for savings of anywhere from 50% to 75% over conventional streetlighting systems. But believe it or not, this is just the tip of the iceberg. When implemented as part of a larger “smart” network, like a smart city or smart roadway system, there is no telling what connected streetlights could bring to the table - pardon the cliche, but the sky truly is the limit.

Intelligent public lighting systems are cropping up in major urban areas all over the world. If anything, these early usecases just corroborate the claims that have been made about these systems for years now. Chicago leads the way in the use of IoT in street lights. The American city has announced a plan to invest a mammoth $160 million in replacing over 85% of the city’s public lights. The mayor of Chicago expects this investment to pay off very soon, with a projected 50-70% reduction in energy costs. Los Angeles has already deployed wireless sensors in over 80% of its roadways. These connected light systems boast of LED bulbs and high speed data connectivity, as well as wireless sensors that are capable of identifying gunshots and other instances of violent crime. In the very first year of use, the city council has reported a 63% reduction in energy expenditure. The proof, as they say, seems to be in the pudding. This brings us to our favourite topic - wireless sensors and batteries are a match made in hell. And if at all there is a use-case for wireless sensors that seems tailor made to highlight this problem, it is this. Think about it, if you’re going to invest a ridiculous amount of money into installing entire cities’ worth


of smart lights, it would make no sense for the hundreds of thousands (if not more) of sensors in these systems to be battery-powered. Is smart street lighting the answer?...Alone, smart lighting systems turn a city’s lighting grid into one centrallycontrolled network; each individual light able to be modified as a single element, or part of the wider system. Lighting, of course, is paramount to a city experience; improving safety both for pedestrians and vehicles, enhancing areas of beauty or high tourism footfall, and generally keeping the city running in hours of darkness. A smarter street lighting system offers the opportunity to control the output of each and every light; brightening in areas of high crime, or being programmed to respond to pedestrian or vehicle activity. It also offers the chance for each light to be individually monitored and maintained, meaning technicians need not be needlessly called out to manually check the health of each bulb. COVID-19 has highlighted the importance of automation and resiliency for cities, but reduced municipal budgets mean that access to financing through ESCOs (energy service companies) and other third parties is increasingly important. Likewise, a phased-in approach to smart cities that starts with smart streetlighting before proceeding to other applications and a focus on choosing interoperable software platforms that can serve multiple smart city segments are also key trends that have only become more salient in the past year. With modern day metropolises, half of a city’s energy budget is from public lighting – for example public offices, schools and outdoor lighting. On average, energy savings of 40 per cent are made possible simply by switching to energyefficient lighting technologies such as LED. On a global level, that means potential savings of around €128 billion (USD 140 billion) in reduced electricity cost, or 670 million tons of CO2 (the equivalent annual output of 642 power plants). With so much of the global population living in cities, municipalities will have to offer welcoming atmospheres to attract residents, visitors and industry. In short, cities themselves will have to become brands. High-quality, intelligent lighting helps make a city safer and more attractive, enhancing its brand identity — the distinctive signature that defines its appeal and differentiates it from other cities.

Photo Credit: Grooveland Designs

We are living in an unprecedented urban moment of opportunity. We should seize this moment and position humanity and the city at the heart of growth and development. P

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Promote a Smoother Installation and Commissioning Process for Lighting Control Systems By KYLE WHEELER

Commercial Lighting Sales

Energy-saving goals and energy codes require more functionality and flexibility from today’s lighting control systems over the lighting controls that were on the market 20 years ago. Modern lighting control systems are more secure and offer more flexibility and scalability for a single room to an entire campus of buildings. Advanced lighting control systems allow the design of a space to focus more on the effect of lighting on its occupants. With increased functionality comes more perceived complexity related to installation and commissioning. Manufacturers have introduced solutions employing plug-and-play technology, simplified wiring, apps for configuration, and other technologies to make the installation and commissioning process easier. However, even with these features, installation and commissioning may still seem complex and not as intuitive, especially if the installer is unfamiliar with lighting controls. The good news is that several steps can be taken to prepare for a successful installation and commissioning process, with each step

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MANUFACTURER REPRESENTATIVE’S COLUMN involving ongoing communication and collaboration between all parties involved. •

Setting the stage for success with the Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR)

Specifying quality control with the Basis of Design (BOD)

Ensuring occupant satisfaction with end user training

Defining Commissioning

(OPR) statement to ensure all parties have clear expectations for the project and used as a reference throughout the entire design and construction process. Some customers may be unfamiliar with the different technologies and their limitations as well as energy code requirements, so creating a comprehensive OPR can be an investment in time, but it’s an investment well spent. The time with the customer sets the stage for selecting the right product for the right application and allows the system to be configured to meet the customer’s intent. This discovery and planning phase can also help eliminate unwelcome surprises in the following steps and at installation and commissioning.

Commissioning is the process of activating lighting control systems so the installed equipment performs as intended and meets the design intent and owner requirements. Simply put, it’s the process of ensuring that the lighting control system provides the right amount of light where and when needed. Setting the Stage for Success with the Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) Part of the pre-design and pre-site visit should include identifying and understanding the customer’s project requirements and establishing project objectives. How will the facility be used and how should the lighting control system perform? What do they want and need the lighting control system to do? All these details should be documented in an Owner’s Project Requirements

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Details should include requirements for individual spaces and how the lighting should operate in those different spaces. Elements should include a description of the various tasks the space will be used for as well as unique architectural considerations that may impact the lighting. Lighting considerations should also include aesthetics, light levels, color, and visual comfort preferences. During this process, zones, energy-saving goals, and the need to meet energy codes and standards should also be identified as well as maintenance and technology requirements. Multiple elements will determine the selection of the lighting control components, the technologies to use, the functionality and complexity of the lighting control system that will be installed, as well as fixtures. Elements includes project budgets, required lighting levels, controllability, space usage, efficiency goals, and maintenance requirements.

Specifying Quality Control with the Basis of Design (BOD) The Owner’s Project Requirements (OPR) help create the Basis of Design (BOD) and give all parties a plan on how to proceed in the right direction. The BOD should clearly describe the lighting control system and a well written Sequence of Operation (SOO) that precisely details how the lighting controls should operate in each space in response to different situations. The SOO should describe the requirements for all the different space types, including specific criteria for device settings, light levels, switching, dimming, dimming levels, timeouts, daylight harvesting, scheduling, scenes, demand response, and more. Similar spaces in the same facility can have different control requirements. It can range from spaces requiring multi-zone dimming and daylight harvesting to varying light level preferences for occupants in the same zone. This critical document should be referred to throughout the design and construction process with any changes clearly communicated, documented, and agreed to by all parties. Having these details in advance provides the information that the commissioning team needs to ensure that each space is working as intended. Additional consideration should be given to the installer and ensuring that they are familiar with the product being installed with the manufacturer providing training if needed. Documentation should include drawings that provide all equipment details, wiring connections, mounting details, and other relevant installation

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information. Limitations for the products should be included as well to ensure no assumptions are made and the installation is optimal. All this information can be extremely helpful in addressing and preventing common issues that can arise on site.

Ensuring Occupant Satisfaction with End User Training Successfully completing the Owner’s Project Requirements and Basis of Design will ensure a smoother installation and commissioning process. Once these steps are completed, the owner or facility manager who will be responsible for operations and maintenance should be trained on how to correctly operate, maintain, and modify the lighting control system. One additional item that gets overlooked is the importance of educating occupants on how the lighting controls should operate. Being unfamiliar with the features and functions of the new system may cause them to presume it is not functioning properly. It might be as simple as not knowing that an occupancy sensor was installed with a pre-determined timeout that was programmed for the space or a schedule that was implemented for the lights to dim up and down or on and off during certain times of the day or as simple as operating keypads with pre-programmed scene controls. Training occupants will help them understand why the new control system has been installed, how to operate it, and what to expect. Educating occupants on how the lighting controls will perform after a retrofit or move-in can be highly effective in contributing to occupant satisfaction and avoid having them try to override or bypass the system.

Partner with the Right Manufacturer Promote a smoother installation and commissioning process for lighting control systems. It all starts with a comprehensive understanding of your customer’s needs and requirements to install a lighting control system for optimal performance, occupant preferences, and energy savings. The key to success is communication between all the parties involved. The whole process should be a collaborative one where the customer partners with the right design team and manufacturer who will ensure top-notch service and support every step of the way from product selection and design to project delivery and customer handoff. P


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UNDERSTANDING TM-30 By DON PEIFER

Founder of Earthlighting

Figure 1 Color Vector Graphic (courtesy Nichia)

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When I say “90 CRI,” you hear the phrase, you process it, and you summon your past experiences with 90 CRI. You may reference additional biases, but you instantaneously arrive at an understanding of what I said—a common ground upon which to communicate. So much of what we prefer and promote as lighting professionals is based on experiential feedback. Our impressions are formed by how light looks on our skin or how it compares in a side-by-side inspection with reference objects. Yet, many facets of the lighting specification process are abstract. We rely heavily on software programs during the specification process, and when communicating color, we rely on metrics. It seems like now—especially during the pandemic, when our travel is curtailed, when conventions are sparsely attended—we are forced to rely on proxies for first-hand experiences that we would normally enjoy. And despite our personal visual differences, we need a common language that we can all agree on because communicating color is at the core of what we do as lighting professionals. CIE Ra—what we refer to colloquially as “CRI”—has been with us for over 50 years. Prior to the CIE adopting IES TM-30 Rf in 2018, it was the only color rendering metric recognized by an institutional authority. Most specifiers recognize the untenable limitations of CRI. Two light sources with the same CRI score, for example could render object colors quite differently. CRI is computed as an average using only eight reference colors, and that small set of reference color leads to a high-degree of imprecision. Yet, when asked, many lighting pros are not ready to totally embrace the alternative, TM-30. Why is that? The answer is different depending on the perspective of the various shareholders.

Specifiers The reason most lighting specifiers are reticent to back TM-30 is a belief that it is too esoteric and therefore too difficult to teach to clients. Realistically, almost all of the metrics we employ in our industry are abstruse. Most lighting professionals would be hard-pressed to teach concepts like luminance, coefficient of utilization or MacAdam ellipse, yet we rely on these metrics daily. They appear on specification sheets and in our

submittals. We don’t have to teach them; they just are part of the background of our workaday lives as lighting professionals. TM-30 is a tool—just like any other metric, and we simply need to know how to employ it. It may feel large in scope, but the information you need—even simple information is readily available. Take Fidelity as an example. CRI is based on the average of how a light source renders eight color samples vs. a reference light source. Rf, TM-30’s Average fidelity measure, uses 99 colors. That’s 91 more than CRI! And, those colors were methodically chosen from a large sets of color having uniform distribution in color space and wavelength space. If we do nothing else as an industry, we should embrace Rf, as replacement to CRI. Rf appears in the upper left-hand corner of the Color Vector Graphic (figure 1) generated by the IES TM-30 calculators, which is information—available at-a-glance that should easily fit on every manufacturer’s cut sheets. Value engineering is another reason to embrace TM-30. In a time when you have to write a specification like a legal document in order to avoid 11th hour swaps, TM-30 with its specificity provides a template for customization—a way for the lighting designer to drive value by setting specific attributes of color rendering. It provides a unique opportunity for call-outs for minimum requirements, which, in turn, leads to possible specification lock. The details keep the vultures at bay.

Manufacturers A review of the spec sheets for leading lighting manufacturers shows a reluctance to provide TM-30 information. This creates a bit of a catch-22 scenario. Designers point to the lack of information from equipment manufacturers as a reason not to use TM-30. With TM-30 enjoying widespread institutional acceptance, it is difficult to understand why there is not more demand for reporting. It doesn’t require anything more than the spectral power distribution (which manufacturers already have), and the output is practically instantaneous. Let’s face it: CRI gives manufacturers a place to hide soso color quality, but there is also an issue of differentiation

Said another way, the manufacturers that master it now will be those that lead the industry when color-mixed LEDs have the crown.

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among these same manufacturers. The features of a 2” slot fixture, for example, can be annoyingly similar from manufacturer to manufacturer. TM-30 conversely provides firms with the ability to differentiate. Those firms that gravitate toward the ability of TM-30 to enhance their offering will be the same firms in the future innovating with color as color mixing LEDs and spectral engineering evolve. Said another way, the manufacturers that master it now will be those that lead the industry when color-mixed LEDs have the crown.

Consumers Wattage equivalency appears to be the only metric consumers understand, and with incandescent phase-out, even that is fleeting. Energy star labelling did a good job of demystifying CCT, but in order to capture general color quality, we’ve relied on CRI with all the baggage we’ve previously mentioned. TM-30’s color rendering graphics provide a consolidation of the information consumers need in order to make an educated decision. There is the Fidelity score, Rf that appears on the Color Vector Graphic that can be a proxy for quality. In addition, we can provide on package labelling Local Fidelity Charts (figure 2). A home-owner who is painting their walls a certain color, for example, can reference the Local Fidelity

Chart and find the best light source for their palette. Consumers are capable of changing behaviour. What is critical, however is consistency in metrics. TM-30 is a robust framework and has an infinite shelf life because the outputs can be modified to meet changes in lighting science and technology. There was a time when CRI was “good enough” to distinguish between the three fluorescent lamps on the market. But now that LEDs have so much spectral variability, CRI is not useful. As such it becomes ideal for consumers, who throughout these changes will be looking for tried and true metrics that they have experience with to show them the best choices. There is a learning curve with TM-30, but it isn’t nearly as steep as lighting professionals believe. Some simple updates to LC curriculum and certification/testing can create mandates to learn the information. Once learning increases at large that information becomes table stakes. Every lighting pro will learn it to stay abreast. Color is a huge part of what we do as lighting professionals and we need a common language from which to share information. CRI is out; TM-30 is in. It’s time we all catch up. P

Figure 2 Local Fidelity Chart (courtesy of Nichia)

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Organized by IALD Japan, Enlighten Asia 2021 is the premier educational forum for lighting professionals to meet and exchange knowledge, insights and experience on the current issues and trends impacting the architectural lighting and the built environment in Asia and beyond. The online event will be held November 11-12, 2021. Created by and for lighting design professionals, the Enlighten Conferences are a series of educational and networking events. The lighting community comes together to learn, share ideas and explore solutions with like-minded people who are passionate about light. Intimate by design, the events build meaningful connections and spark thought-provoking discussions with experts who inspire and motivate, moving architectural lighting design into the future.

LIGHTING FOR NEW NORMAL All over the world, we are facing significant shifts in our values and the structures of our lives. The lighting design world needs to interpret this new era through the lens of rapid technological change and global environmental protection. We need to respond to the digital age and coexist and co-prosper with technologies in other fields. To stop wasting energy and eliminate light pollution to create a beautiful and comfortable nighttime environment. At Enlighten Asia 2021 in Japan, we will begin to search for the new normal in lighting. To register, go to IALD.com.

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PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Ron Kurtz

Darcy Veneziale

Ron Kurtz has joined Dark Light Design as principal in charge of their new St. Louis office. Kurtz has more than 30 years of lighting design experience, including infrastructure/bridges, monuments, museums, retail, and hospitality projects throughout the U.S. and abroad. Kurtz is a professional member of IALD, a member of IES, and is a LEED AP. Prior to joining Dark Light, Kurtz was a senior associate at Randy Burkett Lighting Design.

Darcy Veneziale has been promoted to Business Development Manager of The Lighting Practice. For the past 9 years, she served as Marketing Coordinator and then Marketing Manager. Darcy will continue to work closely with firm leadership, supporting business development efforts for both the New York and Philadelphia offices.

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designing lighting salutes our charter advertisers and we thank them for their support. salutes and thanks its advertisers for their support. We applaud the achievements of lighting practitioners recognize We applaud the achievements of lighting practitioners andand recognize the importance importanceofoftheir theirwork work architecture and design. the inin architecture and design. page 57

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UNDER

40

SHINING A SPOTLIGHT ON WORLD-WIDE INDUSTRY TALENT The 40 under 40 is a unique annual global competition to select young and outstanding individuals who work in a creative capacity in the application of lighting in architecture. The annual program identifies the 40 most talented and promising individuals working in the lighting design industry under the age of 40. Past sponsor, Filix Lighting has taken over this nowindependent competition that will be supported in conjunction with Light Collective. The 2020 judges were Craig Bernecker, Helena Gentili,

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Karolina Zielinksa-Dabkowska, Ray Molony and Jill Entwistle. According to Ivica Jekic, Filix Business Development Manager, “This has been a difficult year and we believe that highlighting the future leaders of our industry is a great way to ensure that we are looking forward and developing the profession.” Candidates should be passionate about lighting and display outstanding talent and potential, with demonstrable achievements in the field. Meet the 2020 winners.


Martina Alagna

Matt Alleman

Graduate of the Master in Lighting Design and LED Technology - Politecnico di Milano 2017

Matt has a background in architecture and building systems, which together, helped him hone in on the niche that really speaks to him: lighting design.

Dominik Buhl

Jess Baker

UK

GERMANY

Project management and on-site controlling for the Palace Of International Forums in Uzbekistan 2009

USA

USA

Earned a BA Theatre Lighting & Technology from Univ. of TN, Knoxville, 2012

Andrea Carson

Duygu Cakir

Graduated with an Architecture degree from Polytechnic University of Milan, 2013

Graduated with an MSc Lighting Technology and Design from Politecnico di Milano 2010

Giovanbattista Cannela

Katheryn Czub

ITALY

UK

Graduate of the Master in Lighting Design and LED Technology, Politecnico di Milano

TURKEY/ITALY

USA

Katie was exposed to the impact light has on the perception of space while studying for her Bachelor of Architecture at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Florencia Castro

Cheryline Chua

Graduated from Parsons the New School of Design MFA Lighting Design - 2015

Started lighting career in 2007. Received IES Award of Merit and LIT Award for Atlas Bar in 2017.

USA

SINGAPORE

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Haley Darst USA

“I’m amazed at the rapid transformation of our industry and the constant boundaries we continue to push as a collective voice."

Martina Frattura PORTUGAL

Started the artistic project La Mia Paura è Bianca 2013

Russel drives innovation and is a recognised expert in the fields of power distribution, resilience, IoT and LED Field of Play sports lighting.

Jacob Gerber USA

Worked with Antione Predock Architect on the Highlands Pond House in Aspen, Colorado 2006

Jonathan Hoyle

Associate Lighting Designer at Buro Happold.

Teaching at Drexel University 2010-2014

Surbhi Jindal

Chloe Kazamia

INDIA

Women in Lighting Ambassador for India

USA

GREECE

Graduated from KTH Stockholm Sweden MSc Light & Lighting 2009

Andressa Lopes

Carolin Liedtke

Since starting her career in 2008, Andressa has had the opportunity to design and manage a variety of luxury retail projects, worldwide,

Dr.-Ing. Carolin Liedtke studied media technology at the TU Ilmenau and received her doctorate in 2018 on light distribution in interiors at the TU Berlin.

USA

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UK

Claire Hope UK

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Russel Evans

GERMANY


Mohana Barros Bezerra De Lima BRAZIL

Post graduate degree in Lighting Design, Universidade Castelo Branco, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2007

Melissa Mattes USA

Co-Chair of IES Sustainable Lighting Committee 2021

Anusha Muthusubramanian INDIA

Graduated from University of Wismar with an MA in Lighting Design

Artem Masorin GERMANY

Started own independent practice ‘Looch Lighting Design Bureau’ in 2015

Magali Mendez MEXICO

Graduate of Msc Lighting KTH Stockhom 2008

Dagmara Nowak USA

Graduate of the MFA Lighting - Parsons School of Constructed Environments, 2014

Momena Saleem

Deeksha Surendra

Graduated from Politecnico di Milano, Italy with a Master’s degree in Lighting Design & LED Technology with Grade 110/110 Cumlaude 2018

Started career in Lighting Design in Edinburgh in 2012

PAKISTAN

UK

Kunal Shah

Ana Tanveer

Spent a year in KTH Stockholm with 12 persuing Master in Lighting design

Graduated from Politecnico di Milano in Lighting and LED Technology 2018

INDIA

PAKISTAN

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Gayathri Unnikrishnan

Pei-Chun Yang USA

USA

2015 Lumen Award of Citation, 2015 IES Illumination Award of Merit, 32ndAnnual IALD Award of Merit for Brown institute for Media Innovation at Columbia University, NYC.

Masters in Architectural Lighting in Stockholm, Sweden (and experiencing daylight in northern latitudes)

Ryan Fischer

Erin Gussert

USA

USA

Focus Lighting

RL Studio

Tim Huth

Nikhil Divekar

Luma Lighting

Aims Lighting Consultancy

USA

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INDIA

Lisa Wong, USA

Chao Chen, CHINA

Lighting Design Austria

Brandston Partnership

Yezhen Cai, CHINA

Xaio Ming Yang, CHINA

Lumina Lighting Design

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Enlighten Lighting Design


SUBMIT NOW FOR

2021 CLASS OF

To be eligible for consideration in the 40 under 40 Class of 2021, nominees must be under the age of 40 on the 9th of September 2021. Candidates who turn 40 between the nomination deadline and 9th of September 2021 will not be eligible. By entering a nomination or confirming the nomination, entrants accept and agree to abide by the rules and the decisions of the organisers and selectors with respect to all aspects of the scheme.

Entries are subject to verification by the 40 under 40 organisers. In the event it is determined that an entrant has entered in a manner deemed by the organisers to be against the interests of the scheme, or if it is determined that the nomination or nominee submission forms misrepresent the candidate’s achievements in any way, the entrant will be disqualified. All the material submitted – including information and photographs – should be copyright-free – and you agree to its dissemination in print and online. Enter Nomination Here by November 19th.

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UP CLOSE WITH

There are three different women-in-lighting organizations and two have the exact same name: Women in Lighting (WIL), which is a committee of the American Lighting Association; Women in Lighting (WIL), which is a world-wide ambassador program run by The Light Collective out of the U.K.; and Women in Lighting + Design (WILD), which is the focus of this article. At last month’s ArchLIGHT Summit, we caught up with Kelly Roberts, the new president of this 1200+ member organization. Surprisingly, the organization has been around for about 30 years with no formal structure. Not only is Kelly the new president, but she is also the first president. Kelly is a lighting designer and serves as Studio Director of WALD Studio in New York. Her role with WILD is voluntary, as it is with all WILD members. Kelly attributes a lot of her success with WILD to WALD. She explained, “My supervisor, William Armstrong, has been super supportive in giving me the time and mental space to dedicate to building WILD as a community for the lighting industry.” Kelly pointed out that the organization started with small groups of women in lighting meeting at industry conferences. She said, “Most conferences were like old boys’ clubs and didn’t give any time or space for women’s issues or opportunities for networking.” About seven years ago, the organization began to grow and establish chapters in different cities, making waves nationwide. In August they held their first election and installed a National Board of Directors to help guide WILD into the future. That board elected Kelly president. Today, WILD has 14 chapters that vary in size and levels of activity. She stresses that the organization is 100% volunteer with no paid employees. As of this writing, there are no dues, no income, and not even a checking account. Kelly gives great credit to many people who brought the organization to where it is today, and she singles out Megan Carroll who was one of the founding members and a mentor to Kelly. Recently, Megan stepped down from her duties with WILD as she was elected President of IESNYC. Although membership is open to all genders, their focus remains on issues that affect a woman’s ability to be

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successful in the industry. She explained that as the organization further developed, they changed their name from Women in Lighting Design to Women in Lighting + Design. This seemingly minor change is colossal as it opens the door to all in the lighting profession, including, but not exclusively, designers. Her goal is to make WILD a resource that people can look to, including employers, for best practices. She discussed other organizations with similar missions to increase awareness of minority issues in the lighting industry, including the North American Coalition of Lighting Industry Queers (NACLIQ). She said, “Partnering with these relatively new organizations help us amplify their message as well as keeping to our mission of inclusivity.” Recently Kelly has been leading WILD NYC as they partnered with Paddle for the Cure for the fundraiser LIGHT FOR LIFE, which is a 90FT long x 3FT high ribbon of dynamic color-changing light. Individuals have the chance to “Buy a Light” in a tribute to thank a frontline worker or honor a loved one who has been touched by cancer or COVID (survivor or departed). Names provided in the “Buy a Light” program are illuminated across the installation throughout the day and provide an opportunity for the community to create a deep, personal connection with the installation. The display opened earlier this month at Elmhurst Hospital in Queens and is available to view throughout the month of October. Tivoli donated the lighting equipment. More information here. As our industry evolves and transforms and we see traditional organizations pulling back and laying off, it is great to see a grass roots organization taking shape, expanding, and influencing our industry for the better. P


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Fotografiska New York

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The Oculus

The Shed

Moynihan Train Hall

An Interview with Dan Darby

The Javits Center Expansion

designing lighting