Page 1

TE REIMANA MARUMARU PKW-RAVENSDOWN SCHOLARSHIP AWARDEE

PoutU-te -rang i 2013 issuE

6

UNDERSTANDING OF

FARM STRUCTURE

&

EFFLUENT MANAGEMENT

2012 TARANAKI MĀORI SPORTS AWARDS RECIPIENTS

+

NEW MANAGER

ALLIE HEMARA-WAHANUI


Tena koutou te whānau whānui o Parininihi ki Waitotatara. Very shortly we are due to report results on a challenging season at our ½ yearly general meeting. Though this recent drought has been a significant issue occupying our time, I have also been pondering on recent events in the political landscape that bring to fore the importance of succession planning. It is an area our Committee of Management is having serious discussions on. For many organisations like ourselves this can be a challenge as we analyse the consequences of land confiscation, the growing diaspora of our people to Australia and the reality that so many of our leaders who have been at the forefront of Māori development are no longer around to see the benefits of their hard work. It’s important to ask who will be here to pass the mantle on to? Promoting the many options to farm for the Incorporation lets us highlight the opportunities that exist to work in the dairy sector and with our managed farm programme we

are endeavouring to transition our people into roles as they evolve and most importantly as their skills emerge. We believe there are many exciting opportunities yet to be realised across the Agri-business sector. So it’s pleasing to be able to present stories in this issue that feature our rangatahi, who may one day be our future leaders. Like Te Reimana Marumaru our PKWRavensdown scholarship recipient who we thought should speak for himself, after all his thoughts are what motivated us to make the investment in his future. We also introduce Allie HemaraWahanui, recently appointed into the newly established Community Development Manager role, who rightly points out that part of her job is to develop strategic relationships that will enable PKW to ‘lasso in’ the talent the Trust has invested in through our grants programme. The Incorporation also sponsors the Taiohi Tama and Kotiro (Junior Maori Sportsman and Sportswoman) awards presented during the Taranaki Maori Sports Awards annual event. As you can see our 2012 recipients are focussed on sporting careers that

will see them develop personally and professionally and importantly show other rangatahi what can be achieved through setting goals, being committed and doing the hard yards. We wish them well in their endeavours and are pleased to see their achievements are regularly reported in our local media. We also hear from PKW Scholarship recipient A’Cushla O’Carroll who over the next few editions of Whenua will be providing us with insights into her Doctoral research thesis on ‘Rangatahi and Social Media’. It makes for interesting reading. Lastly, Ben and Sue Rupapera are an example not only of teamwork but how planning a career in farming does not necessarily need to stop when you are close to retirement age. The skills and guidance they have to offer to our future Māori farmers is an invaluable part of the ‘future proofing’ our Incorporation. No reira,


02 / WHAKAMANA


04

06

CONTENTS WHAKAMANA

MANAGER TO PROMOTE 04 NEW CAREER PLANNING

10

Appointed to the newly established Community Development Manager position, Allie HemaraWahanui brings a wide range of skills and experience to her role.

12

MANAGEMENT 06 FARM A GOOD MOVE

14

FOR RUPAPERA FAMILY

18

Ben and Lynn Rupapera are moving into a farm management role that suits their present lifestyle

ANARU ADMINISTRATION 09 BEV SUPPORT

21

Meet Bev Anaru the latest edition to the administration team

22

PĀKIHI

ĀWHINA

REIMANA MARUMARU 14 TE PKW-RAVENSDOWN SCHOLARSHIP AWARDEE

Te Reimana Marumaru explains his aspirations for learning about Agribusiness

TARANAKI MAORI SPORTS 18 2012 AWARDS

RECIPIENTS SPONSORED BY PKW Taiohi Tama and Kotiro Awards recipients acknowledge PKW Support

MĀTAURANGA

TARANAKI’S 20 EXTENDING SUCCESS TO ITS PEOPLE

IT COASTAL 21 KEEPING WHĀNAU DAY Promoting career opportunities to encourage jobseekers to live and work in Taranaki

OF FARM STRUCTURE INVESTING 10 UNDERSTANDING AND OPPORTUNITIES 22 IN TARANAKI REO FOR EMPLOYMENT WHENUA MAGAZINE Editor Dion Tuuta Deputy Editor Amokura Panoho Creative Director Jeremy Moa Photography Quentin Bedwell Graphic Design iStudios Multimedia

The many different farm structures that operate within PKW are explained

12

PARININIHI KI WAITOTARA

EFFLUENT MANAGEMENT A KEY FOCUS

Postal PO Box 241, New Plymouth 4340 Physical Taranaki House, 109 Devon Street West, New Plymouth 4310 Telephone +64 (6) 769 9373 Fax +64 (6) 757 4206 Email office@pkw.co.nz www.pkw.co.nz

Meeting shareholders expectations to have sustainable farming practices has led to improved effluent management

PKW recognises the work Te Reo o Taranaki are undertaking

MAORI AND SOCIAL 25 RANGATAHI NETWORKING SITES Acushla Dee O’Carroll shares insights into her doctoral research

ISTUDIOS 77B Devon Street East, New Plymouth. Telephone +64 (6) 758 1863 Email info@istudios.co.nz www.istudios.co.nz

Cover Te Reimana Marumaru is enjoying his study at Lincoln University in Christchurch.


NEW MANAGER TO PROMOTE CAREER PLANNING

WITH A WELL-ESTABLISHED PUBLIC SERVICE CAREER, ALLIE HEMARA-

WAHANUI (NGĀRUAHINE/TARANAKI/ MANIAPOTO) MADE A CONSCIOUS

CHOICE TO RETURN TO TARANAKI AND IS PLEASED THAT DECISION HAS LED TO HER NEW ROLE AS COMMUNITY

DEVELOPMENT MANAGER FOR PKW TRUST.

after everything behind the scenes, kind of like the ‘Whānau Ora’ approach and let me get on with doing my mahi with the iwi”, says Allie. That ‘mahi’ with her iwi was extensive prior to her departure to Wellington and then on her return where she took on a role in South Taranaki District Council as the Iwi Liaison Officer then moved onto working fulltime with the Ngāruahine Treaty settlement claim.

Now living in New Plymouth since commencing her new role early this year, Allie is enjoying her new Having worked in various management surroundings, though she still has to get used to cooking for herself while her and policy roles within the public service, Allie appreciates the experience extended whānau remain in Hawera. and skills she gained that came in “I’ve been lucky that since I returned handy in her dealings with government to Taranaki to work my whanau looked on behalf of the iwi. 04 / WHAKAMANA

“The downside of working in the public service is that you are working within a bureaucracy, but the upside is that you get to have a real intimate knowledge of government structures, their operational processes and how policy is developed and then implemented,” says Allie. “It’s a really good training ground and I was able to be involved in so many different capacities, from marketing, contracting, funding, capacity building and policy development.” Starting her public service career in 1989 in New Plymouth as Māori Cadet working with Training Support, the precursor to the Tertiary Education


Commission, Allie also worked across a number of government agencies including Te Puni Kokiri fine-tuning her community development skills. Keen to test her skills in the Wellington environment, Allie took on a secondment with Te Taura Whiri I Te Reo to look after their flagship programme ‘Mā Te Reo’ moving into a management role for the first time.

team Allie feels her experience in developing strategic relationships and promoting regional development will be invaluable for strengthening those conversations and engagements across a range of stakeholders.

“Our core business is actually our people and I believe that the Trust provides a conduit by which wider relationships with PKW can be enhanced and that is hugely important. “I must admit I really enjoyed the If the incorporation didn’t have the Wellington scene initially because the Trust then they wouldn’t have the issues for us as Māori take on a whole relationships with many talented new dimension. However before long rangatahi who are may or may not I started to struggle with those issues be a shareholder. My job is to lasso becoming more generalised or generic that talent back into our region for the and being dealt with and treated as ‘just benefit of PKW and rohe.” Māori’ in a broader sense.”

Recognising that she is facing a big challenge to encourage young graduates to look at opportunities in Taranaki, Allie is picking up the initiative of establishing a PKW Alumni based on the tuakana teina model mentioned at last years AGM. With a succession planning model still being thought through by the Incorporation, Allie is pleased she is part of an organisation that has intergenerational aspirations. “I’m the product of future proofing our whanau as the daughter of Te Rawanake Coles and Maunder HemaraWahanui. They have been my support mechanism to allow me to achieve the things I have done and I am looking forward to what the future brings.”

Having been involved with the commercial Fisheries settlement for Ngāruahine that established the pataka to bring kaimoana back onto the marae tables, Allie was still actively working with her iwi to progress the claim but realised she would be more effective if she was actually living amongst her community and made the decision to return to live in Taranaki. Now almost five years since the Fisheries Settlement a quantum settlement for the historical and treaty claim has been negotiated and Allie is personally happy with what has been achieved Her focus has now shifted to a vision for the future and with that in mind taking on the newly created role of Community Development Manager for PKW Trust was an opportunity Allie felt comfortable in putting her hand up for. “I am encouraged by the intelligent and careful approach the Committee of Management are taking and really impressed with the Management team led by Chief Executive Dion Tuuta,” says Allie. “They are willing and wanting to talk with their shareholders and the wider Taranaki community rather than leaving that conversation to occur only at the ½ yearly or annual general meetings.”

Previous Page & This Page Allie Hemara-Wahanui has settled quickly into her new community role and is relishing the opportunity to make strategic relationships more productive for PKW

Now as part of the PKW Management 05 / WHAKAMANA


FARM MANAGEMENT A GOOD MOVE FOR RUPAPERA FAMILY BEN AND LYN RUPAPERA AREN’T QUITE READY TO RETIRE FROM

Butcher and Supervisor, Lynn might have been somewhat surprised.

FAMING AND HAVE DECIDED INSTEAD

That was around 1995 and like any good team who have reached a RUN TO BECOME FARM MANAGERS crossroad, the Rupapera family are FOR PKW INCORPORATION AT NEWLY embarking on this new adventure ACQUIRED FARM 21 IN WAVERLEY. with the same tenaciousness and commitment that has seen them Though Ben laughs that Lyn has been through their many years in the dairy made redundant as a result of their taking on a new venture, it’s easy to see industry. that they have been a hardworking team Ben is also pleased that he is handing for a number of decades. over the reigns of the present farm TO SWAP THEIR 50/50 SHAREMILKER

“I would recommend to any young ones to get into dairying”, says Ben. “It’s not easy and you need whanau help but if you put in the hard yards there are definitely the rewards for yourself and your family.” Ben and Lynn should know, as Ben did not start his farming career the traditional route. Instead he walked into his home one day and told Lynn he wanted to go dairy farming. Having worked for Hutton’s Meatworks in Eltham for 20 odd years, and working his way up to becoming an A Grade 06 / WHAKAMANA

based on Lennox Road at Waverley to another young Maori farmer, Dallas McLean (featured in Whenua Issue 2).

“Spencer Carr was the chair at the time this farm was leased from the South Taranaki District Council. Before PKW came here, it was actually run by John Young who converted it from a sheep and beef station. He did a hell of a lot of work putting in the pastures and drainage and now it’s a 337ha dairy unit with a 45ha run off. We started our contract with PKW trialling a new hybrid >


07 / WHAKAMANA


“I WOULD RECOMMEND TO ANY YOUNG ONES TO GET INTO DAIRYING”, SAYS BEN. “IT’S NOT EASY AND YOU NEED WHANAU HELP BUT IF YOU PUT IN THE HARD YARDS THERE ARE DEFINITELY THE REWARDS FOR YOURSELF AND YOUR FAMILY.”

Previous Left Enjoying a quiet moment at home Ben and Lynn are happy to share their story with Whenua Previous Right and Left Ben and Lynn take every opportunity to proudly wear their newly acquired PKW Jackets, even around the farm.

< agreement where ½ the stock of 800900 cows are ours, and ½ are PKW’s. They take 26% from the Milk Shed and meet all the animal health, fertilizer and mating costs.” With production on target despite the drought Ben is confident the staff that are mainly migrant workers have a handle on things to support the McLeans. “Our two children Tracey and Corey aren’t interested in farming, so we were thinking through out options. Our moko always help out but making this transition to the calving unit is a good way to move into semi-retirement. ” “It’s a role we are both happy to continue and give’s us something to get up for”, adds Lynn.

08 / WHAKAMANA

No doubt it will still be hard work but Ben is looking forward to the ongoing working relationship he has established with the PKW Farm management team. “It took me a while to understand why they wanted us to use certain suppliers, because I like to be able to pick up the phone and get the local guy up the road. But I enjoy giving Shane Miles (PKW Farms Supervisor) a razz and keep him on his toes. So far everyone who has come to work with us have done an excellent job,” smiles Ben. Ben even laughs when he says that the Incorporation might see him at their shareholder meetings now that he has more time on his hands. No doubt Lynn is more than likely to be at his side.


BEV ANARU

ADMINISTRATION SUPPORT

office doing Cashbooks & GST returns THE PKW ORGANISATION JOINING THE for mainly farming clients, Bev then worked for 7 years for a Māori Health ADMINISTRATION TEAM. Organisation as a Senior Accounts Born and bred in New Plymouth, Bev Clerk. comes from a family of five and has an “While I was there I completed and adult daughter. received a Certificate in Year One Te Educated at New Plymouth Girls’ Ara Reo Maori with Te Wananga O High School, Bev initially left school to Taranaki”, says Bev who also undertook work as a cashier and then went on to the Certificate of Attendance for Cultural Orientation Training provided Central Supplies at the Barrett Street by Te Hauora Pou Heretanga, which Hospital, sterilizing equipment for the covered Tikanga, Protocols and Cultural hospital wards. Awareness. “I had always been interested in a “When the opportunity to work as a nursing career but after working in the Finance Assistant with Parininihi Ki hospital environment I decided it was Waitotara came up I thought it would be not for me so returned to a career in a good opportunity to return to farming office work”, says Bev. accounting and am enjoying Working for 4 years in an Accountants’ my present role.” BEV ANARU IS THE LATEST EDITION TO

Above Being busy with accounts is all part of a normal day for Bev Anaru 09 / WHAKAMANA


UNDERSTANDING OF FARM STRUCTURE AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR EMPLOYMENT PKW’S FARMING BUSINESS

IS PRESENTLY MADE UP OF A

RANGE OF DIFFERENT FARMING

STRUCTURES INCLUDING A MIXTURE OF FARM MANAGERS, VARIABLE

ORDER SHAREMILKERS AND 50/50

SHAREMILKERS. SO WHAT EXACTLY

IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THESE STRUCTURES?

FARM MANAGERS

Under a managed farm structure PKW meets 100% of the total cost of the farming operation and owns the cows on the farm. PKW Farm Managers and their staff are employees contracted under Individual Employment Agreements and PKW is responsible for 100% of the costs involved in running the farm including feed and fertilizer. Managed farms normally require more management oversight than other structural options as well as carrying more risk. In return PKW receives 100% of the profit from the operation 10 / PĀKIHI

and with higher payout levels, managed farms are very profitable. This structure enables PKW to build livestock and machinery ownership and gives the Incorporation full control over our farming operations. The managed farm structure is also useful because it allows PKW to employ staff who demonstrate their likelihood to succeed and to develop their skills and abilities further. At the present time 2 of 3 PKW’s managers are from shareholding whānau. VARIABLE ORDER SHAREMILKERS

Unlike farm managers, Variable Order Sharemilkers are contractors whose agreements are governed by the Sharemilking Agreements Act 1997 and 2012 Order in Council. Variable Order Agreements contain specified minimum contract terms for the protection of the sharemilker. Under this structure PKW provides the

land, livestock, plant and machinery (negotiable) and the Variable Order sharemilker provides some plant and machinery and all the labour including the employment of staff. Control of the operation rests with the sharemilker. PKW meets all costs of the operation except the labour costs which are met by the sharemilker. The Variable Order Sharemilker also meets a share of specific costs specified in Clause 106 relating to harvesting, forage crops, nitrogen, purchase feed, grazing off and a range of operational costs. The Sharemilking Agreements Order 2012 provides for a minimum 21% of milk proceeds payable to the sharemilker or 22% (milk price only) where the herd numbers are under 300 cows. For herds over 300 cows the agreed share is fully negotiable. The agreed share includes the full cost of calf rearing with the owner receiving the proceeds of all bobby calves unless otherwise agreed. Profits from milk production are split between PKW and the sharemilker in accordance with the agreed share. 50-50 SHAREMILKING

The 50-50 Sharemilking structure is similar to the Variable Order Sharemilker in that it is a contract arrangement rather than employee status.


Having a range of farming structure options also provides PKW with a level of flexibility which other farming operations may lack. Most importantly, PKWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s standard 50-50 Sharemilking these structure options provides our Agreement reserves the right of the farming staff with a career path within owner directly or by the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agent the organisation as staff can begin as to obtain the management control of the managers before moving up the system land and any stock the pasture thereon to Variable Order Sharemilkers and and of all operations thereon. eventually 50-50 sharemilkers.

Agreements are freely negotiable but are feed costs such as meal concentrate, based on a regional convention relating PKE or hay and silage harvested off the to negotiated terms and conditions. property. PKW supplies the land, receives 50% of the milk income and meets most of the property related farm costs comprising fertiliser application, repairs and maintenance costs, rates and insurance, a share of grazing and any bought in feed costs, PKE or hay and silage harvested off the property. The sharemilker supplies the livestock and plant (tractors and machinery), receives 50% of the milk income and all proceeds from the sale of cull cows and bobby calves. The sharemilker meets most of the direct stock and machinery costs associated with the farming of the operation in respect of hay and silage harvested within the boundaries of the farm property, animal health costs, electricity costs for the dairy shed and water pumps, running and maintenance costs for all tractors and plant along with their personal administration and insurance costs. Shared costs relate to any bought in

This structure carries lower risk for PKW as the land owner as sharemilkers generally have more experience than managers and variable order sharemilkers but PKW receives a lower financial return. IN SUMMARY

Having a mixture of operations helps PKW manage financial risk due to milk price sensitivity. On average 50-50 and variable order sharemilker arrangements provide a better financial return during lower payout years whereas managed farms generally achieve better financial returns during high payout years.

Ultimately as an intergenerational business this allows PKW to retain and develop quality staff for the long term benefit of the Incorporation and its shareholders.


EFFLUENT MANAGEMENT A KEY FOCUS

Adequate storage is important. If a farm does not have the right amount of storage it can be forced to spray paddocks when it might not be optimum to do so – such as when it has been raining for a long period – thereby increasing the risk that effluent could wash into nearby streams.

the environment then we can’t just plant a few riparian margins and say that’s our commitment to the environment ticked off.” She says. “You’ve got to look at the full range of tools that are available and invest accordingly.”

“As Māori dairy farmers we are mindful of the impact of our business on SUSTAINABILITY BEING A KEY other aspects of our lives.” Hinerangi CONCERN FOR AOTEAROA, PKW HAS After considering these issues the says. “We are dairy farmers but we DEMONSTRATED ITS COMMITMENT Committee moved to adopt the new are also members of Iwi and Hapu TO PROTECTING THE ENVIRONMENT system. The system cost approximately who depend on the environment as WITH THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A $100,000 and can hold one million litres well. We don’t want our dairy farming NEW LEADING EDGE EFFLUENT of dairy effluent giving the new farm 30 operation negatively impacting on that MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ON ITS LITTLE days storage. By way of comparison sphere of our people’s lives therefore TEMPSKY RD DAIRY FARM. the average Taranaki farm has less than its important that we manage our farms 7 days storage capacity. appropriately.” An effluent system captures wastewater (effluent) created after a cowshed The issue of environmental sustainability PKW CEO Dion Tuuta says the is washed down after milking. The is very important to the PKW Committee installation of the new effluent system is wastewater from the dairy shed flows of Management and all members of the an example of the leadership role that into a holding tank. At the right time, PKW whānau. PKW Chair Hinerangi PKW wants to take on environmental the water which contains valuable Raumati notes that the Incorporation issues. “The Committee of Management nutrients, is sprayed onto the pastures has a responsibility to protect the is very clear that PKW must be a leader to promote grass growth as free environment for future generations. “If in this area. We are working hard to set we are really serious about protecting fertilizer. a high standard for all of our farms. WITH ENVIRONMENTAL


This new system will be replicated across our other farms in time as we upgrade all our effluent management systems.”

“The spraying system is set up with a GPS monitor on a travelling irrigator which moves up and down the field on its own. If effluent is being pumped but for some reason something happened to the irrigator and it’s not actually moving down a paddocks it detects the problem and will shut the pump down.

“The dairy industry is coming under a lot more pressure with environmental compliance.” Dion says. “So we are preparing for that now. It’s better to be One aspect of the technology that ahead of the game rather than having to deal with change when it is forced on is very good is the ability to set up ‘exclusion zones’ in parts of farm using you by the authorities.” GPS maps which makes it possible to PKW’s Dairy Operations Manager set up ‘buffer zones’ around water ways Shane Miles has been responsible for to ensure that no effluent is allowed to managing both the effluent pond project enter these areas. and the commissioning of the new dairy Monitoring the flow and strength of shed on the farm. He says having so the effluent is another benefit which much storage capacity ensures that the system offers. “Because you know effluent can be sprayed on the farm to how much has been pumped out of the gain the maximum benefit. pond you can get the effluent tested One of the big advantages lies in the including the nutrient levels of it. We technology that runs the system which can then get nutrient application maps is based on farm but can also be that can automatically feed into the accessed remotely. system so we can easily get an NPK

reading of what’s gone on to a particular paddock. Having the ability to provide that information to the regional council in the long term is going to work to our advantage, says Shane. The other advantage for Shane is his ability to monitor the system even when he’s back in his office in New Plymouth. “I can actually get onto the system from the office and see that morning that the pumps gone for three hours and how much effluent it has pumped. Having that sort of information at your fingertips is a big advantage and gives us piece of mind,” he says.

Left and Below The efflent treatment system is fully operational at the Little Tempsky Road Farm


TE REIMANA MARUMARU PKW- Ravensdown Scholarship Awardee PHOTOS BY GUY FREDERICK

WINNER OF THE 2013-2016 PKW-

RAVENSDOWN SCHOLARSHIP, TE

REIMANA MARUMARU (TE ĀTIAWA) IS PRESENTLY STUDYING AT LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. IN HIS OWNS WORDS WE LET TE REIMANA SHARE HIS

PERSPECTIVE ON THE BENEFITS OF

STUDY AND SEEKING A FUTURE IN THE AGRICULTURE SECTOR.

My name is Te Reimana Benjamin Marumaru but I have always been called Rei as most people are unable to pronounce Te Reimana properly. I live in Bulls with my family on a sheep and beef farm. Our family consists of my father Te Hoeroa who is a farmer, mother Ruth who tests peoples hearing and sister Kate who is in the first year of a accounting degree at Canterbury University. I have always been interested in farming and to be honest I can’t imagine doing anything else, so last year I began studying agriculture at Lincoln University and I am thoroughly enjoying it. My hobbies include hunting, fishing, diving and more recently competitive shearing. While studying agriculture down at Lincoln I am lucky to have all of these activities easily accessible. AGRICULTURE / HORTICULTURE IN NZ. - WHY TERTIARY STUDY WILL ASSIST BOTH ME AND THE INDUSTRY. For me personally, tertiary education has given me an understanding of why we do certain practises. There are somethings e.g. putting on fertiliser or feeding supplement that I knew took place but didn’t know why. Now I know the science behind these events and the consequences of doing or not doing them. I think that this sort of knowledge is important and will help when I make decisions like which fertiliser to use or which and how much supplement to feed in the future. 14 / ĀWHINA


Above The lecture theatres at Lincoln University are normally teeming with students and Te Reimana Marumaru is happy to be learning alongside of them. Next Page (Left) Mike Davey(Sales Manager Western North Island Region), Mike Manning(General Manager of R&D & Key Customers) and (Right) James Livingston(Key Account Manager) from Ravensdown along with Dion Tuuta (CEO PKW) proudly present Te Reimana Marumaru (centre right) his scholarship award 15 / Ä&#x20AC;WHINA


“MY TERTIARY STUDY HAS TAUGHT ME TO ANALYSE THE SYSTEMS WE HAVE ON THE FARM. JUST BECAUSE WE’VE DONE SOMETHING FOR YEARS DOES NOT NECESSARY MAKE IT RIGHT….UNIVERSITY HAS TAUGHT ME TO ALWAYS KEEP AN OPEN MIND.”

Tertiary education has also helped me to broaden my horizons. For example before I started study I thought that I only wanted to be involved in the sheep industry, but now that I have had exposure to the other sectors of the industry I would also like to learn about and try the other sectors. I believe that this will not only allow me to extend my knowledge in these areas but the ideas and practices that are used in those sectors may help me in my future.

For any industry to improve or develop new ideas must be created and tested. In the agriculture industry the place where these ideas are created and tested are our universities such as Lincoln or Massey. Nearly all of the new innovations from new animal breeds or grass breeds to different ways of pasture management or new feeding regimes. Without these institutions there would be no new ideas and therefore no development in our industry.

Study has also taught me to analyse the systems that we have on the farm. Just because we have done something for years does not necessarily make it right. Since learning this I have seen examples of where there could be new improved ways of doing things that some people have just ignored because it’s not the way that dad or grandad did it. I don’t want to become one of these people and university has taught me to always keep an open mind.

It is no secret that there is a considerable lack of skilled people entering the agricultural industry. It is highlighted in nearly every farming magazine and is the opinion of most of our country’s farm owners and managers. The best place to create these skilled people is our universities or other tertiary education providers. Students coming out of university have all the skills that are needed to understand how things work both on and off the farm, all that is then needed is real life experience to become successful in their chosen field of farming.

Tertiary study is giving me a lifetime of learning in a few short lectures. One of the things I like most about studying at university is we are given what previously took someone their whole working life to learn, that is then taught to me by that person in a much shorter period. This means that I can learn from someone else’s mistakes and experiences without having to experience them myself. This will give me a considerable advantage when I’m out in the real world, when I don’t have to make someone else’s mistakes I can spend more time making my own. I think that a university education gives students a good base from which they can build a successful future. With a degree or diploma students have a good foundation of theory from which all they need is the practical experience to become successful and leaders in their field. 16 / ĀWHINA

In a world economy as fragile and unpredictable as the one that we are living in at the moment it is crucial that we give our products the best possible chance of being successful on the global market. I find it fascinating that even in times of global financial turmoil our agrculture industry continues to be successful and even expand. This will be due to many things like intelligent marketing that gives us good exposure to the markets that will buy our products. It is our tertiary providers that are giving us these skills so that we can stay one step ahead of other world markets. New Zealand farmers are arguably the best in the world at what they do. Although we don’t have the most fertile land or best climate in the world we get

some of the best production figures for our land use systems. An example of this is our dairy industry which is a world leader in innovation and production results. The majority of these innovations or management practices come from ideas or studies done at our universities such as Lincoln or Massey. Different environments require different practices to obtain maximum production levels. For example dairy farming in Southland will differ from Canterbury or Waikato dairy farms. Even different parts of the same region can be varying climates and altitudes so farmers need to adjust their practices to suit their own farm. University teaches how to analyse options to achieve the best results for a particular operation. Farming is no longer set in stone. There used to be only one way to do things. These days the industry continues to change and develop; the highest priced products differ from year to year. Therefore farmers need to continue learning or they lose the advantage. Successful farmers never stop learning, university teaches this. Students also learn how to learn, and although it sounds simple this is probably the most important aspects of farming and one of the most common skills people don’t have. Lastly I believe that farming is still the future for New Zealand. It is one of the most stable and consistent parts of our economy and one of the few things that has optimism regarding its future. As long as our universities continue to produce skilled and willing people into the industry I can only see it grow and improve. We are recognised worldwide as hard workers in New Zealand, when this is combined with a good education our possibilities are endless.

Te Reimana Marumaru


Image supplied by Ravensdown

PKW – RAVENSDOWN SCHOLARSHIP Ravensdown is proud to support Parininihi Ki Waitotara (PKW) in providing a three year scholarship valued at $5,000 per year. Many young people think of agriculture as just farming but it is so much more than that, as there are a huge variety of career opportunities in agriculture. Technology plays a huge part in agriculture today, as does science and we encourage young people coming through universities to look towards the agriculture sector to continue moving forward in their careers. If you are a PKW shareholder or beneficiary considering tertiary study in the agricultural/ horticultural sector, you are entitled to apply for the PKWRavensdown Scholarship. The recipient receives the cash grant and also a chance to complete paid holiday work in an area of Ravensdown’s business. A selection panel made up of directors from PKW Committee of Management and Ravensdown senior managers judges all applications. Only one PKW-Ravensdown scholarship will be available at any one time (e.g. if it is a 3 year scholarship, only that scholarship will be financed until the 3 year term is completed, then the scholarship will again be available for applications). For further information about eligibility and the scholarship application process please visit here http://careers.ravensdown.co.nz/f/ a5a94f2f03970dad.pdf 


2012 TARANAKI MĀORI SPORTS AWARDS RECIPIENTS SPONSORED BY PKW PARININIHI KI WAITOTARA SUPPORT

THE TARANAKI MĀORI SPORTS TAIOHI TAMA AND KOTIRO AWARDS (JUNIOR

SPORTSMAN AND SPORTSWOMAN) AS A WAY OF RECOGNISING EMERGING SPORTING TALENT AND THE

POTENTIAL OF RANGATAHI MĀORI

WHO WHAKAPAPA TO THE TARANAKI

REGION. WHENUA CATCHES UP WITH THE LATEST AWARDS RECIPIENTS. TAIOHI TAMA -

JUNIOR MĀORI SPORTSMAN

Awarded to 21-year-old Curtis Rona (Te Ātiawa) – Rugby League - who is presently living in Townsville, North Queensland. Although Curtis, originally born in 18 / ĀWHINA

Waitara moved to Australia to live in Perth, he recalls regularly returning to Taranaki to visit whānau as a child and still tries to return at least once every couple of years. Starting his playing days with Joondalup Giants his talent was soon recognised when he was signed up the Sydney Roosters on a three year deal, making his debut in the under 20’s during the 2010 season. In July 2012 Curtis signed a two-year deal with the North Queensland Cowboys joining the first grade squad this year. “My season with the North Queensland Cowboys has been good yet quite challenging, as pre season was very tough both mentally and physically,” says Curtis.

Curtis. Though his career aspirations continue to be focused on being a sportsman getting paid to play a game he loves, his dream come true would be to play for New Zealand in Rugby or League. “Thank you for the honour and the privilege of winning the Taiohi Māori Sports award it truly is a blessing. Winning this award helps me get closer to my dreams with the support and love of the family’s and friends back home.” TAIOHI KOTIRO – JUNIOR MĀORI SPORTSWOMAN (JOINT WINNER)

Awarded to 16 year old Gayle Broughton (Ngāti Ruanui/Ngāruahine)

With former NZ Netballer and now the new Coach for Netball Scotland Gayle With training twice a day and 7am starts Parata as her namesake, young Gayle Curtis is still adjusting to the Townsville clearly has the pedigree to become a humidity and heat. He admits that multi-sport athlete. joining a club that supports him on and Her main focus is presently on 7’s off the field has made the transition Rugby where she has recently been much easier. carded by NZ High Performance Sports “My highlight so far this season was the as well as making the development bonding session at Arile beach,” says squad for NZ Women’s 7’s.


“My ambition is to make the NZ Women’s Rugby Seven’s team to represent our country at the Rio de Janiero 2016 Olympics”, says Gayle. Sprint, strength and stamina tests were all on the agenda during a recent weekend training session but Gayle is comfortable with having become part of the Taranaki Rugby academy where she trains alongside a host of fringe NPC men’s players. As she recently quoted in a Taranaki Daily News article ““The main thing they said to us about being an Olympian is you have to be as good off the field as you are on it.” With that in mind completing her NCEA Levels at U-Turn in New Plymouth is also high on her priority list in between attending the NZ camps that are mainly based in Waiouru or Auckland. “I was totally surprised that I received the Taiohi Kotiro Award which I am thankful for and that I have my whanau and my partner and her family supporting me on this journey.”

TAIOHI KOTIRO – JUNIOR MĀORI

SPORTSWOMAN (JOINT WINNER)

Awarded to 15-year-old Zoe Hobbs (Ngāruahine) who is also a multi sport athlete with a specific focus on Athletics. Recent achievements for Zoe include winning gold at the Australian Youth Olympics and gold at the New Zealand Secondary Schools Athletic Association meet in the U16 100m, 200m and long jump. In March Zoe also broke three intermediate girls records at the Taranaki secondary schools athletics championships in Inglewood, running the 100m in 12.35sec (the previous record, set in 1978, was 12.4sec), the 200m in 25.31sec (previously 25.33sec, which she set in 2012) and in the long jump reaching 5.54m (previously 5.46m, set in 2002). Zoe who is a boarding Year 11 student at New Plymouth Girls High was also very surprised to be a joiner winner of the Taiohi Kotiro award.

“I thought with the other nominees I wouldn’t win but I am thankful for the opportunity and support,” says Zoe. Having also taken up Surf Lifesaving at the Fitzroy Club, Zoe is still keen to specialize on Athletics. “I want to make the Commonwealth Relay Team (Glasgow 2014) and then aim for the Olympics in 2016. So I am aiming for those qualifying times. With the help of awards like this and the support of my family I hope to achieve my goals.”

Above Left Curtis Rona (foreground) has settled in well with his new club North Queensland Cowboys. Above Right Gayle and Zoe proudly display their awards and trophy above. 19 / ĀWHINA


Extending Taranaki’s success to its people

Stuart Trundle, Venture Taranaki

Each year economists BERL release a detailed analysis of the performance of New Zealand’s regions. These reports measure things like population, employment, value added (GDP) and the number of businesses, and provide a good benchmark by which regions can be measured. The 2012 rankings, released recently, have New Plymouth as the number one city in New Zealand. Taranaki is the second-placed region behind Auckland, up from third in 2011. Taranaki’s dairying and oil and gas industries have helped us achieve this ranking, with the highest growth nationwide in exports over the last five years and strong regional employment and new business growth. The performance of regional New Zealand is at the heart of transforming our nation’s economy, and helping us achieve the quality of life we want for our families, whanau and mokopuna. Though Auckland and its transport issues have been a dominant theme, research like the BERL report proves that there needs to be greater recognition that regions matter, and that Taranaki matters more than most. This is one challenge that Venture Taranaki is working to overcome on the national stage to ensure that Taranaki’s success becomes New Zealand’s success. There are many more challenges we must face together to make sure that our current success extends to future generations, and that our

region’s current economic strength extends to every business, community group and whanau right around the Mountain. We must foster a culture of learning throughout our region that starts at school and lasts a lifetime. A culture where innovation, talent and lifelong learning are valued and treasured is necessary to ensure our people and businesses have the skills to keep Taranaki at the top. We must invest the effort so that Taranaki remains a desirable place to live, work and visit, encouraging more of our diaspora home and more new residents. Taranaki needs 135,000 residents by 2035 if it is to keep its share of population based funding models for health, education and social services. Our businesses need these skilled people to grow. Taranaki’s economic development strategy outlines the region’s response to these challenges. It is only by working in partnership across all of these areas that the rising tide will lift all of Taranaki’s waka, and that future generations can benefit from Taranaki’s current wealth.

Venture

TARANAKI Te Puna Umanga

To find out how Venture Taranaki can help your business, call us on 06 759 5150, email us at info@venture.org.nz or visit www.taranaki.info

Photo: Rob Tucker


KEEPING IT COASTAL WHANAU DAY SUNDAY 9 JUNE 2013

THE KEEPING IT COASTAL – WHĀNAU DAY IS A COLLABORATION BETWEEN PKW AND TE PUNI KOKIRI TO RAISE

THE AWARENESS OF WHĀNAU LIVING IN THE RURAL COMMUNITIES LIKE THE COAST ABOUT THE TRAINING

AND EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES WITHIN THE ROHE (REGION).

As a region we’re challenged with a falling population and the effects of this are felt more so in Coastal Taranaki. PKW is an inter-generational business whose future is tied to the

whenua and the people; we need to ensure a prosperous future for both the Incorporation and Taranaki. On Sunday 9 June 2013, PKW will join forces with employers, local providers along with respected personalities to promote the many employment and training options available.

The key message being promoted is that you can work and have a rewarding career and enjoyable lifestyle by staying in Taranaki. On the day there will be a range of whānau-friendly activities and some amazing prizes with PKW sponsoring a major prize.

There are two objectives this event aims to achieve: • To focus on Māori whānau and individuals aged 14 years and older who live in Coastal Taranaki and want to explore career options that are Taranaki based; • Celebrate Coastal-Taranakitanga by showcasing and celebrating areas of innovation and excellence.

21 / MĀTAURANGA


Above Te Reo o Taranaki manager Mitchell Rītai teaches Highlands Intermediate students about theTaranaki Reo, Taranaki Tāngata exhibition at Puke Ariki last year.

INVESTING IN Reo MAori

LANGUAGE REVITALISATION

In 2013 Te Reo o Taranaki will host 6 pilot wānanga for youngsters with leadership potential within our communities.

For almost three decades Te Reo o Taranaki has focused on uplifting the region’s distinctive variation of reo Māori, and its revitalisation work is recognised as a nation-leading approach.

Long-time language stalwart Ruakere Hond has developed a three-year programme for year 9 and 10 students, and will work with selected rangatahi in Te Kura Taiohi to strengthen their knowledge of Taranaki reo and tikanga.

PARININIHI KI WAITOTARA IS PROUD TO BE BACKING A SIGNIFICANT

EXPANSION OF TARANAKI’S MĀORI ORGANISATION THIS YEAR.

“Parininihi ki Waitotara believes that supporting initiatives to strengthen our reo is important not just for our PKW Trust but also for the Incorporation. We’re proud to be involved and to recognize Te Reo o Taranaki’s significant work to create this capability,” says PKW CEO Dion Tuuta. 22 / MĀTAURANGA

There have already been three wānanga at Muru Raupatu marae and Parininihi ki Waitotara is looking to help further develop the programme. Parininihi ki Waitotara is also backing Te Reo o Taranaki’s oral history project. He Kaponga Maumahara records


kaumātua across Taranaki, with a focus on their experience of the reo. Over the next two years Te Reo o Taranaki Trust is building a community archive. It will store written and recorded material held by the Trust and space will be available for iwi, hapū, whānau and community organisations to safely house their taonga. Parininihi ki Waitotara has funded a study to prove the project is feasible under the Trust’s archive stream, Te Pūtē Routiriata. Last year Te Reo o Taranaki digitised Parininihi ki Waitotara’s collection of historical lease documents and the correspondence attached to them, resulting in more than 160,000 digital images of the papers. The work made the documents more easily accessible, while also enabling Te Reo o Taranaki to set up a digitisation process for future projects. The chair of Te Reo o Taranaki Trust, Puna Wano-Bryant, says Parininihi ki Waitotara’s support is invaluable.

Image supplied by Te Reo o Taranaki

“OUR LANGUAGE NEEDS TO BE SPOKEN IN EVERYDAY SETTINGS TO PROSPER. SUCCESSFUL MĀORILED ENTERPRISES LIKE PARININIHI KI WAITOTARA CAN LEAD THE WAY FOR TARANAKI REO IN THE BUSINESS COMMUNITY.”

“The financial backing is a great help, but just as important is building the shared purposes of our two organisations,” says Puna. “We both want to bolster the understanding of Māori viewpoints throughout Taranaki, and believe that will benefit everyone who lives here,” she says.

independent charitable trust, but the move allows closer day-to-day cooperation with WITT’s Te Wānanga Māori. The Trust’s weekly experiential learning programme for kura children and their parents is also expanding. For two years Tūkaikaha has operated in partnership with New Plymouth’s Te Pi’ipi’inga Kākano Mai i Rangiātea Kura Kaupapa Māori. Tūkaikaha is preparing to spread to another three kura this year To support the growth, Te Reo o Taranaki is taking on more staff. Two new roles have been created – a Trust administrator and an archive development coordinator. Tūkaikaha’s teaching staff of two will double. Meanwhile last year’s exhibition at Puke Ariki museum goes on the road. In late May Taranaki Reo, Taranaki Tāngata opens at South Taranaki’s whare taonga, Aotea Utanganui, and discussions are underway for two other showings at Te Tau Ihu and Te Whanganui-a-Tara. The annual education programmes continue under the coordination of Peeti Wharehoka-Watene. The courses spring from the demand of Taranaki speakers for Taranaki reo, and are built on the basis that everyday community use is essential. Pōkaitahi Taiahoaho courses for Certificates in Kaumātua Skills are underway.

“Our language needs to be spoken in everyday settings to prosper. Successful The advanced Taranaki reo courses Māori-led enterprises like Parininihi ki began with a warm welcome at Puniho Waitotara can lead the way for Taranaki Pa last month. After completing his reo in the business community.” doctoral thesis, Ruakere Hond is back heading Pōkaitahi Kāpunipuni Reo, and The archive will be built to professional standards beneath Te Reo o Taranaki’s Keri Opai continues to lead Pōkaitahi Hōpuapua Reo. new offices on the WITT campus, off Hendrie Street.

In partnership with WITT, Te Reo o Taranaki delivers the region’s only advanced Taranaki reo and tikanga educational programme developed in Taranaki, by and for Taranaki whānui. The organisation remains a completely

The first Pūtake Reo o Taranaki wānanga of the year will be held at Te Tatau o te Pō marae in Te Whanganuia-Tara on April 26 to 28. Another of the intensive one-off weekend wānanga will be held in Taranaki, then a third in Te Tau Ihu later in the year. 23 / MĀTAURANGA


Rangatahi MAori and social networking sites NĀ ACUSHLA DEE O’CARROLL NGĀRUAHINE, NGĀTI RUANUI, TE ĀTIAWA A.D.OCarroll@massey.ac.nz

The researcher is currently completing her PhD thesis entitled “Kanohi ki te kanohi, a thing of the past? An examination of whanaungatanga, tuakiri and tikanga in social networking sites”. Social networking sites (SNS’s) have changed the ways in which rangatahi Māori communicate and connect with others, forming new ways of communicating and building relationships. Rangatahi Māori are connecting and communicating through Facebook profile pages and are faced with new challenges of online/ offline variations and protocols that become blurred - particularly in online spaces. The wider study describes how rangatahi are using SNS’s that enhance, adapt and challenge ways of self-expression, ways of communicating with whānau, maintenance of relationships and ways of accessing information. The study revealed that many rangatahi Māori used SNS’s in advanced and complicated ways, which had and continues to have meaningful and impacting affects on their lives, networks, relationships and their perceptions of themselves. One of the major findings of the study looked at how online identities (how participants

chose to represent themselves) became scrutinised by audiences where judgements were made about how their identities were produced, reproduced, represented and perceived. Societal expectations and pressures in the offline world were instantly transferred to the online world (and potentially more so) where individuals felt obsessed with manufacturing their desirable image. A second finding looked at relationships in SNS’s as being just as important as offline relationships. Many rangatahi poured time and effort into navigating and negotiating their various relationships online and ensuring that they met expectations of friends, family, work colleagues and so on. SNS’s facilitated whānau connections and communication and thus, increased whānau ties and connectedness. This in turn enhanced whānau ora amongst families and communities and provided them with the tools to carry out their roles and tasks of being family orientated and connected. The majority of rangatahi that were interviewed felt a moral obligation and responsibility to their families and extended families. The obligation involved the establishment of an online relationship with family members,

regular contact and interaction, particularly with those who were not physically seen at regular times. This strong familial obligation relates to whanaungatanga as a value and practice for Māori. Ensuring that relationships are strong and maintaining them in alternative ways and using various methods (such as Facebook) is innovative and exemplifies how strong family values are to Māori. The study also revealed that many of the rangatahi who were interviewed had very little idea about online privacy. There are concerns for rangatahi Māori and their personal safety online, as well as the highly personalised data they are sharing in SNS’s and not knowing who they’re sharing it with. The implications of their actions can have serious impacts on employment, education, family relationships and friendships. Possible strategies to help contribute to the issue of privacy could be to increase education and awareness around the topic. These strategies are currently being explored by the researcher and will be published in her doctoral thesis later this year. For the full article on ‘An analysis of how rangatahi Māori use SNS’s,’ please see the upcoming MAI Journal. 25 / MĀTAURANGA


Copyright Parininihi ki Waitotara 2012 109 Devon Street West | New Plymouth 4310 Taranaki | New Zealand

WHENUA Issue 6  

Whenua magazine issue 6 - Poutu-te-rangi. Produced for Parininihi ki Waitotara, showcasing their business.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you