Page 1

September / 2009

The Nate Martinez Team Loves Referrals! The Nate Martinez Team would like to take the opportunity to thank the following people for the wonderful referrals they have sent our way:

Ed Birdsong, Birdsong Real Estate Christy Maciel Jim Nawrocki, RE/MAX 2000 Nick & Ariana Vieron Jaime Moore, Freedom Realty Sherry Gordon, RE/MAX Metro Judy Batson, Cartworks Corp. Dave Ramsey, Dave Ramsey Show

Nate Martinez Team Year-to-Date Activity Report In Escrow 2009 YTD • 319 sellers / 52 buyers = 371 Total Closed 2009 YTD • 265 Sellers / 59 buyers = 324 Total ACTIVITY ESCALATED IN JULY WITH THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF CLOSINGS FOR THE YEAR! Closed in July 2009 • 59 Sellers / 11 Buyers = 70 Total

Need Help Buying?

Our average listing price is $131,273 Our average sales price is $129,540

First-time home buyers purchasing any kind of home— new or resale—are eligible for the tax credit. To qualify for the tax credit, a home purchase must occur on or after January 1, 2009 and before December 1, 2009. For the purposes of the tax credit, the purchase date is the date when closing occurs and the title to the property transfers to the home owner. Call us TODAY to learn more!

101.3% sales price to list price ratio 63% of our sales are selling at or above list price!

Now You Can Get Information Any Time Day or Night on Any Property Listed for Sale with Voice Pad! Call Us Today to Register for Your Personal Voice Pad Phone Number!

602-942-7000

www.NatesHomes.com www.NatesLuxuryHomes.com www.TheReserveAtEagleHeights.com 7111 W. Bell Road, Suite 101 Glendale, AZ 85308 www.NatesHomes.com www.NatesLuxuryHomes.com 602.942.7000 office 800.284.1158 toll free 602.430.5226 cell 602.532.7352 fax NateM@remax.net

Organic • Regional • Modern

Overall Market Report for Maricopa County HOMES FOR SALE SALE PENDING AWC (Pending w/ contingency) SOLD YTD

ALL DWELLING TYPES 31,337 12,072 5,725 50,361

SINGLE-FAMILY 24,047 10,764 5,095 44,894

A Recession is a Terrible Thing to Waste By Peter L. Mosca I had the pleasure of interviewing on my radio show Michael Anderson, Founder and Co-Owner of RealSource.net who told me on the air, “A recession is a terrible thing to waste.” As I quizzed him further about his statement I quickly realized why he was being remarkable with his words: once in a lifetime opportunities – FDIC distressed assets — exist right now for investors with IRA funds, cash or equity. And, unlike the past when the RTC scandal and S&L fiasco resulted in investment opportunities for the ‘inner circle,’ today’s FDIC assets are securable for any level of investor – beginner, intermediate and advanced – with connections. Listen, if these assets weren’t a great opportunity, then why would the bank lobbies themselves be fighting on Capitol Hill to allow their members (the banks) to buy the assets themselves. I urge you to take advantage of this fundamental transformation taking place in real estate. Get off the sidelines and onto the playing field. You should not wait any longer for the market to bottom out. It has, and savvy investors — from niche entrepreneurial investors to huge bond fund managers — are eyeing the increasingly troubled commercial real estate market as a goldmine. What do you need to do today to be prepared to take advantage of these ‘once in a lifetime’ opportunities? Interview and partner with a team that features active market participants who have all the players working on your behalf – successful bidders, due diligence experts, lender relationships, property managers, construction and facility advisors, etc. Be the 1% who ACT — not the 99% of investors who 3-to-5 years from now will say, “I wish I would have moved forward, gotten off the fence, listened to Peter’s advice, etc., etc., etc.”

Are you or someone you know facing foreclosure? Please call our office today – we have onsite CDPE certified agents who can help! Call Jaime Stark in our Short Sale Department for more information on how we can help you sell your home or to learn more about your options. JAIME@NATESHOMES.COM OR 623.643.1051 If your home is currently listed, this is not a solicitation for that listing. Each office independently owned and operated.

contemporary southwest design

Produced by Desert Lifestyle Publishing • 480.460.0996

gardening in cooler temps Transition Your Yard for Fall/Winter

sushi scottsdale style

Geisha A Go Go’s Tuna & Crab Tartar


Event Calendar

September 2009

Healing Field Tempe Beach Park, Sept. 11th – 14th 480.967.2001 or tempe.gov/lake Stroll down Tempe’s Healing Field in remembrance of those who died during the tragic events of September 11, 2001. 3,000 American flags are placed in honor of the heroism, strength and unity of Americans on this infamous day in our country’s history. What a perfect opportunity to unite again as a community, remember the fallen, and stand strong in the face of those who wish to harm us. So Long to Summer Fest Freestone Park Ballfield Complex, Sept. 12th 480.503.6871 or ci.gilbert.az.us/parks Head over to Gilbert to bid adieu to summer. The City of Gilbert coordinates this yearly event and provides activities for the entire family to enjoy. Listen to live music, try your hand (and feet) at wall climbing, and let the kids enjoy the inflatable bounces and slides. A colorful fireworks display will round out the celebration! Walk for Homeless Families Wesley Bolin Memorial Park, Sept. 19th 602.275.7852 or umom.org Holding their first-ever Walk for Homeless Families, UMOM is encouraging people to step out for some fun physical activity and raise funds and awareness for the ever-growing needs of Arizona’s homeless families. You can register as a group or independent walker and can choose the 5K or 10K course. If walking isn’t your style, join the event as a volunteer or to simply cheer on others. 2009 Arizona Restaurant Week Various restaurants in the Valley, Sept. 19th – 26th 602.307.9134 or arizonarestaurantweek.com Showcasing the many culinary gems here in the Valley, Arizona Restaurant Week returns with a bang! During this seven-day promotion, scores of Valley restaurants will feature a special three-course menu featuring some of their signature dishes at $29 per person or $59 a couple. Restaurants participating in this event include Bloom, Arrowhead Grill and Tarbell’s. Treat yourself to a fabulous meal, while supporting our local restaurant industry! Legally Blonde ASU Gammage, Sept. 22nd – 27th 480.965.3434 or asugammage.com Based on the hit movie, Legally Blonde has been transformed into a hilarious and uplifting musical. Elle is determined to prove herself when her boyfriend dumps her for someone “more serious” and decides to attend the most “serious” university around, Harvard Law. Legally Blonde has only been running for two years and has already been nominated for six Tony Awards!

As the earth tilts on its axis, fall officially starts September 22nd and winter December 22nd, at least in our hemisphere. Fall, for some, may just be a transition time from summer into winter but in the world of gardeners each season stands on its own. Landscaping in Arizona is unique. Although many might argue that we don’t experience four seasons in our climate, the truth is that your landscaping does need transitional care to take it from hot weather to cold weather. Fall The extreme heat of the desert summer starts to subside in the fall making it the perfect time to prepare plants for the winter. This is when you tuck your flowers and plants to bed for the winter. If done right, your spring landscaping will emerge beautifully.

Winter Desert dwellers benefit from beautiful weather right through the winter months. However, we do get cold temps at night and even an occasional frost. Take the necessary precautions and your landscape will survive the season.

• Time to Plant - add organic amendments to prepare soil - plant spring bulbs - sow seeds of cool-season vegetables (carrots, green onions, peas), wait on lettuce until cooler temps arrive - aerate, seed and fertilize lawns with winter grass

• Time to Plant - if weather is mild, continue to plant wildflowers from seed - provide color with flowering annuals (petunia, pansy, viola, calendula)

• Time to Water - heavily irrigate trees and plants - as temps cool off, increase duration of watering but reduce frequency - reduce watering of landscape plants as it gets cooler and cooler, to acclimate them for winter temps • Time to Care - stop fertilizing rose bushes, cover with eight inches soil and prune back to 36 inches tall - prune trees and shrubs after leaves turn in early fall, fertilize hardy landscape plants - stop fertilizing cold-tender plants (hibiscus, citrus, bougainvillea) and deciduous fruit trees - as night temps hit 50, bring potted plants inside

• Time to Water - cut back on watering until warmer temps arrive - only water as needed • Time to Care - cover cold-sensitive plants (citrus, bougainvillea, tender perennials) - use the newer hi-tech frost cloth which allows in more light - keep cacti from frost damage: columnar cacti – cover growing points with Styrofoam cups. Saguaros, barrels, cardons – cover top of plant with frost cloth. Large cacti – use propane heaters at base - wait until January/February to prune deciduous trees and shrubs - wait until March to cut back tender plants (lantana, bird of paradise)

Those Pesky Pests Even animal lovers get annoyed when the local rabbits and birds feast on their new plants and seeds. Don’t get mad. Get building. Keep the rabbits out with sturdy wire cages anchored several inches deep around your plants/garden. Keep the birds away with fencing, netting and screening over newly seeded wildflowers, vegetables and annuals. If your desert environment includes hungry javelinas, attempt to grow plants and flowers in containers that are too high for them to reach.

Your Home

The allure of the desert’s spectacular sunsets, sky-reaching saguaros and breathtaking mountainous peaks has lured many architects over the years from all parts of the country to the Valley of the Sun. The emergence of Contemporary Southwest vernacular design in Arizona is largely the result of our unique environment. In most cases, it is the desert itself that inspires the work of architects and interior designers when transforming a concept or project to this popular design style. The new millennium solidified the stature of Contemporary Southwest architecture which focuses on the use of elements existing in nature coupled with simplicity of design. This style combines several regional influences including Pueblo, Anasazi, and Spanish Colonial. The emphasis is on using materials that evolve into the actual design elements. EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED Tony Sutton of EST EST Interior Design brings the unexpected to his designs. Contemporary Southwest design allows you to break from the traditional using a contemporary interpretation of Old World influences. It is organic, blending nature and history with the modern world. Homes designed in this style tend to freeform around the natural terrain. Sutton likes to mix things up creatively. Contemporary allows him to develop unexpected variations on the expected, but without radical change. Sutton says, “There is no dominant design style right now….we’ve branched away from Tuscan. I like to work with a contemporary interpretation of many design styles. Arizona is great for that as it’s a melting pot and collision of cultures.” INSIDE/OUT The incredible flora and fauna of the desert is perfect for bringing the inside outside and vice versa, an important focus in Contemporary Southwest design. As a natural native backdrop or incorporated into the actual living space, the light and colors of the Sonoran desert become one with the design and materials in the construction of the home. Sutton often does his design research by browsing botanical books to incorporate the natural elements of the desert into his work. The spirit of the surroundings should blend into the design of the home, as the environment is a key element. This type of home is integrated with the naturalness of the outside creating an indoor/outdoor setting. The beauty and climate of the Arizona desert make it an ideal place for this lifestyle.

Tuna and Crab Tartar Ingredients: 2 oz. chopped raw tuna 1 oz. crab meat 1/4 oz. soy sauce (lite) 1/4 oz. sesame oil pinch of Japanese chili powder pinch of white sesame seeds Japanese rice crackers

Local Flavor!

Phoenix Cooks Westin Kierland Resort & Spa, Sept. 5th 602.374.6024 or phoenixcooks.com This is the ultimate culinary dream come true! Three performance-kitchen stages will showcase the talents of several remarkable chefs from over 50 restaurants and resorts. Participate in an interactive cooking session with a top chef and learn healthy variations of your favorite dishes. Or, simply kick back, have a drink and indulge in all the great food. Proceeds benefit the Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

Directions: 1. In a small mixing bowl combine first six ingredients and mix well. 2. Plate and serve with Japanese rice crackers.

Featuring Geisha A Go Go 7150 E. 6th Ave. • Scottsdale • 480.699.0055 or geishaagogo.com

Serves one.


Event Calendar

September 2009

Healing Field Tempe Beach Park, Sept. 11th – 14th 480.967.2001 or tempe.gov/lake Stroll down Tempe’s Healing Field in remembrance of those who died during the tragic events of September 11, 2001. 3,000 American flags are placed in honor of the heroism, strength and unity of Americans on this infamous day in our country’s history. What a perfect opportunity to unite again as a community, remember the fallen, and stand strong in the face of those who wish to harm us. So Long to Summer Fest Freestone Park Ballfield Complex, Sept. 12th 480.503.6871 or ci.gilbert.az.us/parks Head over to Gilbert to bid adieu to summer. The City of Gilbert coordinates this yearly event and provides activities for the entire family to enjoy. Listen to live music, try your hand (and feet) at wall climbing, and let the kids enjoy the inflatable bounces and slides. A colorful fireworks display will round out the celebration! Walk for Homeless Families Wesley Bolin Memorial Park, Sept. 19th 602.275.7852 or umom.org Holding their first-ever Walk for Homeless Families, UMOM is encouraging people to step out for some fun physical activity and raise funds and awareness for the ever-growing needs of Arizona’s homeless families. You can register as a group or independent walker and can choose the 5K or 10K course. If walking isn’t your style, join the event as a volunteer or to simply cheer on others. 2009 Arizona Restaurant Week Various restaurants in the Valley, Sept. 19th – 26th 602.307.9134 or arizonarestaurantweek.com Showcasing the many culinary gems here in the Valley, Arizona Restaurant Week returns with a bang! During this seven-day promotion, scores of Valley restaurants will feature a special three-course menu featuring some of their signature dishes at $29 per person or $59 a couple. Restaurants participating in this event include Bloom, Arrowhead Grill and Tarbell’s. Treat yourself to a fabulous meal, while supporting our local restaurant industry! Legally Blonde ASU Gammage, Sept. 22nd – 27th 480.965.3434 or asugammage.com Based on the hit movie, Legally Blonde has been transformed into a hilarious and uplifting musical. Elle is determined to prove herself when her boyfriend dumps her for someone “more serious” and decides to attend the most “serious” university around, Harvard Law. Legally Blonde has only been running for two years and has already been nominated for six Tony Awards!

As the earth tilts on its axis, fall officially starts September 22nd and winter December 22nd, at least in our hemisphere. Fall, for some, may just be a transition time from summer into winter but in the world of gardeners each season stands on its own. Landscaping in Arizona is unique. Although many might argue that we don’t experience four seasons in our climate, the truth is that your landscaping does need transitional care to take it from hot weather to cold weather. Fall The extreme heat of the desert summer starts to subside in the fall making it the perfect time to prepare plants for the winter. This is when you tuck your flowers and plants to bed for the winter. If done right, your spring landscaping will emerge beautifully.

Winter Desert dwellers benefit from beautiful weather right through the winter months. However, we do get cold temps at night and even an occasional frost. Take the necessary precautions and your landscape will survive the season.

• Time to Plant - add organic amendments to prepare soil - plant spring bulbs - sow seeds of cool-season vegetables (carrots, green onions, peas), wait on lettuce until cooler temps arrive - aerate, seed and fertilize lawns with winter grass

• Time to Plant - if weather is mild, continue to plant wildflowers from seed - provide color with flowering annuals (petunia, pansy, viola, calendula)

• Time to Water - heavily irrigate trees and plants - as temps cool off, increase duration of watering but reduce frequency - reduce watering of landscape plants as it gets cooler and cooler, to acclimate them for winter temps • Time to Care - stop fertilizing rose bushes, cover with eight inches soil and prune back to 36 inches tall - prune trees and shrubs after leaves turn in early fall, fertilize hardy landscape plants - stop fertilizing cold-tender plants (hibiscus, citrus, bougainvillea) and deciduous fruit trees - as night temps hit 50, bring potted plants inside

• Time to Water - cut back on watering until warmer temps arrive - only water as needed • Time to Care - cover cold-sensitive plants (citrus, bougainvillea, tender perennials) - use the newer hi-tech frost cloth which allows in more light - keep cacti from frost damage: columnar cacti – cover growing points with Styrofoam cups. Saguaros, barrels, cardons – cover top of plant with frost cloth. Large cacti – use propane heaters at base - wait until January/February to prune deciduous trees and shrubs - wait until March to cut back tender plants (lantana, bird of paradise)

Those Pesky Pests Even animal lovers get annoyed when the local rabbits and birds feast on their new plants and seeds. Don’t get mad. Get building. Keep the rabbits out with sturdy wire cages anchored several inches deep around your plants/garden. Keep the birds away with fencing, netting and screening over newly seeded wildflowers, vegetables and annuals. If your desert environment includes hungry javelinas, attempt to grow plants and flowers in containers that are too high for them to reach.

Your Home

The allure of the desert’s spectacular sunsets, sky-reaching saguaros and breathtaking mountainous peaks has lured many architects over the years from all parts of the country to the Valley of the Sun. The emergence of Contemporary Southwest vernacular design in Arizona is largely the result of our unique environment. In most cases, it is the desert itself that inspires the work of architects and interior designers when transforming a concept or project to this popular design style. The new millennium solidified the stature of Contemporary Southwest architecture which focuses on the use of elements existing in nature coupled with simplicity of design. This style combines several regional influences including Pueblo, Anasazi, and Spanish Colonial. The emphasis is on using materials that evolve into the actual design elements. EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED Tony Sutton of EST EST Interior Design brings the unexpected to his designs. Contemporary Southwest design allows you to break from the traditional using a contemporary interpretation of Old World influences. It is organic, blending nature and history with the modern world. Homes designed in this style tend to freeform around the natural terrain. Sutton likes to mix things up creatively. Contemporary allows him to develop unexpected variations on the expected, but without radical change. Sutton says, “There is no dominant design style right now….we’ve branched away from Tuscan. I like to work with a contemporary interpretation of many design styles. Arizona is great for that as it’s a melting pot and collision of cultures.” INSIDE/OUT The incredible flora and fauna of the desert is perfect for bringing the inside outside and vice versa, an important focus in Contemporary Southwest design. As a natural native backdrop or incorporated into the actual living space, the light and colors of the Sonoran desert become one with the design and materials in the construction of the home. Sutton often does his design research by browsing botanical books to incorporate the natural elements of the desert into his work. The spirit of the surroundings should blend into the design of the home, as the environment is a key element. This type of home is integrated with the naturalness of the outside creating an indoor/outdoor setting. The beauty and climate of the Arizona desert make it an ideal place for this lifestyle.

Tuna and Crab Tartar Ingredients: 2 oz. chopped raw tuna 1 oz. crab meat 1/4 oz. soy sauce (lite) 1/4 oz. sesame oil pinch of Japanese chili powder pinch of white sesame seeds Japanese rice crackers

Local Flavor!

Phoenix Cooks Westin Kierland Resort & Spa, Sept. 5th 602.374.6024 or phoenixcooks.com This is the ultimate culinary dream come true! Three performance-kitchen stages will showcase the talents of several remarkable chefs from over 50 restaurants and resorts. Participate in an interactive cooking session with a top chef and learn healthy variations of your favorite dishes. Or, simply kick back, have a drink and indulge in all the great food. Proceeds benefit the Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

Directions: 1. In a small mixing bowl combine first six ingredients and mix well. 2. Plate and serve with Japanese rice crackers.

Featuring Geisha A Go Go 7150 E. 6th Ave. • Scottsdale • 480.699.0055 or geishaagogo.com

Serves one.


September / 2009

The Nate Martinez Team Loves Referrals! The Nate Martinez Team would like to take the opportunity to thank the following people for the wonderful referrals they have sent our way:

Ed Birdsong, Birdsong Real Estate Christy Maciel Jim Nawrocki, RE/MAX 2000 Nick & Ariana Vieron Jaime Moore, Freedom Realty Sherry Gordon, RE/MAX Metro Judy Batson, Cartworks Corp. Dave Ramsey, Dave Ramsey Show

Nate Martinez Team Year-to-Date Activity Report In Escrow 2009 YTD • 319 sellers / 52 buyers = 371 Total Closed 2009 YTD • 265 Sellers / 59 buyers = 324 Total ACTIVITY ESCALATED IN JULY WITH THE HIGHEST NUMBER OF CLOSINGS FOR THE YEAR! Closed in July 2009 • 59 Sellers / 11 Buyers = 70 Total

Need Help Buying?

Our average listing price is $131,273 Our average sales price is $129,540

First-time home buyers purchasing any kind of home— new or resale—are eligible for the tax credit. To qualify for the tax credit, a home purchase must occur on or after January 1, 2009 and before December 1, 2009. For the purposes of the tax credit, the purchase date is the date when closing occurs and the title to the property transfers to the home owner. Call us TODAY to learn more!

101.3% sales price to list price ratio 63% of our sales are selling at or above list price!

Now You Can Get Information Any Time Day or Night on Any Property Listed for Sale with Voice Pad! Call Us Today to Register for Your Personal Voice Pad Phone Number!

602-942-7000

www.NatesHomes.com www.NatesLuxuryHomes.com www.TheReserveAtEagleHeights.com 7111 W. Bell Road, Suite 101 Glendale, AZ 85308 www.NatesHomes.com www.NatesLuxuryHomes.com 602.942.7000 office 800.284.1158 toll free 602.430.5226 cell 602.532.7352 fax NateM@remax.net

Organic • Regional • Modern

Overall Market Report for Maricopa County HOMES FOR SALE SALE PENDING AWC (Pending w/ contingency) SOLD YTD

ALL DWELLING TYPES 31,337 12,072 5,725 50,361

SINGLE-FAMILY 24,047 10,764 5,095 44,894

A Recession is a Terrible Thing to Waste By Peter L. Mosca I had the pleasure of interviewing on my radio show Michael Anderson, Founder and Co-Owner of RealSource.net who told me on the air, “A recession is a terrible thing to waste.” As I quizzed him further about his statement I quickly realized why he was being remarkable with his words: once in a lifetime opportunities – FDIC distressed assets — exist right now for investors with IRA funds, cash or equity. And, unlike the past when the RTC scandal and S&L fiasco resulted in investment opportunities for the ‘inner circle,’ today’s FDIC assets are securable for any level of investor – beginner, intermediate and advanced – with connections. Listen, if these assets weren’t a great opportunity, then why would the bank lobbies themselves be fighting on Capitol Hill to allow their members (the banks) to buy the assets themselves. I urge you to take advantage of this fundamental transformation taking place in real estate. Get off the sidelines and onto the playing field. You should not wait any longer for the market to bottom out. It has, and savvy investors — from niche entrepreneurial investors to huge bond fund managers — are eyeing the increasingly troubled commercial real estate market as a goldmine. What do you need to do today to be prepared to take advantage of these ‘once in a lifetime’ opportunities? Interview and partner with a team that features active market participants who have all the players working on your behalf – successful bidders, due diligence experts, lender relationships, property managers, construction and facility advisors, etc. Be the 1% who ACT — not the 99% of investors who 3-to-5 years from now will say, “I wish I would have moved forward, gotten off the fence, listened to Peter’s advice, etc., etc., etc.”

Are you or someone you know facing foreclosure? Please call our office today – we have onsite CDPE certified agents who can help! Call Jaime Stark in our Short Sale Department for more information on how we can help you sell your home or to learn more about your options. JAIME@NATESHOMES.COM OR 623.643.1051 If your home is currently listed, this is not a solicitation for that listing. Each office independently owned and operated.

contemporary southwest design

Produced by Desert Lifestyle Publishing • 480.460.0996

gardening in cooler temps Transition Your Yard for Fall/Winter

sushi scottsdale style

Geisha A Go Go’s Tuna & Crab Tartar


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