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Philanthropic Roots

August 2010

Working for a company rooted in philanthropy continuously reminds me of perspective. With over $300,000 donated to numerous community charity partners, our unique platform of consistent philanthropic donations supports our community through each real estate endeavor. Each of my successful real estate transactions results in a donation to Phoenix Children’s Hospital or a worthwhile Arizona charity of your choice that benefits those far less fortunate than you and I. If you are considering selling over the next few years, call me and we can discuss maximizing your interests well ahead of time. If you know someone who might like to obtain the Paradise Valley lifestyle for today’s new prices, please have them call me. If you want some additional information on the fine charities you see highlighted in each issue – call me and I’ll never even ask you about buying or selling real estate!

Brief Market Data for Paradise Valley (Inclusive of non-gated areas as well)

• The median home price of Paradise Valley homes is $1.225M versus $1.30M last month, $1.315M last quarter, $1.515M last year and $2.00M two years ago. • The average home in Paradise Valley sold for 89% of list price last month, last quarter and last year. • The average price-per-square-foot for all listed Paradise Valley homes is $456.69. The average price-per-square-foot for the 28 homes currently in escrow is $314.82.

Faith, Hope & Inspiration

• The sales-per-month in Paradise Valley was 25 last month. The average for last quarter was 21. This number is moving up. • The number of Paradise Valley homes listed for sale has reduced to 404 from 470 last quarter, and 534 last year. After looking at the statistics above it’s natural to feel disappointed. But as much as we may pine for the values of 2004-2008, our desires don’t affect value. “Perception is not what is, … it’s what man thinks is.” In our market today, the perception of home values has changed. As much as we don’t embrace this change, we must remember that values are what the market will bear. If you are curious about concrete quantifiable information with which to make your individual informed real estate decisions, you will not find a more interesting statistical analysis than I can provide. One particular set of data I compile will empower you with some simple knowledge you will not find elsewhere. Call me at your convenience.

Most Recent Sales in Paradise Valley Gated Communities

A Local Author Shares His Experience

Stepping Stones of Hope Grieving Children Receive Support

(Since last issue)

KEVIN WEIL

Certified Luxury Home Marketing Specialist Mobile: 602.793.7492 E-Mail: Kevin@KevinWeil.com THE WILLIAMS REAL ESTATE COMPANY 10605 N. Hayden Rd. Suite G-120 Scottsdale, AZ 85260

Subdivision Mountain Shadow Resort Mountain Shadow Resort Clearwater Hills Clearwater Hills Mountain Shadow East Colonia Miramonte Casa Blanca Estates Clearwater Hills Finisterre Montelucia Hidden Paradise Finisterre

Address 5635 E. Lincoln Dr. #22 5525 E. Lincoln Dr. #125 4010 E. Canyon Ct. 4402 E. Clearwater Pkwy. 5635 E. Lincoln Dr. #93 5434 E. Lincoln Dr. #80 5219 N. Casa Blanca Dr. #33 7570 N. Silvercrest Way 6140 E. Huntress Dr. 4949 E. Lincoln Dr. #1 5433 E. Berneil Dr. 6400 N. 61st Pl.

Sq. Ft. / Bed / Bath 2751 / 4 / 3.5 2876 / 4 / 3.75 3289 / 4 / 4 2397 / 3 / 2.5 3450 / 3 / 3.5 2646 / 3 / 4 3265 / 3 / 3.5 4160 / 3 / 3 6286 / 4 / 4 4352 / 3 / 3.5 7299 / 5 / 7 8802 / 4 / 7.5

Sold Price $515,000 $600,000 $799,999 $800,000 $850,000 $1,000,000 $1,100,000 $1,225,000 $1,500,000 $2,350,000 $2,355,000 $3,000,000

All information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. If your home is currently listed, this is not a solicitation for that listing.

Produced by Desert Lifestyle Publishing • 480.460.0996 • www.DesertLifestyle.net

Arizona Humane Society Passionately Committed to Valley Pets

www.KevinWeil.com


Our first story exposes you to Stepping Stones of Hope and their very ambitious efforts to assist kids who have just lost a parent or sibling. The thought of a child losing a sibling or parent is almost too hard to even think about, but it happens and we can be thankful there is a group that can lend assistance to kids who don’t know how to deal with what has happened. Also, by bringing families with similar experiences together they hopefully realize they aren’t alone. A local author, Barry Kluger, just published a book about his daughter’s passing. His book fits in perfectly with the work Stepping Stones of Hope does and his practice of donating a portion of his proceeds to his favorite charities fits in perfectly with the intent of this mailer. — Kevin Weil

STEPPING STONES OF HOPE support for grieving children

How do you reach out to a child or teenager after they experience the death of a love one? How does an adult grieve the loss of a loved one and, at the same time, help their child find hope? For over 10 years, Stepping Stones of Hope has helped grieving families find the answers to these questions through their camp programs. In a fun-filled environment, children and their families learn they are not alone and realize the thoughts and feelings they may be experiencing are normal. When a life is interrupted by the death of a loved one, there is a need to talk about the good times and memories, as well as the pain. Families are offered the opportunity to participate with their peers and engage in similar healing activities thus providing a foundation for family dialogue long after the program ends. Kids and adults, speaking what is in their hearts, allowing the empty place inside them to fill with hope. What exactly does camp accomplish? Perhaps it is best said in a mother’s very simple words: “I can’t tell you how much this past weekend meant to us. It was an AMAZING experience, thank you.” — excerpt from an email received after Camp Paz April 2010 Stepping Stones of Hope’s vision is to be the premier provider of community-driven grief and wellness outreach programs. Over 80 volunteers help facilitate the numerous programs: Camp Paz for Kids: Weekend camp program held twice a year in Payson, AZ which places children and families in a neutral and safe environment. Children are transitioned through a variety of coping skills-based activities. Small group discussions, role-play, music, humor and art are all used to build trust and family dynamics. Camp Paz for Grown-Ups: Serves the adult family members of the children referred to Stepping Stones of Hope and runs concurrently with the children’s camp, at an adjacent facility. Sessions are designed to help adult family members process their grief and transitions in a way that supports the grieving children in their life. First Steps: Monthly sessions, facilitated at the office, provides grieving families support during the early months of the grief process when the death may not yet seem real. This program closes the gap between the time of the actual loss and the time it may be most beneficial for families to process their thoughts and feelings at a weekend camp program. Camp Paz at School: Hosted by local school districts and similar to the Day at Camp Paz program. Stepping

A Life Undone A FATHER’S JOURNEY THROUGH LOSS

Death ends a life, not a relationship.

Since 1957, Arizona Humane Society has fostered the belief that every pet deserves a good life and we are passionately committed to doing what’s best for pets and the people in their lives. While adoptions comprise a big part of our mission, AHS goes beyond adoptions to help animals who have no one else. In fact, last year, AHS: • Answered 22,837 calls to help sick, injured and abandoned animals or those in need of rescue • Treated 11,508 dogs, cats and critters in our Second Chance Animal Hospital™ • Performed 19,334 spay and neuter surgeries • Returned 899 lost pets to their worried owners

— Robert Benchley

Stones of Hope provides training for district volunteers who partner with the agency volunteers to facilitate the day. Educational Outreach: topics related to grief and bereavement are presented annually upon request. An annual grief and bereavement conference is hosted each year for professionals within the community and serves to provide additional training for volunteers. Research indicates: • 3.5% of children under the age of 18 experience the death of a parent annually. For Maricopa County the number of children affected is nearly 86 children a day! This figure does not include the death loss of siblings, relatives, friends or other significant loved ones. • Stepping Stones of Hope programs have typically served children and families who experienced a death loss due to cancer (26%), suicide (21%), heart (17%), motor vehicle accidents (24%) and violent crimes (7%). • Death loss of a parent is one of the top five risk factors for children who experience certain behavioral problems. • Arizona is experiencing the highest growth rate in the country among children under 5, and the second highest population growth among children 5 to 17. The number of children enduring the death of a parent or loved one is sure to rise in the years to come. STEPPING STONES OF HOPE 4000 N. 7th Street, Suite 108 Phoenix, AZ 85014 602.264.7520 info@steppingstonesofhope.org www.SteppingStonesOfHope.org

When a parent has to bury a child, there is no manual, no guide, no 12-step program. A Life Undone, A Father’s Journey Through Loss is the story of Scottsdale resident Barry Kluger’s voyage through this most horrific experience, battling unimaginable grief to find a new way of life after losing his 18-year old daughter Erica, his only child, in a car accident in Scottsdale in 2001. It is not surprising that Kluger, a former MTV Networks and Prodigy corporate communications executive and frequent columnist for The Arizona Republic, would compose a story about his daughter’s life, her tragic death and his grieving process. It will, however, surprise many that Kluger holds nothing back—not his own failings nor his daughter’s. His realism, tempered with humor, is refreshing and inspiring. A Life Undone is not a how-to book; it is a view into one man’s parenting and grieving. Readers get a road map—not a guide—via Kluger’s thoughts, emails and recollections, on how to adjust to life’s inevitable changes, from the miniscule to the monumental. Readers see Kluger adjust as a new father, as a divorced parent, a remarried man and finally, as a grieving dad. Kluger, who was for many years “casual” about religion, turns to his faith as an anchor to help him cope with his grief. The experiences he shares help people of any faith traverse the fine line between embracing their beliefs and becoming strangled by religion when faced with turmoil. Readers learn much about Erica; the first half of the book is a celebration of the times they shared together. Kluger does not sugar-coat the bad times, grappling with the realization that his decision to divorce Erica’s mother may have contributed to her demise. But he learns to accept that he did the best that he could, an invaluable lesson to all parents. In the beginning of A Life Undone, Kluger includes an article by Jack Riemer about a concert given by Itzhak Perlman, during which one of his violin strings broke. This article sets the stage for the book’s most powerful message: Like Perlman’s playing at the beginning of his concert; Kluger lived life with all that he had. And akin to Pearlman’s masterful completion of his concert with only three strings, he now lives to the fullest with what he has left. A Life Undone recounts one man’s grieving process, but more importantly, it is a celebration of love and life. Kluger has made a commitment to take a portion of the proceeds and donate to three organizations: the Erica A. Kluger Scholarship at The Spotlight Dance Academy (Long Island, NY), Autism Speaks™ (Kluger refers to himself as the “proud uncle” of an Asperger’s nephew) and a scholarship in the name of Jeffrey Miller, one of the four students killed at Kent State University 40 years ago this past May (May 4, 1970), who attended high school with Kluger and whose mother, Elaine Miller Holstein, wrote the foreword, knowing all too well what it is like to be a grieving parent. To learn more about these organizations, Kluger asks that you email him at barry@barrykluger.com. Jeffrey Zaslow, Wall Street Journal columnist and the co-author of “The Last Lecture,” writes the front cover for the book saying, “By sharing his most loving memories of his daughter, Barry Kluger has written a powerful book filled with humor, heartache and an unflinching form of introspection. In his words, we see our own losses, and possibilities of life also.” A personally signed and inscribed book is available at www.alifeundone.com. It can also be purchased for several e-books, including Amazon Kindle, Sony E-reader and the Barnes and Noble Nook. It will be available in bookstores on September 1st.

A leader in the animal welfare community for many decades, AHS touts a long list of innovative, thoughtful programs that bring dignity to pets and the people who love them. Programs such as our one-of-a-kind Emergency Animal Medical Technicians™, or pet paramedics, who rescue animals to give them a second chance at a good life; our Second Chance Animal Hospital – the largest shelter-based trauma center in the Southwest: or programs, such as our new AHS Spay/Neuter Incentive Program (SNIP), that address the main reason we exist: pet overpopulation. Everything AHS does is made possible only through donations. As the state’s largest animal welfare and protection agency, we receive no government funding, nor do we belong to a national network of humane societies or other animal groups. We are an open-intake facility, meaning we do not turn away animals based on breed, age or medical condition. With an estimated 7 million dogs that end up in animal shelters across the nation, there is so much more we can do. We just can’t do it alone…we need your help. Whether you adopt, donate or volunteer, you can help homeless pets get the good life they deserve. Visit us at www.azhumane.org to learn about the many ways you can help. Every day Arizona Humane Society helps homeless pets like this little puppy find a good life.

Cats like Fluffy come in by the hundreds during the summer time. The average cost to care for a pet from the time it comes into the shelter until the time it leaves is about $300.


Our first story exposes you to Stepping Stones of Hope and their very ambitious efforts to assist kids who have just lost a parent or sibling. The thought of a child losing a sibling or parent is almost too hard to even think about, but it happens and we can be thankful there is a group that can lend assistance to kids who don’t know how to deal with what has happened. Also, by bringing families with similar experiences together they hopefully realize they aren’t alone. A local author, Barry Kluger, just published a book about his daughter’s passing. His book fits in perfectly with the work Stepping Stones of Hope does and his practice of donating a portion of his proceeds to his favorite charities fits in perfectly with the intent of this mailer. — Kevin Weil

STEPPING STONES OF HOPE support for grieving children

How do you reach out to a child or teenager after they experience the death of a love one? How does an adult grieve the loss of a loved one and, at the same time, help their child find hope? For over 10 years, Stepping Stones of Hope has helped grieving families find the answers to these questions through their camp programs. In a fun-filled environment, children and their families learn they are not alone and realize the thoughts and feelings they may be experiencing are normal. When a life is interrupted by the death of a loved one, there is a need to talk about the good times and memories, as well as the pain. Families are offered the opportunity to participate with their peers and engage in similar healing activities thus providing a foundation for family dialogue long after the program ends. Kids and adults, speaking what is in their hearts, allowing the empty place inside them to fill with hope. What exactly does camp accomplish? Perhaps it is best said in a mother’s very simple words: “I can’t tell you how much this past weekend meant to us. It was an AMAZING experience, thank you.” — excerpt from an email received after Camp Paz April 2010 Stepping Stones of Hope’s vision is to be the premier provider of community-driven grief and wellness outreach programs. Over 80 volunteers help facilitate the numerous programs: Camp Paz for Kids: Weekend camp program held twice a year in Payson, AZ which places children and families in a neutral and safe environment. Children are transitioned through a variety of coping skills-based activities. Small group discussions, role-play, music, humor and art are all used to build trust and family dynamics. Camp Paz for Grown-Ups: Serves the adult family members of the children referred to Stepping Stones of Hope and runs concurrently with the children’s camp, at an adjacent facility. Sessions are designed to help adult family members process their grief and transitions in a way that supports the grieving children in their life. First Steps: Monthly sessions, facilitated at the office, provides grieving families support during the early months of the grief process when the death may not yet seem real. This program closes the gap between the time of the actual loss and the time it may be most beneficial for families to process their thoughts and feelings at a weekend camp program. Camp Paz at School: Hosted by local school districts and similar to the Day at Camp Paz program. Stepping

A Life Undone A FATHER’S JOURNEY THROUGH LOSS

Death ends a life, not a relationship.

Since 1957, Arizona Humane Society has fostered the belief that every pet deserves a good life and we are passionately committed to doing what’s best for pets and the people in their lives. While adoptions comprise a big part of our mission, AHS goes beyond adoptions to help animals who have no one else. In fact, last year, AHS: • Answered 22,837 calls to help sick, injured and abandoned animals or those in need of rescue • Treated 11,508 dogs, cats and critters in our Second Chance Animal Hospital™ • Performed 19,334 spay and neuter surgeries • Returned 899 lost pets to their worried owners

— Robert Benchley

Stones of Hope provides training for district volunteers who partner with the agency volunteers to facilitate the day. Educational Outreach: topics related to grief and bereavement are presented annually upon request. An annual grief and bereavement conference is hosted each year for professionals within the community and serves to provide additional training for volunteers. Research indicates: • 3.5% of children under the age of 18 experience the death of a parent annually. For Maricopa County the number of children affected is nearly 86 children a day! This figure does not include the death loss of siblings, relatives, friends or other significant loved ones. • Stepping Stones of Hope programs have typically served children and families who experienced a death loss due to cancer (26%), suicide (21%), heart (17%), motor vehicle accidents (24%) and violent crimes (7%). • Death loss of a parent is one of the top five risk factors for children who experience certain behavioral problems. • Arizona is experiencing the highest growth rate in the country among children under 5, and the second highest population growth among children 5 to 17. The number of children enduring the death of a parent or loved one is sure to rise in the years to come. STEPPING STONES OF HOPE 4000 N. 7th Street, Suite 108 Phoenix, AZ 85014 602.264.7520 info@steppingstonesofhope.org www.SteppingStonesOfHope.org

When a parent has to bury a child, there is no manual, no guide, no 12-step program. A Life Undone, A Father’s Journey Through Loss is the story of Scottsdale resident Barry Kluger’s voyage through this most horrific experience, battling unimaginable grief to find a new way of life after losing his 18-year old daughter Erica, his only child, in a car accident in Scottsdale in 2001. It is not surprising that Kluger, a former MTV Networks and Prodigy corporate communications executive and frequent columnist for The Arizona Republic, would compose a story about his daughter’s life, her tragic death and his grieving process. It will, however, surprise many that Kluger holds nothing back—not his own failings nor his daughter’s. His realism, tempered with humor, is refreshing and inspiring. A Life Undone is not a how-to book; it is a view into one man’s parenting and grieving. Readers get a road map—not a guide—via Kluger’s thoughts, emails and recollections, on how to adjust to life’s inevitable changes, from the miniscule to the monumental. Readers see Kluger adjust as a new father, as a divorced parent, a remarried man and finally, as a grieving dad. Kluger, who was for many years “casual” about religion, turns to his faith as an anchor to help him cope with his grief. The experiences he shares help people of any faith traverse the fine line between embracing their beliefs and becoming strangled by religion when faced with turmoil. Readers learn much about Erica; the first half of the book is a celebration of the times they shared together. Kluger does not sugar-coat the bad times, grappling with the realization that his decision to divorce Erica’s mother may have contributed to her demise. But he learns to accept that he did the best that he could, an invaluable lesson to all parents. In the beginning of A Life Undone, Kluger includes an article by Jack Riemer about a concert given by Itzhak Perlman, during which one of his violin strings broke. This article sets the stage for the book’s most powerful message: Like Perlman’s playing at the beginning of his concert; Kluger lived life with all that he had. And akin to Pearlman’s masterful completion of his concert with only three strings, he now lives to the fullest with what he has left. A Life Undone recounts one man’s grieving process, but more importantly, it is a celebration of love and life. Kluger has made a commitment to take a portion of the proceeds and donate to three organizations: the Erica A. Kluger Scholarship at The Spotlight Dance Academy (Long Island, NY), Autism Speaks™ (Kluger refers to himself as the “proud uncle” of an Asperger’s nephew) and a scholarship in the name of Jeffrey Miller, one of the four students killed at Kent State University 40 years ago this past May (May 4, 1970), who attended high school with Kluger and whose mother, Elaine Miller Holstein, wrote the foreword, knowing all too well what it is like to be a grieving parent. To learn more about these organizations, Kluger asks that you email him at barry@barrykluger.com. Jeffrey Zaslow, Wall Street Journal columnist and the co-author of “The Last Lecture,” writes the front cover for the book saying, “By sharing his most loving memories of his daughter, Barry Kluger has written a powerful book filled with humor, heartache and an unflinching form of introspection. In his words, we see our own losses, and possibilities of life also.” A personally signed and inscribed book is available at www.alifeundone.com. It can also be purchased for several e-books, including Amazon Kindle, Sony E-reader and the Barnes and Noble Nook. It will be available in bookstores on September 1st.

A leader in the animal welfare community for many decades, AHS touts a long list of innovative, thoughtful programs that bring dignity to pets and the people who love them. Programs such as our one-of-a-kind Emergency Animal Medical Technicians™, or pet paramedics, who rescue animals to give them a second chance at a good life; our Second Chance Animal Hospital – the largest shelter-based trauma center in the Southwest: or programs, such as our new AHS Spay/Neuter Incentive Program (SNIP), that address the main reason we exist: pet overpopulation. Everything AHS does is made possible only through donations. As the state’s largest animal welfare and protection agency, we receive no government funding, nor do we belong to a national network of humane societies or other animal groups. We are an open-intake facility, meaning we do not turn away animals based on breed, age or medical condition. With an estimated 7 million dogs that end up in animal shelters across the nation, there is so much more we can do. We just can’t do it alone…we need your help. Whether you adopt, donate or volunteer, you can help homeless pets get the good life they deserve. Visit us at www.azhumane.org to learn about the many ways you can help. Every day Arizona Humane Society helps homeless pets like this little puppy find a good life.

Cats like Fluffy come in by the hundreds during the summer time. The average cost to care for a pet from the time it comes into the shelter until the time it leaves is about $300.


Philanthropic Roots

August 2010

Working for a company rooted in philanthropy continuously reminds me of perspective. With over $300,000 donated to numerous community charity partners, our unique platform of consistent philanthropic donations supports our community through each real estate endeavor. Each of my successful real estate transactions results in a donation to Phoenix Children’s Hospital or a worthwhile Arizona charity of your choice that benefits those far less fortunate than you and I. If you are considering selling over the next few years, call me and we can discuss maximizing your interests well ahead of time. If you know someone who might like to obtain the Paradise Valley lifestyle for today’s new prices, please have them call me. If you want some additional information on the fine charities you see highlighted in each issue – call me and I’ll never even ask you about buying or selling real estate!

Brief Market Data for Paradise Valley (Inclusive of non-gated areas as well)

• The median home price of Paradise Valley homes is $1.225M versus $1.30M last month, $1.315M last quarter, $1.515M last year and $2.00M two years ago. • The average home in Paradise Valley sold for 89% of list price last month, last quarter and last year. • The average price-per-square-foot for all listed Paradise Valley homes is $456.69. The average price-per-square-foot for the 28 homes currently in escrow is $314.82.

Faith, Hope & Inspiration

• The sales-per-month in Paradise Valley was 25 last month. The average for last quarter was 21. This number is moving up. • The number of Paradise Valley homes listed for sale has reduced to 404 from 470 last quarter, and 534 last year. After looking at the statistics above it’s natural to feel disappointed. But as much as we may pine for the values of 2004-2008, our desires don’t affect value. “Perception is not what is, … it’s what man thinks is.” In our market today, the perception of home values has changed. As much as we don’t embrace this change, we must remember that values are what the market will bear. If you are curious about concrete quantifiable information with which to make your individual informed real estate decisions, you will not find a more interesting statistical analysis than I can provide. One particular set of data I compile will empower you with some simple knowledge you will not find elsewhere. Call me at your convenience.

Most Recent Sales in Paradise Valley Gated Communities

A Local Author Shares His Experience

Stepping Stones of Hope Grieving Children Receive Support

(Since last issue)

KEVIN WEIL

Certified Luxury Home Marketing Specialist Mobile: 602.793.7492 E-Mail: Kevin@KevinWeil.com THE WILLIAMS REAL ESTATE COMPANY 10605 N. Hayden Rd. Suite G-120 Scottsdale, AZ 85260

Subdivision Mountain Shadow Resort Mountain Shadow Resort Clearwater Hills Clearwater Hills Mountain Shadow East Colonia Miramonte Casa Blanca Estates Clearwater Hills Finisterre Montelucia Hidden Paradise Finisterre

Address 5635 E. Lincoln Dr. #22 5525 E. Lincoln Dr. #125 4010 E. Canyon Ct. 4402 E. Clearwater Pkwy. 5635 E. Lincoln Dr. #93 5434 E. Lincoln Dr. #80 5219 N. Casa Blanca Dr. #33 7570 N. Silvercrest Way 6140 E. Huntress Dr. 4949 E. Lincoln Dr. #1 5433 E. Berneil Dr. 6400 N. 61st Pl.

Sq. Ft. / Bed / Bath 2751 / 4 / 3.5 2876 / 4 / 3.75 3289 / 4 / 4 2397 / 3 / 2.5 3450 / 3 / 3.5 2646 / 3 / 4 3265 / 3 / 3.5 4160 / 3 / 3 6286 / 4 / 4 4352 / 3 / 3.5 7299 / 5 / 7 8802 / 4 / 7.5

Sold Price $515,000 $600,000 $799,999 $800,000 $850,000 $1,000,000 $1,100,000 $1,225,000 $1,500,000 $2,350,000 $2,355,000 $3,000,000

All information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. If your home is currently listed, this is not a solicitation for that listing.

Produced by Desert Lifestyle Publishing • 480.460.0996 • www.DesertLifestyle.net

Arizona Humane Society Passionately Committed to Valley Pets

www.KevinWeil.com


Paradise Valley Gated Aug 10