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/ WWW.DESIGNANDARCHITECTURE. COM /

RUMAH TEBING QORAVANT IDEAS & DESIGN HAPPY VALLEY RESIDENCE LIM+LU OASIA DOWNTOWN HOTEL WOHA + STUDIO PATRICIA URQUIOLA WEWORK WEIHAI LU LINEHOUSE HOPPERS KL POW IDEAS INTERCONTINENTAL BEIJING SANLITUN CHENG CHUNG DESIGN

A SPANISH ICON

JAIME HAYÓN HOTEL BARCELÓ TORRE DE MADRID


/ FAIR REPORT: ISH 2017 /

BATHROOM AFFAIR REPORTED BY MARTIN TEO

ISH, the world’s leading trade fair for the combination of water and energy, has once again demonstrated its significance for visitors and exhibitors. Over 200,000 visitors made their way to Frankfurt Fair and Exhibition Centre to discover the numerous innovations and the latest trends. The innovations in bathroom products, solutions and sanitary ware have evolved tremendously within the past decade. International brands are competitive in promoting their products and collaborating with big design figures in the industry. Here are some trend-spotting exclusively from ISH 2017.

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STEEL ENAMEL IS THE WAY TO GO With the new Miena washbasin bowls made of superior steel enamel Kaldewei presents yet another highlight of modern bathroom design. The washbasins made with a single layer of steel enamel combine the highest standards of minimalist design with a unique fine-edged quality. The Miena washbasin bowls designed by Anke Salomon are available in round and rectangular versions, both in two different sizes. What is completely new is the diversity of colour: apart from the classic bathroom colours, customers can choose from the exclusive shades of the Coordinated Colours Collection. It is lightweight, extremely durable, scratch proof and offers a unique aesthetics altogether. www.kaldewei.com

FORMAL CODE OF AESTHETICS AXOR Uno pursues the uncompromising design principles of the original Purist movement with consistent construction: two precisely shaped cylinders joined together at a right angle. The spouts and handles are available in radical or gently rounded versions. The precise contours and the raised proportions in the golden ratio of the taps are their defining stylistic features, lending them a special aura and giving them a sleek and elegant look in any setting. Special surface finishes impart added radiance to the collection, which comprises over 70 products for washbasins, showers and bathtubs. It is clean, minimalistic and subtle; embodying the most fascinating shape to form and function. www.axor-design.com

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ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN FESTIVAL IN MANILA 1. Invited speakers and guests etching their signature on the colourful backdrop

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he future looks bright for Philippine architecture as professionals and students gather together in one of the biggest and most optimistic celebrations of architecture and design in the country. Over 4,000 architecture and design professionals, students, and enthusiasts brave the summer heat to join the three-day festivities at Anthology Architecture and Design Festival Manila 2017 with the theme Context and Intent at the Puerta del Parian, Intramuros, Manila. The festival is organized by WTA Architecture + Design Studio headed by its Principal Architect and Festival Director, William Ti Jr. alongside Festival Manager Dianne Naval. Covering the one-hectare Puerta del Parian and ASEAN Gardens grounds, the festivities include lectures, dialogues, exhibitions, competitions, workshops, and activity booths.

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The festival’s highlight is the Anthology Talks. These exciting sessions featured H. Koon Wee and Eunice Seng of Hong Kong University and SKEW Collaborative; Masaki Morinobu of Nonscale; Budji Layug and Royal Pineda of Budji+Royal Architecture+Design; Alexander Furunes of ErikssonFurunes; Sudarshan Khadka of Leandro V. Locsin Partners; Felino Palafox Jr. of Palafox Architecture; Luke Yeung of ArchitectKidd; Stephen Pimbley of SPARK Architects; Michael Cu Fua of Ong & Ong; Patrick Bruce of OVAL Partnership; Isabella Leone of Portland Design; and Julien de Smedt of JDS Architects. Interior Design is also highlighted with a dedicated pavilion headlined by Frenjick Quesada of Design H+Q; Jigs Adefuin of Adefuin Design Studio; Shanwei Weng of AN Design Studio; Norman Agleron of HBA Manila.

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Shelter Dialogues, another highlight, is a roundtable discussion on the pressing topics in today’s industry. Topics include A Global Architecture; Architecture, Culture, and Society; The Practice of Architecture; Designing Architects: Evaluating Architecture Education; Architecture as a Multi-disciplinary Practice; Building the Nation: Architecture in the Philippines. Anthology aims to be the center for architecture and design in the region as it moves forward. Next year, the festival will be in January and will feature more speakers and a much bigger platform for architecture. The celebrations will highlight the launch of a new temporary annual Shelter Pavilion as Anthology continuous to be the biggest architecture and design event in the Philippines. (www.anthologyfest.org)

IMAGES ANTHOLOGY ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN FESTIVAL MANILA 2017

2. From left to right: Ar. William Ti Jr., Budji Layug, Royal Pineda & Tobias Guggenheimer


IMAGES COMMUNE

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MADE OF WOOD

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he Bruno furniture collection by Commune features rustic finished acacia wood laid in a classic herringbone pattern, paired fashionably with age-worn brass. With its modern vintage elements, the collection is designed for individuals who appreciate sophistication and elegance. Commune’s design director Julian Koh shares that the Bruno collection merges the trendy rustic chic and tropical urban tribe styles. “I was inspired to create a collection that would add sophistication to a home, while providing a feel of tropical nature within the urban living space. I took inspiration from British colonial

heritage, particularly from the rich material generated by frequent voyages, explorations, expeditions and travels made during the colonial period.” This resulted in a collection that celebrates Art Deco elements in a modern way, through its distinctive herringbone pattern. This detailed visual pattern adds sophistication and nostalgic elements to the collection. The brass detailing has a worn-out antique brass finish that blends with the dark acacia wood, giving it a mild contrast that is aesthetically pleasing to the human eye. The complementary finishings portray a modern rustic feel that could complement a variety of different

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styles for the modern home – namely, urban tribe, rustic Art Deco, rustic chic, modern tropical, travellers’ pad and more. On the core material used, Julian confides: “Acacia wood was picked specifically to provide the collection with the desired look. Its wild grains and knots add character to each individual piece, to make each piece uniquely different.” The Bruno collection took a total of three months to develop from research, style guides, design to prototyping and is being rolled out in all Commune stores worldwide. (www.thecommunelife.com)


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1. The interior space is a representation of Kit Kemp’s design aesthetics

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THE WHITBY OPENS IN NYC

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aking center stage on Manhattan’s pulsing Upper Midtown scene, The  Whitby  is Firmdale Hotels’ second outing in New York, and a fitting creative bookend to its ever-popular Crosby Street Hotel in the heart of SoHo. Situated on West 56th Street at 5th Avenue, The Whitby is surrounded by world-class restaurants, boutiques, and museums, and is set to become a destination to rival any of it illustrious neighbors thanks to the Firmdale Hotels Co-owner and Design Director Kit Kemp’s award-winning design. Each of The Whitby’s 86 rooms and suites has been individually designed in Kit Kemp’s colorful and carefree style, crafted through her innovative use of pattern, texture, color, and original artworks. Set over the hotel’s sixteen stories, each guestroom boasts floor-to-ceiling windows, and some have private terraces with views over the city skyline. The show-stopping  Whitby  Suite is a spectacular twobedroom headline suite spread over the entire top floor with spacious furnished terraces facing uptown and downtown. Bathrooms are elegantly finished in marble or granite and feature Firmdale’s exclusive bath and body collection Rik Rak by Kit Kemp. 

Located on the ground floor and open all day, The Whitby  Bar is a richly colorful and airy room with high ceilings, a 30-foot pewter bar, beautifully upholstered banquettes, and gray oak floors. Warehouse-style windows and doors lead through to an  orangery with vaulted ceilings and a skylight, bathing the space in natural light. The drawing room, nestled between the orangery and reception area, is a warm, informal spot defined by a feature fireplace and cozy, overstuffed furnishings. Throw in several stylish private-event rooms and a 130seat state-of-the-art cinema, and the City That Never Sleeps has another good reason to never go to bed.  “Hotels should be living things not stuffy institutions” maintain Tim and Kit Kemp, owners of Firmdale Hotels. Comprising ten  hotels and nine  bars and  restaurants in London and New York, each of the Firmdale properties’ standard of excellence and unique style of decoration have added up to a winning combination. Kit Kemp also designs the interiors of each property in her fresh and contemporary English style. (www.designhotels.com)

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IMAGES DESIGN HOTELS

2. Colours and eccentricity are never understated in The Whitby


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THE NEW SERPENTI

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original and more exclusive, it calls for a meticulous tanning process, after which the leather is extremely pleasant to wear, soft and smooth. On the surface, the colouring with natural pigments, in vivid, luminous shades and beautifully matching the dial colours, is further enhanced by a varnish lending a subtle gloss. INSTANT METAMORPHOSIS This new contemporary version boldly flaunts its polyvalent nature. Ours is an age of speed and change. Serpenti can be transformed in a heartbeat thanks to an extremely practical fastening system making the straps easily interchangeable by the wearer on all models, those with a steel or pink gold case, with or without diamonds. While each watch comes with two straps – in Karung or calfskin – in the client’s choice of colours, a wide range of additional shades is available on Bulgari boutiques, where the new Serpenti will be available as of May. The nuances will be perfectly coordinated with the colours – black, red, green or white – of the motherof-pearl, finely lacquered and sunburst guilloché 27mm dials. In a subtle jewellery detail setting a Bulgari signature, a cabochon-cut rubellite adorns the winding crown of these watches driven by quartz Calibre B033. (www.bvlgari.com)

IMAGES BVLGARI

rom the recent Baselworld 2017, it is clear that Bulgari is redesigning and redefining the aesthetic codes when it comes to injecting a waft of fresh air into the blueprint of the Serpenti collection. The finest love stories are those that endure and are constantly reinvented. This is an art, a rare ability that is admirably mastered by la Femme who is brilliantly capable of handling such transformations. A hairstyle, a new garment, an accessory – and suddenly a woman becomes another while losing nothing of herself. In the animal kingdom, the serpent does likewise. A symbol of eternal regeneration, it constantly sheds its skin and takes on another, like the Serpenti. After interpreting the figure of the reptile in countless different ways, consistently at the crossroads between goldsmithing and High Jewellery, Bulgari now reaches beyond its customary universe to propel the eternally youthful Serpenti towards a new field of expression, as the icon adopts double wrap-around straps made from multicolour exotic leathers. A natural and legitimate continuation of the Serpenti saga, these new straps are made from Karung, a nonvenomous water snake whose particularly thin and supple skin features scales mid-way between those of a lizard or the more customary snake variation. Precious, more

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A HAPPY REVAMP An aged apartment in Hong Kong is now a place flood lit with natural light and joy to live in. WORDS ANEETA SUNDARARAJ / PHOTOGRAPHY NIRUT BENJABANPOT

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1. The centre living room oversees the entire space 2. Vibrant colourful tiles demarcate the more private internal space

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icture in your head a marshy environment amidst burial grounds and paddy fields. Perhaps a racecourse or a scene of a bloody massacre plagued with fatal diseases. These are some of the former incarnations for the area that is now known as Happy Valley in Hong Kong. It is also located within one of the busiest and vibrant commercial areas in Wan Chai, peppered with office blocks, parks, hotels as well as an international conference and exhibition centre. Densely populated, Wan Chai is one of the first areas developed in Hong Kong. With time, it is inevitable that many of the buildings would face a natural decay. Major gentrification efforts have been taking place in recent years and today, this area has seen a new light with an upper income residential profile that includes a mix of locals and expatriates.

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Set against this background is the story of a newly revamped apartment by Architects, Lim + Lu. This apartment in Wan Chai doubles as their showroom. The young New York-born multidisciplinary design practice is keen to showcase the 1,200 square feet space that neighbours Happy Valley Racecourse as a reflection of their versatile and colourful design aesthetic. Â Born and raised in Hong Kong, Vincent Lim, cofounder and Creative Director of Lim + Lu studied and worked in New York. His co-founder and the Managing Director of the practice, Elaine Lu was born in China but raised in Atlanta. She studied and worked in New York. And having spent years abroad, both now find refuge in their new home in Hong Kong. Originally, the interior of the apartment has all the characteristics of a typical Hong Kong dwelling


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3. Sublime corner with lush white textures and brass pieces 4. Metallic surfaces contribute to the elegance of the interiors of Happy Valley Residence

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place – a long and narrow corridor that is void of light. This corridor services three bedrooms and distinctly demarcates spaces for the kitchen and living room. Almost everything has a tired and muted colour tone. In efforts to revamp this traditional apartment, Lim + Lu decides to challenge the typology of the conventional apartment and the norm of labelling rooms. They are determined to keep the aesthetics of the place clean, fresh and sophisticated. Their first step is to consider how the modern-day individual uses the home. They understand that modern homeowners now have a need to be adaptable in multiple situations. Translating this concept into what they want to create with the apartment, the designers come up with the idea to free up the space in the apartment and still maintain the option for privacy. The walls of the corridor now give way to a set of suspended glass, black powder coated stainless steel sliding doors. This immediately creates a flexible and adaptive living environment that better reflects the transient lifestyle of today’s city dwellers.

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What was once the living room and bedroom now gives way to a unified, core living space that has a continuous warm oak flooring. This helps to blur the boundary between the public and private spaces in this home. The walls of these spaces are painted white with black accents, signalling spaces of rest and relaxation. An easy way out to maintain this apartment’s spatial continuity may have been to fall back on what is now the ubiquitous New York industrial style. Lim + Lu, however, choose to avoid this and deliberately pick hues that will inject fresh life into the space. The shape-shifting bedroom adjacent to the main living area now is adorned with a striking jade green drapery that allows it to be an extension to the living room space or enclosed as a guest bedroom. Colourful geometrical patterned tiles spruce up the space into a corner of happiness. Pops of green, pink and turquoise appear vital in bringing out the cheerful essence of this space. Bauble lighting from the ceiling sparkles in crystal clear illumination.


Elaine Lu & Vincent Lim, Lim+Lu

“Moving away from the ubiquity of industrial-”chic”, we deliberately chose hues that would inject fresh life into the space”

HAPPY VALLEY RESIDENCE LOCATION SITE AREA COMPLETION ARCHITECT DESIGN TEAM

WANCHAI, HONG KONG 111 M2 2016 LIM + LU (WWW.LIMANDLU.COM) ELAINE LU, VINCENT LIM

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TWIN EFFECT A twin-house in Singapore with two dualities works together to create a wholistic living experience for two families. WORDS MARTIN TEO / PHOTOGRAPHY RAYDEN OJ PICTURES

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1. Looking into the house through the communal courtyard 2. At the facade where the twin-house looks absolutely symmetrical

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tanding where I am at now, approximately 25 metres from the twin-homes, the structure is pretty much the mirror image of each other. The symmetry is evident. Both houses feel and look similar, but upon experiencing the spaces, you’ll begin to see and experience the distinct character of each house. Dark or light, his or hers. These are dualities that have shaped the initial concept for the twin houses on the outskirts of Katong, Singapore. Khai Saharom, Principal Architect of Kite Studio Architecture imagines the place as two long, narrow, low volumes with two or more bedroom suites and at least two home offices-a set up tailor made for not just one young couple, but two; the Lim brothers who have been recently married and have decided to build their first homes mirroring each other on a single, expansive piece of land. “The houses are designed for two close brothers and their young families. The brothers look very similar physically. However they have rather different personalities. This shows even in their choice of colours,

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materials and finishes. The design concept was derived from this duality and underlying contrast,” shares Khai. The project demonstrates the ‘jig-saw’ concept – from form and material to spatial configuration and response to context and brief. One house fits or compliments the other in terms of function, massing and spatial layering. Openings are strategised to frame each other, reflecting spatial configuration and needs for privacy. Both houses are conceived from the interplay of various elements driven by response to site and brief – mass versus voids, opaque versus transparent, private versus public. Even its landscaping strategy is derived from this idea. The architect continues: “Where one side is a water feature or pool, the other is land. Here’s where the idea of soft-scapes versus hardscapes can be witnessed.” Material palette is kept unique but consistent for both houses. Reflecting on the owner’s likings, one features stone-clad exterior and cool tones in the interior spaces while the other celebrates warmer tones with timberclad exterior and an interior of veneer panels.


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3. When light shines through, a display of shadow and light accentuates the architectural elements of the house 4. The dining is kept simple with elegant touches of artistic pendant lights 5. An unexpected, but outstanding pair of hippos embellishes the central area

CLEVER CONSTRUCTION Proportion and massing make both houses seemingly alike. As the ground level needed to be propped up by about three metres in compliance to required platform levels, massing is kept to two storeys facing the road. In doing so, the byproduct respects the present streetscape and avoids looking too imposing. The elevated ground level allows the creation of a natural basement, with entry at road level. This basement serves as a private garage, which, may fit up to 12 vehicles and provided private-access only entrances for the owners. The attic level is tucked away toward the rear to minimise the houses’ height impact at the front. Khai has also provided a more generous rear setback of four meters for landscaping. On a macro level, the houses may look symmetrical, but in actual fact, they are not. Besides the difference in facade

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articulation, the space orientation and organisation for each house is different. This is a response to clients’ needs as well as, more importantly, climate. Because of west-facing facade, one house has deeper rooms to reduce heat gain. The attic floor and roof for each house are also oriented and articulated differently. Location of verandahs and openings for both houses are strategised in tandem to factor in need for privacy as well as climate consideration. “The clients were very clear of what they want from the start. They set certain boundaries and left the rest to me. I have to say the design process was a rather smooth one,” laments Khai. Clarity proves to be the antidote to the well-put together home. Also with a healthy level of trust, the architect presents a blueprint that strikes a balance between the two brothers in the most fluid and effortless way.


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WILKINSONS LOCATION SITE AREA GROSS FLOOR AREA (GFA) COMPLETION ARCHITECT LEAD ARCHITECT DESIGN TEAM INTERIOR DESIGN LANDSCAPE DESIGN CONTRACTOR C&S CONSULTANT M&E ENGINEER QUANTITY SURVEYOR

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26 WILKINSON ROAD, SINGAPORE 1747.70 M2 1454.71 M2 2016 KITE STUDIO ARCHITECTURE KHAI SAHAROM BRENDA YEK, CHUNG CHIALING, FLOR ARROYO KITE STUDIO ARCHITECTURE & CHRYSANTHEMUM COLLECTION PTE LTD KITE STUDIO ARCHITECTURE / CHEN WA LANDSCAPE PTE LTD C+S BUILDERS PTE LTD / SOILBUILD E & C PTE LTD T C SIN & ASSOCIATES AE&T CONSULTANTS PTE LTD PEB CONSULTANTS


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REINVENTING FARM LIVING Striking a balance between nature and modern interventions, Rumah Tebing harvests the best of its surroundings in response to the tropical climate, geographical context and the natural code of aesthetics. WORDS MARTIN TEO / PHOTOGRAPHY HEARTPATRICK

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ilenced from any nuances from the concrete jungle, the drive here – about an hour’s away from Kuala Lumpur city centre – is an absolute change of scenery. Within 800m away from the destination, the vibe changes - only stillness broken by the sounds of birds chirping and leaves rustling. And almost towards the end of the road, the unmistakable sight of the villa within the premise of Tanah Larwina becomes evident. Perched in a 3-acre agricultural land in Hulu Langat countryside, Tanah Larwina boasts an expanse of naturally manicured land for farm animals and fruiting trees such as mangosteen and kedondong. Goats, geese, chickens and horses roam freely. Large boulders pepper the undulating green landscape, a geological feature harking back to a time when a larger river system may have flowed through the site. Today, the tributary remnants that are the Sungai Lui and Sungai Larwin streams bifurcate the grounds from the forested foothills a stone’s throw away. The smaller Larwina, from which the retreat takes its moniker, isn’t only the main attraction, but also hosts the unique on-site accommodate that is known as Rumah Tebing or the Riverbank House.

CHARMED BY NATURE As I sit by the lanai of Rumah Tebing, overlooking the perpetual stream of gushing water – as clear as crystal – it strikes me in an instance; this is not an eco-retreat as how many would perceived it to be. Tanah Larwina is a place where the elements of nature are at their best. It is a place where people create that special connection with the surroundings, whether it is the animals, water, trees, mossy rocks or the fresh cool air. It is an outstanding funky-looking house, in absolutely contrasting fashion that coexist harmoniously in its own context. “The brief for the ‘villa’, as Rumah Tebing was referred to back in 2012, called for a contemporary design that had equal parts charm and character. It had to be well-lit and could handle the unpredictable and oft-times harsh tropical weather. There had to be an economy to the design, and above all, it has to be low maintenance,” reveals Nizar Musa, the lead architect of this project. It is clear that the villa is designed with the river in mind. Where the stream would be a naturally organic entity, the design would, by contrast, be a machined construct. Three interconnected modules made of glass and metal, unified under a soaring roof, would be

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1. Walking into Rumah Tebing at Tanah Larwina 2. Geese and chickens roam freely around the 3-acre farmland


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3. Alternating modules create a dynamic spatial quality that translates comfort and airiness 4. The metal and glass structure is surrounded by greenery 5. Enjoy fresh air in a well-lit interior space by the river

perched on the riverbank, their balconies cantilevering towards the water edge. To achieve such a vision, the use of long-span steel structures was a foregone conclusion. And where a semiindustrial I-beam aesthetic may have put-off conservative owners, it was not an unfamiliar look for the client-architect team, who had seen and built such work during their respective years in New Zealand. Of steel, concrete floor, glass on all the facades and a corrugated metal deck roof, these became the key ingredients in a work that took almost four years to complete. COOL CONSTRUCTION The project brief sounds like a blueprint of a futuristic house that leaps beyond the stereotype of conventional ‘kampung’ houses. Rumah Tebing portrays more than just a house. It is a functional space that communicates directly with the elements of nature, blending well with its surrounding, climate and site context. In December 2016, the envisioned ‘villa’ became Rumah Tebing. Nizar reassures: “Where there had been three modules, now there are two. The glass enclosures, the flying

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roof and cantilevered balconies, did however survive the cut. The sacrificed module has been transformed into a lanai, or covered porch, that greets guests with a majestic vista of the stream and forest.” The accommodation value-engineered into a 1,383 ft2 footprint. From afar, the structure stands out; as if calling you home each time when you’re possibly 20 feet away. The panorama of the great outdoors extends through the interiors thanks to the clear full-height glass. Once inside, you will find a spacious and minimal interior with the grey polish of concrete offset by the dark timber tones of the balconies and the striking red brickwork that cleverly conceals a queen-sized foldaway bed. Ever corner seems to be fighting for my attention. Finding it hard to resist, I climb up the central ladder, leading me to an airy and ethereal loft. The views out to the farm and surrounding hills are unrestricted through adjustable glass louvre windows that also contributed to the airiness and brightness of the interior space. Outside, a bold play of angled surfaces and materiality ensues. Slanting sheets of unrelenting Zincalume dynamically


Nizar Musa, Architect of QID

“The farm isn’t an eco-retreat, nor does it market itself as one. It relies on simple practices to harmoniously co- exist with its surroundings”

RUMAH TEBING

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rise as if attempting to touch the flying roof overhead, their sheer expanse broken only by shadow breaks and black steel fins. Underlying these planes of muted silver are the dark greys of universal steel framing, slender in appearance yet structurally robust. It is further enhanced by the uniquitous black of window frames and their transparent crystalline panes. At ground level, the larger module holds a dry kitchen and storage facilities, and the smaller, separate shower and washroom cubicles. And where the building touches the ground, it does so with respect, where in lieu of steel framed stairs, flat-faced boulders form steps to the gravel beneath. By extension, stones quarried from the grounds form the concrete-paved entrance ramp and concrete-topped rubble walls, picnic tables and benches. Here, a BBQ area and campfire captures my attention. The way the entire floor plan works is simple but encapsulates the essence of its natural way of life. The perpetual gushing of water and the infinite vista of green expanse have certainly a rustic appeal that moulds the character of this place. In the context of jungle trees that line the stream and a series of strategic planning that bring Rumah Tebing ever closer to nature.

LOCATION SITE AREA BUILT AREA COMPLETION ARCHITECT LEAD ARCHITECT STRUCTURAL ENGINEER C&S CONSULTANT FINISHING CONTRACTOR LANDSCAPE

HULU LANGAT, SELANGOR, MALAYSIA 3 ACRES 1,383 FT2 2016 QORAVANT IDEAS & DESIGN NIZAR MUSA T&T KONSULT SDN. BHD. FAISOL HUSSAIN (OWNER) FUWIL HOLDINGS SDN. BHD. FAISOL HUSSAIN (OWNER)

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6. The architect adds a utilitarian ladder that brings you upstairs to the bed loft 7. It’s back to basics in Rumah Tebing, with simple furniture configuration and practicality 8. The bed loft upstairs opens to an elevated view of the surrounding expanse

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ECCENTRIC ECOLOGY “The farm isn’t an eco-retreat, nor does it market itself as one. Far from being a Green Building Index point-scoring paragon of sustainability, it relies on simple practices to harmoniously co-exist with its surroundings,” explains Nizar. The building orientation aligns Rumah Tebing’s solid insulated face against the hot afternoon sun, cutting off direct heat transmission into the building. Yet west-facing clerestory windows under the roof apex harvest that same sunlight, as do narrow window slots that together with other apertures also promote cross ventilation. The architect adds some more: “As a testament to good passive design, there isn’t a single air-conditioner in sight. And with low-wattage LED fixtures proliferating the site, energy consumption on this three-acre plot is at a respectable minimum.” Solid waste in most forms is either recycled, or composted or buried. Animal droppings and manure make for natural plant fertiliser. And while grey water discharges to a soak pit, separated washroom waste water is soil-piped into an aerobic treatment system, with both facilities kept well clear of the stream to avoid any pollution.

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And we know that maintaining a place like Tanah Larwina demands more than just ecological solutions. Rumah Tebing has recently opened its doors to visitors through Airbnb, welcoming guests and travellers who would like to experience the organic ‘kampung’ lifestyle or simply trying to get away from the bustle of the city. “What most people expect out of this retreat, as they pour over its website photos and Instagram pics, is a casual day out by the stream and seeing farm animals. The reality is so much more. For urbanites, and especially city children who have yet to experience the real Malaysian outdoors, Tanah Larwina is a great first step, where the sights and sounds of the jungle, cascading water, butterflies, dragonflies and other exotic wildlife are there in all their splendour,” shares Nizar, echoing the same sentiments of the owner, Faisol Hussain. From outside to inside to outside, this is a place where the education in the appreciation of nature is at its heart, a place that wants to start a conversation about the environment in a time when that matters the most.


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RED LIVING HOOD Celebrating the colours of life with a bright red skyscraper, WOHA and Patricia Urquiola team up to conceive the effervescent Oasia Hotel Downtown. WORDS MARTIN TEO / PHOTOGRAPHY OASIA HOTEL DOWNTOWN SINGAPORE

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copperish glow – almost rose gold – illuminates the front entrance of the building. Despite the unpredicted celebratory crimson shades that shell the 190.15m tall building, the main entrance welcomes with an inviting vibe in layers of warm yet sweet tones. On the ground floor, a selection of wooden and steel tables is peppered with colourful padded stools and chairs. It reminds of a marriage between Scandinavian’s simplicity and the edginess of steam-punk. Very quickly, a ground staff guides me over to the lift lobby as he indicates that the check-in counter is located on the 12th floor. The lift doors open up to another unexpected space. It does feel like walking into a sanctuary inside a concretedominated city. The open grass patch makes up the

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communal space facing the main concierge. Here, furniture pieces designed by Patricia Urquiola stand out. And speaking of first impressions, the hotel represents great hospitality and warmth. It doesn’t take long for me to get used to the space. The signature woven pieces by the celebrated Spanish designer become evident on almost every communal floors; by the poolside or even the executive lounge area. Urquiola’s signature flair includes a great sense of colours and arts with a touch of funkiness. The energy is real. I can’t help but to make an instant visit to the two rooftop-pools at Level 27. As I submerge myself into the undisturbed quietness ‘on top of the world’, a few design elements appear evidently interesting. It is how the peak connects from one side to another and how the creepers create a

1. Signature pieces from Patricia Urquiola pepper the club lounge area 2. Oasia Hotel Downtown is the only red skyscraper in Singapore


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sky to allow the building to stand out amongst the dull-coloured downtown skyscrapers. The building is conceptualised and designed by homegrown award-winning architecture firm, WOHA. The iconic red façade and lush vertical garden remain as the building’s signature, in response to the site context. Welcoming guests since April 2016, the 314room hotel is truly designed by a star-studded ‘dream team’ with an organic-themed interior by Studio Patricia Urquiola. Akin to being cocooned within nature, the 21 different species of creepers growing around the building’s five shades of red aluminium mesh create a vibrant mosaic of colour and life, providing the muchneeded ‘fresh air’ in the city. Common types such as the Passiflora Coccinea and Ficus Pumila can be spotted easily from the main entrance, but identifying all 21 may be a tricky task. As a whole, the verdant creepers with some flowering types work together beautifully. Cabanas, specially designed lounge chairs including Urquiola’s very own Maia Rope chairs and the Rift Armchairs, as well as unusual meeting spaces are scattered throughout the public areas – encouraging guests to take a break, relax and conquer the day at their own pace.

contrasting silhouette against the expanded metal sheets. The roof crown structure is evident from afar; looking serene with five warm tones despite weighing 231 tonnes and boasting a 42.9m complex structure from within. The Thunbergia Grandiflora with gorgeous violet flowers flourish beautifully around the pool as it creeps across the brick wall effortlessly. The bricks are laid in a creative way, creating textures to complement Urquiola’s tricolour Tropicalia chairs. In an instance, I melt away in a quick relaxed pause as I – in a fetal position – hugging myself in one of Urquiola’s Cocoon Bench Swings. DESIGNED BY LEGENDS Oasia Hotel Downtown, located on Peck Seah Street is a singular. It is still the one and only red skyscraper in Singapore. Built to stand out, in one way or another, Oasia Hotel Downtown is a magnificent landmark for the urban dwellers and an easily recognisable sight for tourists and visitors. One cannot seem to peel away the attention gazing upon this gargantuan ‘red thing’; sticking out in the concrete jungle of Singapore’s Central Business District. The red colour gives good contrast to the lush greenery and cool blue

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WOHA

“Oasia Hotel Downtown is a prototype of land use intensification for the urban tropics, a tropical “living tower” offering an alternative image to the sleek technology of the genre”

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3. The communal areas are designed to be elegant and expensive but welcoming at the same time 4. A play on volume and light is displayed immaculately here at the bar area 5. The Club level oversees amazing vista of the central cityscape 6. The pool with sundecks and cabanas is a great space to unwind and relax amidst the citycentre

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ROBUST ROTATION The Ivanhoe Grammar School in Melbourne is invigorated with not just an outburst of colours but an unexpected pragmatic approach to its new building programme. WORDS MARTIN TEO PHOTOGRAPHY JOHN GOLLINGS

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he walk around the Melbourne’s Ivanhoe Grammar Senior Years and Science Centre is rather a kaleidoscopic experience. The spin of dynamically put together timber fins in a circular formation has a certain appeal that catches the attention within seconds with a burst of colours in its centre. A welcoming sensation and a waft of cheerful spirit encapsulate the building from the main entrance. Commissioned to give a new lease of life to the existing Ivanhoe Grammar School are Robert McBride and Debbie Ryan of Australiabased architecture firm, McBride Charles Ryan

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(MCR). The firm’s strong portfolio in educational institution and school designs has been evident with a number of outstandingly designed schools including Penleigh & Essendon Grammar Middle Girls School, Fitzroy High School and Dallas Brooks Community Primary School. MCR recently bagged the WAN Colour in Architecture 2016 Award for the commanding design of this school. However, the building’s selling point doesn’t revolve around its colours but also the configuration that goes beyond its colourful front. As an extension to the school, the new brief was for a new Science and Senior Years Centre.

1. The main entrance 2. From the opposite corner, black fins circulate the circular building, unassuming of the burst of vibrant colours 3.Vivid colours contrast each other, creating a unique palette on the facade


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4. Students walk through the internal courtyard feeling cheerful and energetic with the pop of zesty colours 5. The dynamic extrusions and protrusions of the facade showcase a high level of creativity by the architect 6. From pink to green, the colours almost tell a story of vitality and vigour to the surrounding areas.

The proforma included a variety of general learning areas, provision for the senior year teachers and a science centre that will be used by also the younger students in the school. HISTORY LESSONS Ivanhoe Grammar School is a co-educational school established in Ivanhoe in 1920. Then, a rural setting punctuated by magnificent red river gums surrounded the Plenty Campus of Ivanhoe Grammar School. Despite the encroaching suburbs, the school has retained a character where the native landscape flavour dominates the campus. At the heart of the campus, the original buildings are set out in a formal arrangement based on the metaphor of the Town Square. Subsequent additions to the campus, executed in a variety of architectural styles, have a looser relationship with this formal centre. The circular shaped plan is adopted for the building. It is a shape that has an appropriate civic quality, which seems to build upon the schools original masterplan. The circular plan is an alluring one for architects. Clearly it is a definitive human mark upon the landscape, and yet its many precendents, from Grounds to Stonehenge to

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indigenous gathering, show that it can, perhaps paradoxically, coexist with and not disrupt a native landscape. Rather than adopting a circular or radial pattern dictated by the shape of the plan, the architects choose to overlay an angular geometry. This geometry is used to define the central courtyards, the light wells and a mosaic of learning spaces. It contrasts and disrupts the building’s circular motif, highlighting key entry points and providing a distinction between the outer world that is defined as singular, civic, circular and executed in a muted landscape palate; and the inner world that is complex, dynamic, expressive and colourful. CONFIGURED SPACES The architecture is configured in the most unexpected way. Commanding a strong yet understated presence, the black steel framed exterior surfaces with rhythmic fins reflect the surrounding neighbourhood; creating a harmonious connection between the existing building and the environment. In its most complex and expressive state, the main entrance takes visitors to a whole new journey with a blend of shocking pink, apple green, turquoise and orange; colour-blocked. The zigzag of


IVANHOE GRAMMAR SENIOR YEARS & SCIENCE CENTRE LOCATION BUILDING AREA COMPLETION ARCHITECT LEAD ARCHITECT DESIGN TEAM CONTRACTOR C&S CONSULTANT QUANTITY SURVEYOR LAND SURVEYOR BUILDING SURVEYOR SERVICES ENGINEER/ESD PLANNER DRAFTER LANDSCAPE EXTERIOR FINISHING INTERIOR FINISHING AWARDS

MELBOURNE, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA 2,870 M2 2015 MCBRIDE CHARLES RYAN ROBERT MCBRIDE & DEBBIE RYAN DREW WILLIAMSON (SENIOR ASSOCIATE) BUILDING ENGINEERING PTY LTD MCFARLANE & CO (STRUCTURE & CIVIL) DEBTECH PTY LTD. ABSOLUTE SURVEYING TEKCON GROUP BUILDING SURVEYORS NJM DESIGN CONSULTING ENGINEERS WHITEMAN PROPERTY AND ACCOUNTING ROWE’S DRAFTING OCHRE LANDSCAPES LYSAGHT (LONGLINE 305 CLADDING), VITRA PANEL WALL PANELS, SPOTTED GUM BATTERNS (EXTERNAL TIMBER FINS) ELLA PANEL INTERIOR WALL PANELS, BORAL CEILING, COMCORK FLOORING, DULUX PAINT 2016 WAN COLOUR IN ARCHITECTURE AWARDS (WINNER), 2016 IDEA AWARDS – PUBLIC SPACES (HIGH COMMENDATION) 2016 A4LE – NEW BUILDING (COMMENDATION) 2016 IDEA-TOPS AWARDS (SHORTLISTED) 2016 PREMIER’S DESIGN AWARDS (SHORTLISTED)

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building orientations including its separate design elements are all put together in a very playful manner. Offsets from negative spaces give shape to planters while seating spaces are put designed to complement the crisscross puzzle-like layout plan. Great consideration has been given to the configuration of the learning spaces. Some of the key characteristics include the transparency into and between spaces; a variety of spatial type; interconnectivity and transitions; multiple functionality; flexibility as well as adaptability of the learning spaces. The central courtyard is truly an inviting space to simply ‘breakaway’ from the monotony of classroom-learning. Surrounded by colourful ‘blocks’, the grass patch dotted with colourful seats is considered a happy place for students. The voids within the internal space also create sufficient positive and negative areas to allow the premise to build its visual impact. The spatial quality is clearly defined with unexpected extrusions and recessed walls. As one walks away into the classrooms and science labs, the colours dissolve into muted tones and slowly to white. The lab for instance is entirely in crisp white with a tiny hint of subtle tones from the exterior fins; visible from the peripheral windows.

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1. The internal atrium is the epicentre of the building that melds old and new 2. A variety of seating types in the internal atrium allows for informal discussions, hot-desking and chanced meetings

PLAY AT WORK Shanghai has an exuberant new co-work venue: a collaboration between Linehouse and the WeWork inhouse design team, WeWork Weihai Lu melds history with modernity, opulence with tactility, and fiction with function. WORDS LUO JINGMEI PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF LINEHOUSE / JONATHAN LEIJONHUFVUD & DIRK WEIBLEN COURTESY OF WEWORK / SETH POWERS

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long Shanghai’s Weihai Lu sits an industrial brick building, surrounded by ‘longtangs’ (traditional lane houses). Its aged demeanour belies an exciting, new function, as suggested by the words ‘Creatives Welcome’ scribbled in neon light on the historical Chinese stone arches above the entryway. This is the location of WeWork Weihai Lu, the China flagship of American co-work space and service provider WeWork. Started in 2010 in New York City, WeWork has more than 100,000 members spread across 130 locations worldwide. Their success is reflective of the workspace sharing practice, now a common and necessary industry model for freelance

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workers, small creative industries, entrepreneurs and start-up companies fuelled by today’s mobile technology and culture. WeWork is known for picking heritage spaces and transforming them into attractive collaborative work environments. “WeWork loves the charm and characteristics of older buildings. Our design approach is to find ways to bring the building to life, let it be what it is and show off the way it was constructed rather than hiding it behind finishes or with heavy handed interventions,” says Ashley Couch, Senior Associate, Director of Interior Design at WeWork. Their Shanghai branch has an interesting past as a warehouse for the East India Company, artist studios and


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galleries, and an opium storage facility in the 1930s. In response, the design team took a page from the city’s 1920/1930s belle époque period when fashion and architecture embraced a mix of Eastern and Western influences. The result is a delightful melody of colour, forms and patterns, creating an engaging setting that well suits the WeWork branding and synergy. It is a collaboration between Shanghaibased architecture and design studio Linehouse, helmed by Briar Hickling and Alex Mok, and WeWork’s in-house design team, with the former focusing on the design of the public areas and the latter on the private offices. WORKING SPACES Past the aforementioned stone gateway, an old laneway washed in pink paint leads to the reception area. This sits in an in-between

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zone where the original brick structure meets a layer of industrial additions made over the years. Playing with the narrative of a grand hotel “to transport guests and members on an unexpected journey of whimsy, voyeurism and festivity”, the words ‘Ring for Service’ flash behind the wood panelling and concrete counter, against a blue cabinet of curiosities. Surrounding it is a bronze metal structure that hangs lights and creates leaners. This bronze frame is used throughout the building as a multipurpose element – casual space divider when fixed with etched glass for the creation of semi-private meeting areas, and holder of lighting fixtures, shelving and artwork. Its materiality injects a dose of opulence, contributing to the narrative. This zesty reception hints at what lies ahead – an equally cheerful mise-en-scène in the central atrium. Covered by a


Briar Hicking, Linehouse

“The interweaving form of the stair inhabits the void of the atrium and as you meander around, up and down the staircase and around the surrounding space, one’s perspective of the staircase is always changing”

3. A dynamic ivy green shade colours an existing steel structure and new staircase and bridges 4. Alex Mok and Briar Hickling of LInehouse, who worked on the project with WeWork’s in-house design team

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/ DINE /

RENEWED PALATE With a rebranding exercise, a new menu and a series of local ‘hand-made’ touch by L.Inc, the first revitalised Delicious restaurant marks the start of a creative journey. WORDS MARTIN TEO / PHOTOGRAPHY HEARTPATRICK

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t takes more than just ambient and design to fall in love with a place. Upon entering the newly revitalised Delicious in One Utama Shopping Centre, a waft of surprise powders into multiple blinks of amazement. Soon, a warm feeling of joy lingers and the soul now filled with contentment. Within seconds, I have decided on my favourite spot - the corner padded seat at the end of the restaurant, right between the interior space and outdoor alfresco dining area; separated by a glass wall. “Delicious has been a place where we laugh of the silliest moments, cry over heartbreaks and

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celebrate happy times with loved ones. It is a place that has etched tremendous layers of memories throughout the years,� reminisces Tan San Hui, who recently returned to Malaysia from Australia to help manage the business which was taken over recently by Envictus International Holdings Limited. In its new brand direction, Delicious is no longer running on the young turquoise logo and a western-heavy menu. Instead, the new direction now introduces a more mature palette and an east-meets-west fusion palate for diners.


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1. At the entrance, the new Delicious emblem looks classy against a geometrically tiled wall 2. Lisette’s hand-drawn murals can be found embellishing the walls in the restaurant 3. Find comfort in this cosy corner surrounded by books, old-school chairs and emerald green tiles 4. Nala Designs prints can be found on the tiles, upholstery, tables and walls

CREATIVE CONTROL Lisette Scheers from local design studio, L.Inc takes pride in redesigning the entire interior space and branding of the new Delicious. Lisette clearly remembers where her ideas and sketches for the new Delicious were conceptualised. “It was in an airport in India. As I was a few hours early, I got some water, flashed my watercolours and began sketching. Within an hour or so, I had a few design schemes ready to be presented. And they were all in my favourite colours, blue and green,” recalls the creative director. It doesn’t take long for Tan and the Delicious team to accept the proposed design scheme and the rest is history. Its realisation proves to be a turning point for the restaurant. “We love the personalised touches that Nala Designs brought into the space, and it has inspired

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me to further develop ideas for our future expansions,” confides the aspiring 24-year old restaurateur. Being in Delicious demands not just a hunger for its new food items but also a thirst for fine little surprising details in the space. If you’re inquisitive, spend some time looking at the biscuit tins and figure the narratives in black and white. For Lisette, there’s always a reason behind each of her designs. Biscuit tins, arrayed behind the bar counter tell a love story that is depicted through Lisette’s handpainted black ink sketches. With 47 square tins in total, she illustrates a cliché love story in 47 steps. While many of these minute detailing remain unnoticed unless told, they are also Delicious’s unique selling points that are hand-made and designed by Lisette, who also runs Nala Designs, which specialises in prints, accessories, stationery and home decors.


Lisette Scheers, Creative Director, Nala Designs

“Everything I do must have a story. No matter how big or small the project, it has to come with a story”

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SELANGOR, MALAYSIA 309.7 M2 2017 L.INC LISETTE SCHEERS MAHASIN NORMAN, ANDY TEO, EDISON LOW MAHASIN NORMAN, ANDY TEO, EDISON LOW OCTAGON DESIGN STUDIO LISETTE SCHEERS, MAHASIN NORMAN

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/ PRIME /

A SPANISH ICON Designer Jaime Hayón’s design of the Hotel Barceló Torre de Madrid is a rich tapestry of textures, colours and Spanish cultural nuances reflecting the designer’s individualistic talent. WORDS LUO JINGMEI / PHOTOGRAPHY KLUNDERBIE

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JAI M E H AYÓN

People can term whatever they want but I think my work is about quality, and it’s about trying to find surprises, to find something that is actually special but is at the same time long lasting… What is the point to actually work if not to discover the new things you can make?

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the creation of museum exhibits since establishing his eponymous studio in 2003.

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1. The Garra lobby bar with Fri armchairs by Fritz Hansen, Beetle stools for Gubi and custom-designed whimsical, bulbous hanging light fixtures 2. Gently curving edges in the columns are part of the leitmotif of movement 3. Custom-designed lighting fixtures fill the lobby’s voluminous space

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here is no mistaking Jamie Hayón’s distinctive design language. Curves, colour, hyperbole, the fantastical and the figurative – Hayón’s spirited and whimsical idiosyncrasy stands out in the modern design world where the safety and predictability of straight lines and minimal forms dominate. The Valencia-born Hayón is a true multi-hyphenate. While he studied industrial design in Madrid at the Istituto Europeo di Diseño and later, the École nationale supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, he has dabbled in all fields from furniture, objects and interior design to

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MAESTRO OF SURPRISE The furniture and accessories Hayón has designed is most well known. Many of his pieces take on an almost anthropomorphic nature – such as the Showtime armchair for BD Barcelona with its exaggerated hood and the Chinoz lamp for Parachilna with its feminine shape. Sinewy lines in his Favn sofa for Fritz Hansen embrace users while his alluring whimsical characters and doodles grace ceramics for Bosa and crystal boxes for Baccarat. Currently with three offices, in Spain, Tokyo and Italy, and one of the most prolific of his generation, Hayón is certainly successful. What he is not is egotistical. The man is gentlemanly to a fault, thanking the interviewee both at the beginning and end of the interview. This reflects his down-to-earth persona, matched by an alluring impish grin and curly mop. When ask what his current obsessions and influences are, the family man laughs and replies: “My obsession is actually agriculture at the moment. I love the things that are grown in the earth. I live in the countryside where there are a lot of artichokes and oranges and tomatoes around me. I get inspired by travelling and then coming back to the nice, beautiful land to which I can concentrate on living my life with my family.” Hayón certainly travels a lot. While 90 percent of his work remains overseas, he maintains. “The vision is always international so it’s a very sophisticated eye that I have all the time, trying to work on the details,” he says. When asked what he thinks of people labelling his work quirky and flamboyant, Hayón laughs. “Well, people can term whatever they want but I think my work is about quality, and it’s about trying to find surprises, to find something that is actually special but is at the same time long lasting. I work with furniture companies that are very high end, so when I design furniture, it has to be functional, it has to be good. When I do art, it has to provoke certain


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/ PEOPLE /

THE COLOUR MASTER Lisette Scheers of Nala Designs is more than just a pattern maker. The creative director, painter, author and designer shares her unique intercultural upbringing and how she celebrates the colours of life. INTERVIEW MARTIN TEO PHOTOGRAPHY HEARTPATRICK

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TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT YOURSELF In 1992, I graduated in Antwerp with a double degree in illustration and graphic design. But I ended up in advertising, working with BBDO Network. I was working in the advertising industry in Brussels and Amsterdam and in between, I’ve lived in Hong Kong and Holland for a couple of years. After 17 years away, I came back to Malaysia and that was before we even have computers. HOW DID GROWING UP IN MALAYSIA HAVE AN INFLUENCE IN YOUR ARTISTRY AND PRACTICE TODAY? I was born in Singapore but I grew up in Ampang, Kuala Lumpur. That’s before Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre (KLCC) and the twin towers were built. I am pure Dutch with some far off Indonesian Chinese blood, somewhere. (chuckles) I come from a family of designers. My father also distributed printing machines and we would have a huge supply of paper at home, and that explains a lot about my work today. My parents made sure that we mingled with local friends. And up to this day, most of my friends are local and not expats. In my teenage years, I had an amazing teacher in the International School of Kuala Lumpur (ISKL), Mrs. Beryl Lau who taught me everything. She would bring banana leaves and even roosters to the school. Once, we went to Kuantan to batik factories and we’d paint for a week. She also brought in a Chinese calligrapher to teach me calligraphy painting. All these techniques are 100% from her. I’m very lucky.

TELL US SOMETHING THAT WE DON’T KNOW ABOUT YOU. The whole world would probably know my whole life and everything about me. Well, I’m a single mother and I recently opened a store in Paris. A few things. I set up the Graphic Design Department in Raffles College 14 years ago when I came back. I love gardening, giving parties and Malaysian food. I was even a guest chef in Europe, cooking nasi lemak, laksa and rendang. I have a deep passion for everything Melayu (Malay). My friends would probably know this; I never sit still. I have 20 ideas running in my head every second. Oh! And I love, love, love durian. You can wake me up in the middle of the night for durian! HOW IS YOUR PRACTICE DIFFERENT? I know I am the only agency that can give you from A-Z. As the creative director, I can design your fabrics, to your tiles, your lamps, advertising, communication, website and ever single thing. I know I’m the only one here who can do everything by hand. WE NOTICED THAT YOU’VE DRAWN AND PAINTED ALMOST EVERYTHING HERE IN YOUR STUDIO AND HOME. TELL US MORE… When I paint, it comes from here (points to her head). I only buy four colours (of paint), always. It’s usually white, yellow, red and blue. It’s wwreally important to mix colours, otherwise it’s too easy. I’m really old school. I go to a very traditional school where I learnt how to paint. Everything I do for Nala is hand-painted. I designed everything by hand. It’s all hand-drawn. There are a lot of work and processes involved. It’s a double-edge sword. It’s my biggest asset and my biggest downfall.  WHO DO YOU LOOK UP TO IN DIFFERENT PHASES OF YOUR LIFE: AS A CHILD, A YOUNG STUDENT AND AN EXPERIENCED CREATIVE PERSON NOW? As a child, I look up to my Aunt Lisette who is a designer. She did textile and carpet design. She even designed the way its woven; it’s very technical. In my advertising days, my favourite advertising agency is Kessels & Kramer. I really liked their work. I even wished and prayed that someday, they would call me and ask me to work with

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1. The Sara Battaglia for Salvatore Ferragamo Pre-Fall 2017 Collection / 2. BR X1 R.S.17 Limited Edition (250 Pieces) by Bell & Ross / 3. The new equipment option “Scissor Doors” by MINI / 4. “Sicily Is My Love” Collection by Dolce&Gabbana / 5. ClassicCon Pli Table series by Victoria Wilmotte / 6. Kartell Bubble Club by Philippe Starck / 7. Gucci Goes Wild Spring/ Summer 2017 Campaign / 8. Tie-set Home Porcelain by Hermés / 9. Moooi O Rocker by Marcel Wanders / 10. Hindmarch’s Architectural Design Sensibilities, titled ‘Circulus’ by Anya Hindmarch Spring/Summer 2017 / 11. Colour Pop Matt Bamboo Bowl by Oliver Bonas / 12. Handcrafted 504 Colour Block Series eyeglasses by TVR Japan / 13. Arflex Arcolor Sofa by Jaime Hayon / 14. Honeycomb-like Patterns, BeoSound Wall speakers by Bang & Olufsen / 15. MB1 Quartet Armchair by Mario Bellini

d+a Issue 098 (Preview)  

Evolution is happening faster than we speak. Artificial intelligence is replacing the way we think. In this issue, we celebrate the paradoxe...

d+a Issue 098 (Preview)  

Evolution is happening faster than we speak. Artificial intelligence is replacing the way we think. In this issue, we celebrate the paradoxe...

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