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MINNESOTA Official Publication of Minnesota Recreation and Park Association

Jan

Volume 5, Issue 2

June 2010

Recreation and Parks

Creating Events

Finding the perfect space is literally a walk in the park

Enforcing Our Parks Exploring Park Districts, Part 2

www.mnrpa.org March-May 2010 • MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 1


Jan

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MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks

Publisher Minnesota Recreation and Park Association 200 Charles Street NE, Fridley, MN 55432 www.mnrpa.org Tel: 763.571.1305 Editorial Staff Michelle J. Snider, Bethani Gerhard Editorial Board Patty Anderson, Maple Grove Jan Ficken, Brooklyn Park Jennifer Fink, Anoka County Chad Ubl, Winona Jason T. West, New Brighton Advertising & Design Pernsteiner Creative Group, Inc. MRPA Board of Directors President Jon Oyanagi, Brooklyn Park President-Elect Cris Gears, Three Rivers Park District Past President James “Corky” Ebeling, Owatonna Secretary Jay Hutchison, Albert Lea Treasurer Dale McCamish, Rochester RSC Chair Scott Breuer, Apple Valley Sandy Breuer, New Brighton Erica Chua, Plymouth Jennifer Fink, Anoka County Holly Heitkamp, Moorhead Regina Michaud, Plymouth Wayne Mooney, Brainerd Rick Schaber, Saint Charles Dan Schultz, Rosemount Nicole White, Eden Prairie This magazine is the official quarterly publication of Minnesota Recreation and Park Association and is provided complimentary to members as part of their MRPA membership. The editorial board encourages the submission of articles and photos for publication. Articles of approximately 500-700 words or less may be submitted, but may be edited for length and clarity. Contact Michelle Snider, MRPA, at 763.571.1305 x100 if interested in submitting an article for a future issue.

Deadlines for Articles and Advertising Summer.................. April 15 for the June issue Fall................ July 15 for the September issue Winter.... October 15 for the December issue Spring............. January 15 for the March issue MRPA reserves the right to approve all submitted advertising in MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks magazine. All requests for advertising should be made to Todd Pernsteiner, Account Manager, at 952.841.1111 or info@pernsteiner.com. Cover photo: City of Brooklyn Park An affiliate of National Recreation and Park Association

WHAT’s INSIDE By MRPA Magazine Editorial Board

What’s on your mind? This can be the section of the ‘magazine’ where concerns, praise, agreement and disagreement are highlighted as letters from readers, usually pertaining to the previous issue. It is our goal for you to read the magazine and respond to what we are producing; good or bad. It is our goal not to incite a mass cancellation of your subscription similar to the annual Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, but a little feedback is always welcome as we move this forward. As we peruse other publications we feel we are in line with the short attention span and immediate need for gratification world we live in, with our shorter stories and highlights. However, more importantly we think this is the way we reach more readers. The Keeping Up, Section Highlights, MRPA in Action and From the Board President regular features underscore the value to be connected as members. Speaking of the Board President the editorial board feels a kindred spirit with Jon. We are highlighting the park districts intentionally to bring awareness to his platform. We also are going back to see if we can glean ethnic information from the

student surveys the editorial board had commissioned for future articles pertaining to the interest of our young people to enter the recreation field. When this reaches you, the summer season will be in full swing and so too will wedding season. Not only did many of you know the bride when she used to rock and roll but many of you played an important role in making the bride’s day. We highlight you and your facilities that make weddings the fairy tale they should be. In conjunction to the event space spotlight, we asked ourselves if the recession could be gauged on the use of park and recreation facilities. As economists look at retail sales and the stock and housing market, we wonder if charging fees, increasing fees, and offering discounts at our facilities is a better indication of the economic times we live in? Lastly, summer is here — have fun and be safe!

June 12, 2010 national get outdoors day Details at www.nationalgetoutdoorsday.org March-May 2010 • MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 3


ADVERTISER INDEX

TABLE OF CONTENTS What’s Inside.................................3 From the Board President............5 Keeping Up....................................6 Enforcing Our Parks......................8 MRPA Programming...................10 MRPA In Action............................10

Exploring Park Districts..............12 There’s a Space for That.............16 Space Rental Guide....................24 Rental Directory..........................25 Corporate Connections.............28 What’s Going On....................... 30

We’re Going National and you can come along! MINNESOTA magazine will be given to all delegates attending the 2010 Congress & Exposition in Minneapolis, October 25 - 29. This is a great opportunity to advertise directly to 4,500-5,000 national recreation and park decision-makers. Advertising space deadline is Friday, July 23.

Anderson Race Management........................................... 13 Bonestroo........................................................................... 10 Clearwater Recreation......................................................... 7 Earl F. Andersen, Inc...........................................Back Cover Edinburgh USA........................................ Inside Back Cover JRK Seed............................................................................. 23 Kidology LLC........................................................................ 5 Landscape Structures............................ Inside Front Cover Midwest Playscapes, Inc.................................................... 10 Minnesota/Wisconsin Playground..................................... 4 Minnesota Recreation and Park Foundation................... 29 Emerging Recreation Leaders Institute........................... 12 Musco Lighting..................................................................... 7 Pernsteiner Creative Group, Inc....................................... 29 Rath Emergency Communications..................................... 9 RJ Thomas Mfg Co, Inc...................................................... 29 St. Croix Recreation........................................................... 27 Science Museum of Minnesota........................................ 11 SEH........................................................................................ 5 Thank you to our advertisers for your help in supporting MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks magazine. We kindly ask members to please support our advertisers.

Contact Todd Pernsteiner at 952.841.1111 or info@pernsteiner.com for rates and details and to reserve your space.

Interested in advertising? Contact Todd Pernsteiner at 952.841.1111 or info@pernsteiner.com.

When the Green Bay United Way wanted to supply a new playground to a deserving area of the community, they turned to the team at Minnesota/Wisconsin Playground. Along with Green Bay Packers and a team of United Way volunteers, we helped install a playground that will positively affect the lives of thousands of children. Are you looking to tackle a new playground? We can help you score a great solution.

< Green Bay Packers James Jones, Al Harris, T.J. Lang, Breno Giacomini, Evan DietrichSmith, Nick Barnett and John Kuhn lent a hand to a team of United Way volunteers.

4 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks • www.mnrpa.org

This project was highlighted during Super Bowl XLIV!

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FROM THE BOARD PRESIDENT By Jon Oyanagi, MRPA President

Open Wide Along my professional road, there have been mentors that have offered guidance and insight shaping me into the professional I am today. Don’t blame them. Seriously, every step of the way there were supporters that helped me get to the next opportunity. Every park and recreation professional should have that same opportunity. The one mentor that stands out is Barb Tuckner. After high school I volunteered to work at a day camp for children with developmental disabilities. Barb was one of the leaders. Through her encouragement, prodding, and modeling of a true professional she inspired me to seek out therapeutic recreation as a career. I thought I was destined to be a dentist. At the annual meeting I mentioned one of the four goals of my term as president of this association was to encourage current professionals to actively seek out youth of color in order to mentor those interested in pursuing parks and recreation as a profession. Gauging the diversity within our profession from a visual survey at conferences and meetings, one would tend to classify us as a fairly homogeneous group, based on ethnicity. Being dedicated public servants, many of us work hard to learn about the various cultures around us and adapt to more effectively serve these residents. For all people, the natural comfort level comes easiest with those who are similar to us.

Park & Trail System Plan Park Master Plan Park Design Funding & Implementation

Certainly as we look at the people we serve we realize that our communities are increasingly more diverse. Brooklyn Park has become a community rich with a variety of ethnicities. Approximately 40% of the community is made up of various ethnic minorities. Through intentional efforts, the recreation and parks department has a seasonal staff that is fairly representative of the ethnic diversity in our city. We work with youth as “leaders-in-training” when they are under employment age. They move on to become aides, then assistants then leaders and supervisors. They are encouraged to pursue recreation and parks as a profession. Take the time to be intentional and seek out youth you employ who are considering their career choices. Especially encourage youth of color to consider the profession. This initiative will take a special effort in order to overcome the lack of role models. Attend job exploration opportunities to recruit tomorrow’s colleagues. An encouraging word might be all it takes. Without that special effort the profession will continue on a historic path and be slow to evolve. We cannot afford to be slow to evolve.

The Minnesota Recreation and Park Association has developed a Mentorship Program Guide to provide professionals with the information helpful in developing a mentoring relationship. This resource is available on the web site as a part of the Best Practices information. The guide is extremely helpful for preparing anyone for this type of relationship.

“Take the time to be intentional and seek out youth you employ who are considering their career choices.” If every MRPA member took the initiative to approach a young person of color who has the potential to be a good park and recreation professional, we might become a more colorful profession and more relevant in the eyes of our clients. And there would be fewer dentists.

866.830.3388 www.sehinc.com bkost@sehinc.com June-August 2010 • MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 5


KEEPING UP

Conference. New park. Awards aplenty. Retirees. “Keeping Up” is a new feature that will highlight MRPA member events, news, people and more. To contribute to this section, please send a 125 word or less brief and photos to Michelle Snider at MRPA (snider@mnrecpark.org).

National Congress Coming Soon

University of Minnesota Awards Alumnus

National Recreation and Park Association Congress will be held October 25 - 29 at the Minneapolis Convention Center. There will be 220 educational break-out sessions offered throughout Congress week. The Local Host Committee has been working for over 18 months on the following event areas: offsite institutes, leisure tours, golf tournaments, 5K fun run/walk, community build project, general store, leisure park, elected officials’ breakfast, and volunteer efforts. We’re ready to welcome NRPA delegates, exhibitors, and speakers to Minnesota!

The University of Minnesota College of Education and Human Development Alumni Society has chosen Donna Tilsner as this year’s Larry Wilson Award recipient. This award is presented annually to an outstanding graduate of the college who has demonstrated excellence in Donna Tilsner, second from left educational achievement outside the traditional school environment. The award was presented April 9 at the McNamara Alumni Center. Donna is a recreation supervisor with Edina Park and Recreation.

Team Challenge Update If you remember back in January we told you that Roseville employees Eric Boettcher, Gretchen Carlson, Jill Anfang, Kara Thomas and Roxann Maxey were chosen to participate in a weight loss challenge against five KQRS radio staff. Team members received Seattle Sutton meals three times a day for 14 weeks. They are also committed to working out regularly. Team Roseville lost 147 lbs, KQRS lost 107 lbs. Congratulations!

Maple Grove Goes Green with New Park The Town Green is a new urban park in Maple Grove. The park provides a distinctive community gathering place with its main focus on the performing arts. The landmark feature of the park is the bandshell with a dramatic wing-like roof canopy located at the water’s edge. The three pavilions include a concession space, restrooms and a rentable meeting room for small gatherings or parties. The Town Green will host numerous summer time performances of music, dance, and theater programmed by Maple Grove Parks and Recreation. Seating for 300 is incorporated into a classic terraced bowl shape with ample space beyond for visitors to spread out and enjoy the park. The park also features a peninsula which will be a great spot to experience the lake or host a small event.

6 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks • www.mnrpa.org

L to R: Anfang, Boettcher, Carlson, Thomas, Maxey

Scholarships Awarded Southern Minnesota Recreation and Park Association would like to announce the 2010 student scholarship award recipients. Cody Buechner, a student from the Minnesota State University, Mankato and Karlie Galias, a student from Winona State University each will receive $1,000 from SMRPA. This is the second year SMRPA has awarded a scholarship(s) to students majoring in Recreation, Park and Leisure Studies. Congratulations to Cody and Karlie.

Two Set to Retire Plymouth Parks and Recreation’s Karol Klint Greupner and Minnesota State University, Mankato’s James Petersen are both retiring this spring. MRPA thanks both Karol and James for their dedication to the profession, and many contributions to the association.


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March-May 2010 • MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 7


Enforcement in Our Parks: Finding the Right Balance By Hugo McPhee, Director of Public Safety Three Rivers Park District, Plymouth, Minnesota

Park and law enforcement professionals typically strive for the same goal: guest satisfaction and enjoyment of the parks. Park law enforcement can help ensure this by reducing or eliminating crime so park guests are not victimized and have an enjoyable and memorable time. This sounds like a straight forward concept but there are a myriad of ways for law enforcement to achieve these goals. It all starts with a solid partnership with park staff. There are three main enforcement models a park entity can choose for obtaining police services: employing your own law enforcement staff (Three Rivers Park District and State of Minnesota); relying on the jurisdictional law enforcement authority, be it city or county agencies (Minneapolis Parks, Scott County and almost all rural or out-state communities); or contracting for services via a security force or existing law enforcement agency. A fourth and less widely used option is to create a security department to maintain order and address low level order maintenance issues such as parking or animal violations (St. Paul Park Security). There are additional variations or hybrids of these primary models, but essentially, police services can be broken down into one of the above areas. Once you decide which model is the best fit for your organization based on the mission of your organization, costs, responsiveness to your individual needs, etc., you must decide what the focus of the policing action should be. Do you prefer an educational approach with citations or arrests coming only after educational efforts have failed or do you prefer a less tolerant enforcement mindset which is more stringent when dealing with violators?

Park

What is the expectation of park guests? What is the expectation of the law enforcement entity? Most urban police departments and sheriff’s offices do not have the luxury of Staff time to spend proactively educating trail users on nuances of

trail crossings or leash laws. In these high call jurisdictions, officers and deputies “work off the stack” of waiting or pending calls and response is predicated by severity or risk of life. It is not uncommon in some communities that low level crimes are taken over the phone or that it will take law enforcement staff an hour or more to respond. In some cases, officer or deputy availability is simply to drive through a park or take a break in a park location, as that is about all the time they have available. Additional consideration should be given to what role or amount of input park leaders have in determining the law enforcement response. In many locales, law enforcement is left to the police or sheriff’s authorities and their goals may and often times are vastly different from what the park supervisor’s goal was. Most law enforcement agencies strive to be proactive and partner with the communities they serve and represent. A higher level of accountability can be attained if the park entity has more control such as in hiring their own police department or contracting for police services. If service levels are inadequate, the park entity can sever the contract or use progressive discipline to guide their own law enforcement staff to focus on important issues for the park. Once this partnership is created and law enforcement is working closely alongside park staff with the same vision in mind, attention can shift toward how visible the law enforcement entity is within

Balance

8 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks • www.mnrpa.org

Contracted Services City/County Agencies Employed Law Enforcement


Law enforcement staff must be seen doing their activity within the park.

the parks. Numerous studies show that a highly visible, yet friendly, law enforcement presence is a strong deterrent to crime within a given area. It is not enough to be simply visible within the parks, but law enforcement staff must be depicted as vigilant. Long gone are the days of having a park ranger stationed at the gate entry welcoming guests to the park. Although an important relations tool, this presence has very little impact on crime occurring within the park.

Law enforcement staff must be seen doing their activity within the park. This can be in the form of proactive educational traffic stops reminding guests to obey the speed limits, wear their safety belts, be mindful of trail crossings, etc. This can also be in the form of foot patrol through campgrounds and trail areas. Additionally, mounted patrol on horse, ATVs, scooters, etc., provide unique patrol opportunities. The point is that the law enforcement entity be seen as both highly visible but also as an active entity so those intending to commit crime know there is a reasonable likelihood they may be arrested if they choose to commit the crime in the park.

In summary, it is imperative that both park staff and patrolling law enforcement share the same mindset in addressing crime issues. Once that partnership is created, there needs to be leeway for both sides in handling the proper response to crimes. Park staff needs to know and trust that law enforcement is taking the right precautions when responding to crimes and law enforcement must know and trust that park staff are an important part of the solution to crime in the parks. Hugo McPhee is the Director of Public Safety for Three Rivers Park District and serves on the Minnesota Chiefs of Police Board of Directors where he is also the statewide Regional Representative. He also serves on the National Park Law Enforcement Board of Directors and is the Educational Committee Chair. Hugo has presented on topics at the national and regional level and will be presenting two topics regarding park safety at NRPA Congress in Minneapolis this fall.

Three Rivers Public Safety embraces a high visibility, proactive, and friendly approach to law enforcement in the parks. Police staff is encouraged to make traffic stops not only within the parks themselves, but also in areas immediately adjacent to parks if the action will have a positive effect on the safety or enjoyment of the parks by staff or guests. The result is a very visible and professional policing agency that is viewed as being very active and involved with the safeguarding of park properties. This approach has seen crime drop 9.1% from 2005-2010 despite annual park guest visits increasing from three million to eight million. Additionally, crime clearance rates have risen from 25% to 53%. Many surrounding communities have not enjoyed the same reduction in crime. These are remarkable improvements, especially when you consider most crimes in the parks are un-witnessed property crimes such as thefts from vehicles, vandalism, etc.

March-May 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 9


MRPA IN ACTION

MRPA Programming

Photos: Summer Leadership Committee

The MRPA Programming Section hosted the annual Summer Leadership Workshop May 22 in Chanhassen. There were 101 summer staff members registered for the event, an increase in participation over the last two years. Session topics included implementing music into game time, sporting adventures, mentorship sharing, communication, power of acceptance and inclusion, working with difficult behaviors, and nature play. Thank you to committee members: Becky Sola, Shoreview; Margo Prasek, Fridley; John Stutzman, Chanhassen; and Lisa Abernathy, Falcon Heights for coordinating this educational opportunity for summer staff.

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Meet Brad Martens

Brad Martens’ first parks and recreation job was at MRPA members are the Flandrau State Park in New heart of our organization. Ulm, Minn. He worked at the They are involved and park seasonally from 2000 committed to advancing to 2003 and worked his way the parks and recreation through most of the posiprogramming. MRPA in tions from maintenance to Action is a new magazine park security. He states, “It feature which will highlight was a great job that included one section/committee and one professional per issue. taking care of a 400,000 gallon outdoor swimming pool along with miles of trails and 93 campsites.” Following the state park position he interned with Ramsey County Parks and Recreation. He was then fortunate to get hired by New Brighton as a recreation coordinator, recreation supervisor, and now facilities manager. Martens has gained many benefits from being an active MRPA member. He states: “MRPA provided networking opportunities during my undergraduate classes at Minnesota State University, Mankato at the annual conference and the professional connections. Through conference networking, I met Jody Yungers and secured an internship with Ramsey County. Additionally, I found the position with New Brighton through an MRPA job posting and enhanced my skills by attending the MRPA Emerging Recreation Leaders Institute.” He continues to be involved wherever he can. “I’ve definitely received more than I have put in”, says Martens. He has been continuously involved in MRPA since 2005 by attending section meetings. In addition, he was a part of the 2007, 2008 and 2009 conference committees and has been the chair of the Community Facilities Section since 2009. Congratulations to Brad for recently finishing the master’s in public administration program at Hamline University. His final project was a study on the effects of early retirement incentive programs on local government organizations. Martens states, “Local governments are in a whirlwind of change right now and I chose the topic to better understand just one of the many ways we are trying to reduce our expenditures. It provided an opportunity to take an extremely recent issue and learn what the true effects are. I’d be happy to share the paper.” Martens’ final comments are, “I have benefited a great deal from MRPA and strongly encourage younger professionals to get involved with the sections or committees. I can’t imagine being where I am today without jumping in and taking advantage of the great opportunities MRPA provides.”

10 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks • www.mnrpa.org


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Have potential? “Before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others.” - Jack Welch Emerging leaders seek out opportunities to learn, explore and take risks. MRPA is committed to preparing professionals with the leadership skills and knowledge base needed to sustain and better the organization and the people they serve. The Institute, which is limited to 40 participants, will meet on six Tuesdays during the fall of 2010. ERLI is geared for the parks and recreation professional with less than 10 years of experience. Seasoned professionals will serve as the faculty for each of the sessions. Registration includes Institute materials, lunches and a long-sleeve t-shirt. A minimum of 20 participants is needed to run the program.

MRPA Member: $225 Non-MRPA Member: $275 Deadline: August 27 Register: mnrpa.org/erli 2010 ERLI Curriculum November 9 – Anoka County Districts • Partnerships • Athletic Associations

September 14 – Golden Valley • Recreation Areas • City Structure

• School

September 28 – Eden Prairie • Policies/Procedures • Staffing • Human Resources • Enterprise Funds

November 16 – New Brighton • Sales/Marketing/Branding • Case Studies

October 12 – Eagan • Legal/Risk Management • Finance • Park Planning/Trails • Park Maintenance

December 7 – Bloomington • Professional Opportunities • MRPA • Mock Council

Register at: mnrpa.org/erli

12 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks • www.mnrpa.org


A perfect day to go birdie watching. SMRPA 2nd Annual Golf Tournament Wednesday, September 8 Brooktree Golf Course Owatonna, MN $60 includes cart, meal and prize drawing A major fundraiser for the student scholarships is the Southern Minnesota Recreation and Park Association Annual Golf Tournament. The golf tournament will be held 11 a.m. Wednesday, September 8 at Brooktree Golf Course in Owatonna, Minnesota. The entry fee is $60 and includes the cart, a meal following your round, and a raffle ticket for door prizes. This is a four person best shot tournament. If you are interested in supporting the scholarship program as a participant or sponsor please contact Mary Jo Knudson at knum@waseca.k12.mn.us for more information or download an entry form at www.mnrpa.org.

March-May 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 13


Exploring

398.01 PARK There are he park districts subdivisions county, whic city shall be one county b until it conta

Park Distric As outlined in the last issue of MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks magazine, the Association will research park district legislation and development throughout 2010. The magazine will feature a four-part series focused on park districts as a way to provide further information to the membership. Features will include information on park district governance: what is a park district, which states currently allow for this governance structure, advantages and disadvantages, and more. In this issue we focus on park districts as a service delivery model.

14 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks â&#x20AC;˘ www.mnrpa.org

Park Districts as a Service Delivery Model By: Jon Oyanagi, MRPA President The idea of park districts has been around for many decades and has worked well for many agencies around the country. Illinois is one of the states utilizing this method of service delivery most predominantly. The state of Washington created this ability in 1907. Wisconsin has attempted and failed to pass similar legislation. Within Minnesota, Three Rivers Park District operates as a park district. Approval of the creation of this park district occurred back in 1957 through state legislation. Chapter 398 of the Minnesota State Statutes addresses the creation of park districts for counties. That is one method for establishing county park districts. However, Chapter 398 does not allow cities to form park districts. Voter approval is another method to authorize the creation of a park district. First, enabling legislation must be created at the state level that authorizes such votes, or referendum. There is usually a process determined to put the issue on a ballot. Sometimes a petition is required with a minimum percentage of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voters required before the matter will be placed on a ballot. Voters determine whether they will approve of a park district as a separate taxing authority supported through a dedicated tax levy. The legislation dictates the threshold for passage of the referendum â&#x20AC;&#x201C; whether it be a simple majority or a certain percentage.


K DISTRICTS; SINGLE AND MULTICOUNTY. ereby created, subject to activation by the boards of county commissioners, as hereinafter pro s which are bodies corporate and politic and which, when activated, shall be deemed to be p s of the state of Minnesota and public corporations. Park districts shall be of two kinds: (1) si ch shall be coterminous with a county except that in counties containing a city of the first cla excluded from the park district; and (2) multicounty, which shall include parts or all of more but shall not include any city of the first class. No park district shall be activated under this c ains at least part of a county having a population of 350,000 people or more according to the

cts

Another method is to write into the enabling legislation the ability for the councils or boards governing the district voting on whether to create a park district. This is more common for counties where the district will share the same boundaries or cities large enough to support a district internally. In another scenario, cases where multiple cities or counties and cities combine, the proposed district would need to pass resolutions in all jurisdictions in order to authorize the creation of the district. The legislation, public referendum, or council/board vote usually also establishes the governing board of the newly created district. This can be the existing council/board or create a new board and procedure for establishing the board. Also included in the legislation are definitions of power, employees, ordinances, bonding ability, levying, and other details concerning the district. The most likely scenarios for Minnesota would involve multiple cities in the metropolitan area jointly pursuing the efficiencies of becoming a district or cities and counties in rural areas working together as one park and recreation agency. The taxing capacity would need to be sufficient for the creation of a district to make sense to decision-makers. There would need to be efficiencies achieved through the consolidation of administration, maintenance, programming, and facility operation for the district idea to proceed. In the past, the state legislature has also created special districts for distinct purposes with sunset clauses. There are

examples around the country where residents approved the creation of a special park district to solve an issue. A swimming pool in Washington was operated by the city and the council was concerned about the financial losses incurred by the operation. The school district took over operation and soon was also concerned about the operation costs. The city agreed to resume operation of the pool if a special park district (that included just the swimming pool) was approved by voters. Risking the loss of the pool, the referendum succeeded and the city operates the pool with revenue from dedicated taxes that voters approved. In this case, residents were willing to pay extra taxes to subsidize the operation of a pool they felt added to the quality of life in their city. There is a long road before this process is available. The next steps include drafting proposed legislation or changes to existing legislation. That will take some time as writers at the state craft the language and cross-reference the implications so as not to conflict with other existing legislation. Authors will be sought to carry this bill through their respective body of the state legislature. Then the work of educating and advocating occurs. Shepherding the work through committees will occur until ultimately the bill is heard on the floors of each house. Hopefully, the bill would pass and be signed into legislation by the governor. Then the communities of Minnesota will have the ability to create parks and recreation districts as an alternative to the current service delivery model. To review the full Chapter 398 of the Minnesota State Statutues, visit: https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=398.

June-August 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 15


There’s a space for that.

Making an event memorable in Minnesota is literally a walk in the park.

county and state park facilities offer a plethora of meeting rooms, exhibit areas, outdoor spaces, golf courses and banquet halls. Park and recreation managers are finding more ways for event planners to utilize space for gatherings of all sizes – from weddings and family reunions, to tradeshows, meetings and unique team building outings.

16 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks • www.mnrpa.org

Photo: City of Brooklyn Park

Renting a park facility makes sense. Minnesota city,


Photo: City of Brooklyn Park

Photo: City of New Brighton

Photo: Three Rivers Park District

Photo: City of Brooklyn Park

Photo: City of Apple Valley

Photo: Anoka County Parks

Photo: Three Rivers Park District

June-August 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 17


Stepping Back in Time Photo: Three Rivers Park District

By: Gina Gryniewski Brooklyn Park Recreation and Parks When event planners are looking for outdoor fun for families, a unique place to have a meeting, or interested in learning about agriculture and farm life, these beautiful historical venues aim to exceed expectations.

Three Rivers Park District The Landing and Gale Woods Farm The Three Rivers Park District has a variety of parks, pavilions and banquet facilities, but nothing compares to the special charm and beautiful scenery of The Landing and Gale Woods Farm. The Landing, formerly Historic Murphy’s Landing, was established in 1969. This 88-acre living history museum portrays life in the 1840s–1890s with beautiful 19th-century buildings, displays and a scenic river trail and overlook. The original site includes Major Murphy’s Inn and Ferry Crossing, the Pond Grist Mill, and a river overlook wall. The mission of the park is to interpret how people, for thousands of years, have connected with the Minnesota River and its surrounding natural and cultural resources. Although most of The Landing is used for recreational and educational programming, it can also be rented for weddings and events. With its historic church and town hall setting, this site appeals to many brides and grooms to be. Photo: Three Rivers Park District

The Landing

18 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks • www.mnrpa.org

Gale Woods Farm Gale Woods Farm, located in Minnetrista, Minn. is also owned and operated by the Three Rivers Park District. Gale Woods Farm was donated to the Park District to develop and turn into an educational farm. This 40-acre farm includes a barn, machine shed, livestock, hay storage and a pavilion. “The pavilion rentals bring in about 90% of the revenue, which helps offset the costs of educational programming at the farm,” said Tom Knisely, media relations specialist. “Our pavilion holds up to 320 people and is intended to host many different types of events.” For more information on these facilities, please visit www.threeriversparks.org.

City of Brooklyn Park Eidem Homestead Similar to the Three Rivers Park District’s historical venues is the Eidem Homestead, located in Brooklyn Park, Minn. The homestead is a ten-acre living record of farm life in Minnesota during the years of 1890 to 1910. Homesteaded over a century ago, the farm was owned by the Eidem family for 82 years. The historical farm recreates the physical surroundings in which the family lived their daily lives. Interpreters at the Eidem Homestead carry out the tasks of farming and related household activities using the tools and techniques of the late 1800s. You can experience the sights, smells and sounds that were part of the daily lives of many Americans during this period in our nation’s history.


Photo: City of Brooklyn Park

Anoka County - Riedel Farm Estate Just to the north of Brooklyn Park is another quaint farm location, the Riedel Farm Estate in Anoka County. The Estate was built in the 1880s and is the former home of dairy farmer Albin E. Riedel. Today, the farm serves as a special event facility. Anoka County acquired the property in the 1980s and has recently renovated the interior finishes, re-landscaped the grounds, and renewed all furnishings. The 140-acre Riverfront Regional Park features biking and walking trails, picnicking, a boat launch, and plenty of open play areas.

Eidem Homestead

“We have about 5,000 visitors per year and our space can accommodate 50-100 people depending on the season,” said Marketing and Visitor Services Manager Jennifer Fink. “The majority of our rentals are weddings, but we also have hosted holiday parties, grooms’ dinners, family picnics, and more.”

The historical farm consists of a farmhouse, barn, outhouse, chicken coop and windmill, period farm equipment and crop land. The barn and barnyard harbor livestock such as horses, cows, sheep, goats, chickens, ducks, geese and cats. The purpose of this restored farmstead is to preserve and portray 19th century farm life through guided tours, displays, pioneer craft demonstrations and hands-on activities. The Brooklyn Park Recreation and Parks Department also offers art classes, special events and concerts at the farm. School groups, summer camps and families enjoy activities such as pumping water from the well, making lemonade, washing clothes and feeding the farm animals.

Please visit www.anokacountyparks.com or call the Anoka County Parks and Recreation Office at 763-757-3920 for more information regarding the Riedel Farm Estate. Photo: Anoka County Parks

“We are hoping to accommodate more weddings and private events at the Eidem Homestead. With its serene and natural surroundings, many people are inquiring about having their private event at the homestead,” said Farm Coordinator Susan Gower. For more information on the Brooklyn Park Eidem Homestead, please visit www.brooklynpark.org or call the Brooklyn Park Recreation and Parks Department at 763-493-8333. Photo: City of Brooklyn Park

Riedel Farm Estate Eidem Homestead

June-August 2010 • MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 19


Facility Use for Free…or Not for Free By Bethani Gerhard Minnesota Recreation and Park Association Offering various city and county facility rentals can be a challenge, especially with added pressure from certain groups requesting free use. “We try very hard to abide by our fee schedule,” says Jennifer Fink, marketing and visitor services manager with Anoka County Parks. “But there is always pressure to offer more and more freebies.” Photo: City of Winona

Masonic Lodge Theatre

There are three rooms available for rental at the Monticello Community Center, all at different hourly rates. “We have a very large meeting/banquet room which can hold 300 people for large meetings or wedding receptions,” says Kitty Baltos, director of the Monticello Community Center. The medium size room can seat up to 80 people and the smaller room which can hold up to 28 people. They also have a party room, called the Warehouse Room. Baltos adds, “Our room rentals have increased as compared to 2009.” The City of Monicello does allow non-profits to use their City Hall’s Academy Conference Room once per month for free after 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, or on weekends. “This is a no-frills room, conference table and chairs,” says Baltos. “No other set up is provided, and no food can be brought in so we don’t have to spend time cleaning. This conference room can’t hold more than 15 people, so it doesn’t work for every group.” Anoka County gives non-profit organizations and government agencies discounts on meeting rooms and pavilions Monday through Friday, with no fee reduction on weekends. The non-reduced fee for renting meeting rooms varies from $20/hour for the library at the Wargo Nature Center to $70/hour at the Riedel Farm Estate. In addition, there is a $20/hour fee for their facility rentals when the buildings are not regularly staffed. Photo: City of Monticello

The City of Winona recently made it mandatory that there will be no more free use of any of their facilities. They have Holzinger, Lake and Valley Oaks lodges with meeting rooms available for rent as well as open-air shelters, gazebos, patios and a bandshell. According to Chad Ubl, community services director for the City of Winona: “During the 2010 budget process, the Winona City Council asked recreation staff for a report detailing the amount of facility rental fees that are typically waived in a given year. Based on the report and the reduction in Local Government Aid, the Council has discontinued the practice of granting facility use for free. To date all requests to the City Council for the waiving of fees have been denied. Those entities requesting have been given a reduced fee. It is our opinion that the City Council recognizes the costs associated with maintaining and administering the facilities we own and that revenue, in any amount, is relevant.”

20 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks • www.mnrpa.org

Monticello Community Center


Photo: City of Chaska

The Archery Building, Riedel Farm Estate and the Rum River North Building and Camp Salie also have a $40 opening and closing fee. “We usually never waive the open and close or guest service fees,” adds Fink. “Those are hard costs we incur to open and close staff facilities.” Anoka County Parks gives government agencies a 50% reduction on all facility rentals during the week and nonprofit agencies a 25% reduction. However, during the weekends there are no fee reductions for any group. According to Fink, offering free use of facilities was taking space away from those customers that were willing to pay full price for the limited facilities that we’re available on the weekends, such as the pavilions. “We didn’t feel that it was fair to them,” says Fink, “or the taxpayers in general to be subsidizing groups during our highest use times.”

Chaska Community Center

Neighborhoods Glow During National Night Out Numerous parks and recreation agencies will be involved with National Night Out on August 3, 2010. It is an annual nationwide event that encourages residents to get to know their neighbors. It also promotes crime prevention and community-police partnerships. Here is a sampling of what’s going around Minnesota.

The City of Rochester has a Night to Unite/National Night Out. The Olmsted County Sheriff’s Office Crime Prevention Division partners with the Rochester Police Department’s Crime Prevention Division. Rochester Parks and Recreation Department delivers picnic tables to neighborhoods for use during their gatherings.

The City of Minneapolis is hosting their 27th Annual National Night Out. Neighbors can register their event online. When they register, they get free mystery point passes for Nickelodeon Universe at MOA. Registration also places them on the official list of National Night Out events, distributed to police and other departments.

The City of Inver Grove Heights Parks and Recreation Department has a partnership with their fire and police department for their event. It is called “Night to Unite in Inver Grove Heights.”

Maple Grove is also requesting neighbors to complete a National Night Out registration form and return it to their police fepartment. As an early bird bonus, the first 50 registered parties will be guaranteed a visit by the police or fire department. They also have a community picnic planned in the Lions Pavilion at the Community Center. The Winona Park and Recreation Department provides hotdogs and burgers to neighbors. Last year they provided activities such as street bowling, a dunk tank, a visit from the fire department, and a variety of bands. They hope to do something similar again this year.

Thief River Falls Parks and Recreation Department collaborates with their police department and will be holding their event on August 4. It is for all residents at one time and not divided into block parties. Each year, between 900 and 1,000 people participate. With a population of 8,500, that is an excellent response. Check out National Night Out in an area close to your neighborhood or to register an event, visit www.nationaltownwatch.org/ nno/

March-May 2010 • MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 21


Photo: City of Saint Paul

The Perfect Wedding By Bethani Gerhard Minnesota Recreation and Park Association The perfect wedding demands the perfect location. Many park and recreation agencies offer their facilities for both indoor and outdoor weddings. The prices vary depending on the caterer, alcohol distributor and extra amenities, but one thing remains the same, the hope for a smooth wedding day. The Millennium Garden in Plymouth is a popular place for wedding ceremonies. “Helping brides achieve their wedding vision while staying within our policies is a challenge,” says Angie Jedinak Dehn, rental coordinator with the City of Plymouth. “We have 50-plus receptions in our ballroom and about 55 ceremonies held in our garden.” The cost of renting the garden is $355 or $475 for nonresidents. The Plymouth Creek Center room holds up to 352 people for a wedding and costs $895 or $1,195 for a nonresident on a Friday or Saturday. “A renter does need to use one of our three exclusive caterers for all food and beverage needs,” says Jedinak Dehn. And if alcohol is served, a Plymouth police officer must be on duty for $60 per hour (minimum of three hours). Harriet Island also requires an off-duty St. Paul police officer for all private events. The rate is $45 per hour with a minimum of four hours. Harriet Island has a 5,000 squarefoot pavilion for wedding rentals. “We are completely full on Saturdays during the summer,” says Katie Reed, Harriet Island event staff for Saint Paul Parks and Recreation. “We have approximately 40 to 50 weddings during the year. Seventy-five percent of those also have a wedding ceremony at the patio that overlooks the river.” Photo: City of Maple Grove

Maple Grove Garden

22 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks • www.mnrpa.org

Harriet Island Pavilion The pavilion rental is $2,000 for the entire day, which includes the north and south patios, tables and cloth chairs. There are no exclusive caterers, but the caterer does have to be licensed. Renters have to complete a beverage permit if they are going to be serving alcohol. “The pavilion can hold up to 250 people comfortably,” says Reed. “We also have the north and south patios open if there are more people.” The Maple Grove Community Center banquet room can also hold up to 250 for weddings. “The biggest challenge is that people think the room has elastic sides,” says Lisa Jost, community center manager with Maple Grove Parks and Recreation. “The banquet room can hold a few more, but we tell them that just in case 30 or more show up.” There are four exclusive caterers and two liquor providers for the banquet room. “We are seeing more ceremonies and receptions in one location,” says Jost. Maple Grove has a large patio with a flower garden for outdoor weddings. The Town Green band shell and park facility just opened and offers another option for ceremonies and a reception area. Outdoor weddings can also be booked through Hutchinson Parks and Recreation. “We see about four or five outdoor weddings a year at local parks,” says Dolf Moon, director of Hutchinson Parks and Recreation. “The Hutchinson Event Center holds about 35 weddings annually and accommodates up to 525 people.” Rental of the event center is $400 for the day or evening and includes room set-up and tear down. There is a list of six alcohol dispensers and 27 caterers to choose from. People can upgrade from the $400 basic room set-up by adding decorating or dining extras. “The funny thing is that people still think this is expensive, especially the locals,” explains Moon. “But they are actually getting quite a deal compared to the metro area.”


Photo: City of Owatonna

Renewed Space Former orphanage provides for unique office and rental space By Gloria Kolander Owatonna Park and Recreation The State Public School for Dependent and Neglected Children operated from 18851945 in Owatonna, Minnesota. The facility is now used for city administration offices, Owatonna Arts Center, park and recreation department, Little Theater of Owatonna, Wee Pals Day Care Center, Semcac, Big Brothers –Big Sisters, AA/Alanon, Senior Place, West Hills Lodge, State School Museum and newly added Cottage 11. C-11 is a unique site which clearly reveals to the world how 6-13 year-old boys lived in a cottage during their stay at the orphanage. This site features a self-guided tour, gift shop, displays designed to recreate aspects of the life and times which influenced these boys (www.orphanagemuseum.com), and other various short-term rentals. The tennis and fitness center and the former gym are now known as the Owatonna Fitness Center. The fitness center is used for swimming, indoor sports, and there is tennis available for all ages. The Owatonna Arts Center, located inside the Owatonna administration building, is better known as “The Castle” to the community. The arts center provides meeting space available for rental. Additionally, Senior Place has five meeting rooms and is on the State School West Hills Campus.

March-May 2010 • MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 23


Indoor Theater Capacity

Pool/Waterpark Rental

300

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

N

100

100

N

Y

N

N

N

Y

N

Apple Valley

Y

Y

Y

2

75

90

96

N

Y

N

N

Y

Y

N

N

Apple Valley - Hayes Community and Senior Center

N

Y

Y

5

160

310

224

Y

20

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

Bloomington - Creekside Community Center

N

Y

Y

5

35

45

175

Y

12-15

N

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Brooklyn Park Community Activity Center

Y

N

N

6

240

375

330

Y

40

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

N

Buffalo

N

Y

Y

2

60

1,000 500

Y

120

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Chanhassen

N

Y

N

5

40

75

N

30

N

Y

N

N

Y

N

N

Cloquet Community Education and Recreation

N

N

Y

10

20

594

N

N

Y

Y

Y

1,000

Y

N

Y

Crystal Community Center

N

Y

Y

3

100

100

100

Y

100

Y

Y

N

Y

986

N

N

N

Eagan Civic Arena

N

Y

N

2

75

125

25

Y

100

Y

N

N

Y

2,000

N

N

N

Eagan Community Center

N

N

N

8

240

400

400

Y

100+

Y

Y

N

N

Y

Y

N

Eden Prairie Community Center

Y

N

N

11

90

100

80

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Hutchinson Event Center

N

Y

N

6

360

1100

500

Y

80

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Inver Grove Heights - Veterans Memorial Community Center

N

Y

Y

8

150

600

600

Y

75

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

Lakeville Area Arts Center

N

Y

Y

3

150

250

100

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Y

Maple Grove Community Center

Y

N

Y

8

150

300

250

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

New Brighton - Brightwood Hills Golf Course

N

Y

N

1

48

48

48

N

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

New Brighton Family Service Center

N

Y

Y

7

180

300

240

Y

46

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

New Ulm

N

Y

Y

6

70

350

250

Y

200

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

350

Owatonna

N

Y

Y

6

30-50 200

120

N

Y

N

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

365

Owatonna - Four Seasons Centre

N

Y

N

2

150

250 2,000

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

Plymouth Creek Center

Y

N

N

8

350

400

400

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

N

Y

140

Ramsey County - Keller Golf Course Clubhouse

Y

N

N

1

100

80

150

N

Y

N

Y

N

N

N

Y

80

Rosemount

Y

Y

7

300

350

300

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

200

Roseville - Frank Rog Amphitheatre

N

Y

Y

10,000

Y

Y

Y

Y

Roseville - Muriel Sahlin Arboretum

N

Y

N

1,000 1,000

Y

N

N

N

Y

N

N

Roseville Parks and Recreation - Nature Center

N

Y

Y

5

50

N

N

Y

N

N

Y

Y

N

Roseville Skating Center

N

Y

Y

3

280

350

280

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

St. Louis Park - The Rec Center

N

Y

N

2

200

200

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Saint Paul - Como Historic Streetcar Station

N

N

N

1

75

75

75

N

N

N

N

N

Y

N

N

Saint Paul - Newell Building

N

N

Y

1

100

100

100

N

N

N

N

N

Y

N

N

Thief River Falls Parks & Recreation

N

Y

Y

4

325

450 400+

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Three Rivers Park District

N

N

N

25

15

320

Y

Y

Y

N

Y

Y

N

Vadanis Heights

N

N

Y

3

350

650

Y

N

Y

N

Y

N

N

Waconia - Safari Island Community Center

N

Y

N

3

50

75

N

N

Y

Y

Y

250

Y

N

N

Waseca Water Park

N

N

N

N

N

N

Y

575

Y

N

N

Washington County Historic Courthouse

N

Y

Y

2

200

200

200

Y

Y

N

N

N

Y

N

N

Washington County Parks

N

Y

Y

2

25

25

25

N

Y

N

Y

N

Y

N

N

24 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks â&#x20AC;˘ www.mnrpa.org

155

300+

25

75

100

Y

25

75 40

38

300

260

500

250

368

1,200+

Indoor Theater Rental

On-Site Maintenance

300

Amphitheater Rental

On-Site AV Rental

25+

Y

Outdoor Space Rental

Alcohol Permitted

Pool/Waterpark Capacity

Meeting Capacity (classroom style)

N

Y

Booth Capacity

Meeting Rooms

Y

N

Convention Hall

Kitchen Rental

N

Anoka County - Riedel Farm Estate

Cocktail Reception Capacity

Open Catering

Anoka County Parks and Recreation

Meeting Capacity (theater style)

On-Site Catering

Minnesota Park and Recreation Space Rental Guide

75

594

300

350


Minnesota Park and Recreation Rental Directory Anoka County Parks and Recreation 550 Bunker Lake Road Andover, MN 55304 Phone: 763-767-2870 Fax: 763-755-0230 Web: www.anokacountyparks.com/ facilities Anoka County - Riedel Farm Estate 5100 East River Road Fridley, MN 55432 Phone: 763-767-2870 Fax: 763-755-0230 Web: www.anokacountyparks.com/ facilities/riedel_farm.htm Apple Valley 7100 W. 147th Street W. Apple Valley, MN 55124 Phone: 952-953-2300 Fax: 952-953-2306 Web: www.cityofapplevalley.org Apple Valley - Hayes Community and Senior Center 7100 147th Street W. Apple Valley, MN 55124 Phone: 952-953-2345 Fax: 952-953-2339 Web: www. ci.apple-valley.mn.us Bloomington - Creekside Community Center Phone: 952-563-4944 Fax: 952-563-4945 9801 Penn Ave. S. Bloomington, MN 55431 Web: www.ci.bloomington.mn.us Brooklyn Park Community Activity Center 5600 85th Ave N Brooklyn Park, MN 55443 Phone: 763-493-8333 Fax: 763-493-8253 Web: www.brooklynpark.org

Buffalo 212 Central Avenue Buffalo, MN 55313 Phone: 763-682-4132 Fax: 763-684-5471 Web: www.ci.buffalo.mn.us

Eden Prairie Community Center Phone: (952) 949 - 8333 Fax: (952) 949 - 8492 16700 Valley View Road Eden Prairie, MN 55344 Web: www.edenprairie.org

Chanhassen 2310 Coulter Boulevard Chanhassen, MN 55317 Phone: 952-227-1401 Fax: 952-227-1404 Web: www.ci.chanhassen.mn.us

Hutchinson Event Center 1005 Hwy 15 South Hutchinson, MN 55350 Phone: 320.234.5659 Fax: 320.234.5655 Web: www.hutchinsoneventcenter.com

Cloquet Community Education and Recreation 509 Carlton Avenue Cloquet, MN 55720 Phone: 218-879-1261 Fax: 218-878-3013 Web: www.cloquetcommunityed.com

Inver Grove Heights Parks and Recreation Department - Veterans Memorial Community Center 8055 Barbara Avenue Inver Grove Heights, MN 55077 Phone: 651-450-2580 Fax: 651-450-2490 Web: www.ci.inver-grove-heights.mn.us

Crystal Community Center 4800 Douglas Drive North Crystal, MN 55429 Phone: 763-531-1174 Fax: 763-531-0949 Web: www.ci.crystal.mn.us

Lakeville Area Arts Center 20195 Holyoke Avenue Lakevlle, MN 55044 Phone: 952.985.4640 Fax: 985.985.4649 Web: www.lakevillemn.gov

Eagan Civic Arena 3830 Pilot Knob Road Eagan, MN 55122 Phone: 651-675-5592 Fax: 651-675-5595 Web: www.eagancivicarena.com Eagan Community Center 1501 Central Parkway Eagan, MN 55123 Phone: 651-675-5558 Fax: 651-675-5565 Web: www.eagancommunitycenter.com

Maple Grove Community Center 12951 Weaver Lake Road Maple Grove, MN 55369 Phone: 763-494-6527 Fax: 763-494-6454 Web: www.maplegrovecommunitycenter.org New Brighton - Brightwood Hills Golf Course 1975 Silver Lake Road New Brighton, MN 55112 Phone: 651-638-2150 Fax: 651-638-2135 Web: www.newbrightonmn.gov

Photo: City of Owatonna

Photo: City of Waconia

Photo: City of Brooklyn Park

June-August 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 25


Minnesota Park and Recreation Rental Directory New Brighton Family Service Center 400 10th Street NW New Brighton, MN 55112 Phone: 651-638-2138 Fax: 651-638-2135 Web: www.newbrightonmn.gov

Roseville - Muriel Sahlin Arboretum 2660 Civic Center Drive Roseville, MN 55113 Phone: 651-792-7106 Fax: 651-792-7100 Web: www.cityofroseville.com/parks

Vadanis Heights 800 E County Road E Vadnais Heights, MN 55127 Phone: 651-204-6000 Fax: 651-204-6100 Web: www.cityvadnaisheights.com

New Ulm 122 S. Garden St. New Ulm, MN 56073 Phone: 507.359.8340 Fax: 507.359.8342 Web: www.ci.new-ulm.mn.us

Roseville Parks and Recreation Nature Center 2660 Civic Center Drive Roseville, MN 55113 Phone: 651-792-7104 Web: www.cityofroseville.com/parks

Owatonna 540 West Hills Circle Owatonna, MN 55060 Phone: 507-451-6156 Fax: 507-444-4299 Web: www.ci.owatonna.mn.us

Roseville Skating Center 2661 Civic Center Drive Roseville, MN 55113 Phone: 651-792-7122 Fax: 651-792-7120 Web: www.cityofroseville.com/index. aspx?NID=337

Waconia - Safari Island Community Center 1600 Community Drive Waconia, MN 55387 Phone: 952-442-0691 Fax: 952-442-0692 Web: www.waconia.org

Owatonna - Four Seasons Centre 1525 S. Elm Ave P.O. Box 57 Owatonna, MN 55060 Phone: 507-451-1093 Fax: 507-451-5078 Web: www.co.steele.mn.us Plymouth Creek Center 14800 34th Ave N Plymouth, MN 55447 Phone: 763-509-5285 Fax: 763-509-5290 Web: www.plymouthmn.gov Ramsey County - Keller Golf Course Clubhouse 2166 Maplewood Drive St. Paul, MN 55109 Phone: 763-744-8609 Web: www.ramseycountygolf.com Rosemount 13885 South Robert Trail Rosemount, MN 55068 Phone: 651-322-6002 Fax: 651-322-6080 Web: www.ci.rosemount.mn.us Roseville - Frank Rog Amphitheatre Roseville Parks and Recreation 2660 Civic Center Drive Roseville, MN 55113 Phone: 651-792-7163 Fax: 651-792-7100 Web: www.cityofroseville.com/parks

Waseca Water Park 508 S. State St. Waseca, MN 56093 Phone: 507-835-9700 Fax: 507-835-8871 Web: www.wasecawaterpark.com

St. Louis Park - The Rec Center 3700 Monterey Drive St. Louis Park, MN 55416 Phone: (952) 924-2546 Fax: (952) 925-5663 Web: www.stlouispark.org

Washington County Historic Courthouse 101 W. Pine Street Stillwater, MN 55082 Phone: 651-275-7077 Fax: 651-275-7076 Web: www.co.washington.mn.us/hc

Saint Paul - Como Historic Streetcar Station Park Permit Office Hamline Avenue North Saint Paul, MN 55108 Phone: 651-632-2445 Fax: 651-632-5115 Web: www.stpaul.gov

Washington County Parks 10191 St. Croix Trail Hastings, MN 55033 Phone: 651-430-8245 Fax: 651-430-8239 Web: www.co.washington.mn.us

Saint Paul - Newell Building Parks Permit Office 1100 Hamline Avenue North Saint Paul, MN 55108 Phone: 651-632-5111 Fax: 651-632-5115 Web: www.stpaul.gov Thief River Falls Parks & Recreation 525 Brooks Avenue South Thief River Falls, MN 56701 Phone: 218-681-2519 Fax: 218-683-7246 Web: www.citytrf.net Three Rivers Park District 3000 Xenium Lane Plymouth, MN 55441 Phone: 763-559-6700 Web: www.ThreeRiversParks.org

26 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks â&#x20AC;˘ www.mnrpa.org

Woodbury - Central Park 8595 Central Park Place, Suite 102 Woodbury, MN 55125 Phone: 651-714-3586 Fax: 651-702-1346 Web: www.woodburycentralpark.com

This directory is just a small sampling of some of the park facilities available throughout the state of Minnesota. For more information on facilities in other communities, contact your local park and recreation department.


MOST DEPENDABLE Meet ADA with both the High & low

Outdoor Fountains 3800 SM

2008 SM

PF PF

440 SM

840 SMSS-02 475 WMSS

Contact St. Croix Recreation

651-430-1247 • 800-525-5914 jj@stcroixrec.com • www.stcroixrec.com Or Call Most Dependable Fountains, Inc.™ 800-552-6331 • www.mostdependable.com March-May 2010 • MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 27


MINNESOTA RECREATION AND PARKS

CORPORATECONNECTIONS Energy Efficiency Rebates for Aquatic Facilities

Horizon Commercial Pool Supply is working with local utility providers and equipment manufacturers to help aquatic facilities improve efficiency and cut costs. In many regions there are rebates available for a wide range of improvements in energy efficiency. Some of the qualifying improvements include efficient motors, boilers, solar heat and Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs). There are also custom rebates available for increases in efficiency that do not have existing prescriptive rebates. The most effective and easy to retrofit solution is the installation of a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) on an aquatic facility’s pumps and motors. The VFD controls the speed of the motor to use only the energy needed for optimal flow and extend its life by eliminating large surges in energy and force when starting.

Earl F. Andersen offers revolutionary BCI Burke Nucleus For the first time, you can combine elements of the BCI Burke’s Intensity fitness play complex with scores of activities available for the traditional post-and-platform component system. The result? Nucleus™ - a versatile playground that offers a powerful mix of events combining fun, fitness, creativity, and excitement. All this means kids will be moving and challenging their young bodies and getting healthy in the process. And of course, like all Burke

products, Nucleus & Intensity fusion designs are backed by the unrivaled Generations Warranty™ and Total Cost of Ownership Package™. Earl F. Andersen and Burke—the premium choice for all playground, park, and recreation in Minnesota.

Escape with Matrix. No atlas required. What if you could offer your members the chance to escape to the lush forests of Hawaii; to hike the majestic Grand Canyon; or to run Sin City’s infamous Strip, all within your facility’s walls? Virtual Active™ by Matrix allows you to deliver just this – a revolutionary workout experience. Not only will your members see their destination in the dynamic video content displayed on the console, but they will feel gradual terrain changes under their feet and hear the ambient sounds through their headphones, for a near total immersion. The workout will take them miles away from your club. Virtual Active™ by Matrix will keep them coming back for more. For more information please contact Scott Sigety with One Source Fitness at 763-516-5730 or scott.sigety@onesourcefitness.net.

Corporate MRPA members are invited to submit CORPORATE CONNECTION briefs, up to 125 words or less, along with a photo (optional) of new products or services, company news, special events or anything related to the profession of parks and recreation. Consideration will be given for future issues of MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks magazine. We reserve the right to edit content. Submissions placed based on when submitted and space availability. Send your article and photos to info@pernsteiner.com two months prior to publication date.

28 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks • www.mnrpa.org


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You wear a lot of hats in your job, graphic designer shouldn’t have to be one of them. Quality, effective graphic design isn’t a luxury only large organizations can afford. Give us a call to discuss options for your community, facility, association or company’s marketing needs. • Advertising Sales & Design • Exhibits • Printing & Planning

• Magazines & Directories

• Event Marketing

• Direct Mail

• Branding & Implementation • Calendars

Proud member of MSAE, MAGC and MRPA.

952.841.1111

www.pernsteiner.com

It takes change to make a change. Post your pocket change for parks! The Minnesota Recreation and Park Foundation is “giving away the bank”. Actually, they’re giving away Playground Post banks (and labels to previous recipients), sponsored by Landscape Structures and Flagship Recreation, to MRPA/MRPF members who register and save their pocket change. The Foundation will use the money to assist in financing the New Initiative Grant program. Visit us at the 2010 Annual State Conference for details.

Questions? Contact Michelle Margo at 763-585-7287.

MINNESOTA RECREATION & PARK

Foundation

June-August 2010 • MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks 29


WHAT’S GOING ON By Chad Ubl, Community Services Director, City of Winona

I’m sure the majority of us… I’m sure the majority, if not all of us in the profession are on board with the get outside, eat right, see your doctor, and do campaigns. It is encouraging to see all the creative ways we collectively say the same thing; eat healthy and exercise. I’m on board for anything, no matter what we call it that promotes a healthy lifestyle. However, once in awhile I like my thirty minutes of sedentary lifestyle. I do my best to catch NBC’s Parks and Recreation but typically the last thing I want to do when I get home is watch the rebroadcast of what I just experienced the previous eight hours. It is entertaining though; if you take a step back and have a sense of humor about local government. According to Entertainment Weekly, which I consider as certain as death and taxes, Parks will take a break until midseason, but the comedy will insert a new character played by Rob Lowe. This could mean big things for Parks or the insurgence of a new high profile character could signal a life ring being thrown to the comedy. This is where I would like to interject my thoughts. In my second life I would like to come back as a TV producer. My pitch to NBC would not be a sitcom about Parks and Recreation but it would be a reality show centered on Parks and Recreation. Here is how I’ve arrived at my ultimate pitch to NBC. I first thought about a show called Aquatic Center: MOA (Mall of America). It would have the same flavor as Ocean Force: San Diego. The show would focus on the training of lifeguards, daily activities, rescues and of course teenage drama. However there is a flaw with this type of

show, I’m pretty sure David Hasselhoff owns the rights to any lifeguarding show. My next thought was The Real Directors of Anoka County, a spin-off on The Real Housewives series. The problem here is that John VonDeLinde could never play the mean guy and too many nice people work in Anoka County.

“My pitch to NBC would not be a sitcom about Parks and Recreation but it would be a reality show centered on Parks and Recreation.” Then I was thinking maybe a cross between Project Runway and Celebrity Apprentice. I would challenge a group of interns to create the latest and greatest youth program. I would start by having them develop plans for swim lessons and then script a child throwing up in the pool. They would be judged by three panelists, on their ability to handle the situation. Since I can’t afford Heidi Klum or Donald Trump the judges would be the annual winners of the Jack Niles, Clifton E. French, and Dorothea Nelson awards. The winner of the show would receive an entry level job with the Three Rivers Park District. Of course, I haven’t asked Three Rivers Park District, but it sounds good in concept. However it is my next appeal to NBC that I think has merit and potentially could get them out of the doldrums of the Jay Leno,

Conan O’Brien spat. I would call the show Base Knock. Base Knock will follow an adult softball team around with cameras for a season, similar to HBO’s Hard Knocks, which follows a NFL team during training camp. Of course I would choose a team that has a lot of controversy; it should not be difficult finding one! Maybe a team that went from C to D based on a roster move or two. I could follow a player going to the DMV to get their license changed in order to be on multiple rosters. I would conduct interviews with the players about why they wear eye black, two batting gloves and break-in their bats by banging them against trees. I could film a player going in front of the MRPA Recreational Sports Commission pleading for a lighter sentence for punching a fellow teammate. I would highlight the college kid that gets $10 per bat rolling and $5 per dozen balls placed in the microwave. And of course, it wouldn’t be exciting if I didn’t highlight the player confessing they used PED’s (performance enhancing drugs) to hit the ball 50 feet farther. I would begin filming the team during spring practice sessions, follow them to Corky’s Early Bird Tournament and then on to the State tournament. We would have hundreds of hours of film to choose from, detailing just how serious adult softball players take their leisure time. And that would only be Season One! Why do I think this would be a successful show? I wouldn’t have to hire script writers. They couldn’t begin to script more creative stories than the actual day to day doings of ‘adult player softball player.’ You simply can’t make this stuff up.

Be seen by thousands of potential customers. Reach over 5,000 park and recreation delegates at the 2010 NRPA Congress & Exposition in Minneapolis this October. MINNESOTA magazine will be given to delegates through multiple delivery methods. For advertising details, call Todd at 952-841-1111 or email info@pernsteiner.com

30 MINNESOTA Recreation and Parks • www.mnrpa.org


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MINNESOTA RECREATION AND PARK ASSOCIATION 200 CHARLES STREET NE FRIDLEY, MN 55432


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