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CITY CENTRE MASTERPLAN Sept 2010


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Contact details: City Centre Development Development Directorate Birmingham City Council Office: 1 Lancaster Circus Birmingham B4 7DJ Post: PO Box 28 Birmingham B1 1TU Telephone: 0121 303 3075 Email: bigcityplan@birmingham.gov.uk

Foreword

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Introduction to the document

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Birmingham Context

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Why a city centre masterplan

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City centre masterplan Areas of transformation

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Growth Sustainability Connectivity Walkability Building heights Heritage

The quarters City Core

Eastside Digbeth Southside and Highgate Westside and Ladywood The Jewellery Quarter The Gunsmiths’ Quarter

14 16 20 22 26 32 34

36 46 54 60 68 76 82

Delivery

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Acknowledgements

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Plans contained within this document are based upon Ordnance Survey Material with the permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office © Crown Copyright. Unauthorised reproduction infringes Crown Copyright and may lead to prosecution or civil proceedings. Birmingham City Council. Licence Number 100021326, 2010.

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Foreword

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The Big City Plan is the most ambitious, far-reaching development project ever undertaken in the UK. Our aim is to create a world-class city centre by planning for the next 20 years of transformation. This masterplan, forming a key element of the Big City Plan, is about delivering transformational change in our city centre by supporting sustainable growth, creating new and improved public spaces, giving our streets back to pedestrians and bringing the cultural life of Birmingham to the heart of the city. It represents the culmination of our work since 2007 and is a seminal moment in our progress with the Big City Plan. Since 2007 we have achieved many things as part of the Big City Plan. We have set our vision, defined our objectives and consulted widely on the type of city centre we want to create. In this period we have also made significant progress with key investments including: • New Street Station – The £600 million Gateway scheme to deliver a bright, modern, 21st century focal point for Birmingham, helping to regenerate parts of the city centre creating thousands of jobs. • The Library of Birmingham – £189 million city council investment creating one of the largest libraries in Europe in the heart of the city.

• Ormiston Academy – £30 million investment in a new academy for creative arts in Eastside catering for over 900 students. • A new City Centre Interchange on Moor Street Queensway – £12 million investment by the city council and Centro improving the bus system in the city centre. These and others represent over £1 billion of public investment in the city centre committed in the last 3 years as part of the Big City Plan. While public sector investment is important, what pleases me most is how our private sector partners have responded to the Big City Plan even in this difficult climate for development. The last 3 years have seen the CUBE built; the construction of Colmore Plaza and Snow Hill One extending the Central Business District; the refurbishment of Baskerville House, and the completion of Brindleyplace with No. 11 Brindleyplace. These and others represent a further £500 million of investment in the city centre. Much more is planned.

One of our key achievements to date is that the Big City Plan has been adopted by a wide spectrum of organisations with both the private sector and our partners actively seeking to work with us in helping to deliver the Big City Plan. The next stage of the Big City Plan, which is launched with this masterplan, happens at a time which is particularly difficult for public finances. This challenges us to be even clearer about our priorities and how investment forms part of a strategic plan. We know we will face difficult choices, the city centre masterplan will be crucial to us all defining how the city centre will be transformed over the next 20 years. In launching this city centre masterplan I am inviting businesses, residents, and our partners to comment on it. The masterplan should not just be the city council’s plan but Birmingham’s plan to take our great city to new heights. I look forward to hearing from you.

Councillor Mike Whitby Leader of Birmingham City Council

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Introduction to the document

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Key city centre developments

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Town Hall St. Philip’s Cathedral

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Birmingham Coach Station Birmingham Hippodrome

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BRISTOL STREET

Mailbox International Convention Centre & Symphony Hall

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Bullring Shopping Centre

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Rotunda

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NEW ST REE T

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Moor Street Station

Custard Factory

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St. Martin’s Church & Bullring Markets

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Snow Hill Station

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National Indoor Arena

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New Street Station

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Key city centre destinations

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River Rea

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Key city centre roads Canals

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Key city centre destinations

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City centre boundary

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The accompanying diagram identifies landmark buildings and key roads, common to plans throughout the document, to help with orientation.

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For the purposes of the masterplan the city centre has been split into seven distinctive ‘quarters’.

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How to use the document The masterplan is divided into three sections; the first covers the key issues facing the physical development of the city in the next 20 years and our proposed strategic responses; the second, from page 36, presents a detailed overview of how the city centre will develop over that time. The third section deals with how we will deliver our vision.

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Where further detail is needed for particular parts of the City Centre, this will provided through Supplementary Planning Documents.

Together these documents will provide the statutory planning tools to support land use change and development activity. The Core Strategy is currently at draft stage and is due for public consultation late 2010 with adoption in 2012.

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The Big City Plan City Centre Masterplan is being produced as a non-statutory planning and regeneration framework for Birmingham’s city centre. The key principles of this masterplan will be embedded in the Council’s Core Strategy – the statutory planning document that will provide the vision and overarching direction to guide the future development of the whole city.

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St. Paul’s Church St. Chad’s Cathedral Millenium Point

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

Landmark buildings, key routes and features in city centre

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Birmingham context

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With a population of just over 1 million and an economic output of £18 billion per year, Birmingham is the West Midlands regional capital and the UK’s second largest city, with an ever-increasing international standing. SUTTON COLDFIELD

• Birmingham is a strategic location at the centre of the national motorway network (M5, M6, M40 and M42) and at the heart of the UK rail network. • Direct access to over 60 destinations including cities in Europe, North America and Asia from Birmingham International Airport, which is a 9 minute train journey from the city centre. • Birmingham has a workforce of over 484,000 employed across a wide range of sectors. It is continuing to diversify its economic base attracting investment from new science and technology based industries and is a designated Science City and a Digital City. • There is an expanding creative industries’ sector which boasts over 3,400 businesses representing 10% of the city’s total number of firms. • The city attracts 33 million people a year for business and pleasure.

playing fields. Many of these areas are linked by rivers, watercourses and canals forming an inter-connected network.

The Big City Plan Context The transformation of the city centre, seeing it grow to cover 800 hectares of the city is set within the context of the wider transformation of Birmingham. Over the next 20 years the city will: • Grow its population by 100,000 • Create new jobs to meet the needs of its growing population • Significantly improve its connectivity to the rest of the region and beyond • Deliver a transformation of the physical environment. This change will focus on a number of key areas, shown on the map on page 9, and the city centre will be central to this transformation. Others are:

• Birmingham has the youngest profile of any in Europe with 37% of the population under 24 years of age and is the second most ethnically diverse population in Europe.

• Icknield Port, occupying a strategically significant location to the immediate west of the city centre, will become a major new sustainable urban neighbourhood.

• Has a strong education and learning base represented by three major universities with a total of 65,000 students.

• Bordesley Park, to the east of the city centre, will be a focus for the wider transformation of the east of Birmingham, providing a significant opportunity for large scale leisure and employment uses.

• More than one fifth of the city consists of open space including parks, nature reserves, allotments, golf courses and

• Eastern Growth Corridor, situated between the economic hubs of the city centre and the Airport / NEC, will accommodate Birmingham’s growing population through new sustainable urban neighbourhoods.

KINGSTANDING

• Lozells, Newtown and Aston, to the north of the city centre, will see revitalised communities through housing regeneration, improvements to local community facilities and provision of new employment opportunities. • Sutton Coldfield town centre, to the north of the city centre, will see regeneration that will turn it into a destination of choice for retail, leisure and commercial investment. • Selly Oak and South Edgbaston, is undergoing significant change with the new Queen Elizabeth hospital and ongoing transformation of the Birmingham University campus alongside major redevelopments. • Longbridge, is a major redevelopment scheme transforming the former MG Rover site into a vibrant new community.

PERRY BARR

HANDSWORTH

ICKNIELD PORT

ERDINGTON

HS2

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LOZELLS, NEWTOWN & ASTON

BIG CITY PLAN

BORDESLEY PARK

HS2

EASTERN GROWTH AREA

NEC BHX

EDGBASTON HARBORNE

BALSALL HEATH SPARKHILL

SELLY OAK

MOSELEY

ACOCKS GREEN

KINGS HEATH BOURNVILLE

NORTHFIELD

KINGS NORTON

The transformation of these areas will be guided by individual frameworks. LONGBRIDGE

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

City wide context with existing neighbourhoods and key growth areas

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Why a City Centre Masterplan? The city centre accounts for a third of Birmingham’s economic output, accommodates over 150,000 jobs, attracts more than £2 billion of shopping expenditure every year and is home to over 30,000 people. We last set out our vision and strategy for the city centre over 20 years ago. That strategy was instrumental in shaping the city centre we have today and achieved many successes, but over this period many new challenges have emerged. In particular Birmingham is operating in a more competitive and globalised world and faces new economic, social and environmental pressures. Central to Birmingham’s success in the future will be the strength and sustainability of its economy which will need to be robust and diverse enough to perform alongside European and international competitors. Creating a strong post-industrial economy driven by a range of sectors including knowledge, technology, research, science and local services will be key. Birmingham can already take advantage of those sectors where it can boast a competitive advantage such as business and professional services, the creative and digital sectors, automotive assembly, low-carbon research and development, financial services, clinical trials and environmental technologies and services. These industries identified by Marketing Birmingham in ‘Support to Inward Investment’ represent, alongside existing firms, the economic future of the city.

There will need to be support for innovation, enterprise and start-ups, developing and diversifying the skills and knowledge of the workforce, investing in infrastructure and utilising existing assets including Science City and Digital City status, three universities, the Birmingham Science Park Aston, Birmingham Research Park. In addition to supporting new growth sectors the City needs to create the quality of place and range of accommodation to retain existing businesses and employees. While the challenges are city and regionwide, the city centre will play a central role in realising this future economic success. As well as an important economic asset

Innovation & Skills

the city centre is a source of creativity, culture and consumption. It is the shop window for the city. Its role will not just be about supporting and providing the skills, accommodation and infrastructure for the economy but providing the softer location factors which are critical to attracting investors, employers and skilled workers. In ‘The Birmingham City Centre Masterplan: The Visioning Study’ Professor Michael Parkinson identified the things that we need to focus on in order to create a successful and competitive city centre, as shown in the diagram below. There are a range of issues that will need to be addressed for the city centre to perform better in relation to these five drivers for urban success.

Economic & Cultural Diversity Strategic Decision taking

Connectivity

Place Quality Interrelationship of the five key drivers of a modern economy

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Innovation and skills The key to future success in a knowledge based, high value-added economy is whether a city can continuously innovate in products, processes and services. The city centre benefits from a strong university and college presence, supports existing service and knowledge based industries and accommodates the Birmingham Science Park Aston. There is a growing creative sector and significant land and premises available to accommodate future growth sectors. The challenge for the future will be retaining and attracting skilled graduates and workers through offering the right jobs and providing a high quality of living.

This not only relates to vehicular transport but also the connections and environment for pedestrians and cyclists within and beyond the city centre. Place quality The quality of place is central to attracting and retaining investors, employers, workers, students and visitors to the city. There are real issues over the quality of the architectural, public realm, environmental, recreational, leisure and residential offer in the city centre. These softer location factors need to be addressed across the city centre building upon the areas of quality and diversity that already exist.

Cultural and economic diversity To succeed in the future cities will have to differentiate themselves from their competitors. The current quality of the city centre experience is not sufficiently diverse in terms of its cultural facilities, heritage, retail offer and services especially for young and ethnic minority groups. In an economic sense there is still a reliance on a narrow set of industries but with great potential to exploit creative and high value-added industries. Creating a diverse economic base will require the provision of workspace, housing, infrastructure and cultural facilities.

Strategic decision making The ability to mobilise strategic support consistently to deliver long term development is a crucial feature of a successful city. Strong leadership, vision and a long–term integrated and partnership approach is a crucial feature for a successful city. The emergence of a Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP), centred on Birmingham, will provide a further opportunity to achieve this. Responding to these challenges we have produced a new strategy, the City Centre Masterplan, to provide the direction for the next 20 years of the city centre’s transformation and to support Birmingham’s aim to become a leading world city in the 21st century.

Connectivity The quality of the connections are an important ingredient in a city’s economic performance. The city centre is in an ideal location to be very successful, with extensive rail and road connections and direct links to Birmingham International Airport. However the quality of this external and internal connectivity is inadequate for the ambitions of the city. View of Birmingham city centre looking west

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City Centre Masterplan

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We want to transform the city centre by growing its central core by 25%, improving its connectivity, strengthening its authentic character and diversifying its economic base. What the masterplan does The masterplan sets out our vision for how we will improve the city centre over the next 20 years. It: • Identifies our priorities as those areas that will grow the City Core by 25%, delivering over 1.5 million square metres of new floorspace, over 50,000 new jobs and contributing £2.1 billion to the economy each year. • Identifies key projects to deliver over 65,000 square metres of new and improved public spaces and 28 kilometres of enhanced walking and cycling routes. • Sets out a movement framework transforming connectivity. • Identifies how we will grow the city centre population, providing over 5,000 new homes to attract more families to live in the city centre. • Explores the evolution of land uses and activities, locations for tall buildings and the role of heritage. • Sets out visionary proposals for each of the city centre quarters. • Fully integrates both sustainable development and addressing the impact of climate change as part of the future transformation of the city centre.

This ambitious agenda will be guided by a set of objectives and a spatial strategy which underpin the masterplan and set the context for our proposals.

Objectives We have set six broad objectives which will guide the transformation of the city centre. Liveable City – provides a high quality of living, creating places for people that offer a diverse mix of activities and spaces within an accessible, safe and attractive environment. Connected City – is safe and convenient for pedestrians and cyclists to move around and has an effective and attractive public transport system with an efficient highway network. Authentic City – offers a unique and diverse experience through its architecture, its streets and spaces, its arts and culture, its businesses and its neighbourhoods. Knowledge City – utilises and supports its universities, colleges, businesses and people to create a strong and sustainable economy. Creative City – values and supports creativity and industry in all its forms. Smart City – responds to the challenge of climate change through sustainable growth, pioneering the low carbon future.

city centre masterplan

Spatial Strategy To achieve our ambition for the city centre we will need to allow the City Core to grow to accommodate greater levels of economic and cultural activity.

GUNSMITHS QUARTER

JEWELLERY QUARTER

The City Core will be allowed to expand beyond its current boundaries as shown in ‘yellow’ on the diagram on page 13. In delivering this growth we will support and strengthen the distinctive character of the areas surrounding the City Core, raising their overall quality and offer. Covering a combined area of 800 hectares, the 7 quarters collectively represent the strength of the city centre but are also a significantly underutilised asset that presents immense potential.

EASTSIDE

CITY CORE

WESTSIDE & LADYWOOD

Each of the quarters has unique qualities which contribute towards the authenticity, diversity and vibrancy of the city centre. These areas are largely based on historic clusters of related uses and existing physical boundaries.

DIGBETH

SOUTHSIDE & HIGHGATE

By allowing the City Core to grow, and in supporting the distinctive activities and environments of the quarters we will facilitate the city centre to change and adapt to meet future needs and to support Birmingham’s ability to succeed economically.

© Copyright Geoperspectives, supplied by Bluesky International Ltd © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

City centre spatial structure showing the expansion of the City Core and the seven quarters

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Areas of transformation Five areas of transformation will deliver over 1.5 million sq.m of new development, investing in new high quality buildings and public spaces, enhancing the city’s environment and connectivity.

Westside

The redevelopment of Paradise Circus, Baskerville Wharf and Arena Central provides significant new mixed-use office led floorspace. Centenary Square, to be expanded across Broad Street, the new Library of Birmingham and the enhanced setting of the Town Hall and Council House will provide key focal points for the area.

New Street Station

Opening in 2015 the redeveloped station will transform the arrival experience and create new links within the city centre. It will act as a catalyst for wider regeneration. The introduction of a new southern entrance will open up the area around John Bright Street to improvement, with opportunities for selective redevelopment for further variety of uses.

Snow Hill District

The eastern expansion of the central office core incorporating key developments around Snow Hill Station will generate major opportunities for mixed-use office led floorspace. Enhanced pedestrian linkages across Great Charles Street will improve the transition from the City Core into the Jewellery Quarter.

Eastside

The expansion of the City Core eastwards will see opportunities for mixed-use development, including office, residential, learning and leisure space. Acting as the main focus, the Eastside City Park will deliver a linear route through the area joining a series of new squares and development opportunities. Future proposals for the new High Speed 2 rail terminus will provide a significant catalyst for regeneration.

Southern Gateway

Expanding the City Core southwards, the redevelopment of the Wholesale Markets site will provide an opportunity for mixed-use development, extending the retail offer at its northern end graduating through niche retail, improved markets, food and leisure space to new residential neighbourhoods with a wider opportunity to stimulate the regeneration of Highgate. The centre piece for the area will be ‘Moat Square’; a new public space.

The masterplan focuses on continuing the process of transforming our city centre by extending and connecting the City Core beyond its existing boundaries while diversifying activity and supporting economic growth. To achieve this expansion five areas of transformation have been identified which create new distinctive places within the city centre. These five areas will be our priority.

3 2

4 1 5

KEY

1 2 3 4 5

City Core New Street Station Westside Snow Hill District Eastside Southern Gateway

© Copyright Geoperspectives, supplied by Bluesky International Ltd © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

city centre / masterplan areas of transformation

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City centre boundary City centre boundary

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Majorroad road- -A38 A38 Major Major road - A38 Other key roads Other key roads Other key roads Maincity citycentre centrereference referencepoints points Main Main city centre reference points

Activities Growth A city should bustle. It should be full of people, of movement, of functions and activities. Providing greater opportunities for people to live and stay in the city centre will be central to a successful area and delivering greater sustainability. The masterplan is not intended to be a rigid, land use zoning plan. It respects that investment markets need the flexibility to adapt to changing circumstances and that rigid zoning will inhibit our ambition to grow the City Core and create a liveable city centre. The masterplan sets out a vision of how the city centre could evolve over the next 20 years in terms of land use patterns, as shown in the supporting diagrams.

Offices & Business The city centre already provides over 150,000 jobs ranging from office based activity, to employment in shops, and jobs in factories and warehouses. Within the office market the city centre has space occupied from global businesses to small start ups relying on cheap space to build their businesses. The masterplan envisages: • Growth of the Central Business District of Grade A office space into Westside and east around Snow Hill station. Both will be facilitated by improved linkages. • Fiveways developing as a focus of major office activity. • A southern extension of the Central Business District to link the area

Expandingoffice officecore core Expanding Expanding office core

around Martineau Galleries and on to the High Speed 2 rail station and Eastside.

around&the City Core. The wider city Science research Science & research Science & research

centre however supports a more diverse mix of housing types and tenures. Through continued renewal of existing housing in areas such as Attwood Green, Highgate and Ladywood, there have been improvements in the wider housing offer.

• Strengthening of the potential for the Jewellery Quarter and Digbeth to provide a range of accommodation for professional practices and start ups, respecting the historic environment of these areas. • The continued provision of low-cost affordable accommodation in the Gunsmiths’ Quarter, parts of Digbeth, the Jewellery Quarter and Southside, supporting manufacturing and new growth sectors.

A key challenge for the future will be to support a growth in the city centre’s population, expanding the housing offer and encouraging more families to live here. This will require a much wider mix of types and tenures of accommodation and a focus on attracting and retaining families. Future developments will need to provide adaptable, flexible accommodation to

RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL KEY KEY

KEY

Citycentre centreboundary boundary City City centre boundary

Major road -Major A38 road - A38 Major road - A38

Majorroad road- -A38 A38 Major Major road - A38

Other key roads Other roads Other keykey roads

Otherkey keyroads roads Other Other key roads Maincity citycentre centrereference referencepoints points Main Main city centre reference points Existinglow lowdensity densityfamily family Existing Existing low density family livingclusters clusters living living clusters

Existing Existing office core office core Existing office core

We envisage concentrations of residential activity in the following locations:

Well-designed dense living environments in the city centre will need to be matched with private and communal open spaces. We want to see architects and urban designers produce high quality interior and exterior residential neighbourhoods that will attract families, young and old.

• Development of a diverse provision of housing, utilising and respecting the historic environment of Digbeth, Gunsmiths’ Quarter and the Jewellery Quarter.

The proximity of housing to where people work and educate their children will be an important feature for living in the city

• Contributing to city living development at Attwood Green, around Broad Street and in Southside.

• Creation of a new family neighbourhood at medium densities centred upon the Southern Gateway area of transformation. Strengthened family housing in Highgate and Ladywood delivered through selective demolition and renewal.

Highdensity densityflats, flats, ‘CityLiving’ Living’ High High‘City density flats, ‘City Living’ Medium-highdensity densityflats, flats, Medium-high Medium-high density conversions,new new typehouses houses etc.flats, conversions, type conversions, newetc. type houses etc.

Other existingmanufacturing professional, manufacturing Other existing professional, manufacturing Other existing professional, & creative business clusters & creative business clusters & creative business clusters Expanded clusters of other professional, Expanded clusters of other professional, Expanded clusters of other professional, manufacturing & creative business manufacturing & creative business manufacturing & creative business

city centre / masterplan growth

their design will be central to achieving improved living spaces and attracting more people. At the same time we will need to achieve higher density development to achieve the levels of growth required.

Futureexpansion expansionofofmedium medium Future expansion densityfamily familyFuture livingclusters clusters of medium density living density family living clusters

Expanding Expanding office core office core Expanding office core

Science & research Science & research Science & research

centre, supporting sustainable city living. New schools, shops, leisure and job opportunities will need to support the growing population.

KEY

City centre boundary centre boundary CityCity centre boundary

Main city centre reference points Main centre reference points Main citycity centre reference points

meet a range of needs and increase the

Residential Other existingprofessional, professional,manufacturing manufacturing Other existing desirability of the city centre as a place Other existing professional, manufacturing & creative business clusters & creative business clusters & creative business clusters to live. The city centre has experienced recent Expandedclusters clustersofofother otherprofessional, professional, Expanded growth in city living that has introduced Expanded clusters of other professional, manufacturing creative business manufacturing &&creative business The quality of the places, buildings and manufacturing & creative concentrations of apartments in andbusiness

• The growth of Eastside as a technology and knowledge based area focused at Birmingham Science Park Aston, but at lower densities and more modest rents than the City Core, with the potential to also capture Civil Service relocations and back office shared services.

OFFICE & BUSINESS OFFICE BUSINESS OFFICE &&BUSINESS KEY KEY

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Existingoffice officecore core Existing Existing office core

Present

Present

Future Office & Business

Residential

Future

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CULTURE & CIVIC KEY

City Citycentre centreboundary boundary

KEY

Major Majorroad road- -A38 A38 City centre boundary City centre boundary Other Otherkey keyroads roads Major road - A38 Main reference Maincity citycentre centre reference Major road - A38 Other key roads Civic Civiccentre centre Other key roads Main city centre reference

18 Cultural and Civic

The ambition in the masterplan is to achieve the following:

The city centre is a hub for both local and international cultural events and activities. A range of major venues including the Symphony Hall, Town Hall, the Hippodrome Theatre, the Birmingham Rep Theatre, the National Indoor Arena and the Ikon Gallery, along with many others, offer important national and international attractions. The new Library of Birmingham, in Centenary Square, will further strengthen the city centre as a hub for major civic and cultural activities.

• A growing cultural offer in Southside and Westside with the expansion of existing facilities and the creation of new ones including art galleries and performance space.

A variety of local events and activities are centred throughout Digbeth, Southside and the Jewellery Quarter.

• The evolvement of a local cultural offer in Digbeth and the Jewellery Quarter reflecting their history. • Bringing culture to the streets. Street entertainment and festivals on the streets and in squares reflecting the diverse population of Birmingham. • Integrate the thinking, work and creative process of artists into city centre regeneration through collaborative engagement between the city council, developers and communities. Opportunities for a broad

CULTURE & CIVIC CULTURE &&CIVIC CULTURE CIVIC KEY KEY

and diverse role for the arts throughout the life of a development and into the future will be promoted. • Cultural activities that contribute to a transition through a space and that create distinctive senses of arrival and place.

The civic heart of Birmingham is focused on the Town Hall, the Council House, the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, Victoria and Chamberlain Squares. Through the redevelopment of Paradise Circus we will see a strengthening of the civic heart, creating a world-class setting for key heritage buildings.

Whilst the city centre has been a success as a main stream retail location, it is recognised that it lacks the diversity of offer as a retail centre. It needs to broaden its offer to create a lively mix of experiences leading to a world-class shopping experience.

RETAIL RETAIL & & LEISURE LEISURE KEY KEY

The city centre masterplan envisages: • Continued support and investment in the retail core bounded by the Bullring, Mailbox, Pavilions, Pallasades, New Street and Corporation Street as prime shopping locations. Within this area uses that create greater activity throughout the day and night will be supported. • The development of new locations for independent high-value retail locations between St Phillip’s Cathedral and New Street, and around John Bright Street onto the Mailbox.

• Entertainment/leisure focuses around Broad Street, St Paul’s Square and Digbeth High Street. • The provision of cafés, bars, restaurants and other leisure activities as part of a broader mix within the retail area • The Business Improvement Districts continuing to play a central role in supporting the improvement of the City Core and Southside area.

• The further development of art and craft/alternative independent sectors, centred upon Digbeth High Street and in the Jewellery Quarter, facilitated by improved connections to the City Core.

RETAIL & LEISURE RETAIL & LEISURE KEY

City Citycentre centreboundary boundary

Major Major road- -A38 A38 KEYroad City centre boundary City centre boundary Other Otherkey keyroads roads Major road - A38 Main reference Maincity citycentre centre reference Major road - A38 Other key roads Existing Existingretail retailcore core key roads Other Main city centre reference

City centre boundary City centre boundary City centre boundary Major road - A38 Major road -Major A38 road - A38 Other key roads Other key roads Other key roads Main city centre reference Main city centre reference Main city centre reference

Main city centre reference Retail Retailcore coreexpansion expansion Existing retail core Existing retail core Existing Existingindependant independant&& boutique boutiqueretail retailRetail core expansion Retail core expansion Expansion && Expansionofofindependant independant Existing independant & boutique boutiqueretail retailboutique retail Existing independant & boutique retail Expansion of independant & Markets Markets boutique Expansionretail of independant & boutique retail Markets Markets

Civic centre Civic centre Civic centre Existing Existing world class/ Existing world class/ world class/ international cultural attractions international cultural attractions international cultural attractions Expansion of world class/ Expansion of of world class/ Expansion world class/ international cultural activities international cultural activities international cultural activities

city centre / masterplan growth

area. The citycultural centreactivities has a broad shopping Expansion of local/authentic offer rangingcultural from regional activitiesshopping centres to value retail locations, and accompanied by a limited range of niche, high-value and independent shops.

• The creation of a new contemporary art gallery and other cultural attractions including public space as part of future redevelopment of the Wholesale Market site.

KEY

Existing local/authentic cultural Existing local/authentic cultural Existing local/authentic cultural activities activities activities Expansion of local/authentic Expansion of of local/authentic Expansion local/authentic cultural activities cultural activities cultural activities

Main city centre reference Existing Existingworld worldclass/ class/ Civic centre international attractions internationalcultural cultural attractions Civic centre Retail & Leisure Expansion Expansionofofworld worldclass/ class/ Existing world class/ international internationalcultural cultural activities international Existingactivities worldcultural class/ attractions Birmingham international is ranked ascultural the third largest attractions Expansion of world class/over Existing local/authentic cultural Existing local/authentic cultural retail centre in the UK, generating international activities Expansion of cultural world class/ activities activities of expenditure £2billion per annum. The international cultural activities city centre gained the Purple Flag status Expansion ofof local/authentic Expansion local/authentic Existing local/authentic cultural for theactivities area covered by the three Business cultural cultural activities activities Existing local/authentic cultural Improvementactivities Districts and the Southside Expansion of local/authentic

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Present

Future Culture & Civic

Retail & Leisure

Present

Future

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Sustainability Making Birmingham Green – An ambitious target has been set for a 60% reduction in the city’s carbon dioxide emissions by 2026. The city centre has an important role to play in helping to meet this goal and to contribute to achieving the wider priorities for sustainable development and adapting to climate change. These priorities include: • Improving the energy efficiency of the city’s homes and buildings. • Reducing the city’s reliance on unsustainable energy through lowcarbon energy generation and energy planning. • Reducing the city’s impact on nonrenewable resource use through resource management. • Reducing the environmental impact of the city’s mobility needs through lowcarbon transport.

city centre / masterplan sustainability

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• Ensuring the city takes a flexible approach to embracing emerging responses to climate change. The city centre is in a good position to support the achievement of these priorities. It has the potential to deliver future sustainable growth supported by an extensive, integrated public transport, pedestrian and cycling network, connecting a wide mix of uses including housing, employment and leisure. The proximity of these activities and the opportunities for future development will help reduce the need for people to travel. Our proposals include improving public transport, promoting a network of pedestrian and cycle routes; extending the network of electric charging points for motor vehicles; supporting denser mixed-use developments including more housing; creating and improving open spaces including more green infrastructure; promoting the use of new technologies and emphasising the

Promotion of cycling in the city

role of our built heritage for conversion and re-use. These will all contribute to creating more sustainable patterns of development. There is also great potential to utilise the existing building stock for energy generation, efficiency gains and future conversions. The greening of buildings including roofs and walls and the spaces around buildings with opportunities for small allotments in residential neighbourhoods and increased biodiversity will be important to improving environmental quality and reducing water run-off. Achieving this will require a coordinated approach to ensure that development in the City Centre is ‘future-proofed’ and able to adapt to and exploit the impacts and opportunities presented by climate change. The masterplan proposes that all future development will need to demonstrate strong sustainability credentials and integrate a response to the impacts of climate change. This will include energy efficiency and low/zero carbon energy provision, ensuring that new development is of an exemplar standard of sustainable design and construction; addresses water efficiency and flood risk; utilises sustainable sources of materials; enhances biodiversity, reduces waste and is supported by high quality ‘futureproofed’ design. Building to the standards of BREEAM excellent and above will be promoted

To ensure the delivery of our ambition for sustainability and the need to address the impacts of climate change are fully integrated, a range of methods and technologies can be applied. Each development will need to show how they contribute to meeting the priorities for the city and the objectives of the Masterplan. On a city centre-wide scale there are a range of opportunities to incorporate new technologies to deliver more sustainable forms of development. These are already being rolled out in some of the areas of transformation but the masterplan envisages that the following are incorporated in future developments: • Combined Heat and Power (CHP) has huge potential in utilising the critical mass of buildings and activity in the city centre. This system integrates the production of usable heat and power (electricity), in one single, highly efficient process. CHP is already in use in the city centre and the extension and expansion of the network will offer significant benefits to future development. • Digital technology will be an important tool in the future knowledge economy and help contribute to reducing the need for travel. The creation of a Digital District in Eastside is starting to realise the opportunity and supporting economic growth and promoting greater social inclusion. The provision of infrastructure and new technologies which enhance digital connectivity should form part of future developments.

Living wall at the Library of Birmingham construction site (top) Brown roof on BVSC building in Digbeth (bottom)

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Connectivity

23 Walsall

The challenge for the future will be to improve the quality of the transport environment and the efficiency of the transport network, making the city centre a place that encourages people to move around on foot, bike and public transport. Major improvements are planned for Birmingham’s transport networks, including a number of imminent projects such as the transformation of New Street Station, the Metro extension from Snow Hill Station to New Street Station, Centro’s plans to transform bus travel and the recent completion of the new Digbeth coach station. In the longer term high speed rail and the runway extension at Birmingham International Airport will enhance international access to the city. Our strategy will ensure that these major improvements are matched by an outstanding pedestrian environment and an attractive, easy to use public transport system, which together will provide capacity for, and stimulate, economic growth.

city centre / masterplan connectivity

There will be a greater emphasis on the role of public transport. This will mean improving what we have but also introducing new methods which have the ability to be delivered in the short to medium term. In the longer term the proposals for high speed rail and the terminus in Eastside will significantly enhance connections with London and potentially Europe. The city centre will need to adapt to enable the connections from the High Speed 2 station to integrate into the wider area. Our approach will have to reflect this. Our focus for the future of public transport will be upon: • Increasing the quality and capacity of Birmingham’s rail network.

Wolverhampton

Newtown

Indicative rapid transit vehicle routes outside city centre

St. Paul’s Snow Hill

City centre area

Colmore Row

Bull St.

Moor Street & HS2 Stations

y

W oo

Aston University

sle

Airport

d

Eastside

Jewellery Quarter

m

City centre train stations

el

City centre metro line extension

Ch

Just as important as these external linkages are the new internal ones that will be opened up, creating improved links through the station and in particular with a new southern entrance. Opening up the station in combination with our proposals for improving the walking experience will set the scene for wider improvements to connections within the city centre.

Indicative rapid transit vehicle routes within city centre

ay

To support the growth and regeneration of our city centre we will need to focus on improving the quality, legibility and choice of sustainable transport modes along major routes in to the city, and their interchange to key destinations. The transformation of New Street Station (Gateway Project) will dramatically improve the arrival experience into the heart of the city centre.

KEY

dw

Birmingham is an ideal location to be a successful well-connected city; served as it is by extensive rail, road and air links. While the city benefits from a range of excellent transport connections, the quality of the transport environment and the connectivity of the transport network requires improvement.

Connected city

ea

The Vision for Movement led by the business community in partnership with the City Council and Centro seeks to deliver a new approach to movement in the city centre creating a well connected, an efficient and a walkable city.

M

22

Corporation St. New Street Ladywood

• Delivering high quality Rapid Transit Routes into and around the city centre. • Transforming bus travel into and around the city centre making it more attractive to use

Centenary Square

Broad Street

• Providing safe and convenient cycle routes to and within the city centre. • Providing Park and Ride facilities to increase the capacity of routes in the city centre. • Simplifying the convenience of the public transport network through improved interchange facilities, ticketing and way finding.

Five Ways

Edgbaston

Bearwood interchange

The following proposals will deliver the improvements we want to make to our transport system: • A series of Rapid Transit Routes providing high quality frequent services, as shown in the diagram on page 23.

Sheldon

Birmingham International Airport, HS2 Interchange & Train Station

Quinton

Birmingham University University Hospital

Longbridge

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Proposal for improved public transport network in the city centre

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• Link up existing rail lines at Camp Hill to enable new railway stations at Moseley, Kings Heath and Hazelwell to the South and Fort Dunlop and Castle Bromwich to the North. • Implementation of the city centre Interchange proposed for Moor Street Queensway.

Efficient city Giving greater priority to pedestrians and public transport will improve movement in the city centre which has long been dominated by the private motor vehicle. Promoting greater pedestrian priority and public transport use will be central to raising liveability, decreasing carbon emissions, improving air quality and ultimately delivering more sustainable patterns of development. Making more effective use of our highway network and creating more attractive, sustainable modes of travel into and out of the city centre will encourage people to make greater use of them and lessen the reliance on private vehicles. This will

city centre / masterplan connectivity

Coach station

• Providing priority access for public transport and pedestrians and cyclists at congested locations.

A38 road interventions, pedestrian crossing improvements Main distributor roads

• Developing co-ordinated parking strategies to improve the efficiency of planning within the city centre.

New connecting roads Existing roads to be connected

• Improve servicing and waste collection arrangements in the city centre and access for emergency vehicles. • Promote the use of sustainable travel options through existing business and residential communities. • The improvement of key junctions around the Ring Road will be required to reduce delays for public transport routes and encourage cross-city drivers to use this route rather than the A38. • Expanding Controlled Parking Zones (CPZs) and/or on-street parking controls. The following proposals as shown on the diagram on page 25 will deliver the improvements we want to make to the efficiency with which our highways are used: • A number of junction alterations may be required as part of the Rapid Transit Routes. • Other junction improvements may be required at locations on the RIng Road as shown in Figure 9. • Responding to large scale developments in Eastside and Southside the city centre road network will be improved, with new connecting roads between Digbeth High Street

:

Ring road junction improvements

• Promote and facilitate the provision and use of alternative fuels including electric charging points.

Cycle hire hubs: New Street Station Mailbox public realm Paradise Forum Ludgate Hill Colmore Plaza Eastside Station Square Moat Square Electric car charging stations: Bullring multi storey car park Margaret Street Temple Row Brindley Drive multi storey Brindleyplace car park Aston Street (Aston University)

Snow Hill Station

New Street Station

Eastside Station Moor Street Station

:

• Extension of the Metro from Snow Hill Station to Stephenson Street.

Train stations

:

• Improved pedestrian linkages along St Martins Queensway between New Street and Moor Street Stations.

25

Middle ring road & A38

:

• Junction improvements at key locations on the Ring Road including at Five Ways, Bordesley Circus, Dartmouth Circus and the Hockley Flyover.

KEY

:

• Cycle parking at key locations and within new developments to encourage cycle and ride.

however mean hard choices regarding road capacity, access and availability of long-stay car parking in the City Core. Our approach proposes:

:

• The introduction of smarter routes creating greater efficiency of road spaces to support Rapid Transit routes.

:

24

and Pershore Street as well as between James Watt Queensway and Digbeth.

Birmingham Coach Station

• An effective signage strategy to encourage cross-city car drivers to use the Ring Road. • Electric charging points at a variety of locations including Aston University and the National Indoor Arena. • The provision of cycle parking and cycle hubs at a variety of locations including St Paul’s Square, the NIA, Eastside, Jewellery Quarter, Highgate as proposed in the diagram on page 25. • Development of a co-ordinated and effective strategy to promote sustainable travel.

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Efficient city

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Walkability

A38

A38

A38

A38

A38

A38

In 20 years

A38

At present

A38

A38

A38

• Centenary Square – the setting for one of Europe’s largest public libraries; the square will be expanded across Broad Street creating an attractive centrepiece to an extended City Core. • Moat Square – the cradle of Birmingham with archaeological remains hidden under the Wholesale Markets. The new open space will be a reflection of the city’s historical core and pride for Birmingham’s cultural identity. Acting as a centrepiece for the Southern Gateway and expansion of the City Core.

In 20 years

A38

We will create a series of upgraded and major new public spaces throughout the city centre to deliver a world-class experience for visitors and residents:

• Golden Square – a new focal point at the heart of the Jewellery Quarter for events, exhibitions and markets.

At present

A38

Our priority over the next 20 years will be to extend the existing network of spaces building upon the successes to date.

20 years ago

expanding north and south by breaking through the former Inner Ring Road and A38 The city core with expansion of the -open space network. expanding north of and south breaking Further sections the canalbyand river Rea will through the former Inner be exposed to public use.Ring Road and A38 The city core with expansion of the -open space network. expanding north of and south breaking Further sections the canalby and river Rea will through the to former Inner be exposed public use.Ring Road and A38 with expansion of the open space network. Further sections of the canal and river Rea will be exposed to public use.

A38

Providing a network of high quality pedestrian routes and a series of

The city centre benefits from a series of distinctive public squares and civic spaces that are concentrated in the City Core along the pedestrian spine. Beyond this there are a range of other spaces, parks and cemeteries which are poorly connected and under utilised.

20 years ago

In 20 years - The city core

A38

Our proposals for the next 20 years will see major improvements delivering a wider network of new spaces connected by enhanced streets. The evolution of the space and routes network is depicted in the diagram on page 27.

Walkable City

• New Street Station (Gateway Project) – the transformation of the station will create a number of new squares, enhancing the public realm and the arrival experience at one of the UK’s busiest stations. These new spaces will improve north-south and east-west connections.

A38

In the last 20 years Birmingham has achieved great success in creating a pedestrianised spine running through the City Core from St Martin’s via Centenary Square to Brindleyplace.

accessible open spaces, parks and squares will be vital in helping the city to reduce its carbon emissions, improve visitor experience and create a safer and more welcoming environment. This network will connect our wider city centre within and beyond its existing boundaries.

At present

- The city core has started to grow east and west breaking through the inner Ring Road. The main - Theestablished city core has pedestrian axis has been between started to grow and westhas breaking key spaces. Parteast of the canal been through inner Ring Road. The main exposedthe to public realm improvements. - Theestablished city core has pedestrian axis has been between started to grow and westhas breaking key spaces. Part east of the canal been through inner Ring The main exposedthe to public realmRoad. improvements. pedestrian axis has been established between key spaces. Part of the canal has been exposed to public realm improvements.

A38

This is an essential element of the overall strategy, providing attractive, safe and legible routes between transport connections and destinations.

20 years ago

- ‘The concrete collar’ - Inner Ring Road restricting linkages between open spaces. The canal is hidden - ‘The concrete and underused collar’ - Inner Ring Road restricting linkages between open spaces. The canal is hidden - ‘The concrete and underused collar’ - Inner Ring Road restricting linkages between open spaces. The canal is hidden and underused

A38

Improving and expanding the walking routes and open space network will support our ambitions for a liveable and well-connected city centre.

27

A38

26

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city centre / masterplan walkability

Centenary Square with new Library of Birmingham

New Street Station eastern square

Evolution of spaces and linkages in the city centre

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In the longer term we envisage creating additional major urban spaces including Digbeth Viaduct and Lancaster Circus. To complement these major interventions more localised spaces throughout the city centre will be improved and created. This network will be explored in detail throughout the individual quarter sections. The improvements to and extensions of the walking routes throughout the city centre will help to connect these spaces.

Network of walking routes New and improved routes with pedestrian and cycle priority will be central to delivering a more sustainable city centre that is more attractive to live in.

city centre / masterplan walkability

Complementing these primary walking routes are the secondary and tertiary routes. These routes provide additional capacity and alternative links. - the city realm centrewill walking Improvements to the public be distances of ‘main walking Loop’ in London prioritised to improve primary routes first and subsequent streets will follow.

Walkability

KEY KEY

ORD

EET

Street Station 1 New 1 New Street Station churchyard 2 St.St.Philip’s Philip’s churchyard 2 Square 3 St.St.Paul’s Paul’s Square 3 - Golden Square 4 NEW 4 NEW - Golden Square & Chamberlain’s Squares 5 Victoria 5 Victoria & Chamberlain’s Squares - Centenary Square 6 NEW 6 NEW - Centenary Square Square 7 Brindleyplace 7 Brindleyplace Square & Cube public realm 8 Mailbox 8 Mailbox & Cube public realm & Arcadian public realm 9 Hippodrome 9 Hippodrome & Arcadian public realm Square & St. Martin’s 10 Rotunda 10 Rotunda Square & St. Martin’s - Moat Square 11 NEW 11 NEW - Moat Square Factory public realm 12 Custard Custard Factory public realm 12 NEW - Eastside Station Square 13 13 NEW - Eastside Station Square - Lancaster Circus 14 NEW 14 NEW - Lancaster Circus 15 Lakeside 15 Lakeside - City Park 16 NEW 16 NEW - City Park - Digbeth viaduct park 17 NEW - Digbeth viaduct park distances in Birmingham are equivalent 17 NEW Park 18 Highgate 18 Highgate Park Central 19 Park 19 Park Central

4 14 3 15

16 2

2

13

5 6 1

7

10

8

11 9

12

17

to

City centre boundary

19

Birmingham’s primary walking routes London’s major walking loop superimposed over Birmingham city centre Canal and River Rea

STR

18

1

3

PA RK

29

Major open spaces Major open spaces

5

OXF

New Street Station - major city centre node New Street Station - major city centre node Existing major open spaces Existing major open spaces Major short-medium term improvements short-medium term improvements & Major opportunities for open spaces & opportunities for open spaces Major long term aspirations for improvements long term for improvements & Major opportunities foraspirations open spaces & opportunities for open spaces Extension of primary walking routes Extension of primary walking routes Existing primary walking routes Existing primary walking routes Radial and local walking routes Radial and local walking routes River Rea River Rea Canals Canals Existing & proposed water Existing & proposed water space nodes space nodes

KEY

E N LA

The compact nature of our city centre means that many trips are achievable on

The network of walking routes is formed by a hierarchy of streets which prioritise their importance and as a result the scale of intervention and investment. This network is illustrated in the diagram on page 29. The primary walking routes are those that are identified as of significance for the wider city centre connecting key destinations. This makes them the most significant in terms of pedestrian connectivity, movement and activities. Along these routes improvements to the public realm will be targeted and the emphasis on active frontages and street entertainment will be key.

DI LL Y

• Water spaces (Emerald Ring) – both the canal network and the River Rea are an important part of the city’s historic legacy and represent an unexploited asset. They provide a great opportunity to form a network of spaces and routes within the city centre to help connect the quarters and link to areas beyond the Ring Road. Along the canal and river there are opportunities to create spaces for new and improved public realm, with cafes, performance spaces and squares.

CA

• Eastside City Park – the first new urban park to be developed in Birmingham for over 125 years, creating a key focal point for Eastside and providing a catalyst for the area’s regeneration with a series of themed open spaces.

foot. The concept of the walkable city puts the needs of pedestrians at the heart of the movement strategy for the city centre. This strategy reflects that achieved in other cities such as London with 20 minute walks from key points around the network, as shown in the diagram below. These routes can support the links to those areas beyond the Ring Road enhancing wider connectivity.

PI C

28

• Eastside Square – a new focal point in Eastside for those arriving from the proposed High Speed 2 terminus

4

1

St. Philip’s churchyard

2

St. Paul’s Square

3

Brinleyplace Square

4 5

St. Martin’s Lakeside at Aston University

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City centre open space network

bigcityplan.org.uk


30

In improving the overall walkability of our city centre we will focus on: • Extending the city centre’s network of high quality streets and public spaces. • Transforming the quality, safety and security of the walking environment through introducing activity, improved lighting and street furniture so that walking becomes the most enjoyable and convenient way of getting round the city centre. • Creating a simple and memorable mental map of the city centre to encourage walking as part of an overall journey that includes public transport. • Providing for the needs of the elderly and mobility impaired through design. Our priority over the next 20 years is to create a network of primary walking routes that are legible, clear and easy to use. This will enable direct connections between key areas within our city centre supporting the growth of the City Core and improving connections to neighbouring quarters and beyond. Specific improvements include: Moor Street – New Street Station link A high quality pedestrian route will provide an attractive and convenient connection between the main transport interchanges of New Street Station and the existing Moor Street and proposed High Speed 2 stations. Great Charles Street A number of improvements are proposed to prioritise pedestrian movement: The main priority will be to create a safe and attractive pedestrian link from Church Street in the City Core to Ludgate Hill in the Jewellery Quarter. In the short term improvements to the existing foot bridge are at planned enhancing its quality

city centre / masterplan walkability

and appearance. In the longer term an innovative design solution will be required to deliver a direct and convenient pedestrian link connecting Church Street and Ludgate Hill. Improvements are also planned to the pedestrian route at the upper end of Great Charles Street in connection with the redevelopment of Paradise Circus. Linkages to Digbeth/ Southside and Highgate The redevelopment of New Street Station will provide new connections through entrances and walkways on the south, north and east of the station.

In the longer term we envisage other key improvements which will extend the network of primary walking routes and improved access across the city centre for pedestrians.

31

To complement this primary route network a wider and more localised network, of pedestrian routes (local walking routes) throughout the city centre will be created. This network will be explored in detail throughout the individual quarter sections.

Improvements to Digbeth High Street including alterations to the gyratory at the top end by the Bullring will improve connections between Digbeth and the City Core. Redevelopment of the Wholesale Markets will reintroduce direct connections helping to improve links between the City Core, Digbeth, Southside & Highgate areas. Way finding A new wayfinding system will create an easy to interpret and consistent means for finding your way around the city centre. The system will consist of easy to interpret and access maps, utilise digital and mobile technology and create a single system of on-street signage (identified as signage points on the diagram on page 31). All will conform to a standard approach and style, providing a consistent method for finding your way around the city centre. The primary walking route from New Street Station to the Colmore Row business district and onto the Jewellery Quarter will be the first area to receive improved on-street pedestrian information.

WALKING CITY KEY

City centre boundary Train/ coach/ metro stations Canals River Rea Signed primary walking routes Signed secondary walking routes Signed tertiary walking routes Signage points Canal route marker

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Network of walking routes

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32

Building Heights Tall buildings provide the opportunity to manage and create an identifiable skyline memorable for its key buildings. The location of tall buildings needs to be handled carefully, respecting the surrounding environment and the topography. The quality of design must reflect and justify their dominant position in the built environment. Our approach to tall buildings has been a positive one of working in partnership with developers and investors to enable tall buildings of the highest quality to achieve planning consent. High Places, a tall buildings policy document produced in 2003, defined tall buildings as anything over 15 storeys in height. The focus for these buildings is the central ridge, which includes the city’s highest point and runs west to east through the city centre. In recognising the value of tall buildings to the city we have developed an approach which identifies:

• Broad locations suitable for tall buildings.

• Locations where clusters of taller buildings can be beneficial.

• Areas where tall buildings are not appropriate.

The diagram on page 33 shows a broad zone where tall buildings could be appropriate. Within this zone our approach will be for building heights to rise up from the east toward the western end of the city ridge to reflect and emphasise the topography of the area.

Whilst individual tall buildings will continue to be important; clusters of taller buildings can also bring benefits in terms of urban structure, skyline identity and definition of key places. Such clusters will consist of three or more buildings that must be carefully planned to address their context and setting. Suitable locations for such clusters of tall buildings are identified by the orange circles in the diagram on page 33 and include areas at: Five Ways / Broad Street, Westside / Paradise Circus, New Street Station South, Snow Hill District, Lancaster Circus and Rotunda Square. In general, proposals for tall buildings will be considered subject to detailed consultation on location, massing, density and design quality. They will need to ensure they integrate into and are compatible with their surroundings; enhance skylines, views and settings; protect and preserve areas of special character and interest including principal views across the city and historic skyline; assist in the legibility of the city and contribute strongly to a sense of place and promote the highest design quality.

33 facilities, creating high quality public space at the same time. They will need ‘breathing space’, and the creation of a publicly accessible plaza, or extension of existing public realm will be required. The control and concentration of taller buildings along the city centre ridge can only be successful if balanced by limitations imposed within adjoining areas of distinctive character. These sensitive areas, where heights and massing will be carefully controlled and determined by existing heights and guidelines, to enhance and retain intrinsic character are identified within the Jewellery Quarter, Digbeth and Southside & Highgate areas.

KEY

City centre boundary Key locators: St. Philip’s cathedral St. Martin’s Rotunda New Street Station

Tall buildings will also be considered in context, proximity and relationship to neighbouring buildings, overshadowing, impact on micro-climate, key views both distant and local and incorporation of sustainable principles. Each tall building proposal will need to satisfy the Aerodrome Safeguarding requirements of Birmingham Airport.

Existing height ridge zone

A

New height ridge zone Tall building cluster zones

It will be important that such buildings have a good relationship with the street, movement patterns and transport

Zones with restricted height limit Indicative city centre skyline

A city centre / masterplan building heights

A

Section line

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Tall building clusters and height limits within city centre

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34

Medieval Birmingham until 1730

Heritage Although best known as the Victorian ‘workshop of the world’, Birmingham has a rich heritage dating back as far as the Middle Ages. The city’s heritage is its roots, its authenticity and its individuality. This heritage is the physical legacy that has been left by human activity in the form of buildings, monuments, sites and landscapes that reflect the history of trade, population movement, architectural endeavour, economic, political and social development and the use of natural resources from prehistory to the present. Within the city centre this consists of: • Individual buildings and other structures, surviving above ground in whole or in part principally dating from the mid 19th century onwards, but a few older buildings survive. • Street patterns and property boundaries from the 12th century onwards. • Landscapes and townscapes, including cemeteries, squares and canal corridors whose group value in combinations of buildings or structures and their contribution to the street scene may be greater than their individual significance.

Medieval Birmingham 1730 - 1810 Medieval Birmingham until 1730 until 1730

183 183 35

The heritage that survives from the past is unique and irreplaceable. It contributes to sustainability, character, local distinctiveness, and a sense of place. It provides much of the authentic character of the city. The present character of the city centre reflects its historic growth. The diagrams below are based upon old maps of the city, and show how the city centre has evolved over the past centuries with key features and street patterns that emerged. Established as a new planned town in the 12th century, Birmingham was an important industrial and market centre in the medieval period. Although the only surviving buildings from this period are the Old Crown, in Digbeth and parts of St Martin’s church, the medieval street pattern is still in use throughout the City Core and into Digbeth. Well-preserved archaeological remains provide the

evidence of past activity and uses. Growth of the city centre in the 18th and 19th centuries resulted from the release of land from large estates to form industrial development, particularly related to the canal system. The Jewellery Quarter and the Gunsmiths’ Quarter are well known as part of this period of the city’s development. Elsewhere distinctive street patterns are prominent in the present townscape, for example in north Digbeth and in Southside, even though relatively few 18th and early 19th century buildings survive. The city’s canals are an integral part of the surviving industrial character, accompanied in their corridors by wharves, basins, bridges, tunnels, and the remains of adjoining industries. The railways followed in the mid 19th century and features are still a central part of today’s network. Further 18th and 19th century development included several public buildings, places of worship and burial grounds.

MedievalBirmingham Birmingham Medieval Birmingham 1730--1810 18101730 - 1810 Medieval 1730 until1730 1730 until 1730 until

20th century buildings in the city centre are often under-appreciated but range from offices and department stores to wartime structures. Archaeological investigation of surviving structures and excavation of below ground remains of the past 300 years has provided much additional information on the past uses in the city centre. heritage assets have designations St.Some Philips, moat & reflecting their special medieval manor house significance such as listed buildings, conservation areas and registered parks. These are only part of the historic environment; many nondesignated heritage assets in the city centre are recorded in the City Council’s Historic Environment Record, some are locally listed and many simply reflect the important part of the authentic character and an asset in their own right or as a collective.

1830--1910 1910 1830- 1990 - 1910 1830 1930

The masterplan recognises that the historic environment will significantly contribute to the future transformation of the city centre. This will be achieved by: • Understanding the character and contribution, whether it be as part of a designation or as a result of a better understanding of the inherent quality.

St. Philips, moatthat & the historic • Recognising St. Philips,manor moatishouse &itself a resource and medieval environment St. Paul’s &manor canal system medieval house that retention and reuse contributes to sustainability including reduction in carbon emissions, waste and use of resources.

• The full potential of archaeological remains to provide information about the past will be exploited through investigation and recording where their preservation is not feasible. The important heritage assets that will contribute to the authentic character of the city centre will be identified through the individual quarters. St. Paul’s & canal system Rail viaducts & parks St. Paul’s & canal system

Rail via Rail via

KEY

KEY KEY

• Making the most of what’s there already; designing the historic environment into schemes, using it to encourage and inspire high quality modern design that enhances the heritage assets and their settings.

1930 - 1990 1930 - 1990

• A wide range of well preserved archaeological remains, including structures and objects, organic remains and evidence for past environmental conditions. Although the archaeological remains generally date from the 12th century onwards, surfaces dating back 10,000 years have been found near Banbury Street.

Current city Centre centreBoundary boundary Existing City Arterial roads

St.Philips, Philips,moat moat&& St. Philips, moat & St. medieval manor house medievalmanor manorhouse house medieval

city centre / masterplan heritage

1730 -- 1910 1810 1830 1730 - 1810

Other main roads

Ring St. Paul’s & canal system Rail Railroads viaducts & parks St.Paul’s Paul’s&&canal canalsystem system Railviaducts viaducts&&parks parks St.

Ring roads Ring roads

Key features

bigcityplan.org.uk


36

The Quarters City Core

JEWELLERY QUARTER CITY CORE

Birmingham’s City Core is the single biggest economic driver of the regional economy. It is the centre of the region’s retailing, banking and financial services and the civic and cultural heart of the city.

37

GUNSMITHS QUARTER

EASTSIDE

WESTSIDE & LADYWOOD

DIGBETH

SOUTHSIDE & HIGHGATE

About the quarter • The £600 million New Street station (Gateway Project), will deliver a bright, modern 21st century transport hub for the city. • 40 million people visit the Bullring and retail heart with over £2 billion spent every year. • The Colmore Business District supports over 24,000 jobs. • The Town Hall, Art Gallery and Museum and Council House provide the civic heart of the city. • It is served by three main line train stations with over 14 million people using New Street station every year. • House of Fraser is the largest department store outside London. • It is home to over 100 independent shops. The City Core is mainly defined by the route of the former Inner Ring Road which in the most part continues to create a distinct change in character from the surrounding city centre quarters. The Core is densely built up with its historic street layout largely intact. There are several landmark buildings, the most notable being Selfridges and the Bullring development, the Rotunda, St Martins

Church, the Council House with the adjoining Museum and Art Gallery and the Town Hall – one of ten Grade I Listed Buildings in the City Core.

sits underneath the Pallasades Shopping Centre and the block currently forms a physical barrier to pedestrian access beyond.

At the centre of the Core is St Philips’s Cathedral, around which the churchyard provides a popular green space to form one of the city’s most attractive squares. The square and surrounding streets were originally laid out as a Georgian planned extension of the original medieval town based around St. Martin’s Church and the Bullring.

Victoria Square, to the west of the Cathedral, is the centrepiece of the civic heart and is overlooked by the impressive Council House and Town Hall. The pedestrianised square, together with the adjoining Chamberlain Square, forms one end of the primary walking route along New Street to the Bullring and hosts markets and events throughout the year.

To the north-west of the square lies the Colmore Business District, the heart of the city’s business and financial sector, within a historic and high quality setting, much of which is protected by a conservation area designation. Alongside more recent office developments, some fine historic buildings have been sensitively modernised to provide a variety of spaces for the city’s main office offer.

Much of the north-east area of the City Core is dominated by some fine historic buildings forming a hub of legal activity around the Victoria Law Courts and the Children’s Hospital complex.

To the south-west, the older buildings closest to St Philip’s Churchyard give way to more modern, large scale retail developments. The heart of the city’s retail core is focused upon Corporation Street, New Street, High Street and the Bullring. New Street station

vision for our City Core is to strengthen its role as a 24 hour city bigcityplan.org.uk


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The City Core accommodates a wealth of activities; however it is relatively small for the size of the city and its wider catchment area. For many years, the ‘concrete collar’ of the former Inner Ring Road constrained growth and concentrated activity. As a result the central area of the city centre is compact and walkable, yet often confusing to navigate and bursting at the seams.

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The overall vision for the City Core is to strengthen its role as a 24 hour city – a thriving shopping, leisure, and business destination which supports the civic and cultural role of Birmingham within a high quality, distinctive and vibrant environment. Expanding the City Core into the surrounding quarters will provide long-term strength and stability for the city centre.

CITY CORE

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Major highways barriers Central nodes © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

City Core masterplan

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In order to achieve our ambitions for the City Core we will need to address a number of key issues including: • The creation of more attractive, distinctive streets and places within a city centre that is easy to navigate. • The provision of a unique and diverse retail offer that can compete with other major centres. • The provision of a prestige office location with a variety of high quality development opportunities to meet a wide range of business requirements. • The opportunities created in the areas of transformation – the redevelopment of New Street station and around Snow Hill.

Connected City Attractive and convenient connections within the Core are fundamental to the quality of the visitor experience and to its strength in attracting investment. We want to transform the look and feel of the

city centre’s retail core shopping streets and make Birmingham the top retail and cultural destination in the UK outside of London. Focusing and expanding on our two key shopping streets, New Street and Corporation Street, our retail strategy proposes improvements to transform the streetscape and activities in order to create high-quality, well connected and unique environments. Distinctive character areas have been identified within the retail core where the focus will be to promote their individual characteristics and opportunities as part of a diverse retail offer. New Street will become one of the world’s great streets. It is already the key primary walking route linking the civic heart of the city at Victoria Square to the Bullring shopping centre and comes to life with regular markets and events throughout the year. The streetscape does however need rejuvenating, particularly in order to maximise the benefits of the proposed transformation of the public realm around New Street station.

Corporation Street will be re-discovered as the grand street created by the Victorians. It forms the second of the Core’s primary walking routes between New Street station and Aston University. Within the retail core, buses will be removed to transform the pedestrian and shopping environment allowing introduction of the metro extension. Beyond Old Square, towards Lancaster Circus, the streetscape will be improved to make the most of the area’s historic buildings including the Law Courts and the landmark Methodist Central Hall. Navigation Street will extend the pedestrian route from New Street Station to the Mailbox through planned improvements to the railway bridges as part of the Gateway Project creating opportunities for artwork and lighting that could animate and provide a draw to the route. Along the primary walking routes, rationalised market stalls and dedicated space for street performers will be important to create attractive and thriving places between shopping destinations.

An improved, exciting pedestrian environment along the streets within the ‘Cathedral Walks’ character area between New Street and St Philip’s Cathedral will be introduced. This area will become the home of small-scale specialist boutique and independent shopping, with Temple Street also providing a key route between the new Stephenson Street entrance to New Street station and the Colmore Business District. There are a number of independent and specialist retailers, particularly along Smallbrook Queensway. The new southern entrance to New Street station will help to bring greater numbers of people to the area. John Bright Street will become a location in which to develop niche and independent retailing. Church Street will become part of the primary walking route between the Colmore Business District and the Jewellery Quarter. With Big City Plan Initiatives and Colmore Business District funding in place, a new high quality public square will visually link the focal points of St Philip’s Cathedral in the Core with St Paul’s Church in the Jewellery Quarter. The remodelling of Great Charles Street will be instrumental in completing the physical link between the two churches.

Bus travel will be transformed by Centro’s proposed re-working of bus routes into and around the City Core and the provision of the City Centre Interchange for buses on Moor Street Queensway.

Authentic City The city’s civic heart is focused around the Council House, Town Hall and the Art Galleries and Museum. Here, some of the finest showpiece buildings help to define the image of Birmingham. The redevelopment of the existing buildings within Paradise Circus will reconnect Broad Street and Centenary Square into the City Core and also provide a fitting setting for these world-class buildings and squares. Much of the City Core is covered by conservation areas and significant Listed Buildings, such as the Victoria Law Courts, that require improved settings and management of the public realm in order to really show off and make the most of their fine heritage and authentic character.

Liveable City The City Core should provide a place in which people choose to shop, work, live and spend their leisure time. Different needs should be catered for, and opportunities to broaden the appeal of the city should be grasped. Expanding range and choice to create a diverse retail offer will be a key priority. Opportunities to further expand the quantity and range of retailers at every level will be supported. To make Birmingham stand apart, the diversity and choice of specialist and independent trading will be promoted. The Square shopping centre between Bull Street and Priory Queensway currently provides a range of value and niche retailers including the Oasis Indoor Market. The centre adds diversity to the city’s retail offer in terms of choice and price and these aspects will continue to be needed and also promoted within the wider city centre.

The Gateway Project will transform the current 1960’s station into a modern facility providing visitors with the arrival experience they would be expecting of any world-class city. New entrances opening out to high quality public space to the south, east and north will reconnect this part of the city centre. The proposal for High Speed 2 into Eastside will need strong links from within the City Core to capitalise on the benefits presented by the regeneration of Eastside. Walking links from New Street station will be improved.

the quarters / city core

City in light – Retail Birmingham lighting proposal

Cathedral walks improvement proposals (before & after)

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The district houses one of the country’s most comprehensive, and respected Children’s Hospitals. The masterplan seeks to provide an opportunity for the hospital to expand, and upgrade its facility to modern efficient standards, while retaining use and occupation of historic listed Victorian buildings.

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The growth of supporting leisure, retail and commercial activities will be accommodated and grouped at key nodes. • Public Realm Snow Hill Square with its granite surfaces, dynamic water feature, and high quality planting and street furniture sets a standard for public realm in this area which should be matched in new public spaces and revitalised streets throughout the district.

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

Snowhill District transformation area masterplan

Long-standing proposals to replace The Square and surrounding blocks as part of the Martineau Galleries retail development are likely to adapt, recognising the important link between the Colmore Business District and the Masshouse and Eastside developments – these locations will become particularly attractive for offices should the High Speed 2 terminus come. The retail component of the scheme will still need to be significant in order to retain a critical mass of shoppers to ensure the revitalisation and vitality of High Street. The City Core has a relatively low number of residential units compared to some of the surrounding quarters, leaving the core area quieter at times when it should still be buzzing with life and activity. As part of mixed-use developments or building

the quarters / city core

conversions, more residential apartments will be encouraged in the City Core on upper floors to create a larger resident population that will support shops and services, and enliven the heart of the city.

Areas of Transformation Snow Hill District The Snow Hill District is the natural extension to the existing Business District, and significant new office buildings are planned, complete or under development. The recognition of the Children’s Hospital as an important national and regional facility and its potential future need for modern facilities could open up further opportunities for new development.

This area of the City Core overlaps into the Jewellery Quarter and its transformation will bring the two quarters closer together in terms of the transition from the City Core and the physical connections. Development opportunities will need to be supported by the creation of a series of new primary walking routes and open spaces.

Snow Hill Queensway could be radically traffic calmed and boulevarded to give greater priority to pedestrians. A new link will lead to Lancaster Circus where proposed redevelopment includes filling in the subways and raising its levels to create an attractive and usable public space, accessed by street level crossings.

• Growth The potential of a high speed rail link terminating nearby significantly raises the likelihood of major HQ relocations and expansion of existing business needs. The demand for the highest quality of architecture incorporating cutting edge sustainable design and construction principles, a broad range of scale and adaptable floorspace, environmental quality and supporting infrastructure must be met.

• Connectivity Snow Hill station acts as a physical barrier to the expansion of the Business District. The redevelopment of the existing car park, giving access over the railway via ramps and escalator links through a new station concourse to Snow Hill Square, the new Metro extension, and the wider area beyond will vastly improve connections. The improvements to pedestrian routes will establish vital, legible and necessary links to the Jewellery Quarter, the Gunsmiths’ Quarter and the Learning Quarter of Eastside. The proposal for the High Speed 2 terminus at Moor Street Queensway focuses the need to provide clear and legible routes to the Snow Hill District, with strong pedestrian routes through the Martineau Galleries site and Masshouse. A new pedestrian priority route through the hospital site will open up access to new non-hospital development and generate further permeability across the area. High quality streets with pedestrian priority, well signed, and active throughout the day and evening will be important.

The area links into major educational centres and student accommodation. Good clear cycle routes will encourage sustainable travel, as well as serving office workers. • Massing General storey heights in the area will range from 6 to 12 storeys, with a stepping up from Lancaster Circus along the Queensway to St Chads to a cluster of tall buildings grouped around Snow Hill Queensway up to 30 storeys. There is potential for a taller building up to 16 storeys at the point within the Children’s Hospital site where Corporation Street meets Lancaster Circus, ensuring that views through to the historic towers of the main hospital building would be retained. If it is possible to develop over Snow Hill station, mass will step up from Livery Street with an overall height not exceeding 8 storeys, and retaining views through from Cornwall and Edmund Streets. Building heights and proximity will need to take account of allowing good daylight to activity areas and public spaces.

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

Post & Mail Square proposal

Indicative option for transformation areas – Snow Hill District

bigcityplan.org.uk

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active arrival and departure space. The station entrance ‘electronic eye’ will provide information and visual interest. A grand staircase, lift and ramp gives access to Station Street and Hill Street, and new granite paving, wall treatments, street furniture and lighting to the surrounding streets are part of the station renewal programme.

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• Connectivity New Street station will have six access points, and a pedestrian route around the entire perimeter. The route through the station concourse from north to south will be open 24 hours giving easy connection from the retail and civic core to the entertainment district, Chinese Quarter and Gay Village.

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

New Street Station transformation area masterplan

• Heritage The area is covered in part by two Conservation Areas and has a number of Listed and Locally Listed Buildings. These are integral to the character of the district, and architectural design which responds in terms of quality of materials, appropriate scale and detailing is vital to promoting an historic district which can incorporate the best in contemporary design. Sequential views will be carefully managed to enhance the character of the district and provide landmark reference points to journeys through the area. New Street Station Immediately to the south of New Street station, large-scale office and hotel redevelopment took place between the 1950s and 1970s on sites cleared to build

the quarters / city core

New Street Station southern approach from Southside

the former Inner Ring Road. However 50 years on and the blockage to pedestrian routes created by New Street station has resulted in several vacant and underused sites, with major recent investment limited to the landmark Radisson Hotel at Holloway Circus and residential apartments around John Bright Street. • Growth The redevelopment of New Street station will have a profound impact on the whole of the City Core, but the new street level link, from the north at Stephenson Street, through a new concourse and public space, to a grand entrance to Station Street and Hill Street will galvanise the regeneration of the station’s southern neighbourhood.

Pedestrian links across the Smallbrook and Suffolk Street Queensways are poor, particularly at Holloway Circus, and need improvement. This will achieve strong links between Southside, the residential communities of Bath Row, and the Mailbox, CUBE and canalside.

The Hill Street link to Southside will see significant environmental improvement and the introduction of new activity and better public transport.

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The area will benefit from the introduction of the metro extension and Rapid Transit. • Massing Future development on the southern plaza will be tall, up to 30 storeys. There is potential for tall buildings between 16 and 20 storeys on other redevelopment sites in the area. Care must be taken to avoid overshadowing the public realm and residential uses. • Heritage Station Street has a fine traditional frontage with some listed buildings, which needs to be retained and enhanced by a sensitive design and active frontage to the station side. John Bright Street has good buildings some of which are locally listed. The character should be retained and enhanced by appropriate active uses at ground floor, with residential above.

This area will be the hub of taxi dropoff and pick-up. The public space will be active and lively, sitting above new retail shops on Hill Street and Station Street. Ultimately this public space will incorporate tall development, which could be a mix of office, retail and residential. A small number of local sites and buildings will be subject to new mixed development or redevelopment. John Bright Street is a pleasant pedestrianised street with some fine buildings. It is intended that this street encourages niche retail occupants and extends its cafe / bar offer. • Public Realm The southern station plaza will provide a substantial public space as well as an

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

Indicative option for transformation area – New Street Station

bigcityplan.org.uk


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Eastside

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Eastside is a central focus for regeneration activity in the city centre that has brought about the removal of the ‘concrete collar’ at Masshouse and the emergence of the area as a location for knowledge, skills and innovation. It has both great potential for accommodating the expansion of City Core uses through major mixed-use development alongside the established science, technology and learning activities. The proposals for high speed rail will bring both major opportunities and challenges for the future of the quarter.

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About the quarter • Home to a number of educational institutions including Birmingham Metropolitan College, Ormiston Academy, the 40 acre Aston University campus with its 9,500 students and the proposed Birmingham City University campus bringing an additional 5,000 students. • An estimated one million people a year visit Millennium Point – England’s largest millennium project outside of London. • Alongside modern developments sit a number of historical buildings including the fine Grade I Listed Curzon Street Station – the original terminus for the Birmingham to London rail line. • Occupying a 22 acre campus, Birmingham Science Park Aston is a focus for innovation-led knowledge based businesses.

Eastside consists of three distinct character areas. The area north of Jennens Road, known as The Aston Triangle, consists of the Aston University campus with Birmingham Science Park Aston. The area is dominated by large individual buildings dating from the 1960s – 1980s set within open spaces. This pattern of development is complemented by the more recently completed structures around Jennens Road including the distinctive Millennium Point building. From here down to the Victorian viaducts and east of Millennium Point much of the land is cleared, but interspersed with historical buildings including Curzon Street Station. Some of the historic Victorian street pattern remains and with the Digbeth Branch Canal, which runs along the eastern side of the quarter, the area retains links to its industrial heritage.

The spread of City Core uses has seen development activity around the Masshouse area that is more reflective in scale and character to buildings within the City Core.

The Vision The overall vision for Eastside is to maximise its unique and extensive development potential to create a quarter supporting the best in learning, technology and science with opportunities for expanding the City Core with new commercial, residential, leisure and entertainment uses. Responding to the proposals for high speed rail will transform Eastside into a key arrival destination, unlocking development opportunities and linking the area into the City Core.

On the doorstep of the City Core, Eastside offers major redevelopment opportunities and an established learning and technology focus. bigcityplan.org.uk


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On the doorstep of the City Core, Eastside offers major redevelopment opportunities and an established learning and technology focus. The area has all the attributes to drive forward our ambitions for Birmingham as a place of fantastic connections and a driver of the knowledge economy. The role of the Birmingham Science Park Aston and the educational establishments will be central in creating a hub for research, learning and technological advances. The heart for the city’s digital revolution will be Eastside. We will address a number of key issues so we can realise the full potential for Eastside.

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Quarter boundaries 1 Quarter boundaries Key characteristic areas with Key characteristic areas with significant boundaries significant boundaries Pedestrian connections Pedestrian connections Rail line Rail line Proposed HS2 line Proposed HS2 line Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010. Major highways© barriers Major highways barriers Central nodes Eastside masterplan Central nodes

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Knowledge City In today’s increasingly knowledge based society, economic success will be derived from the exploitation of the knowledge, skills and innovation potential of the city. Birmingham Science Park Aston will be a key component in driving the city’s knowledge economy. The Science Park will act as a hub promoting enterprise and innovation by bringing together people with ideas and technologies, people with expertise and experience and people with funds to invest. Located close to the City Core the Science Park is easily accessible and aspirations for remodelled accommodation will be supported. A new Innovation Village will enhance this facility

with additional work space and high tech infrastructure. As part of the development proposals within this area the new Engineering Academy will create a new focus on engineering and manufacturing emphasising business enterprise and developing the skills necessary for Birmingham to capitalise on opportunities in engineering. It will enable a new generation of innovative and talented engineers. Eastside’s role in the knowledge economy is boosted by the concentration of educational establishments in the area. Based around the activity at Aston University, Birmingham Metropolitan College, the new campus for Birmingham City University, Millennium Point and

Ormiston Academy is where the creation of a learning/knowledge quarter will be achieved. Undergoing a period of transformation Aston University will provide a new and improved campus, becoming a centre for excellence in learning, research and community engagement. Future development will focus on delivering improved facilities, enhanced spaces and improved links. Birmingham Metropolitan College and Ormiston Academy provide further focus for learning and research. The planned Birmingham City University Campus will provide 35,000 to 45,000 sq meters of accommodation acting as the new home for media, arts and engineering learning.

Smart City

Area of Transformation

Digital technology will be central to the future knowledge economy allowing links to be created which are not defined by geography. Such technology will connect people around the world instantly. Birmingham Science Park Aston has the potential to create a ‘digital port’ for Birmingham at the heart of the Digital District. The city’s digital capabilities will ensure connectivity without boundaries, reducing the need to travel and contributing to reducing carbon emissions.

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51

Eastside has long been seen as an area in which to expand the City Core, delivering major change through mixeduse developments in the area south of Jennens Road.

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

the quarters / eastside

Eastside aerial view

Eastside transformation area masterplan

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With the proposals for high speed rail the focus on Eastside as an area of transformation has been further strengthened and its position as a major arrival destination is now at the fore. The area bounded by Jennens Road, Moor Street Queensway, Lawley Middleway and the viaduct has great opportunity to deliver both a new terminus station for High Speed 2 route with opportunities for landmark developments and attractive spaces.

• Connectivity Integrating this area into the wider city centre will be an important aspect for its future transformation. Strong attractive walkable routes will be created within the area allowing easy circulation for people accessing the station and beyond.

Our approach to the future of this area sets out a clear framework to guide change, which will ensure that the city centre capitalises upon the opportunities that this major investment in infrastructure will bring. This approach will be flexible, reflecting uncertainties over eventual delivery of High Speed 2 line. Transformation of this part of Eastside will be planned for the short, medium and long term and come forward in a number of elements linked together.

From the station concourse a series of new access routes through and out into Eastside, Digbeth and out to Moor Street Queensway for the City Core.

The viaduct arches will create a distinctive environment, enhanced with lighting, and space for temporary uses to provide attractive connections into Digbeth.

• Public Realm New public spaces will be created to provide focal points and key nodes to generate meeting places and guide people through the quarter to their destination.

Eastside City Park will create a key focal point for the area providing a catalyst for regeneration. The park will create a pleasant and walkable route connecting the different elements of Eastside to the City Core and eastwards to beyond the Middleway. The delivery of the Eastside City Park will be a priority. The new Eastside Square will provide a focal point for those arriving from the station, dispersing people onto walkable routes. Street furniture and distinctive lighting of places and buildings will provide visual interest, enhance safety and create a sense of place. • Growth Core uses including office, leisure and residential are likely to expand as a result of the High Speed 2 terminus and improved connections to New Street Station.

Mixed-use blocks will create a vibrant 24/7 feel to the area with visitor attractions, employment opportunities, leisure and city living accommodation. Enhancing the new spaces and walking routes with active ground floor uses will be encouraged. Activity should spill out onto the streets to create a lively and interactive atmosphere. • Massing Expanding City Core uses into the area will see opportunities for a range of building heights from 6 to 10 storeys rising to 16 storeys to mark key views. Around the new squares blocks and buildings should be of a human scale, well articulated and visually diverse to reflect the mix of use and intimate character. A range of new buildings fronting the Eastside City Park will form an integral part of the new terminus building and be of a scale and height in keeping with the station.

• Heritage The area still retains some distinct character and a number of attractive buildings and features. New developments will take a sensitive and responsive approach to incorporating such assets through reuse and retention in the context of delivering wider benefits for the area. Curzon Street Station will become the focal point, acting as one of the key accesses for the High Speed 2 terminus but as a feature in its own right reflecting its historical importance and architectural quality. It will be set within a new hardlandscaped square. The rail arches and other distinct industrial features, including the canal environment, will play an important role in guiding an authentic environment complementing the modern structures.

The proposed High Speed 2 set to deliver journey times of 49 minutes between Birmingham and London could be worth £1.5 billion a year to the West Midlands economy.

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

the quarters / eastside

Indicative option for transformation area – Eastside

Moor Street and New Street Station link

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Digbeth

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GUNSMITHS QUARTER

From the earliest beginnings as part of the city’s industrial development, the Digbeth area has evolved to meet changes, constantly reinventing itself and adapting the built environment to meet the needs of new uses. Today although the majority of the factories have gone and the canal is no longer carrying cargoes it still has a certain creative buzz about it.

JEWELLERY QUARTER CITY CORE WESTSIDE & LADYWOOD

EASTSIDE

DIGBETH

SOUTHSIDE & HIGHGATE

About the quarter • The Custard Factory is home to a dynamic community of 500 artists and small creative enterprises based within the 5 acre complex of riverside factories built 100 years ago by Sir Alfred Bird. • The Grand Union Canal, Digbeth Branch Canal and River Rea flow through the area. • Home to the Irish Quarter, a focus for related cultural and entertainment activities centred around Bradford Street and Digbeth High Street Deritend. • The area has been at the heart of Birmingham’s history from the earliest known settlement to the industrial

revolution and planned developments of the 21st century. The important heritage is protected in three conservation areas: Warwick Bar and Digbeth, Deritend, Bordesley Streets. Sandwiched between, and running in the blocks along, the railway viaducts are the historical core of Digbeth, characterised by a range of warehouse complexes and purpose-built works dating from the mid 19th to the mid 20th century. Within this core area the streetscape is wholly derived from the area’s industrial past as a warehouse and industrial quarter. Street blocks are compact and composed of building plots which vary in shape and size.

The Gun Barrel Proof House (built 1813), set slightly apart on Banbury Street, is the sole example of an early 19th century works and remains in its original use. There are very few surviving domestic properties in the area. The Old Crown public house on Deritend High Street, built in the late 15th century, provides one of the earliest remaining buildings in the city. Much of the historic environment is protected by conservation area designations which aim to preserve and enhance the character and appearance of the heritage assets. Running through and across the area, the canal and railway structures provide examples of late 18th and 19th century transport engineering. These structures add to the hard industrial appearance created by the traditional building types with the viaducts dominating the area. Beyond this core area more modern industrial premises exist along the Middleway and parts of Digbeth High Street. The High Street also acts as the key spine running through the quarter from the Middleway into the City Core.

View towards Eastside Station from Fazeley Street

bigcityplan.org.uk


Open spaces

DIGBETH

The Masterplan Vision SOUTHSIDE & HIGHGATE

The ambition for the area is to use its historic roots as a foundation for growing its established creative businesses and developing a vibrant urban community with entertainment, living and cultural opportunities. By embracing the existing building fabric and delivering a high quality, exciting, and safe public realm Digbeth will become a flourishing creative and cultural hub for the city. GUNSMITHS GUNSMITHS QUARTERQUARTER

JEWELLERY JEWELLERY QUARTERQUARTER

EASTSIDEEASTSIDE CITY CITY GUNSMITHS CORE CORE QUARTER

WESTSIDE WESTSIDE & & JEWELLERY LADYWOOD LADYWOOD QUARTER

DIGBETHDIGBETH

EASTSIDE CITY CORE SOUTHSIDE SOUTHSIDE & HIGHGATE & HIGHGATE DIGBETH

WESTSIDE & LADYWOOD

SOUTHSIDE & HIGHGATE

Big Ideas In Digbeth the fundamentals are all there to create a thriving, active and authentic part of the city centre. With some enhancements to the physical infrastructure of the area, the potential can be truly fulfilled. To facilitate the renaissance we will address a number of key issue, including: GUNSMITHS QUARTER

CITY CORE

EASTSIDE

WESTSIDE & LADYWOOD

DIGBETH

• Supporting its gritty and authentic character. SOUTHSIDE & HIGHGATE

URBAN STRUCTURE at • Balancing the needs of local present businesses, residents, cultural and

GUNSMITHS QUARTER

JEWELLERY QUARTER

CITY CORE

KEY

WESTSIDE & LADYWOOD

EASTSIDE

Access Access towithin rail tostations rail stations Gateway Blocks Southern major transformation areas Moor Street & Eastside rail stations Connected City SOUTHSIDE Birmingham Birmingham Coach Coach Station Station DIGBETH

Blockstoforming part of other Access rail stations major developments ImprovedExisting pedestrian connections both Existing blockblock structure structure Birmingham Coach Station & HIGHGATE

into the quarter and between activities Rail viaducts Prposed Prposed highhigh speed speed rail viaduct rail viaduct and openExisting spacesblock willstructure be vital in attracting Blocks Blocks within within Southern Southern Gateway Gateway Existing open spaces and visitors, customers, residents further major major transformation transformation areas areas Prposed high speed rail viaduct investment. Blocks Blocks forming forming part part of other of other New open spaces

Blocks within Southern Gateway major major developments developments major transformation areas The HighBlocks Street Digeth Canals &(including Riverpart Reaofspace interventions Rail viaducts Railforming viaducts other major developments High Street Deritend and High Street Primary walking routes Existing open open spaces spaces Bordesley)Existing currently acts as a major Rail viaducts Local walking routes

block to movement inspaces and through the New New openopen spaces Canal Existing open spaces quarter. We will support the remodelling River Rea Canals Canals & River & River Rea space Rea space interventions interventions of this road to reduce car New open spaces dominance, Primary Primary walking walking routes routes introducing an improved pedestrian Canals & River Rea routes space interventions Local Local walking walking routes environment and create space for activity Canal Canal Primary walking routes along its length. RiverRiver Rea Rea Local walking routes KEY Canal Action to River rationalise the gyratory at the MoorRea Street & Eastside rail stations top end ofAccess the High Street, at the Bullring, to rail stations will be central to drawing people across Birmingham Coach Station from the City Core into the area. The transformation ofblock the Wholesale Markets Existing structure will play a key role in the redesign. Links Prposed high speed rail between viaduct will be significantly enhanced Digbeth, the City CoreSouthern and Southside. Blocks within Gateway

URBAN STRUCTURE in 20 years major transformation areas URBAN STRUCTURE at Blocks forming part of other in URBAN URBAN STRUCTURE STRUCTURE at at URBAN URBAN STRUCTURE STRUCTURE in creative activities. major developments present present present 20 20 years years RailSTRUCTURE viaducts URBAN STRUCTURE at URBAN in present

Existing open spaces 20 years

4 6 5 7 6 8 7 9 8 9

major transformation areas NEW - Connaught Square NEWNEW - Digbeth - Digbeth viaduct viaduct parkpart park of other 6 Blocks forming Custard Factory public realm major developments NEWNEW - Typhoo - Typhoo Factory Factory BasinBasin 7 NEW - Digbeth viaduct park Rail viaducts NEWNEW - Warwick - Warwick Bar public Bar public realm realm 8 NEWNEW - Typhoo Factory Basin for for other - other key opportunities key opportunities 9 Existing open spaces various various open open spaces spaces NEW - Warwick Bar public realm NEW - otherNew key open opportunities spaces for various open spaces

Open spaces

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

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NEW - St. Martin’s & Moat Square NEW - Eastside Square NEW - Beorma public realm NEW - Connaught Square Custard Factory public realm NEW - Digbeth viaduct park NEW - Typhoo Factory Basin NEW - Warwick Bar public realm NEW - other key opportunities for various open spaces

8

7

2

9

FA Z

EL

7

Canals & River Rea space interventions

ST 9

Primary walking routes Local walking routes Canal River Rea

9 9

9

3

Open spaces

1 NEW - St. Martin’s & Moat Square 2 NEW - Eastside Square 3 NEW - Beorma public realm 4 NEW - Connaught Square 5 Custard Factory public realm 6 NEW - Digbeth viaduct park Factory Basin 7 NEW - Typhoo URBAN STRUCTURE 8 NEW - Warwick Bar public realm 20 years - other key opportunities for 9 NEW various open spaces

EY

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OO

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SLEY MIDDLEWAY BORDE

JEWELLERY QUARTER

• Providing safe and convenient connections into and through the quarter.

Birmingham Coach Station

• Responding to the opportunities and challenges thatblock the structure proposal for High Existing KEYKEY Speed 2 in neighbouring Eastside will Prposed high speed railstations viaduct Moor Street Street & Eastside & Eastside rail rail stations bring. Moor

1 NEW - St. Martin’s & Moat Square 2 NEW - Eastside Square 3 NEW - Beorma public realm KEY Street & Square Eastside rail stations - Connaught 4 NEWMoor Open Open spaces spaces Access to rail stations 5 Custard Factory public realm NEWNEW - St. Martin’s - St. Martin’s & Moat & Moat Square Square 1 1 Coachpark Station Open6spaces NEWBirmingham - Digbeth viaduct NEWNEW - Eastside - Eastside Square Square 2 2 -NEW St. Martin’s & block Moat Square 1 NEW Existing structure - Typhoo Factory Basin 7 NEW NEW - Beorma - Beorma public public realm realm 3 3 -NEW Eastside Square Bar public realm 2 NEW - Warwick 8 NEW Prposed high speed rail viaduct NEW - Connaught - Connaught Square Square 4 4 - other key opportunities for -NEW Beorma public realm 3 NEW Blocks within Southern Custard Factory Factory public public realm realm Gateway 9 Custard 5 5 various open spaces

-W AY

WESTSIDE & LADYWOOD

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Access to rail stations

EASTSIDE

CITY CORE

RE ET Q

JEWELLERY QUARTER

ST

Moor Street & Eastside rail stations

MO OR

KEY

GUNSMITHS QUARTER

ST

Canals & River Rea space interventions Primary walking routes Local walking routes Canal River Rea

Quarter boundaries Key characteristic areas with significant boundaries Quarter Quarter boundaries boundaries connections Key characteristic KeyPedestrian characteristic areas areas with with significant significant boundaries boundaries Quarter boundaries Major highway barriers

Pedestrian Pedestrian connections connections Key characteristic areas with significant boundaries River Rea Major Major highway highway barriers barriers Pedestrian connections

Canals RiverRiver Rea Rea

Major highway barriers

Central nodes Canals Canals River Rea Central Central nodes nodes Canals

the quarters / digbeth

URBAN STRUCTURE at

URBAN STRUCTURE in

Central nodes

Quarter boundaries Key characteristic areas with significant boundaries Pedestrian connections Major highway barriers River Rea © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

Canals Central nodes

Digbeth masterplan

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

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The High Street will become a primary walking route from which a network of local walking routes, will run north-south and east-west. Along these routes a series of pocket parks and larger open spaces will be created. Street furniture and distinctive lighting of places and buildings will provide visual interest, enhance safety and create a sense of place. The network of local walking routes includes Bradford Street and Fazeley Street linking east-west, New Canal Street running north into Eastside, Meriden Street linking south toward Southside; and Floodgate Street running south. Bradford Street performs a central role in linking the City Core and Irish Quarter. Public realm improvements along its length are set to enhance the attractiveness of this street. Fazeley Street performs an important role as an east-west route connecting westwards to Eastside and eastwards to Liverpool Street and Adderley Street and onto the Middleway road. It has a strategic role which will be reinforced through improvements to lighting, materials and spaces.

The link from Digbeth into Eastside is also supported by New Canal Street – Meriden Street forming a useful north-south link. In particular this route will play a key role in connecting the redevelopment at Eastside and the High Speed 2 terminus to Southside and the Southern Gateway. The design principles for this street follow those for the other local walking routes with a focus on shifting the balance from vehicular movement to pedestrians, while still acknowledging the importance in the wider road network. Floodgate Street is a particularly distinctive route due to its straightness, meaning there are long views along the entire length of the road. Passing under the railway viaduct provides a significant landmark on this route, reinforcing the industrial character of this area. Our approach will be to support improvements so that the distinct character along this road is enhanced. The canal corridor will also form part of this network of routes acting as an ideal means to aid pedestrian movement. The River Rea and the canals will be opened up further as part of the re-use,

development and/or conversion of buildings and plots along their length. The focus will be on enhancing lighting and access to the canal frontage creating a lively and safe atmosphere that is attractive for pedestrians and cyclists. At Typhoo Basin an attractive mixed-use development opportunity incorporating a permanent modern art gallery around a central water feature will become a key focal point and see the conversion of the existing complex of buildings. Extending out onto the canal network further opportunities will be supported along the canal corridor for mixed-use developments incorporating live/ work units at Warwick Bar. The opportunity presented by the proposal for High Speed 2 and the new station on the northern edge of the quarter offers great potential to connect Digbeth to the City Core and bring a renewed focus to the north of the quarter for a mix of uses. The shared concourse with the southern station entrance, accompanied by a public square, will be a key arrival destination into Digbeth. The traditional building types and strong street grid patterns are vital to local distinctiveness and sense of place. Such assets will be used to create strong character for new developments. Keeping the mix of small properties and larger industrial buildings will be important allowing experimentation in space and place. We will support the utilisation of these assets to form an inspirational and truly authentic place that offers an alternative to other areas in the city centre. We aspire to create an elevated linear park along the disused viaduct, running broadly from Upper Trinity Street to Montague Street. This will provide an exciting ‘viapark’ consisting of high quality public space combining planting, paving and events areas.

the quarters / digbeth

Typhoo Basin public realm proposal

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Public realm at Digbeth viaduct

The Cattle Station is the point at which some significant and underused plots of land can be found, and a spot where the canal is quite close by. In combination with the buildings, streets and spaces, the range of entertainment, creative and cultural activities within the quarter will continue to play a vital role. The Irish Quarter has existed for some 50 years, mainly around St Anne’s Church and community club. While much of the community has now dispersed, the area contains a wealth of Irish-based businesses, independent Irish bars, The Irish Club and related organisations. The contribution these activities make to the edgy and thriving nature of the area will continue to be supported. As the area becomes more successful the pressure will grow for new higher value uses to come into the area. We will need to manage this pressure to ensure that the fundamental character and experience of the area is not lost. The retention, re-use and conversion of buildings is key.

Creative City

The Custard Factory will be the focal point for this creative quarter. Space for new studios and supporting facilities and services will be part of creating a thriving quarter. The re-use of buildings will be vital to the growing creative activity in the area and improved pedestrian connections will have a central role in making the quarter more attractive to visit. Throughout the area mixed-use developments will be supported where they support the aspiration for the area as a creative cultural entertainment hub. Developments along the canal corridor will be supported where they achieve the interaction and accessibility to the canal and retain the character and distinctiveness of the area. We want more people to live in the Digbeth area but they will have to embrace urban living and all that this means. We know there is potential conflict between different activities but in order to attract more activity and create a thriving and diverse area, the workshops, bars, clubs, venues, businesses and residents will

need to come together in inventive ways to support a dynamic community. Future residential provision will need to reflect the character of the area, adapting to the existing building stock and environment. Live/work units and student accommodation will be an important element in future housing development. The creation of an ‘urban village’ will bring greater life and activity to the area and it will be important that this is supported by vibrant facilities.

Smart City Digital technology will become a central part of the focus on creative industries. Such technology will help to connect people instantly and without boundaries. The close links with Eastside are pivotal in the expansion of this technology, with Digbeth forming part of the Digital District. The city’s digital capabilities will ensure connectivity without need to travel, so supporting the reduction of carbon emissions.

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Southside and Highgate Southside, including the Highgate residential area, has a rich mix of existing activities giving the area a unique spirit and vibrancy. Coupled with this character are significant redevelopment opportunities that will complement the area to create one of the most diverse city centre quarters that will be a major cultural and visitor destination.

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GUNSMITHS QUARTER JEWELLERY QUARTER CITY CORE WESTSIDE & LADYWOOD

EASTSIDE

DIGBETH

SOUTHSIDE & HIGHGATE

About the quarter • The Wholesale Markets site presents 8ha of development potential on the doorstep of the City Core. • The historic manor house and moat lie underneath the Wholesale Markets site and represent part of the medieval heart of Birmingham. • Historic retail markets are part of Birmingham’s rich heritage and history; and are home to the largest inland fish market in the UK. • The Hippodrome Theatre with the Birmingham Royal Ballet, is the UK’s most visited theatre with over half-amillion patrons every year. • Home to the city’s Chinese Quarter bringing in thousands of international visitors every year and hosts the Chinese New Year celebrations. • 75,000 visitors to the UK’s biggest free annual Pride Festival around the Gay Village’s thriving, independently owned café bars, pubs and clubs. Southside grew from the original heart of Birmingham around St Martin’s parish church, the manor house and moat, with Edgbaston Street and the approximate line of Smallbrook Queensway once marking the southern edge of the medieval town. From the 1790s and throughout the Victorian period, a dense

pattern of streets, factories, courtyard “back-to-back” housing, shops and pubs spread rapidly southwards towards and over the River Rea.

bars, pubs, clubs alongside established engineering companies and warehouses. Large areas of vacant land and derelict buildings remain towards Bristol Street.

The development of the Wholesale Markets in the 1970s dramatically altered the original street pattern and the fortress-like building turns its back on the surrounding area, leaving Southside with fractured links and dead frontages, thereby isolating the areas and buildings beyond.

A significant portion of Southside, between Sherlock and Barford Streets, down to the River Rea and beyond to Highgate, is covered by low intensity industrial premises. Many units provide space for small engineering companies and a variety of other commercial operations. However some parts of the area are underutilised and remain empty. The unattractive environment isolates and severs the Highgate area from otherwise walkable routes to the City Core and Digbeth.

The removal of subways at Smallbrook Queensway in the early 1990s improved the pedestrian connections to the area along the primary walking route of Hurst Street. Investment followed with the Arcadian Centre, the extended and refurbished Hippodrome Theatre and the restored historic “back-to-back” houses. These provide significant cultural assets for Southside alongside successful bars and restaurants. During the last decade, high-density residential apartment development has provided new urban living which has greatly increased pedestrian activity and has begun to help support a greater mix of commercial uses around Hurst Street. In the streets south of Bromsgrove Street, some of the former industrial buildings have been taken over by vibrant café

The Highgate area rises up from the River Rea towards a ridge at Highgate Middleway. Most of Highgate was comprehensively redeveloped during the 1960s, introducing a mixture of council housing, including tower blocks, maisonettes and modern two-storey terraces. A pocket of industrial land occupying four street blocks divides the residential area. There are a number of key landmarks within the Highgate area including the Central Mosque, St Alban’s Church and Lenches Trust Almshouses, the Paragon Hotel and Highgate Park. bigcityplan.org.uk


KEY

New New open spaces spaces A38open Corridor

Southside and Highgate has the potential to become one of the most exciting and liveable areas of the city centre. While the quarter has many good qualities a number of key issues will need to be addressed in order for the wider area to fulfil its potential. These include: GUNSMITHS QUARTER

JEWELLERY QUARTER

CITY CORE

EASTSIDE

WESTSIDE & LADYWOOD

DIGBETH

SOUTHSIDE & HIGHGATE

• Opportunities presented by the relocation of the Wholesale Markets. • The creation of good, active streets, open spaces and better connections

URBAN STRUCTURE at present

Blocks within Southern Gateway major transformation areas As part of the Birmingham Gateway forming of other Project, theBlocks creation of apart new southern major developments

entrance to New Street Station and the Existing spaces redevelopment ofopen the Wholesale Markets URBAN STRUCTURE at will vastly improve pedestrian connections New open spaces URBAN STRUCTURE present from the City Core to the quarter. at

URBAN STRUCTURE in 20 years River Rea space interventions present URBAN URBAN STRUCTURE STRUCTUREin in

BRISTOL BRISTOL STREET STREET SOUTH SOUTH

INDUSTRIAL INDUSTRIAL AREA AREA

HIGHGATE HIGHGATE HIGHGATE

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HIGHGATE HIGHGATE HIGHGATE HIGHGATE

URBAN STRUCTURE at present the quarters / southside

2

Edgbaston Street public realm

3

Arcadian public realm

4

NEW - Theatre Square

5

NEW - Village Square

URBAN STRUCTURE in 20 years

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NEW - Connaught Square Highgate Park

7 8

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Major road interventions ImprovedRiver quality and number ofand streets River Rea Reaspace spaceinterventions interventions improved pedestrian crossing and spaces for pedestrians will be KEYopenPrimary Primarywalking walkingroutes routes essential Local to the future attractiveness of Local walking walking routes routes RiverRea Rea poor connections and the area. River Currently, Access to rail stations A38 A38Corridor Corridor often rundown or uninspiring streets fail Major Major road roadinterventions interventions and and and Birmingham Coach Station to provide the all-year-round buzz improved improvedpedestrian pedestriancrossing crossing activity that befits a cosmopolitan part of Existing block structure the city centre.

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open spaces New open spaces -Existing other key opportunities 8NEWNEW NEW - Theatre - Theatre Square Square for various open spaces New spaces River open Rea space interventions

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Big Ideas

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- St. Martin’s & Moat Square 1 NEW Open spaces

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Access to rail stations 2 Edgbaston Street public realm Access to railCoach stations Birmingham Station 3 Arcadian public realm Birmingham Station Existing blockCoach structure 4 NEW - Theatre Square Blocks Existingwithin blockSouthern structure Gateway major transformation areas Open Open spaces spaces NEW Village Square 5 Blocks Southern Gateway Blocks within forming part of other NEW- St. - St.Martin’s Martin’s &&Moat MoatSquare Square 11 NEW transformation major developments Connaught Square areas 6 NEW -major Blocks forming part of other EdgbastonStreet Streetpublic publicrealm realm 22 Edgbaston Existing open spaces major developments Park 7 Highgate

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Our vision for the area is to bring about significant change of the Wholesale Markets site, capitalising on this opportunity as a catalyst for bringing investment and activity to the wider area. Improving the transport links and strengthening the areas character will create a vibrant, liveable and wellconnected part of the city centre, creating a major cultural destination. In the longer term there is the potential to transform Highgate and surrounding areas to provide a much improved family neighbourhood.

areas. Birmingham Coach Station • Supporting development of the Existing block structure distinctive cultural and entertainment assets. Blocks within Southern Gateway

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© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

Southside & Highgate masterplan

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Hurst Street – festival street, a primary walking route, links many of Southside’s assets and will become the focus for lively street theatre, markets and events. Further opportunities to make this route more pedestrian-friendly will be explored, including extending the footway and lighting improvements already implemented. Bromsgrove, Sherlock and Kent Street will be important pedestrian routes, forming part of the local walking route network. Ground floor uses and activities, higher quality public realm and street trees will help to transform these routes. The idea of Southside’s squares, a new network of open spaces linked by the local walking routes, will create an improved range of spaces. This will include Moat Square within the Wholesale Markets site and Theatre Place – the potential for a higher quality and memorable setting for the Hippodrome Theatre and “back-toback” houses. A new Village Square at the Gay Village end of Hurst Street is proposed where active uses will surround a much needed green oasis for the area. As part of the Bristol Street South development site, existing public open space off Sherlock Street will be reconfigured as a new park for Southside. Highgate Park will be maintained as an important local space but in the longer term could become a wider improvements with a focal point, and improvements to its overall quality and function will be promoted. Across the wider area, improved open spaces will be sought as part of individual redevelopment schemes.

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Bristol Street will remain a key vehicular route into the city centre from the south and forms part of the A38. Opportunities will be sought to transform the currently harsh pedestrian environment and to improve the number and quality of crossing points in order to better connect Attwood Green with Southside.

Creative City Southside’s status as a major creative and cultural district will be promoted and capitalised upon in order to grow the area’s potential visitor base. The cluster of theatre, entertainment and leisure activities within and around Southside, including the O2 Academy, Hippodrome, Old Rep and Alexandra Theatres, Electric Cinema and lively cabaret bars, provides the opportunity to create a lively cultural focus for the city centre. The development of this cultural centre will be supported where proposals provide the city with facilities of national and international importance, and also the small-scale and diverse. Together they will develop further the rich creative and cultural performing arts offer of the city.

Birmingham’s Gay Village has become well-established within Southside over the last 20 years. Vibrant café bars, pubs, clubs, shops and community services cater for the lesbian and gay community from Birmingham and the wider West Midlands region. The focus of the village is around the lower part of Hurst Street, Kent Street and Lower Essex Street. Investment in the public realm will give this part of Southside a stronger character and presence. There are opportunities for specialist retail, hotels and other business uses to locate within the heart of the village, bringing greater levels of visitor activity throughout the day and night. The retail markets will continue to play a vital role in the city centre’s retail offer which will be promoted and improved as part of the Wholesale Markets’ redevelopment.

Liveable City The richness and variety of activity on offer in Southside is highly diverse in comparison to other quarters. The wide mix of uses and communities still has room to develop further.

Southside has growing residential communities with a dynamic urban village character emerging in the Chinese Quarter and along the Bradford Street corridor. Residential uses as part of the mixed-use redevelopment of derelict sites within the Chinese Quarter and Gay Village will continue to form an important part of Southside’s regeneration. Such uses should be encouraged where they do not compromise the entertainment and leisure uses that provide the unique essence of Southside’s character. The diversity of the area relies on the coming together of entertainment venues, businesses and residents to support a dynamic community. Highgate is a significant area of residential provision in the city centre. Sitting on the fringe of the city centre, it has good links to areas beyond the Middleway. The area suffers from elements of poor design and layout, under-utilised open spaces and insecure pedestrian routes. Selective redevelopment will address these issues with our longer term ambition to see Highgate and the surrounding area become home to improved family living. This will be supported with wellbalanced infrastructure including private and communal open spaces, improved network of local walking routes and community facilities.

The long-term future of the pocket of industry and the fringes of the adjacent industrial area will be considered as part of the masterplan’s aims to expand the quantity and quality of family housing in Highgate. This would also result in improved connections and a higher quality environment. The Bristol Street South site has a prominent frontage to Bristol Street and Belgrave Middleway and presents an opportunity for a significant mixed-use landmark development based around a significantly improved area of public open space. The development will provide strong links to Sherlock Street and Kent Street as local walking routes connecting into the City Core. The site will support a mix of uses that help to provide a magnet to draw economic and pedestrian activity into this part of the city centre.

Authentic City Southside’s authenticity and character are most intact and well-reflected along Bradford Street and the eastern side of Bristol Street where there are significant attractive 19th century historic building frontages. These features will be retained as part of the regeneration of empty or underused buildings and sites behind. In addition, investment will be encouraged throughout the area in the refurbishment of existing character and listed buildings such as the landmark SBQ Building on Smallbrook Queensway. Such an approach will help to protect the future of the some of the city’s most interesting 20th century architectural features. The industrial area beyond the Wholesale Markets site will continue to provide space for small scale engineering and

The residential St. Luke’s Estate includes under-utilised open space that has the potential, working alongside the local community, to be remodelled to accommodate both further family housing and more functional and better quality spaces.

The identity of the Chinese Quarter will be strengthened, particularly around Ladywell Walk and the Arcadian Centre. This will be achieved through working with the Chinese community groups and local businesses to provide decorative features, public artwork and a Chinese arch that will provide a tourist attraction and cement the area’s character.

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The existing parade of shops at Horton Square provides for some day-today needs for the local community, however the range and choice is limited. Opportunities will be sought to expand the retail area to meet this gap and to support new residential growth.

Moat Square proposal

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commercial activities that provide jobs and necessary services within the local economy. The fringes of the area, where economic activity has waned, will provide opportunities for more mixed-use development particularly related to the redevelopment of the Wholesale Markets site and to facilitate the growth and improvement of Highgate residential area.

Area of Major Transformation Southern Gateway The relocation of the Wholesale Markets, leaving an 8ha site on the doorstep of the Bullring, will act as a catalyst for the southern expansion of the City Core. The redevelopment of the Wholesale Markets will facilitate opportunities for a much wider area to undergo transformation. Our approach to the future of this area sets out a clear framework to guide change, which will ensure that the city centre capitalises on the opportunity presented by the relocation of the Wholesale Markets.

The centrepiece of this area will be Moat Square, a new public space based around the archaeological remains of the original Birmingham Manor House, the historic heart of the city. Expansion of the Southern Gateway area offers potential to extend Birmingham’s retail offer at its northern end, graduating through niche retail, improved markets, food and leisure space around Moat Square to new residential neighbourhoods which offer the potential to stimulate the regeneration of Highgate. • Growth The area will form a thriving part of the city centre with opportunities for residential, retail, leisure, entertainment, offices and high tech manufacturing industries. The city’s retail market functions will be integrated within and to the western edge of the new Moat Square and adjoining buildings, and its profile will be raised by encouraging new niche and themed traders to complement and extend the existing range of its offer.

Cafes, bars and restaurants will be encouraged around new squares and spaces with the opportunity to spill out.

space, and the introduction of a water feature to recall the presence of the historic moat.

We will encourage a diverse variety of uses and activities within the blocks and buildings and on the streets, and embrace the Irish Quarter and reflect its heritage and culture.

There will be a network of high quality pedestrian priority streets. Digbeth High Street, Bradford Street, Moseley Street and Cheapside will be pleasant local walking routes connecting to new family housing, Highgate and its park, revived industry and commerce, public transport corridors, and the City Core.

Linked to the Moat Square will be the opportunity for a new Modern Art Museum showcasing exhibitions from a range of local and international artists. • Public Realm A new major public square based around the historic site of the original Birmingham Manor House and moat, will create a focus for local culture, leisure and performance, incorporate a market function, and interpret the history and archaeology of this important site. The change of level will be exploited to form terraces, activity and performance

Street furniture and distinctive lighting of places and buildings will provide visual interest, encourage use, enhance safety and create a sense of place.

Around the public square blocks and buildings should be of human scale, wellarticulated and visually diverse to reflect the mix of uses and intimate character. Storey heights will step up square with setbacks to the south and west to ensure there is good daylight access throughout the year. Any residential development should seek to provide a broad range of typology including family housing 3 to 4 stories high beyond the River Rea and into Highgate, complementing the existing largely apartment-based resident community which will be expanded closer to the core.

• Connectivity The historic street pattern will be restored and enhanced, with a clear hierarchy of street use and character. Streets will be pedestrianised close to the core with shared surface off Moat Square and public transport focused on the High Street, Sherlock Street and Bradford Street. The Coach station will be a key arrival point, serving the area and wider city.

• Heritage The area has a distinct character which includes buildings, street patterns and archaeological remains. Redevelopment must be sensitive and responsive to this character and retain, reuse and enhance these features. The history and archaeology of the area, and particularly the area around the original moated manor, will be acknowledged, respected, interpreted and incorporated in development proposals. Key views such as St Martin’s, Rotunda, Digbeth Police Station, the Paragon Hotel, and the Digbeth HMV Institute, which reinforce the identity and character of the area, will be identified and protected.

Strong, attractive walkable routes with wide pavements and street trees will link Highgate and Camp Hill to the City Core. Clear pedestrian connections will be made across the area, connecting Southside to Digbeth will be made. The River Rea will be utilised as a key feature. New development along its length will need to contribute toward creating pedestrian access to form a prominent, attractive, riverside walkway across the area. • Massing General heights across the area will range from 3 to 12 storeys with opportunities to rise to 15 to mark key views and focal points. At the corner of Edgbaston Street and the new public square a building of up to 18 storeys could be considered.

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

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Southern Gateway transformation area masterplan

Example of Modern Art Museum – MOMA in New York

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

Indicative options for transformation area – Southern Gateway

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Westside and Ladywood Westside, including the Ladywood residential area, is a diverse and vibrant part of the city centre. The area hosts many of Birmingham’s international-class visitor attractions, and forms a hub for shopping, nightlife and entertainment activities. Formerly a neglected and underused area, Westside has been completely transformed in recent decades and is now the primary destination for both business and leisure visitors to Birmingham.

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• At the heart of Westside the Broad Street and Brindleyplace area is home to over 300 businesses, providing 12,000 jobs. • Westside hosts Birmingham’s biggest concentration of hotels, providing in excess of 1,800 rooms. • The area has a large residential population, with Ladywood home to 3,000 residents and the recently redeveloped and award-winning Park Central area incorporating 1,600 homes. • Many of Birmingham’s tallest buildings are located in Westside, reflecting the strong demand for offices, hotels and apartments. Further tall buildings are proposed. Historically the area comprised a predominantly industrial area focused on the hub of the city’s canal network with a dense residential area of back-toback housing to the south. The former industrial area was transformed by the Brindleyplace regeneration project which

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About the quarter • Westside is home to many of the city centre’s premiere business and leisure attractions, including the National Indoor Arena, the International Convention Centre and Symphony Hall, the Mailbox, the Repertory Theatre and the National Sea Life Centre. Symphony Hall alone attracts 370,000 visitors per year.

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created a thriving mixed-use area adjacent to Broad Street, overlooking the canals and including high quality new public squares. This pattern of waterside regeneration has extended along the canal to the south where the conversion of the former Royal Mail sorting office anchors a concentration of premium retail and entertainment uses. The southern part of the area remains residential in character: the former Lee Bank estate having been transformed into the Park Central area, an exemplar urban neighbourhood and the Ladywood area, a housing estate of variable quality. At the heart of the area, Broad Street acts as a focus for entertainment activities and hosts several of the city’s major hotels. In addition Broad Street serves as an arterial route into the city centre, linking to Five Ways, where there is a concentration of shopping, office and entertainment uses. At the top end of Broad Street, Centenary Square provides a direct and convenient pedestrian route to the City Core. The square is the site of the International Convention Centre, the REP theatre, Baskerville House, and the new Library of Birmingham. In addition to providing access to these important locations, Centenary Square is a significant visitor attraction in its own right, and hosts many of the city’s most prominent outdoor events. Ladywood canals

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Our vision is to enhance connections into NEW - Paradise Circus public realm Existing block structure and through the area, bringing in new life Chamberlain Square Blocks within Westside major and activity by extending the network of • In order to support sustainable Victoria Square transformation areas linked public spaces within the quarter. Blocks forming part of other growth of the residential populationOpen spaces Mailbox underpass Improvements to the Broad Street developments improvements are needed to the 1 NEW - Centenarymajor NEW - Arena Central public realm Square improvement corridor and the eastern boundary of the KEY Existing open spaces public realm and local amenities. Mailbox & Cube public realm 2 City Centre Gardens Access to rail stations quarter will be key to achieving this. In Peace Gardens 10 open spaces Wharf Basin 3 NEW - BaskervilleNew New Street & Five Ways rail stations addition, the masterplan will build on the Connected City NEW - Holloway Head playing fields 11 public realm 4 NEW - Paradise Circus success of Westside’s existing residential Canal space interventions Existing block structure Open Open spaces spaces Park Central 12 5 Chamberlain Square areas. In the longer term the aspiration The bridging of Westside Paradise Circus Primary walking routes NEW - Centenary - Centenary Square Square improvement improvement Blocks within major 1Open 1 NEW spaces Gas Street Basin KEY KEY 13 Victoria Square Primary walking routes: link through 6City transformation areas is to transform Ladywood into a much Queensway the 1990s created a high City Centre Centre Gardens Gardens 22 Access Access toin to railrail stations stations NEW Centenary Square improvement 1 14 Oozells Square Blocks forming part of other the building Mailbox underpass KEY 7NEW improved family neighbourhood. NEW - Baskerville - Baskerville Wharf Wharf Basin Basin qualitymajor pedestrian link between 33 New New Street Street & Five & Five Ways Ways rail rail stations stations Centenary developments Centre Gardens Local walking routes 2 CityNEW Access to rail stations 15 Brindleyplace Square Arena Central public realm 8NEW NEW - Paradise - Paradise Circus Circus public public realm realm Canals SquareExisting and the City Core. Despite 4 4 NEW Baskerville Wharf Basin 3 Existing block block structure structure New Street & Five Ways rail stations Existing open spaces 16 Brindleyplace canal area Rail line MailboxSquare &Square Cube public realm Big Ideas Chamberlain Chamberlain 55 this, the Inner Ring Road still presents NEW - Paradise CircusA38 public realm 49 Blocks Blocks within within Westside Westside major major Corridor 17 Sherborne Wharf Existing block structure Victoria Victoria Square Square Peace Gardens 66 New open spaces transformation transformation areas areas a significant barrier between Westside Square Major road interventions and 510Chamberlain 18 Five Ways Blocks within Westside major Blocks forming forming part part of of other other Mailbox Mailbox underpass underpass 77 NEW Square - Holloway Head playing fields crossing The recent history of Westside is a improved pedestrian and the adjacent quarters, limiting the 611Victoria transformation areas major major developments developments Canal space interventions 19 Morville Street open space NEW NEW Arena Arena Central Central public public realm realm 8 8 Open spaces success story; the Brindleyplace, Mailbox Blocks forming part of other Park Central underpass potential foropen expansion of City Core 712Mailbox NEW - other key opportunities for Existing Existing open spaces spaces major developments Mailbox Mailbox & Cube & Cube public public realm realm 20 various open spaces Primary walking routes 9 9 and Attwood Green regeneration NEW Centenary - Arena realmSquare improvement 1 Central Gas Street Basin- public activities into the quarter and movement 813NEW KEY Primary walking routes: link through Peace Peace Gardens Gardens Existing open spaces New New open open spaces spaces projects have created diverse and vibrant City Centre Gardens &2Cube public realm 914Mailbox of pedestrians between areas. 1010 to rail the stations Oozells Square the buildingAccess NEW NEW - Holloway - Holloway Head Head playing playing fields fields 11 11 areas. The quarter plays a major part in Gardens 1015Peace NEW Baskerville Wharf Basin New open spaces 3 Local walking routes Canal Canal space space interventions interventions New Street & Five Ways rail stations Brindleyplace Square Park Park Central Central 1212 Canals NEW Holloway Head playing fields 11 the economy of the wider city centre. NEW Paradise Circus public realm 4 In order to support Westside’s existing Primary Primary walking routes routes Brindleyplace canal area 16Gas Rail line walking Canal space interventions Existing block structure Street Street Basin Basin 1313 URBAN STRUCTURE in 20 URBAN STRUCTURE at Park Central 12Gas However, the existing strength could be Primary Primary walking walking routes: routes: link link through through Chamberlain Square 5 functions and to encourage further A38 Corridor Sherborne Oozells Oozells Square SquareWharf Primary walking 1417 Blocksroutes within Westside major1413 the the building building Gas Street further developed, and in order to ensure years Victoria Square Major road interventions and 6Basin growth and investment, improvements present Primary walking routes: link through transformation areas Local Local walking walking routes routes Five Ways Brindleyplace Brindleyplace Square Square 18 15 15 improved pedestrian crossing Oozells Square 14 the building forming partwith of other Canals that this takes place we will address a Mailbox underpass 7 will beCanals made toBlocks connectivity the161619 Brindleyplace Brindleyplace canal canal area area space Morville Street open Rail Rail line line Local walking routes major developments Square 15 Brindleyplace NEW number of key issues: - Arena Central public realm City Core, Southside and the Jewellery Canals NEW -8 other A38 A38 Corridor Corridor Sherborne Sherborne Wharf Wharfkey opportunities for 1717 canal area 1620Brindleyplace Existing open spaces Rail line Major Major road road interventions interventions and and various open spaces Quarter. These will be delivered as part Five Five Ways Ways9 Mailbox & Cube public realm 1818 • Connectivity into the area to bridge A38 Corridor improved improved pedestrian pedestrian crossing crossing 17 Sherborne Wharf Peace Gardens of key developments at Paradise Circus, 10 New open spaces Major road interventions and Morville Street Street open open space space 1919 the barrier to movement formed by Five Ways 18Morville improved pedestrian crossing NEW NEW - other - other key key opportunities opportunities forfor NEW - Holloway Head playing fields 11 the New Street Station (Gateway Project), 20 20 the existing major road network. Morville Street open space 19various various open open spaces spaces space interventions CITY CORE and the Bristol Canal Street site in Southside. Park Central CITY CORE 12 - other key opportunities for URBAN STRUCTURE in 20 20 NEW Primary walking routes URBAN STRUCTURE atthe • The need for enhancement of various open spaces LADYWOOD Gas Street Basin 13 LADYWOOD Primary walking routes: link through internal network of streets and places. years 14 Oozells Square

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The Broad Street corridor will be the focus for investment and improvements to the public realm. The city council will work in partnership with the Broad Street Business Improvement District (BID) to bring forward improvements which will support the role of Broad Street as a key artery into the City Core and a centre of entertainment and leisure uses. At present the level of traffic along Broad Street means that it acts as a barrier to safe and convenient movement. In order to reduce this conflict, vehicular access to the northern section of Broad Street in the vicinity of Centenary Square will be restricted to buses and taxis only. In addition proposals will be brought forward for a Bus Rapid Transit route connecting Five Ways with the City Core. The enhanced Centenary Square will be the city centre’s most important outdoor space for events and public activity in Birmingham and will be the setting of the new Library of Birmingham, a landmark building that will act as a catalyst for the continued regeneration of the city, attracting visitors both locally and worldwide. The square itself will become a

key focal point for cultural activities and its expansion across Broad Street will deliver an improved pedestrian environment. Within the quarter improvements will be focused to create a network of local walking routes connecting existing and future public squares. Street trees will be planted to improve the appearance of these routes and to provide a visual link between the quarter’s green spaces. This will result in a network of routes and spaces which will support the introduction of new activity into the isolated area to the south of the Mailbox and improve links between the Broad Street corridor and Park Central. This internal network will link in with the improved interfaces with neighbouring quarters and the wider primary walking network. The canal network has allowed waterside development in the heart of the city, leading to the development of one of the most attractive and distinctive places in Birmingham. The canal also constitutes a key route from the Mailbox area, via Brindleyplace and onward both into the City Core and out of the city centre.

Improvements will be made to lighting and the general public realm along the canals in order to encourage greater use of this key route, to support future development and connect to the wider walking network.

Liveable City The area is home to a number of residential areas offering a good range of accommodation and good access to amenities. In the vicinity of the canals and Broad Street are a number of successful high density residential developments. Park Central is a successful regeneration of an urban neighbourhood, with a school and modern community facilities. The Ladywood area sits on the western fringe of the city centre. While recent good quality housing has been introduced the wider area suffers from poor design and layout, under-utilised open spaces and insecure pedestrian routes. Selective redevelopment will address these issues with our longer term ambition to see Ladywood become home to new family living with well balanced infrastructure, including private and communal open spaces, improved network of local walking routes and community facilities.

The creation of a better range of local facilities and amenities accompanied by new public spaces and recreational areas will be central to creating a wellconnected desirable place to live.

Smart City Westside is at the forefront of sustainable development in Birmingham, hosting one of the city’s first Combined Heat and Power (CHP) schemes, which runs along Broad Street and serves the NIA, ICC, the Hyatt Regency hotel, Repertory Theatre and the Town Hall and Council House. The new Library of Birmingham will be linked to the CHP and there will be the opportunity to extend the scheme to support future developments. Forthcoming development in Westside will continue to reflect the highest standards of sustainable design and will incorporate infrastructure to support next generation broadband, ensuring that Westside is at the forefront of the development of the digital economy.

Area of Transformation Westside The Paradise Circus development presents a valuable opportunity to address connections within this part of the city centre, restoring key views and connections between the civic heart and Westside and delivering major development opportunities including the expansion of the Central Business District. This project will link in with the improvements to Centenary Square, and the Arena Central and Baskerville Wharf projects to transform the interface between Westside and the City Core.

• Growth Westside is a truly vibrant area of mixeduse development. It combines business, leisure, culture, commerce and city living. It has major hotels, visitor destinations, galleries, a thriving restaurant and nightlife economy, and of course the International Convention Centre, the National Indoor Arena and the new Library of Birmingham. We seek to build on this early success by improving access and connections, linking with the core and adjacent quarters, extending development opportunites, and improving the public realm.

The new library of Birmingham will be the largest public library in Europe © Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

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New Library of Birmingham

Southern Gateway transformation area masterplan

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• Public Realm The redevelopment of Paradise Circus will allow the introduction of new public spaces, and critically restore key views which will enhance legibility and draw visitors along the main pedestrian routes. The Town Hall will be the focus for significantly improved public realm, with traffic removed and Chamberlain Square extended. Centenary Square will become a key focal point alongside the new Library of Birmingham, and the development of Arena Central fronting this key public space. A sunken performance amphitheatre will be introduced as part of the library development. In the longer term Broad Street traffic will be radically reduced as Centenary Square is extended to give a sense of the public space from the library

to developments at Arena Central. The square will be designed to retain its status as a major performance space. The development of Baskerville Wharf will provide a high quality public realm and canal frontage extending safe and attractive access to the waterway, and making a legible and improved direct link to the Jewellery Quarter across Summer Hill. City Centre Gardens will also become more prominent attracting greater activity. Arena Central will take advantage of the extended Centenary Square by encouraging active street level uses, and provide a new public square within the development with a direct route to the Mailbox and Cube canalside development.

• Connectivity While there is an established pedestrian route linking Westside to the civic heart and City Core, the Central Library and Paradise Forum act as physical and psychological barriers to this connection, particularly for visitors. The redevelopment of Paradise Circus will create a legible network of clear routes and attractive active spaces, restoring key views and providing links to both the City Core and the Jewellery Quarter. Radical transformation of the road network in this area will see the current gyratory at Paradise Circus restored to a more pedestrian-friendly, two-way route on the western arm, with additional surface level crossings. Re-routing of traffic and bus routes will allow for a significant reduction in through traffic where Broad Street passes through

Centenary Square. This will support establishing the square as a largely pedestrian space with controlled public transport along one edge only. Pedestrian routes through Arena Central, Baskerville Wharf and Paradise Forum will provide attractive connections to the Mailbox, Cube and canalside, the civic heart and Jewellery Quarter.

Paradise Circus will see the development of a new mixed-use scheme where heights and massing will need to respond to context, key views, and securing pleasant public space free from overshadowing. This will mean a general range of six to eight storeys, but can rise to a tall building at the Summer Row end providing a termination to Great Charles Street and a gateway to the City Core.

• Massing Westside is recognised as the preferred location for tall building clusters, the 56-storey Regal Tower is already approved at the western end of Broad Street, and there is potential to realise a cluster of the tallest buildings, close to Five Ways.

Baskerville Wharf must respect the scale and character of the canalside but step up in height towards Baskerville House and the City Core. There is an opportunity for a tall building at the corner with Summer Row complementing the highest point of the Paradise Circus development, and acting as a gateway feature.

Arena Central already has approval including the 50-storey V Building.

• Heritage Key to the heritage of the transformational area of Westside are its connections to the civic heart and its many fine and listed buildings, including Baskerville House, the Hall of Memory and the former Banking Hall at Arena Central. Views to the civic heart, and enhancement in the use and settings of historic buildings, will be secured through surrounding developments. The archaeology, particularly in relation to this once thriving area of canalside wharves, will be exposed, examined, recorded, and interpreted. The canalside environment and key industrial buildings will be respected by new development, and incorporated to retain the unique character of the area.

© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

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Paradise Forum redevelopment proposal

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The Jewellery Quarter The Jewellery Quarter is a special part of Birmingham’s heritage: an asset that supports the authentic character of the city centre and differentiates it from other large UK cities. It also is unique internationally as a centre of excellence in the manufacture and trade of jewellery.

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About the quarter • In recognition of its important industrial heritage dating from the 18th century, the city council is working to have the Jewellery Quarter designated as a World Heritage Site. • It has the world’s busiest Assay Office and Europe’s largest School of Jewellery. • It boasts the award-winning Museum of the Jewellery Quarter and the Pen Museum, together with art galleries including the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists. • Alongside the traditional industrial heart and modern creative industries, a growing residential population and high quality bars and restaurants are making the quarter a working and living part of the city centre. • An estimated 400 jewellery related businesses with over 100 independent specialist retailers are located in the quarter. • There are over 200 listed buildings within the conservation area. Sitting within the quarter’s pattern of well-connected streets, a rich range of buildings make up this unique, dense, urban environment. Different character areas give the quarter authenticity, variety and excitement; moving quickly from

the green formal setting of the Georgian St Paul’s churchyard, to the industrial middle’s gritty streets and industrial workshops dating from the 18th to the 20th century. The Golden Triangle retains many of its historic 2-3 storey redbrick and tile roofed buildings housing the biggest concentration of much of the area’s jewellery-related businesses. The north-west portion of the quarter contains the historic Key Hill and Warstone Lane Cemeteries which, along with St Paul’s churchyard, provide the quarter with pleasant outdoor spaces. The character of the quarter changes dramatically in the 2 or 3 street blocks closest to the City Core between the canal and Great Charles Street – part of the former Inner Ring Road. Here, under the landmark BT Telecommunications Tower, larger-scale office buildings, some converted to residential, date mainly from the early to mid-20th century. The building of the Inner Ring Road in the 1960s effectively halted the natural spread of the City Core into the Jewellery Quarter. Large vacant sites still front much of Great Charles Street, accentuating the severance caused by the road, making the quarter as a whole difficult to find and access on foot from the City Core unpleasant.

Key to the Jewellery Quarter’s future success will be reestablishing historical linkages to the City Core across Great Charles Street and improving pedestrian routes to the heart of the quarter. bigcityplan.org.uk


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The Jewellery Quarter, alongside Digbeth, remains a key component of Birmingham’s unique heritage as the ‘City of 1000 Trades’. These sorts of areas make a city worth visiting. Grainy but special to our city, it is vital that its authentic character is both protected and cared for, for both visitors and the local community to enjoy.

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Our vision is to evolve the Jewellery Quarter into an urban village, driven by its historic jewellery trade and emerging creative industries, with a growing residential population. Key to its future success will be re-establishing historical links to the City Core across Great Charles Street and improving pedestrian routes to the heart of the quarter. WESTSIDE & LADYWOOD

The masterplan envisages the designation of the Jewellery Quarter as a World Heritage site, as a living industrial quarter, with the preservation of its unique historic character as a key element of its future success. KEY

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Liveable City Improving the attractiveness of the quarter as a place to live will require a mix of housing types that appeal to a broad range of people. We will encourage more housing where this reflects and fits with the historic grain of the area. Specific emphasis will be placed on providing family housing and delivering town houses. Open spaces to relax, meet people, and hold markets and events will be an important part of the Jewellery Quarter’s attraction. From St Paul’s Square, with its peaceful heart and surrounding vibrant bars and restaurants, a series of other squares and open spaces will be created and improved to form a new network of attractive places through the quarter. Golden Square will become a new high quality public space drawing visitors into the heart of the quarter. It will become a key place for public events and markets. Together with the landmark clock at the junction of Frederick Street and Warstone Lane, Golden Square will provide a much-needed focus and a distinctive open space from which to explore the

surrounding jewellery shops, designers and manufacturers that make the area special.

the Golden Square, the route will follow Caroline Street through to St Paul’s Square and on to Ludgate Hill.

The historic Key Hill and Warstone Lane cemeteries will be enhanced to make more of their rich heritage features and to promote their role as the quarter’s main green open spaces to offer an attractive environment to residents and visitors.

Remodelling Great Charles Street will be a key focus to enable the pedestrian link to continue from Ludgate Hill into the City Core by creating an attractive, safe and convenient pedestrian crossing to replace the existing bridge. In the short term the bridge link will be improved. This transformation will finally break down the physical and psychological barrier, dramatically re-connecting links and allowing City Core activities to grow into the edge of the Jewellery Quarter.

Investment in Albion Square as a new focal point, and the provision of new public spaces within the Kettleworks and Newhall Square developments will further enhance the network of open spaces.

Connected City Improved pedestrian connections, both into the quarter and in forming the links between activities and open spaces, will be vital. Currently, a major impediment to the vitality and attractiveness of the quarter are the poor connections with the City Core. A Golden Square to St Philip’s link will be the main focus for improvements to the public realm as a key pedestrian spine linking back to the Jewellery Quarter Metro stop and station. From the hub of

The remodelling will also create significant development opportunities between Lionel Street and the City Core’s Colmore Business District. On the doorstep of the new entrance to Snow Hill Station, the area will be brought forward for a mixed-use prestige development, expanding the City Core activities and providing an effective transition between the character of the City Core and that of the Jewellery Quarter. The remodelling of Paradise Circus will significantly strengthen the connections between Westside and the southern part of the quarter, linking also to the canal network, the planned Newhall Square and the key route of Newhall Street. Improved access will bring greater development potential to long-standing vacant sites, such as those at Legge Lane. The further opening up of the canal network will provide further connections around and out of the quarter, particularly between Westside and Snow Hill. The authentic features – the locks and impressive railway arches – along this stretch of the canal will be celebrated by encouraging greater visitor numbers through new and improved access points, public artworks, better lighting and security.

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Golden Square proposal

The quality of public realm will be enhanced with materials that strengthen the authentic character and strong urban street grid of the quarter. Improved street lighting will be vital to create a safer and more welcoming place for residents and visitors at night. Existing pavement trails and public art routes will be added with improved way-finding and interpretation. The extension of the Midland Metro from Snow Hill to New Street Station will create a fast, direct and convenient connection between the busy shopping streets of the City Core and the heart of the Jewellery Quarter. Promoting the existing metro station and the new entrance from Snow Hill Station into the quarter will be key to ensuring that the area becomes a more integral part of the city centre’s ‘destination experience’.

Creative City The design and manufacture of jewellery forms the foundation of the quarter’s economy and will continue to be the quarter’s key trademark activity, alongside the expansion of other creative industries. Other uses and activities, such as the 100-plus jewellery retailers, high quality independent bars and restaurants, art galleries and tourist facilities, also bring vibrancy, diversity, customers and employment into the quarter.

and restaurants. Enriching and growing the small-scale and independent feel of businesses within the quarter will boost its visitor potential and maintain its authenticity and character. In creating an urban village, residential uses will continue to form part of the rich mix of uses. Growing the quarter’s residential population will enliven the open spaces and streets, and will also help attract new shops, bars and resturants, as well as supporting existing ones. Improving the publicity and visitor experience of the quarter to promote it as a tourist destination will further enrich its vibrancy.

Authentic City The existing building stock is a vital part of the quarter’s authentic character. However, economic cycles and changing business needs have left some areas of under-use and dereliction. This threatens the fabric of the historic buildings and the quarter’s attractiveness and viability. The conversion and re-use of buildings will continue to be taken to maximise the unique character of the area. The Golden

Triangle and the industrial middle contains the greatest concentration of jewellery manufacture, trade and retailers, forming a fundamental part of the authentic and historic character of the city centre. While a mixed-use, often residential-led regeneration has been successful in the wider quarter, in order to protect the jewellery trade alternative uses will have to be carefully considered. To enable the quarter to sustain a vibrant mix of uses and to bring good quality buildings back into use, attracting new activity and life to the area, the better utilisation of buildings will be supported within the Golden Triangle and industrial middle. In particular the sensitive conversion and re-use of buildings at first floor level and above for residential purposes could in the future play a part in attracting new users and activity. The Great Hampton Street and Constitution Hill corridor contains a number of historic and character buildings that add to the authenticity of the city centre; however some are vacant or under-used. The bleak street environment requires improvements to make it more pedestrian friendly and attractive. New investment and regeneration will be encouraged in order to make the most of the potentially attractive townscape.

With over 400 related businesses, there will be support and promotion for small jewellery design, manufacturing and creative businesses, promoting its role as one of Birmingham’s centres for creative industries. Increased diversity of economic uses and activities will be encouraged around the quarter, particularly on key pedestrian routes and around public squares and spaces where ground floor frontages can be utilised for small-scale retailing, start-up and small office spaces, cafe bars Proposed public realm improvements to create a useable space under Livery Street viaduct

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The Gunsmiths’ Quarter The Gunsmiths’ Quarter owes its name and much of its character to its historical links with the manufacture and trade of guns established in the area toward the end of the 18th century. While much of the gun related activity has ceased the area is still a significant source of employment-generating activity but which has seen the reintroduction of residential uses, growth in commercial activity and the expansion of student accommodation in recent years.

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About the quarter • Historic links to the manufacture and trade of guns is now confined to the Price Street area. • The area is a focus for small scale engineering, warehousing and commercial activity supporting around 370 businesses employing some 3,500 people.

The southern area contains St. Chad’s R.C. Cathedral acting as an important landmark building. Major development activity around the area of Old Snow Hill and Snow Hill Queensway has brought about the remodelling of the Queensway, at St Chad’s Circus, introducing surface level pedestrian crossings into the quarter.

• It has experienced growth in retail led businesses, predominatly focused in the area of Great Hampton Street, Constitution Hill and along New Town Row, with around 95 companies employing some 500 people.

An established residential estate sits in the north-west with a school and open spaces.

• The Birmingham and Fazeley Canal passes through the quarter, linking east to west.

The overall vision for the Gunsmiths’ Quarter is to retain the area’s focus for employment and industrial activity and improve the connections with the surrounding areas to enable growth of a more diverse mix of uses, including residential, to create a thriving community.

At present the quarter is essentially industrial in character. The building stock within the industrial core is of variable quality with more modern and better buildings located along Newtown Middleway. South of the canal and west of Lancaster Circus the area has retained much of its traditional street pattern, although the Ring Road has cut across its grain, leaving a jagged edge. The buildings in this area are a mixture of 19th – 20th century with a few earlier ones. Throughout the core of the area there is a robust Georgian and later industrial building stock formed within a strong street grid pattern.

The Masterplan Vision

Big Ideas The Gunsmiths’ Quarter is an area of opportunity. Its central focus as a location for employment-generating activities, but it has potential to accommodate a greater mix of uses, utilising its key assets of the canal corridor, strong street grid pattern and remaining historic character.

While the quarter has opportunities for new development and activity we will address a number of key issues in order for its current assets to be utilised and opportunities realised. These will include: • The isolated and detached position of the area and a lack of public spaces and attractive walking routes. • Growing pressures for an expanding student population. • How vacant and under-used sites can be utilised for new activities. • Supporting employment-generating activities across the quarter.

Connected City Connectivity will be a key theme for the quarter and like other areas of the city centre it suffers from constraints imposed by the major road infrastructure. Although the quarter has experienced periods of redevelopment activity at St Chad’s Circus and within the canal corridor, it still remains isolated from the rest of the city centre. This is compounded by the physical road infrastructure which forms its boundaries and as such inhibits safe and convenient movement for pedestrians and cyclists.

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© Crown Copyright. All rights reserved. Birmingham City Council 100021326, 2010.

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With its industrial focus the quarter has retained a strong street grid pattern throughout its core with a mixture of 19th and 20th century buildings. However, having undergone periods of piecemeal redevelopment since the mid 20th century, the quarter has lost its clear refrences to the gun industry and urban quality throughout. The housing estate in the north-west and new office, commercial and, most recently, student accommodation along the southern and eastern edge have introduced a mix of uses to the quarter, but with a different urban fabric.

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Responding to the objectives for the wider city centre and the strengths and challenges of the quarter our approach to future development opportunities of the area will be as much about supporting it as a location for employment activities as creating opportunities to enhance its appeal as a place to live and relax, utilising those assets which can make it an authentic part of the city centre.

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The canal corridor’s importance as an asset for movement is well recognised but is also a key feature for future development activity. Along the canal corridor developments will need to utilise this asset and provide high quality liveable environments. Such developments will need to respond to the requirements of the City Centre Canal Corridor Framework and maximise the asset as an environment for residential, leisure and employment activity.

The presence of the existing residential area, bounded by Hospital Street, Smith Street, Newtown Middleway and St George’s Street, with its school and open spaces, provides the basis for further residential development within the corridor of Hospital Street to Great Hampton Street/Constitution Hill. Development will need to respond to the strong street pattern and other historic assets to ensure the authentic character is retained, making it an interesting and distinctive place to live and work.

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In the longer term the creation of a new urban park at Lancaster Circus will improve pedestrian linkages with the City Core and to the Aston University campus.

will continue to see demand for new accommodation. We will continue to support student accommodation within the area of Moland Street and Staniforth Street and along the canal corridor where it enhances the quality of the built environment, provides part of a mixed and vibrant range of activities and contributes to improvements in connections to destinations for students and visitors alike.

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The canal corridor is an ideal means to aid pedestrian movement east and west between areas of the city centre. We are committed to delivering improvements to The Birmingham and Fazeley Canal along its length, supported through Section 106 money and gains from future development activity. The focus will be on enhancing lighting and access to the canal frontage, creating a lively and safe atmosphere that is attractive for pedestrians and cyclists.

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Delivery

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This masterplan sets out a clear vision for the future growth of the city centre over the next 20 years. The delivery strategy for this masterplan is set out across four areas: • Working in partnership. • Embedding the masterplan in the statutory planning process. • Utilising the masterplan to secure funding. • Setting and delivering priorities

Working in Partnership The masterplan will not just be the city council’s vision for the city centre, but one owned by a range of public and private sector organisations. This is important as the implementation of the masterplan requires the public and private sectors to work together. We will achieve this by:

• Increased cooperation and joint working with the city centre Business Improvement Districts to deliver fine grain regeneration in the City Centre.

• Taking forward the Vision for Movement through partnership working between the private sector, the city council and Centro.

• Joint working with Marketing Birmingham on marketing the masterplan as a whole and the opportunities within it to the investment markets.

• Raising standards of architecture by strengthening the role of the City’s Design Review Panel and reviewing existing design guidance to ensure it continues to raise standards.

• Coordination of public sector investment by the development of the Place Based Initiative to maximise the objectives of public sector resources.

• Working with the emerging Local Enterprise Partnership and its partners to link the masterplan to the objectives and implementation framework of the LEP

• Strengthening links with the private sector. These already exist through bodies such as the Westside Initiative and Eastside Developers Forum. We would envisage similar arrangements in each of the areas of transformation.

Key to the masterplan’s success will be to ensure that new development and investment opportunities help to strengthen Birmingham’s economy and improve its environment to the benefit of all who live in the City. The development of the city centre sets the scene for our ambition to connect Birmingham’s people with the creation of new job opportunities that lead to a high quality employment offer and an increase in our overall employment rate. Each investment in the city will be challenged to help us deliver a wider range of economic regeneration outcomes, including opening up brand new opportunities for industry-led training linked to emerging jobs. The city council’s Employment Access Team has a vital role to play bringing together the collective resources of Birmingham City Council, Jobcentre Plus and the Skills Funding Agency in creating accessible job opportunities for all Birmingham people.

Delivery

Construction works at the Library of Birmingham due to be finished by 2013

Statutory Planning This masterplan will be embedded into the statutory planning process utilising the Core Strategy and supplementary planning documents. A programme of supplementary planning documents, both for areas/sites and thematic requirements will come forward to support the Core Strategy and delivery of the masterplan with early priorities for 2011/2012 including: • Southern Gateway/Wholesale Markets. • Building Heights. • Public Realm, Streetscape and ‘WayFinding’. • Review of Places for Living guidance on the design standards for housing development

The masterplan and funding This masterplan has been produced at a time of great challenge for the future of public sector funding. However, to date, since the launch of the masterplan process, over £1 billion of public expenditure has been committed to the city centre. Future opportunities which the city council will explore to support the masterplan are: • Accelerated Development Zones, providing infrastructure funding supported by future business rate income streams

• Community Infrastructure Levy – setting tariffs for funding as public infrastructure required by developments • Utilising emerging European funding regimes such as JESSICA to support projects. • Further Business Improvement Districts in areas such as Southside, Jewellery Quarter and Digbeth.

Westside The future development of this area has been kick-started by the £189 million city council investment in the Library of Birmingham. This investment will be vital to unlocking key development opportunities including the redevelopment of Paradise Circus. In the short to medium term the focus for the city council will be on:

• Asset based vehicles, initiatives to draw in private finance, supported by the city council’s property portfolio.

• The delivery of the Library of Birmingham and refurbishment of the REP Theatre set for completion in 2013.

• Working with the emerging Local Enterprise Partnership to identify priorities for funding.

• Working ever closer with the Broad Street Business Improvement District to deliver their objectives of a brighter, safer and cleaner Westside.

These are the mechanisms identified to draw in additional funding. However, the masterplan will only be successful if it creates the confidence of developers, investors and occupiers in the future success and prosperity of the city centre. Truly outstanding regeneration can only be achieved through a shared vision for a place, which is driven across the public and private sectors.

Setting and delivering priorities The masterplan, supported by the Vision for Movement, identifies a strong spatial focus to the growth of the city centre through the five areas of transformation and the fine grain regeneration. These are the areas that the city council will set as priorities for investment in terms of both its financial resources and its skills.

• Actively supporting Millers to bring forward early phases for the redevelopment of Arena Central. • Developing our partnership with Argent through the Joint Venture to deliver the Paradise Circus redevelopment, with the first phase starting before 2015. • Exploring the redevelopment of Paradise Circus as one of the priority projects for piloting Accelerated Development Zones. In the longer term the focus for the city council will be on: • Establishing further development agreements, utilising city council landholdings, in partnership with the

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private sector, to deliver significant mixed-use development in the area at Baskerville Wharf. • Developing proposals for the regeneration and extension of Centenary Square as the premier event space in the city, and a focal point for Westside. Snow Hill District By setting a single vision and direction, allowing landowners and developers to formulate their plans is central to delivering the future ambitions for this area.

• Continuing to work with the Colmore Row Bid to improve wayfinding and placemaking, including implementing a new wayfinding system to link Snow Hill Station to New Street Station. • Facilitating Birmingham Development Company with the submission of a planning application for the Post and Mail building. • Supporting the redevelopment of the Ludgate Hill surface car parks. In the longer term the focus for the city council will be on:

In the short to medium term the focus for the city council will be on: • Working with Ballymore to support the completion of the 2nd office phase of the Snow Hill scheme. • Supporting the regeneration / refurbishment of the KennedyTower, “the strip” and associated land working with Bruntwood and Abstract Land.

• Supporting Ballymore in bringing forward a viable scheme to deliver the 3rd and final phase of the Snow Hill scheme. • Consulting on options for the creation of a pedestrian friendly link across Church Street – Ludgate Hill. • Supporting the refurbishment / redevelopment of Lloyd House. • Working with the Children’s Hospital to maximise regeneration opportunities in the area.

Eastside The regeneration of this area remains a key priority for the city council with the commitment to the delivery of Easitside City Park and multi-storey car park supporting our future plans. In the short to medium term the focus for the city council will be on: • Enabling the construction of the Ormiston Academy for 900 students in the Performing Arts. • Delivering Eastside City Park and Science Garden and completing the currently under construction multistorey car park. • Supporting the role of Birmingham Science Park Aston through its Centrum Project. • Supporting the first phase of City Park Gate – Hotel La Tour. • Working with Birmingham City University to deliver the first phase of their new campus, and in the medium term bringing forward the remaining phases of their scheme, which will support 5,000 students.

Construction of Paradise Circus Development competition for Wholesale Markets / start on site 2015 Construction of: Golden Sq. in Jewellery Quarter

Construction of Ormiston Academy Church St. public realm improvements

Bradford St. public realm improvements Construction of Library of Birmingham Construction of New Street Station

Delivery

2012

• Supporting the integration of High Speed 2 in the city centre and the development of the new terminus building. • Facilitating the delivery of development opportunities connected with the new terminus building. Southern Gateway The relocation of the Wholesale Markets is a priority for the city council and will help kick-start the regeneration of the wider area. In the short to medium term the focus for the city council will be on: • Securing the relocation of the Wholesale Markets with the aspiration to achieve this by 2013. • Bringing forward a draft supplementary planning document for the wholesale market site and wider area, for consultation in 2011. • Working with the proposed Southside Business Improvement District to improve the street environment and develop place branding.

New Street Station The transformation of New Street Station, driven by the city council and Network Rail, will support wider regeneration and release development opportunities to the south of the station.

City centre wayfinding Phase 1 & 2 Big City Plan

2011

In the longer term the focus for the city council will be on:

• Deliver public realm improvements to Bradford Street.

Construction of Eastside City Park & Science Garden

2010

• Supporting the delivery of new mixeduse development at Eastside Locks, Curzon Park and City Park Gate.

2013

2014

2015

In the short to medium term the focus for the city council will be on: • Supporting the redevelopment of New Street Station, seeing the new station concourse (phase 1) opened in 2012, with the station completed and fully open (phase 2) by 2015. • Producing a draft masterplan and supplementary guidance for the Hill Street and John Bright Street area in 2012.

The delivery of our ambitions for the city centre can only be achieved through the involvement of the wider Birmingham community; our public sector partners, landowners and developers, businesses and the citizens of Birmingham. As we make progress toward achieving our goals the masterplan will evolve acting as an ‘organic document’, in response to changing circumstances.

• Delivering the First Phase of wayfinding improvements in 2012. Delivery outside the Areas of Transformation. The Big City Plan is not all about big projects. Equally important are smaller projects which can transform an individual building or a street corner. Below are some examples of these smaller projects which reflect the Big Ideas of the masterplan. Working with local communities, we want to develop further smaller scale projects as part of the Big City Plan.

Waheed Nazir Director of Regeneration

• New public squares in the Jewellery Quarter at Albion Square and Golden Square, which will be completed by 2012. • Public realm improvements to the junction of Church Street and Cornwall Street in 2011 to create a new public space in the heart of Colmore Row Business Improvement District. • Relocation of the JFK memorial to Digbeth High Street, in the Irish Quarter in Digbeth, during 2011. • The phased development of a wayfinding system for the city centre to include the City Core, Eastside, Digbeth and the Jewellery Quarter as its first priority, to be completed by 2014. • The opening of the Digbeth HMV Institute as a new music venue, to support the development of Digbeth as a Creative and Cultural Quarter. bigcityplan.org.uk

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Acknowledgements

Image credits

In producing the city centre masterplan a number of individuals and organisations have provided valuable input throughout the process. Special acknowledgement is made to: Professor Michael Parkinson CBE Glenn Howells Architects Marketing Birmingham Argent Chamber of Commerce City ID Make Architects Peter Brett Associates Urban Initiatives Mecanoo Foreign Office Architects AEDAS Birmingham Atkins

Glenn Howells Architects

The contents of this masterplan have been informed by a range of studies and background work including: • Interconnect Birmingham vision for a walkable city (2010) – a study to support the creation of a more welcoming, easier to understand and navigate city centre • Revised Eastside Masterplan (2010) – providing concepts for Eastside responding to the proposals for High Speed 2 • Vision for Movement (2010) – setting the strategy for public transport, pedestrian movement and future use of highway network across the city centre • The Retail Birmingham Design Strategy (2010) – generating ideas and concepts to support improving the identity and connectivity of the city centre’s retail district • Digbeth Corridor Study (2010) – outlining proposals for improved connections between the City Core, Digbeth and Southside • The Birmingham City Centre Masterplan: The Visioning Study (2007) – identifying the challenges and opportunities for Birmingham and setting out the parametres for a masterplan for the city centre • The Big City Plan Work in Progress Report (2008) – set out the issues and options for the future transformation of the city centre.

Eastside aerial view on page 50 Moor Street and New Street Station link on page 53 View towards Eastside Station from Fazeley Street on page 55 Paradise Forum redevelopment proposal on page 75

MAKE Architects

City in light Retail Birmingham lighting proposal on page 40 Cathedral walks improvement proposals (before & after) on page 41

AEDAS Birmingham

Post & Mail Square proposal on page 43 Moat Square proposal on page 65

Foreign Office Architects

New Street Station eastern square on page 26 New Street Station southern approach from Southside on page 44

Mecanoo

Centenary Square with new library of Birmingham on page 26 New library of Birmingham on page 72

Lovejoy Capita

Golden Square proposal on page 80

British Cycling

Promotion of cycling in the city on page 20


www.bigcityplan.org.uk


Big City Plan Birmingham UK 2020