Issuu on Google+

CALL TOM - YOUR INVESTMENT WILL BE GLAD YOU DID For three consecutive years (2006, 2007 and 2008), Tom Locati has made The Wall Street Journal’s list of top 50 Realtors® in the United States, by sales volume. In addition, during the same three years, he has been ranked as the #1 agent at Russ Lyon | Sotheby’s International Realty. That’s impressive. But what’s equally impressive, Tom lists and sells nearly $300 million dollars of North Scottsdale luxury real estate each year and is the only Realtor® from Arizona to make the Journal’s ultra-elite list. Tom is one of the country’s leading luxury real estate professionals, representing a wealth of fine properties and affluent clients who rely on his discretion, experience, investment acumen and intimate knowledge of the Scottsdale real estate market. “I generally work with a small segment of society often looking for a second, third or fourth home. My job is to empower you (my client) through knowledgeable, reliable real estate information firmly grounded in ethical and moral real estate transactions; thus, providing a comfort level essential in allowing you to make an informed financial decision.” Tom believes the luxury real estate business is ultimately wrapped around two primary concepts. “First, you have to have a sound understanding of how money and real estate investments work. In fact, acquiring the perfect property is foremost a matter of finding a wise investment and coupling that with a client’s personal tastes and desires. However, it’s equally important that I am able to create a comfort level for the investor/client based not only on market knowledge, but on expert guidance with proven results.” This is what puts Tom at the top of the real estate profession year after year. “If a professional business approach to real estate acquisition is what you seek, call me - Your Investment will be glad you did. I look forward to visiting with you!”

Russ Lyon | Sotheby’s International Realty 20909 N. 90th Pl. #209 Scottsdale, AZ 85255 Office: 480.585.7070 • Fax: 480.419.6931 tomlocati@me.com • www.tlocati.com

TOM LOCATI

DEBBIE NEGRIN

Direct: 480.600.2345

Direct: 480.734.3498

Tom Locati Russ Lyon | Sotheby’s International Realty 20909 N. 90th Pl. #209 Scottsdale, AZ 85255 FORWARDING SERVICE REQUESTED

May 2009

CURRENT REAL ESTATE ACTIVITY IN FEATURED PROPERTY: 9825 E. Blue Sky Drive • Lot 80 • 5 bedrooms / 6 Baths / 8,743 Sq. Ft. • $5,995,000 Truly a magnificent soft contemporary masterpiece located on the 1st fairway of world-renowned Estancia Club. Unobstructed city lights, Pinnacle Peak & golf course views offer a captivatingly private setting with southern exposure. Kitchen is a true “Chef’s Quarters” designed & built by AZ’s most popular chef, Rob Yedor (AKA Chef Dad) and was featured in Phoenix Home & Garden magazine. It’s as tasteful as it is functional. Travertine and African cherry wood floors, fiber optic ceiling, full-service bar and wine cellar, and home audio system that will blow your mind. 20+ TVs are just a few of the highlights. Outdoor living with putting green, negative-edge pool, spa and sunken BBQ area. Address Lot # Sq. Ft. / Bed / Bath Price Per SF CURRENTLY FOR SALE: 10081 E. Blue Sky Dr. 108 2800 / 3 / 3 $455 28095 N. 101st St. 122 2800 / 3 / 3 $498 28092 N. 101st St. 117 2455 / 3 / 3 $570 27441 N. 96th Way 73 3566 / 3 / 3 $498 10010 E. Blue Sky Dr. 103 5361 / 4 / 4 $335 27962 N. 100th Pl. 96 5360 / 4 / 4 $372 28046 N. 96th Pl. 20 3722 / 2 / 2.5 $536 27939 N. 100th Pl. 105 4590 / 3 / 3.5 $435 28034 N. 100th Pl. 99 4450 / 3 / 3.5 $494 10265 E. Running Deer Trl. 165 5400 / 4 / 4.5 $424 28047 N. 96th Pl. 6 5403 / 3 / 4.5 $425 9672 E. Oberlin Way 12 5382 / 3 / 3.5 $446 27336 N. 103rd Way 210 5100 / 3 / 3.5 $480 10230 E. Running Deer Tr. 136 5498 / 4 / 6 $482 9892 E. Blue Sky Dr. 76 7000 / 5 / 5.5 $398 26872 N. 102nd St. 255 6157 / 5 / 7 $471 27081 N. 96th Way 67 5019 / 3 / 4 $597 26945 N. 102nd St. 240 4187 / 3 / 3 $740 28111 N. 96th Pl. 3 4484 / 4 / 4.5 $713 27264 N. 103rd Way 209 5665 / 5 / 4.5 $587 27975 N. 96th Pl. 9 4628 / 4 / 4.5 $724 26931 N. 103rd St. 259 6600 / 5 / 5.5 $515 27086 N. 103rd St. 185 5047 / 3 / 3.5 $692 9709 E. Bajada Rd. 45 5342 / 4 / 4 $654 28159 N. 96th Pl. 1 4700 / 4 / 5 $850 27226 N. 96th Way 50 5719 / 4 / 4.5 $768 9801 E. Dynamite Blvd. 253 n/a / 4 / 4 n/a 27184 N. 97th Pl. 64 7587 / 4 / 7 $606 9720 E. Estancia Way 29 6544 / 4 / 4.5 $760 27473 N. 97th Pl. 33 6850 / 4 / 4.5 $817 27550 N. 96th Way 57 7160 / 5 / 7 $831 9825 E. Blue Sky Dr. 80 8743 / 5 / 6 $686 27341 N. 102nd St. 270 14231 / 8 / 11 $1054 SALE PENDING: 27225 N. 96th Way 69 6441 / 4 / 4.5 $667 SOLD: 27405 N. 96th Way 72 4894 / 4 / 4.5 $501 27597 N. 96th Pl. 28 5907 / 4 / 5 $593

List Price

Choosing Artwork for Your Home

$1,275,000 $1,395,000 $1,400,000 $1,775,000 $1,795,000 $1,995,000 $1,995,000 $1,995,000 $2,200,000 $2,289,000 $2,295,000 $2,400,000 $2,450,000 $2,650,000 $2,785,000 $2,900,000 $2,998,000 $3,100,000 $3,195,000 $3,325,000 $3,350,000 $3,399,999 $3,495,000 $3,495,000 $3,995,000 $4,395,000 $4,500,000 $4,595,000 $4,975,000 $5,595,000 $5,950,000 $5,995,000 $15,000,000 $4,295,000 Sold Price $2,450,000 $3,500,000

All information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. The properties on this list have been listed/sold by various participants in the MLS. If your home is currently listed, this is not a solicitation for that listing.

The Finishing Touch

Produced by Desert Lifestyle Publishing • 480.460.0996

ISSN-1939-9650

Have a Home in Escrow? Tackling Termite Trouble

Bold & Inventive

Cowboy Ciao’s Famous Stetson Salad

Estancia’s

Hot Real Estate Listings


Featuring Cowboy Ciao 7133 E. Stetson Dr. • Scottsdale 480.946.3111 or cowboyciao.com

STETSON CHOPPED SALAD Ingredients: 2 oz. Israeli cous cous, cooked & chilled 2 oz. arugula, chopped 2 oz. Roma tomatoes, diced 1 1/2 oz. smoked salmon, diced 1/2 oz. Asiago cheese, crumbled 1/2 oz. pepitas, toasted 1/2 oz. dried black currants 1 oz. air-dried sweet corn Combine cheese, pepitas and dried currants in a separate bowl. This Ciao ‘trail mix’ is one of the six components of the salad. In a shallow bowl, arrange the six rows with contrasting colors next to each other. After presenting the salad, drizzle dressing on top and toss. Serve extra dressing on the side if desired. Pesto Buttermilk Dressing: (Makes one generous pint) 1/2 cup basil pesto 1 ea. shallot, rough chop 1 cup aioli 1 cup buttermilk 1/2 tsp. coarse black pepper 1/2 ea. lemon, juice only salt & pepper to taste Add first three ingredients to food processor and blend thoroughly. With motor running pour in buttermilk. Add remaining ingredients to combine. Store in refrigerator up to one week.

Ever been to a friend’s house and been impressed by his or her art collection? Picking the right painting or sculpture for rooms in your home can be a painstaking process. Do you choose the artwork first and then design the rest of the room around the painting? Or do you design your room first

and then look for just the right artwork as the pièce de résistance to your decor? (The latter is correct.) No doubt, choosing artwork is a personal endeavor. After all, you’re the only one who knows if you like how something looks. But there are some guidelines when it comes to making the

best choices for your abode. We spoke with Robb & Stucky interior designer Davinder Chawla for some expert tips. The first thing to consider when choosing a work of art for your home: Stick with your style. “You have to know the style of your house,” says Chawla. “Is it traditional, is it contemporary, is it more transitional? Then your artwork should reflect the same or a complementary style.” In other words, you may not want to hang an ultra-modern painting over your mantel if your home is more rustic or traditional. Some styles, however, do meld. “For example, American Indian art can be used in a contemporary lifestyle or setting,” says Chawla. Next, think color. Pick up on hues from the fabrics in your room and the paint colors on the walls and look for complementary artwork. Of course, it doesn’t have to be an exact match. “The scale of your artwork is also very important,” says Chawla. “If you have a large ten-foot wall space, you don’t want a small 36” X 36” piece of art. The art also has to work with the scale of the furniture.” If you have grand, stately furniture, for example, small paintings will be overshadowed and feel out of place. You may also wonder if it’s okay to mix different art mediums – painting, sculpture, and metal artwork, for example – in the same space. The answer is absolutely yes. If you have too many paintings in the room, it’s better to add a sculpture or bring in some metal or iron art to add some texture

HOME INSPECTION REVEALS TERMITES? HOW TO PROCEED. It’s been said that there are two types of homes in Arizona – homes that have termites, and homes that will. Surprisingly, despite our state’s exceedingly dry conditions, those pesky wood-gorging creatures have made a permanent home here, primarily living below the earth and venturing out to sometimes do serious damage. In fact, some areas of the Valley have jokingly been referred to as “termite alley.” Should buyers with a home in escrow be concerned if there is evidence of termites? Not necessarily. Termites are very common here and also very treatable. The presence of termites or the indication of a past infestation isn’t always a reason to cancel the purchase. The important thing is to treat the problem and maintain a warranty. So, how does a homebuyer whose new home is in escrow protect against infestation, or proceed with the sale upon learning they may be sharing their new space with unwanted guests? “Typically, when a buyer is purchasing a home,” says Sharon Wolf-Furman, co-owner of AJF Engineering, a residential and commercial termite inspection company in the Valley, “99.9 percent of the time, they first have a termite inspection which covers ‘wood destroying insects’ only.” In most cases, it’s up to the buyer to pay for the inspection, although there are cases where the buyer may request credit at the close of escrow or have the seller pay for the treatment. If the home is purchased through an FHA mortgage, it may be required that the house be treated and the bank provide credit. Termite inspectors are required to look for several things including evidence of termite infestation and “conducive conditions.” Conducive conditions are those such as moisture around the foundation of the home that would be termite-friendly. Searching for evidence of termites does not actually mean seeing the critters. “What it does mean,” Furman explains, “is finding their shelter tubes or damage to baseboard moldings or door frames, although coming across that is less common.” Inspectors are also required to look for previous termite treatment such as drill holes or a bait station system. Drill holes would typically be on the floor slab in a garage or

to the room. “Art is not just a canvas or a painting,” says Chawla. “It can be anything – sculpture, lighting, mirrors, sconces.” So go ahead and mix it up! Variety is also a plus when it comes to how you hang your art. If, for example, you have two large pieces of art in a room, do some groupings of smaller paintings on the third or fourth wall. “Don’t have all small pieces or all large pieces,” Chawla suggests. And don’t be afraid to go bare. “Having too many pieces of art in the room is not a good thing to do,” adds Chawla. “You have to look at a room and see how many walls and windows there are. You don’t have to have a piece of art for every single wall.” One mistake Chawla often sees her clients make in their own homes: Choosing too many small pieces of art, which can make a wall look cluttered. “One big piece would be better,” says Chawla. “Adding a bigger piece will open up the room and make the room appear bigger. If you have a small house and a small room, lots of small paintings will make the room look even smaller.” Finally, don’t forget to have someone assist you when you hang your artwork. Have them hold the pieces up while you stand back to judge placement. The art should be at eye level – not too high and not too low. And light is very important. If possible, highlight your works of art with recessed can lighting overhead. Once your pieces are hung, friends will soon be admiring your artistic eye!

ROOF PLUMBING

on the outside patio. For this treatment, holes are drilled then filled with a “termacide” which can eliminate infestation. Bait systems involve filling hollow plastic tubes with a wood product soaked with termacide. Termites eat the chemical, bring it back to their colony and eventually wipe it out. “If the house does have evidence of prior treatment,” Furman says, “we tell the buyer to find out from the seller if there is a warranty on the treatment. If there is, that same company could spot treat the areas.” If there’s no warranty, it’s recommended the buyer treat the home and maintain a warranty for as long as they own the home. Fortunately, Arizona regulates the inspection for termites, mandating a report from inspectors; however, the state is also very clear that the inspection is only a visual one for the day of the inspection. It will reduce the risk for homebuyers, but not eliminate it. And, although inspections are quite thorough, there could be significant termite damage that goes undetected, for example behind a wall covered by sheet rock. The average cost of termite treatment is $600-$800, increasing with larger homes. So by all means, if you’ve found the ideal property but were disappointed to learn it has or had termites, don’t fret. Keep in mind that the subterranean termites that inhabit the Valley are generally easily treated. Your Realtor is a good source of advice and information about termites and termite inspections. Turn to them with any concerns that you may have.

ELECTRICAL TERMITES

FOUNDATION

MAY 2009 Stomp ASU Gammage, May 5th-10th 480.965.3434 or asugammage.com This unique, explosive musical performance will keep the whole family entertained. The eight-member troupe uses just about anything as their percussion instruments. Well, anything but actual instruments. Performers will use wooden poles, garbage cans, hub caps and recently added paint cans to create their amazing rhythms. You won’t look at your pots and pans the same way after seeing this performance! 9th Annual Golf 2 Save the Family The Phoenician Resort & Spa, May 9th 480.898.0228 or savethefamily.org Established in 1989, Save the Family was created to help homeless families with transitional housing, case management and supportive services. Take part in their annual golf event to raise proceeds to fund all of those programs. Each registration includes a round of golf, breakfast and lunch, and range balls. There will also be a silent auction. Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band Cricket Wireless Pavilion, May 14th 602.254.7200 or livenation.com If you have never been to a Jimmy Buffett concert, you are in for a treat. The always easy-going, island-loving singer brings his Summerzcool 2009 tour to town. Fans can expect to hear favorites such as Margaritaville, Come Monday and Cheeseburger in Paradise. Parrotheads unite! Peach Festival Schnepf Farms, May 15th-17th 480.987.3100 or peachfestival.net It’s that time of the year again: Peach-picking season! Come out and enjoy a “peachy-keen” day with all things peach. You can partake of juicy peach sampling or even a wonderful peach-pancake breakfast. The festival will also have live entertainment and fun rides for the entire family to enjoy. Although the event is only for this one weekend, peach picking will be available every weekend during the month of May. International Museum Day Heard Museum and Phoenix Art Museum, May 18th 602.252.8848 or heard.org In celebration of International Museum Day, the Heard Museum and the Phoenix Art Museum are both offering two-for-one admission. Explore all the great history the Heard Museum has to offer then take a short stroll to the Phoenix Art Museum where you can enjoy some of the new exhibits such as Charting the Canyon – a collection of photographs of the Grand Canyon. Arizona Diamondbacks Chase Field, May 30th 602.514.8400 or arizona.diamondbacks.mlb.com Root, root, root for our home team as they battle it out against the Atlanta Braves. If you have not yet taken in a game at Chase Field, you will be amazed at how baseball fields have evolved. From the signature swimming pool to the retractable roof, Chase Field is sure to impress you. Arrive early, as the first 25,000 fans will receive a Stephen Drew bobble head.


Featuring Cowboy Ciao 7133 E. Stetson Dr. • Scottsdale 480.946.3111 or cowboyciao.com

STETSON CHOPPED SALAD Ingredients: 2 oz. Israeli cous cous, cooked & chilled 2 oz. arugula, chopped 2 oz. Roma tomatoes, diced 1 1/2 oz. smoked salmon, diced 1/2 oz. Asiago cheese, crumbled 1/2 oz. pepitas, toasted 1/2 oz. dried black currants 1 oz. air-dried sweet corn Combine cheese, pepitas and dried currants in a separate bowl. This Ciao ‘trail mix’ is one of the six components of the salad. In a shallow bowl, arrange the six rows with contrasting colors next to each other. After presenting the salad, drizzle dressing on top and toss. Serve extra dressing on the side if desired. Pesto Buttermilk Dressing: (Makes one generous pint) 1/2 cup basil pesto 1 ea. shallot, rough chop 1 cup aioli 1 cup buttermilk 1/2 tsp. coarse black pepper 1/2 ea. lemon, juice only salt & pepper to taste Add first three ingredients to food processor and blend thoroughly. With motor running pour in buttermilk. Add remaining ingredients to combine. Store in refrigerator up to one week.

Ever been to a friend’s house and been impressed by his or her art collection? Picking the right painting or sculpture for rooms in your home can be a painstaking process. Do you choose the artwork first and then design the rest of the room around the painting? Or do you design your room first

and then look for just the right artwork as the pièce de résistance to your decor? (The latter is correct.) No doubt, choosing artwork is a personal endeavor. After all, you’re the only one who knows if you like how something looks. But there are some guidelines when it comes to making the

best choices for your abode. We spoke with Robb & Stucky interior designer Davinder Chawla for some expert tips. The first thing to consider when choosing a work of art for your home: Stick with your style. “You have to know the style of your house,” says Chawla. “Is it traditional, is it contemporary, is it more transitional? Then your artwork should reflect the same or a complementary style.” In other words, you may not want to hang an ultra-modern painting over your mantel if your home is more rustic or traditional. Some styles, however, do meld. “For example, American Indian art can be used in a contemporary lifestyle or setting,” says Chawla. Next, think color. Pick up on hues from the fabrics in your room and the paint colors on the walls and look for complementary artwork. Of course, it doesn’t have to be an exact match. “The scale of your artwork is also very important,” says Chawla. “If you have a large ten-foot wall space, you don’t want a small 36” X 36” piece of art. The art also has to work with the scale of the furniture.” If you have grand, stately furniture, for example, small paintings will be overshadowed and feel out of place. You may also wonder if it’s okay to mix different art mediums – painting, sculpture, and metal artwork, for example – in the same space. The answer is absolutely yes. If you have too many paintings in the room, it’s better to add a sculpture or bring in some metal or iron art to add some texture

HOME INSPECTION REVEALS TERMITES? HOW TO PROCEED. It’s been said that there are two types of homes in Arizona – homes that have termites, and homes that will. Surprisingly, despite our state’s exceedingly dry conditions, those pesky wood-gorging creatures have made a permanent home here, primarily living below the earth and venturing out to sometimes do serious damage. In fact, some areas of the Valley have jokingly been referred to as “termite alley.” Should buyers with a home in escrow be concerned if there is evidence of termites? Not necessarily. Termites are very common here and also very treatable. The presence of termites or the indication of a past infestation isn’t always a reason to cancel the purchase. The important thing is to treat the problem and maintain a warranty. So, how does a homebuyer whose new home is in escrow protect against infestation, or proceed with the sale upon learning they may be sharing their new space with unwanted guests? “Typically, when a buyer is purchasing a home,” says Sharon Wolf-Furman, co-owner of AJF Engineering, a residential and commercial termite inspection company in the Valley, “99.9 percent of the time, they first have a termite inspection which covers ‘wood destroying insects’ only.” In most cases, it’s up to the buyer to pay for the inspection, although there are cases where the buyer may request credit at the close of escrow or have the seller pay for the treatment. If the home is purchased through an FHA mortgage, it may be required that the house be treated and the bank provide credit. Termite inspectors are required to look for several things including evidence of termite infestation and “conducive conditions.” Conducive conditions are those such as moisture around the foundation of the home that would be termite-friendly. Searching for evidence of termites does not actually mean seeing the critters. “What it does mean,” Furman explains, “is finding their shelter tubes or damage to baseboard moldings or door frames, although coming across that is less common.” Inspectors are also required to look for previous termite treatment such as drill holes or a bait station system. Drill holes would typically be on the floor slab in a garage or

to the room. “Art is not just a canvas or a painting,” says Chawla. “It can be anything – sculpture, lighting, mirrors, sconces.” So go ahead and mix it up! Variety is also a plus when it comes to how you hang your art. If, for example, you have two large pieces of art in a room, do some groupings of smaller paintings on the third or fourth wall. “Don’t have all small pieces or all large pieces,” Chawla suggests. And don’t be afraid to go bare. “Having too many pieces of art in the room is not a good thing to do,” adds Chawla. “You have to look at a room and see how many walls and windows there are. You don’t have to have a piece of art for every single wall.” One mistake Chawla often sees her clients make in their own homes: Choosing too many small pieces of art, which can make a wall look cluttered. “One big piece would be better,” says Chawla. “Adding a bigger piece will open up the room and make the room appear bigger. If you have a small house and a small room, lots of small paintings will make the room look even smaller.” Finally, don’t forget to have someone assist you when you hang your artwork. Have them hold the pieces up while you stand back to judge placement. The art should be at eye level – not too high and not too low. And light is very important. If possible, highlight your works of art with recessed can lighting overhead. Once your pieces are hung, friends will soon be admiring your artistic eye!

ROOF PLUMBING

on the outside patio. For this treatment, holes are drilled then filled with a “termacide” which can eliminate infestation. Bait systems involve filling hollow plastic tubes with a wood product soaked with termacide. Termites eat the chemical, bring it back to their colony and eventually wipe it out. “If the house does have evidence of prior treatment,” Furman says, “we tell the buyer to find out from the seller if there is a warranty on the treatment. If there is, that same company could spot treat the areas.” If there’s no warranty, it’s recommended the buyer treat the home and maintain a warranty for as long as they own the home. Fortunately, Arizona regulates the inspection for termites, mandating a report from inspectors; however, the state is also very clear that the inspection is only a visual one for the day of the inspection. It will reduce the risk for homebuyers, but not eliminate it. And, although inspections are quite thorough, there could be significant termite damage that goes undetected, for example behind a wall covered by sheet rock. The average cost of termite treatment is $600-$800, increasing with larger homes. So by all means, if you’ve found the ideal property but were disappointed to learn it has or had termites, don’t fret. Keep in mind that the subterranean termites that inhabit the Valley are generally easily treated. Your Realtor is a good source of advice and information about termites and termite inspections. Turn to them with any concerns that you may have.

ELECTRICAL TERMITES

FOUNDATION

MAY 2009 Stomp ASU Gammage, May 5th-10th 480.965.3434 or asugammage.com This unique, explosive musical performance will keep the whole family entertained. The eight-member troupe uses just about anything as their percussion instruments. Well, anything but actual instruments. Performers will use wooden poles, garbage cans, hub caps and recently added paint cans to create their amazing rhythms. You won’t look at your pots and pans the same way after seeing this performance! 9th Annual Golf 2 Save the Family The Phoenician Resort & Spa, May 9th 480.898.0228 or savethefamily.org Established in 1989, Save the Family was created to help homeless families with transitional housing, case management and supportive services. Take part in their annual golf event to raise proceeds to fund all of those programs. Each registration includes a round of golf, breakfast and lunch, and range balls. There will also be a silent auction. Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band Cricket Wireless Pavilion, May 14th 602.254.7200 or livenation.com If you have never been to a Jimmy Buffett concert, you are in for a treat. The always easy-going, island-loving singer brings his Summerzcool 2009 tour to town. Fans can expect to hear favorites such as Margaritaville, Come Monday and Cheeseburger in Paradise. Parrotheads unite! Peach Festival Schnepf Farms, May 15th-17th 480.987.3100 or peachfestival.net It’s that time of the year again: Peach-picking season! Come out and enjoy a “peachy-keen” day with all things peach. You can partake of juicy peach sampling or even a wonderful peach-pancake breakfast. The festival will also have live entertainment and fun rides for the entire family to enjoy. Although the event is only for this one weekend, peach picking will be available every weekend during the month of May. International Museum Day Heard Museum and Phoenix Art Museum, May 18th 602.252.8848 or heard.org In celebration of International Museum Day, the Heard Museum and the Phoenix Art Museum are both offering two-for-one admission. Explore all the great history the Heard Museum has to offer then take a short stroll to the Phoenix Art Museum where you can enjoy some of the new exhibits such as Charting the Canyon – a collection of photographs of the Grand Canyon. Arizona Diamondbacks Chase Field, May 30th 602.514.8400 or arizona.diamondbacks.mlb.com Root, root, root for our home team as they battle it out against the Atlanta Braves. If you have not yet taken in a game at Chase Field, you will be amazed at how baseball fields have evolved. From the signature swimming pool to the retractable roof, Chase Field is sure to impress you. Arrive early, as the first 25,000 fans will receive a Stephen Drew bobble head.


CALL TOM - YOUR INVESTMENT WILL BE GLAD YOU DID For three consecutive years (2006, 2007 and 2008), Tom Locati has made The Wall Street Journal’s list of top 50 Realtors® in the United States, by sales volume. In addition, during the same three years, he has been ranked as the #1 agent at Russ Lyon | Sotheby’s International Realty. That’s impressive. But what’s equally impressive, Tom lists and sells nearly $300 million dollars of North Scottsdale luxury real estate each year and is the only Realtor® from Arizona to make the Journal’s ultra-elite list. Tom is one of the country’s leading luxury real estate professionals, representing a wealth of fine properties and affluent clients who rely on his discretion, experience, investment acumen and intimate knowledge of the Scottsdale real estate market. “I generally work with a small segment of society often looking for a second, third or fourth home. My job is to empower you (my client) through knowledgeable, reliable real estate information firmly grounded in ethical and moral real estate transactions; thus, providing a comfort level essential in allowing you to make an informed financial decision.” Tom believes the luxury real estate business is ultimately wrapped around two primary concepts. “First, you have to have a sound understanding of how money and real estate investments work. In fact, acquiring the perfect property is foremost a matter of finding a wise investment and coupling that with a client’s personal tastes and desires. However, it’s equally important that I am able to create a comfort level for the investor/client based not only on market knowledge, but on expert guidance with proven results.” This is what puts Tom at the top of the real estate profession year after year. “If a professional business approach to real estate acquisition is what you seek, call me - Your Investment will be glad you did. I look forward to visiting with you!”

Russ Lyon | Sotheby’s International Realty 20909 N. 90th Pl. #209 Scottsdale, AZ 85255 Office: 480.585.7070 • Fax: 480.419.6931 tomlocati@me.com • www.tlocati.com

TOM LOCATI

DEBBIE NEGRIN

Direct: 480.600.2345

Direct: 480.734.3498

Tom Locati Russ Lyon | Sotheby’s International Realty 20909 N. 90th Pl. #209 Scottsdale, AZ 85255 FORWARDING SERVICE REQUESTED

May 2009

CURRENT REAL ESTATE ACTIVITY IN FEATURED PROPERTY: 9825 E. Blue Sky Drive • Lot 80 • 5 bedrooms / 6 Baths / 8,743 Sq. Ft. • $5,995,000 Truly a magnificent soft contemporary masterpiece located on the 1st fairway of world-renowned Estancia Club. Unobstructed city lights, Pinnacle Peak & golf course views offer a captivatingly private setting with southern exposure. Kitchen is a true “Chef’s Quarters” designed & built by AZ’s most popular chef, Rob Yedor (AKA Chef Dad) and was featured in Phoenix Home & Garden magazine. It’s as tasteful as it is functional. Travertine and African cherry wood floors, fiber optic ceiling, full-service bar and wine cellar, and home audio system that will blow your mind. 20+ TVs are just a few of the highlights. Outdoor living with putting green, negative-edge pool, spa and sunken BBQ area. Address Lot # Sq. Ft. / Bed / Bath Price Per SF CURRENTLY FOR SALE: 10081 E. Blue Sky Dr. 108 2800 / 3 / 3 $455 28095 N. 101st St. 122 2800 / 3 / 3 $498 28092 N. 101st St. 117 2455 / 3 / 3 $570 27441 N. 96th Way 73 3566 / 3 / 3 $498 10010 E. Blue Sky Dr. 103 5361 / 4 / 4 $335 27962 N. 100th Pl. 96 5360 / 4 / 4 $372 28046 N. 96th Pl. 20 3722 / 2 / 2.5 $536 27939 N. 100th Pl. 105 4590 / 3 / 3.5 $435 28034 N. 100th Pl. 99 4450 / 3 / 3.5 $494 10265 E. Running Deer Trl. 165 5400 / 4 / 4.5 $424 28047 N. 96th Pl. 6 5403 / 3 / 4.5 $425 9672 E. Oberlin Way 12 5382 / 3 / 3.5 $446 27336 N. 103rd Way 210 5100 / 3 / 3.5 $480 10230 E. Running Deer Tr. 136 5498 / 4 / 6 $482 9892 E. Blue Sky Dr. 76 7000 / 5 / 5.5 $398 26872 N. 102nd St. 255 6157 / 5 / 7 $471 27081 N. 96th Way 67 5019 / 3 / 4 $597 26945 N. 102nd St. 240 4187 / 3 / 3 $740 28111 N. 96th Pl. 3 4484 / 4 / 4.5 $713 27264 N. 103rd Way 209 5665 / 5 / 4.5 $587 27975 N. 96th Pl. 9 4628 / 4 / 4.5 $724 26931 N. 103rd St. 259 6600 / 5 / 5.5 $515 27086 N. 103rd St. 185 5047 / 3 / 3.5 $692 9709 E. Bajada Rd. 45 5342 / 4 / 4 $654 28159 N. 96th Pl. 1 4700 / 4 / 5 $850 27226 N. 96th Way 50 5719 / 4 / 4.5 $768 9801 E. Dynamite Blvd. 253 n/a / 4 / 4 n/a 27184 N. 97th Pl. 64 7587 / 4 / 7 $606 9720 E. Estancia Way 29 6544 / 4 / 4.5 $760 27473 N. 97th Pl. 33 6850 / 4 / 4.5 $817 27550 N. 96th Way 57 7160 / 5 / 7 $831 9825 E. Blue Sky Dr. 80 8743 / 5 / 6 $686 27341 N. 102nd St. 270 14231 / 8 / 11 $1054 SALE PENDING: 27225 N. 96th Way 69 6441 / 4 / 4.5 $667 SOLD: 27405 N. 96th Way 72 4894 / 4 / 4.5 $501 27597 N. 96th Pl. 28 5907 / 4 / 5 $593

List Price

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$1,275,000 $1,395,000 $1,400,000 $1,775,000 $1,795,000 $1,995,000 $1,995,000 $1,995,000 $2,200,000 $2,289,000 $2,295,000 $2,400,000 $2,450,000 $2,650,000 $2,785,000 $2,900,000 $2,998,000 $3,100,000 $3,195,000 $3,325,000 $3,350,000 $3,399,999 $3,495,000 $3,495,000 $3,995,000 $4,395,000 $4,500,000 $4,595,000 $4,975,000 $5,595,000 $5,950,000 $5,995,000 $15,000,000 $4,295,000 Sold Price $2,450,000 $3,500,000

All information is deemed reliable but not guaranteed. The properties on this list have been listed/sold by various participants in the MLS. If your home is currently listed, this is not a solicitation for that listing.

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