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ISSUE 06

ĀTIHAU WHANGANUI INC. MAGAZINE

MAHURU 2017

AWHI

BRIGHT FUTURE BECKONS FOR ĀTIHAU CADET IMPORTANT DATES FOR YOUR CALENDAR TOITŪ TE MANA

Celebrating Success

TOITŪ TE WHENUA

Hunting Wisely

TOITŪ TE TANGATA

Missing Shareholders


Helping grow the country

Proud to partner AWHI and share your vision Toitu te whenua, Toitu te tangata, Toitu te mana Productive land - Prosperous people - Happy customers At PGG Wrightson we do our part each day in helping grow the country. We work with customers across New Zealand to source the right products and services. Our focus is on leading thinking to enable customers to concentrate on growing their business on a profitable and sustainable basis.

Freephone 0800 36 77 44 www.pggwrightson.co.nz

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Rural Supplies Fruitfed Supplies Finance Insurance Real Estate

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Livestock Wool Water Seed and Grain Training


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CONTENTS ISSUE 6 / 2017

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TOITŪ TE WHENUA

TOITŪ TE TANGATA

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IMPORTANT DATES

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LEADERSHIP GROWTH The best plans have multiple benefits

11 COMMERCE AND CONSERVATION WORKING HAND IN HAND Ngā Whenua Rāhui

24 TE ĀTI HAU TRUST SCHOLAR PROFILE Meet high achiever Charlotte Connell

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CELEBRATING SUCCESS Chairperson joins the NZ Business Hall of Fame

28 WELCOME CHARMAINE Our new Stakeholder Engagement Assistant

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STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP A strategic partnership with ANZCO takes our prime Angus to a new American market.

12 BRIGHT FUTURE BECKONS FOR ĀTIHAU CADET Meet shepherd and Ātihau cadet Dylan Ruki-Fowlie

AWHI

17 HUNTING WISELY Safety is the ultimate priority 20 A GREAT INDUSTRY TO BEE IN Our growing reputation as serious apiarists

29 CONNECTIONS MORE IMPORTANT THAN CASH Unclaimed dividends reconnecting Ātihau whānau 31 MISSING SHAREHOLDERS Get in touch if you’re on the list

ĀTIHAU WHANGANUI INC. MAGAZINE

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EDITOR’S PĀNUI AWHI MAGAZINE Editor Mavis Mullins Deputy Editor Nick Maybury Creative Director Sheree Anaru Photography Quentin Bedwell Graphic Design Dave Pope

ĀTIHAU WHANGANUI INCORPORATION Postal PO Box 4035, Whanganui 4541 Physical 16 Bell Street, Whanganui 4500 Ohakune 22 Ayr Street, Ohakune 4625 Telephone +64 (6) 348 7213 Fax +64 (6) 348 7482 Email office@atihau.com www.atihau.com

ISTUDIOS MULTIMEDIA LTD Postal PO Box 8383, New Plymouth 4342 Phyisical 77B Devon Street East, New Plymouth 4310 Telephone +64 (6) 758 1863 Email info@istudios.co.nz www.istudios.co.nz

COVER PHOTO

Tēnā koutou If it’s true that variety is the spice of life, then this issue of AWHI may be our spiciest to date. From front to back we have a range of stories that highlight the inspirational work and people associated with our incorporation. Our focus on an Ātihau leadership growth strategy gets things under way before we report on the company’s successful partnership with ANZCO, who we have been supplying our prime Angus to, for the American market, since December last year. Next up is a look at Ngā Whenua Rāhui, the government fund that helps protect indigenous ecosystems on Māori land, before we meet Ātihau cadet Dylan Ruki-Fowlie who is currently working as a shepherd at our Tawanui Station. Hunting and beekeeping are next to feature as we speak with the man at the heart of the Ātihau-sponsored Whanganui River Hunting & Wild Food Festival and then sit down with three of the incorporation’s apiarists.

Ahuwhenua finalist for the Young Māori Farmer Award 2017, Dylan Ruki-Fowlie.

Closing out the publication we meet Te Āti Hau Trust Scholar Charlotte Connell, new Stakeholder Engagement Assistant Charmaine Teki and three recent recipients of unclaimed dividends. It is hugely satisfying to ensure our people receive what is rightfully theirs, so please get in touch if the missing shareholders list at the back of the magazine includes your name or that of a family member. Last, but certainly not least, please make sure you exercise your democratic rights and cast your vote in the upcoming general election. Hei konei rā

CONTRIBUTORS Quentin Bedwell Bonita Bigham Polly Catlin-Maybury

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Mavis Mullins Chairperson


IMPORTANT DATES

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 2017

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Date: Friday, 8 December 2017 Location: Whanganui Racecourse Full agenda to be published in November.

COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT (CoM) NOMINATIONS CLOSING DATE: 4.00pm on Saturday, 30 September 2017 See Page 4 for details.

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR APPLICATIONS CLOSING DATE: 5.00pm on Friday, 22 September 2017 See Page 6 for details.

AWHIWHENUA YEAR ONE, N2 LEVEL 3 CERTIFICATE IN FARM SYSTEMS AND VEHICLES, MACHINERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE APPLICATIONS

CLOSING DATE: 5.00pm om Monday, 6 November 2017 See Page 16 for details.

TE ĀTI HAU TRUST INDEPENDENT TRUSTEE APPLICATIONS

CLOSING DATE: 5.00pm on Friday, 22 September 2017 See Page 27 for details.

GRANTS APPLICATIONS

CLOSING DATE: Saturday, 30 September 2017 See Page 28 for details.

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NOMINATIONS TO THE COMMITTEE OF MANAGEMENT

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Nominations for the Committee of Management are now open, and close at 4.00pm on Saturday, 30 September 2017. Toni Waho and Che Wilson are retiring by rotation and are eligible for re-election. The Committee of Management are elected by shareholders and are responsible for setting the strategic direction for the incorporation. They are also responsible for monitoring how the strategy is being implemented. Nomination forms are available online from the Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation website: atihau.com/news or can be requested by email to: keri@atihau.com Nominations must be in writing and signed by both the supporting shareholder and the candidate. The candidate must include a recent digital photo (300 dpi minimum) and a summary resume/CV explaining why they are seeking election and their relevant skills and expertise.

All nominations must be received by 4.00pm on Saturday, 30 September 2017 at the Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation office. Office Location: 16 Bell Street, Whanganui Postal Address: PO Box 4035, Whanganui 4541 Email: keri@atihau.com

www.atihau.com

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LEADERSHIP GROWTH It is often said that the best plans have multiple benefits, and the leadership development approach of Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation falls squarely in this category.

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hairperson Mavis Mullins cites the incorporation’s associate director programme as a prime example of this, providing a ‘triple whammy’ of positives. Reintroduced following a hiatus of more than 20 years, the programme’s most obvious benefit is to those given the opportunity to work as part of the incorporation’s board. They receive the valuable experience of governance and the confidence that comes with ‘stepping up’ into a new role with new peers and objectives. But like other Ātihau leadership growth initiatives, the associate director programme also benefits the incorporation’s more established

leaders by exposing them to more diverse viewpoints and representation around the table. “And the third benefit is to the incorporation as a whole, which gains additional knowledge and expertise in areas such as innovation and entrepreneurship,” says Mavis. “The programme is not just about giving experience to the young people coming through. This exposure to young minds and fresh ideas is great for those of us who are not so young.” Like most successful leaders, Mavis has been helped on her way by the opportunity to work alongside more senior minds and soak up their wisdom and experience.

“I was mentored by a couple of uncles,” she recalls. “You never forget that feeling of real support and encouragement when your leaders pull you in and give you opportunities like these, which have real value for all parties.” The current landscape, with a number of treaty settlements coming to fruition, calls for sustainable Māori leadership, according to Mavis. “It goes beyond our incorporation, it’s about Whanganui as a whole and further afield. “We need to do our bit to develop future leaders for our entity, for iwi, for trusts, for other incorporations and for marae. Good leadership doesn’t happen by accident - we have to be working on it continuously.

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“The leadership development we are pursuing at Ātihau is intended to be a strategic pathway carefully considered for the greater good of everyone at the incorporation.” This programme is well personified by four individuals who are making the most of their opportunity to work and have influence at a senior level. Mavis explains: “We have Anton McKay and Jenny Tamakehu working with Te Āti Hau Trust, Laurissa Cooney in audit and

risk and Francene Wineti as an associate director. “They are all providing valuable input and making meaningful contributions, and we are all learning from them.” Now coming to the end of her two-year stint as associate director, Francene Wineti says she has thoroughly enjoyed her experience working with the governance team. “I feel like I have learned so much and I have been so impressed by

the board members’ passion and dedication to the organisation.” As an employee of Callaghan Innovation, a government agency supporting hi-tech NZ businesses, Frances has contributed her knowledge of how technology can be used to greater effect in developing the Ātihau business. She is particularly enthusiastic about the agri-tech opportunities for the incorporation’s honey production business. “I feel like I don’t mirror anyone and I’ve been able to provide a different take on many of the topics we have discussed,” she says. “For me that is what the associate director programme is all about and I would highly recommend the experience.”

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR APPLICATIONS

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“You never forget that feeling of real support and encouragement when your leaders pull you in and give you opportunities like these...”

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The Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation invites applications from persons interested in becoming an Associate Director. The successful candidate will be appointed for a period of two years. Information about the Incorporation and its activities can be found on the Incorporation website at atihau.com and the AWHI magazine.

Applications close at 5pm on Friday, 22 September 2017. Please register your interest by providing your CV/brief resume and a covering letter to Ātihau-Whanganui Incorporation, 16 Bell St, Whanganui, 4541 or by email: keri@atihau.com

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Mavis at her induction to the NZ Business Hall of Fame in late July.

Image supplied by Cactus Photography.

quickly that her journey from her role in the family shearing business into the world of Māori business development and promotion to the stalwart she is today made her the ideal laureate,” says Terry. “She is a truly inspiring figure for our young people.”

CELEBRATING SUCCESS

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he list of NZ Business Hall of Fame inductees boasts luminaries such as Sir Peter Jackson, the founders of Fulton Hogan and Te Puea Herangi. And now it also includes Atihau Whanganui Incorporation’s very own chairperson, Mavis Mullins. “Including Mavis in this year’s list of laureates was a very easy decision to make,” says Sir Eion Edgar, chair of the Hall of Fame’s selection committee. “We look for those who have not only contributed in a business sense to their own organisations and the wider NZ economy but also in giving back to the community – and Mavis has done that in spades.” The NZ Business Hall of Fame was created by the Young Enterprise Trust in 1994 to recognise the best of the best, those who have made a significant lifetime of contribution to

business and the community. “We are not looking to recognise those who are hot right now,” explains Terry Shubkin, Chief Executive of the Young Enterprise Trust. “We want to celebrate those who are real inspirational role models for the work they have done across their lifetimes. It’s not enough to have just made a lot of money; they need to be a great community citizen too.” Around six to eight people are inducted each year and include living individuals and those who have passed on, in some cases many years ago. Each nomination is researched independently to ensure that individuals are worthy of the honour, and Mavis’s credentials were never in question. “It became very obvious very

Each laureate is paired with a Young Enterprise student for the induction ceremony to signify the passing on of the baton of knowledge and success. It is very fitting that Mavis’s granddaughter Brennagh was selected to accompany her after the youngster’s success in her own Young Enterprise company, Ruff Tucker. The dog treat initiative won the Hawkes Bay region Young Enterprise Award so the apple has clearly not fallen far from the tree. “Mavis is a great role model on so many levels, in business, as a woman and as a Māori,” says Sir Eion, who is also the chair of the Forsyth Barr board as well as a great philanthropist. “She has taken on that leadership role and garnered the respect she deserves for it.” Mavis, who earlier this year received Auckland University’s Outstanding Māori Business Leader Award, has taken the news of the accolade in her characteristically humble way. “I don’t do stuff on my own,” she says modestly. “Recognition like this is as much about the people I work with and the entities I serve as anything else. I have had a lot of opportunities to have influence and I feel very grateful for that. “While I am honoured, of course, at the end of the day it’s just what you do. You do your best for those around you, your people and region, and for New Zealand as a whole.” TOITŪ TE MANA

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A STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP

Thousands of Americans are enjoying prime Angus beef raised on Ātihau land, thanks to a supplier relationship with ANZCO.

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orking with a customer similar to New Zealand’s My Food Bag, the company holds the largest market share in the US in this sector and provides recipes and ingredients for its customers to cook interesting and tasty meals at home. “We have been working with ANZCO for 12 months and we began supplying the customer with our prime Angus just before Christmas,” Andrew Beijeman,

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Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation CE, says. “It is a very satisfying example of the Ātihau value strategy coming to fruition and we aren’t stopping there.” Focus has been on targeting the marbling score, a measure of quality held in high esteem by the customer. “Marbling is the intramuscular fat that really gives the meat its taste,’ Dean Francois, manager of Ātihau fi nishing block, Ohotū Station, explains. “We are really focusing on improving that standard across our Angus herd.”

“We are really focusing on improving that standard across our Angus herd.” Right: Ohotū Station Manager, Dean Francois feeding out stock.

Marbling is mainly an inherited trait and so animals showing a high level of intramuscular fat are being used as breeding stock, such as bulls from the South Island’s Te Mania stud, one of New Zealand’s leading Angus studs. But genetics don’t deliver the goods if the management of the stock is not handled correctly and of prime concern is ensuring that the young stock is adequately fed. “If youngsters lose weight, they lose that intramuscular fat and no amount of fi nishing when they reach 18 months will put it back the damage is already done,” Dean explains. “It is vital that attention to the feeding of the stock happens right from when they are born, to ensure that you get the result you want.” It takes around two years to fi nish an animal, with heifers taking less time and some steers taking longer. Ohotū Station runs 2,700 head of cattle, fi nishing around 1,800 steers and heifers each year. Dean’s knowledge and experience are essential when it comes to deciding when animals are ready. “Each animal is weighed, which plays a large part in knowing when they are ready, but I also assess each animal before a fi nal decision is 10

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made to send them off or keep them on a little longer,” he says.

improvement as some of our animals

Almost half the animals produced are going to the American customer at present, with the rest going to other companies such as Angus Pure who supply Countdown supermarkets, but Andrew is keen to see that increase.

says. “But our long-term strategy of

“There is plenty of room for

future.”

simply do not make the grade,” he

using the best genetics and highlevel stock management will pay off to improve the overall quality of the herd. We have big plans for the


Commerce and conservation working hand in hand T

he work of Ngā Whenua Rāhui is about more than just putting up fences and killing off pests. It is also about caring for Papatūānuku in a cultural and spiritual way that shows how commerce and conservation can work hand-inhand. Ngā Whenua Rāhui is a contestable ministerial $6 million per year fund administrated by a board led by Chairman Sir Tumu Te Heuheu. The board considers applications for assistance in conserving and improving indigenous ecological areas owned by Maori, with 99.9% of cases involving land communally owned by family trusts or corporations. “The important thing to understand about this fund is that it maintains the rangatiratanga of the land and the people,” says Ngā Whenua Rāhui’s Relationship Lead Mike Mohi, who has been involved with the organisation since its inception in 1991. “A kawenata (covenant) lasting 25 years is put in place to protect

it, which ensures that future generations have their say on how their land is managed. Ownership of the land remains in the hands of its people.” More than 2200 hectares of bush remnants and 58 hectares of wetlands on Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation land hold kawenata under Ngā Whenua Rāhui. The fund enables work such as the fencing of bush areas, waterways and wetland areas to be carried out. The barriers keep stock away which in turn reduces erosion, protects plants and allows native species to flourish. Pest control is also a major focus, reducing the numbers of possums and goats to allow native ecosystems to grow and provide habitats for native animal species. The work is carried out by Ngā Whenua Rāhui itself, in collaboration with the landowners and other agencies such as regional councils. “It gives our people the opportunity to do the right thing by their land,” Mike adds. “The land is not there to

“It gives our people the opportunity to do the right thing by their land.” be exploited, to be used for gain. It is there to be nurtured in a sustainable way. By making the environment a healthy one, we do the same for ourselves.” Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation Board member Che Wilson agrees. “The Ngā Whenua Rāhui mechanism helps us to make a conscious and active decision to not only protect the land for our own time, but to sustain it for future generations,” he says. “In turn, the land will help sustain us by enabling us to use taonga species to revive our art forms and traditional foods.” Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation’s involvement in the fund proves that commerce and conservation can work together to provide a sustainable future for all. TOITŪ TE WHENUA

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BRIGHT FUTURE BECKONS FOR ĀTIHAU CADET Initiatives to keep Ātihau people connected to each other and their whenua are paying off with national recognition and career pathways being created. Awhiwhenua cadet, Dylan Ruki-Fowlie, talks to Bonita Bigham about his whirlwind year and his dreams of places and things to come.

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ust one year and 12 days was all that Dylan Ruki-Fowlie could bear of the hustle and bustle of Auckland city, where he had gone to live after fi nishing high school in the central plateau of the North Island. “It was just too busy,” says the affable 21-year-old of the city life. He missed fresh air and open skies. “I like the outdoors, like doing things outside. I couldn’t handle sitting in a confi ned space, that wasn’t an option.” His return to Raetihi brought the opportunity to maximise that love of the outdoors when he landed a spot as an Ātihau cadet on the Awhiwhenua programme, delivered by Landbased Training. His mum, Maureen Fowlie, had seen the programme featured on a Country Calendar episode on television and encouraged him to apply. “It ticked all the boxes,” he says. It was a perfect match, with Dylan fi ring ahead with all his assignments and assessments and he completed the Level 3 Certificate in Agriculture course with ease. That was despite suffering a serious eye injury last year which left him with only five per cent vision in one eye. Dylan is pretty philosophical about this though and it certainly hasn’t prevented him from continuing his studies. He’s now halfway through the Level 4 Business Management and Production programme. “I’m still blind,” he laughs. “But that’s about it, you just gotta adapt to it and keep going.” That drive for success has borne impressive results in just 18 months, much to his own surprise. Earlier this year Dylan was named as one of three fi nalists for the Young Māori Farmer Award in the 2017 14

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Ahuwhenua Trophy Awards, the epitome of recognition of excellence in Māori farming practice across Aotearoa. While he didn’t win, the fact the judges recognised his achievements during such a short time in the industry to put him in the top three made Dylan really reflect on his own abilities. “It was unbelievable really. Everyone said I had the potential to go for it but I thought I was nowhere near, I wasn’t going to make it. “Then I got the phone call. I was pretty astounded.” Dylan said it was a watershed moment for him. “It was a wake-up call for me; I fi nally realised what my potential was,” he says.

“It was a wake-up call for me; I finally realised what my potential was.”


Currently working as an Ātihau shepherd on 2774 hectare sheep and beef Tawanui Station at Raetihi, he helps with the wide and varied workload involved with stock management.

too, so she knows what she’s doing.”

This winter Tawanui has 9,000 breeding ewes, 300 cows and 200 fi nishing steers.

Then there are his sisters who also play a critical role.

“Tawanui is a breeding and fi nishing block,” he says. “The animals get fattened up to a certain weight before going off to the works.”

Dylan’s dad Bryan Ruki lives in the South Island and it’s through him that Dylan can whakapapa to Ātihau and whose shares in the incorporation he will one day succeed to, along with his siblings.

Like anything, a new adventure needs support and Dylan says he’s received lots of help, especially from his partner, Talia Wi. “She puts up with me somehow. I drag her out there (to the station) every now and then, but her whānau has land

Dylan also heavily credits his Mum with his success and “the aunties,” who regularly check in to make sure he’s still on track.

“They keep me humble,” he laughs.

He is grateful for the Ātihau cadetship programme which has provided the exciting pathway he is now on.

“They got me on the ground,” he says. A strong commitment to aspiring to best industry practice on its land and therefore the greatest potential returns and opportunties for its shareholders and their wider whānau is evident, with Ātihau increasing national recognition and initiatives to keep people connected to the land and each other. In 2007 Te Pā Station won the Ahuwhenua supreme prize, the BNZ Māori Farming Excellence Award, recognising its significant increased fi nancial performance over a fiveyear period. Farming both cattle and sheep, the opportunity for Ātihau cadets and employees to work in a hands-on learning environment means they

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get a well-rounded experience with different types of livestock. Dylan is already thinking about the next phase of his career, which starts when his current employment contract at Tawanui and his course of study both fi nish toward the end of this year. It’s a job he loves, being in the outdoors and working with the animals, but Dylan is also keeping an eager eye and ear out for the next opportunity. “I’d like to go elsewhere, to learn different skills in different places, in other areas,” he says. He’s pretty sure about one thing though, it would have to be in the same line of work, in the same kind of environment.

Dylan and Fern enjoying their work at Tawanui Station.

4 o’clock every morning for milking,” he laughs. Whatever Dylan decides to do next or wherever he goes, his eventual long-term goal is to come back to the Ātihau whenua and give back. “In time I’d hopefully come back to the land, to have a crack at being a head shepherd or a stock manager,” he says. And no doubt, to contribute to cycle

Dylan is pretty adamant that dairy farming really doesn’t ring his bells. Or rather, the hours don’t.

of success, and pass on his ever-

“I’m not that keen on waking up at

farmers working their own whenua.

increasing wisdom and experience to the next generations of Ātihau

AWHIWHENUA 2018

6 PLACEMENTS FOR YEAR 1 STUDENTS

Year One, N2 Level 3 Certificate in Farm Systems and Vehicles, Machinery and Infrastructure The Awhiwhenua agricultural training course is now seeking six applicants to join the 2018 intake.

Do you have a passion for agriculture, a strong work ethic and a give-anything-a-go attitude? Do you want to learn both the theoretical and practical elements of sheep and beef farming in a supportive environment? in a supportive environment? If you are keen, get in touch with the Awhiwhenua co-ordinator Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation has moved our on-farm Robyn Matthews 027 281 9717 or Land-Based Training on training programme to a fully residential live-in course. 0508 TRAIN ME (872 466) or go to Cadets are based mainly at Te Pā station for practical learning www.landbasedtraining.co.nz to find out more information. experience (improving the consistency and breadth of practical training) and study with their Land-Based Training tutor at Ngā Mōkai marae. Applicants must be at least 17 years old or over and have passed NCEA Level 2 Maths and English.

Tel: 0508 TRAIN ME (872 466) or www.landbasedtraining.co.nz

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HUNTING WISELY As any hunter will tell you, hunting can be great fun. And it also helps control pests like deer, rabbits, pigs and possums that destroy native flora.

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esponsible hunters will also emphasise how important it is to hunt wisely and safely – and this is certainly the highest priority for Ātihau when it allows shareholders and those that whakapapa to the incorporation to hunt on its land. According to Chris Kumeroa and Daryn Te Uamairangi, who runs the annual Ātihau-sponsored Whanganui River Hunting & Wild Food Festival, there are 12 fundamentals (listed on the next page) that everyone should follow to enjoy a safe and successful hunt. With a military background in counter terrorism, human tracking, mountaineering and security risk management, Chris has credibility in spades when it comes to the subject of hunting. And with extensive time overseas, he has brought home a good understanding of numerous cultures.

Each year, the festival attracts a multi-generational attendance where fathers and sons, koroua and mokopuna come back to hunt and learn about the land and history of the area. “Getting our people back to the land and allowing them to connect to their whenua and whakapapa is a main part of what we do,” says Chris. There is a real focus on engaging with youth and the journey to get them immersed in understanding the importance of our role as kaitiakitanga, Chris explains. One of the most important themes of the festival is the tribal journey from mountain to sea and our rich history. There’s a strong belief that by connecting to the whenua and resources our people will have a better understanding of what is needed to protect and preserve our resources. >> TOITŪ TE WHENUA

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Previous page: Chris showing the importance of hunting safety at the Whanganui River Hunting & Wild Food Festival.

Images supplied by Chris Kumeroa.

the information we are trying to impart.”

Chris expands on this: “Having our rangatahi be able to touch, hear, feel and breathe the outdoors in a Te Ao Māori kaupapa gives them more of an emotional, physical, mental and spiritual connection to

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“In turn this makes them more engaged about being part of the long-term plan for the preservation, management and care of our various taonga, maunga, awa, whenua, moana and ngahere.” Each year the festival is held at a different marae. In 2017 it was held at Hiruharama Marae and next year Pipiriki Marae will be the host. As an event sponsor, Ātihau provides access to some of its land blocks for the competition. With safety the ultimate priority,

the festival has detailed plans for risk management and health and safety, ensuring that all personnel are aware of the strategies to reduce harm and prevent fatalities. A major part is the fi rearms programme where the correct use of a fi rearm is taught, along with Chris’s 12 fundamentals on how to hunt safely and wisely. Ātihau support this initiative as a means of ensuring best practice behaviours and thinking that keep people safe. Safety for our own has been part of our cultural DNA for centuries. That hasn’t changed even in today’s modern world, we still fundamentally care for one another.

On the next page are Chris’s twelve fundamentals on how to hunt safely and wisely.


12 SAFE HUNTING FUNADAMENTALS

1 Know the environment and establish an intelligence picture

Understand where you are going and what topography it offers. This will help shape how you approach the hunt.

4 Assess risks and hazards

Always look at the variable risks associated with the area you are hunting. What are the key challenges at that particular hunting spot and how will I/we negotiate this?

7 Make a contingency plan

Always discuss and plan for worst case scenarios (emergency situations). Invariably what can go wrong, will go wrong. A plan will help minimise the impact of an emergency (i.e. medical emergency, injury, quad breakdown etc.).

10 Map the hunt

Take a GPS or topographical map to help you understand where you are at all times. This will avoid unnecessary wrong turns and getting lost. This is important for when you might be slightly lost: you will at least know where the road or stream is.

2 Understand and interpret the weather conditions

Find out what the short- to long-range forecast is and what the weather patterns,are for the time of year you want to hunt (raining, white out, hot, humid etc).

5 Plan your hunt

Map out how you are going to achieve the objective. A plan helps you troubleshoot issues early at home, as opposed to when you are out there and exposed to the conditions.

8 Get local knowledge

Ask the locals about the hunting stock, where they were last seen and the numbers. What are the creature habits (grazing areas and watering holes etc.)? Attempt to make the hunting easier by getting an informed picture.

11 Hunt for the freezer

Hunt only what you need or what you can carry. Remember to protect the hunting for tomorrow’s generations.

3 Dress for the environment and the conditions

Avoid overheating during the summer and always stay warm during cold periods. Take emergency clothing in case you are caught out.

6 Inform others

Stay connected with the outside world. This is critical, especially tell others (outside hunting group) where you are going (generic) and when you are returning home; who is in the group; and what is your vehicle type (red quad,Nissan truck, etc.).

9 Zero your rifles

Go to a range and check fire your firearms before the hunt. This will establish where the fall of shot is and what variations one has to make if the animal is outside the rifle’s normal range. This also aids in safe use of that particular firearm.

12 Enjoy the hunt

Emphasise the enjoyment factor in the hunt experience. Take people that enjoy having a laugh, including at themselves.

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A GREAT INDUSTRY TO BEE IN

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TOITŪ TE WHENUA


It’s physical, and painful when you get stung, but being a beekeeper is a fine life according to Ātihau apiarists. And what’s more, the opportunities are stacking up in this rapidly growing industry.

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oday Ātihau has 1,200 hives but if things go as planned that number could be as high as 10,000 within five years. As Ātihau CEO Andrew Beijeman said in the last issue of AWHI, the company now has an industry reputation as a serious apiarist. Some of this is down to good strategic planning and being awake to opportunity, but equally as important is the quality of our Ātihau beekeepers. Three of the company’s apiarists – head beekeeper Ethan Paulsen and junior keepers Kevin McDonnell and Sam O’Donnell – recently took time out from their off-season maintenance tasks to give Ātihau an insight into their work and backgrounds. The youngest of the trio at just 20-years-old, Kevin will have been with Ātihau for two years in November. Of Ngāti Rangi descent, his parents William McDonnell and Gabriel Taurerewa are both Ātihau shareholders. Kevin, of Raetihi, came to the

>>

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“You can’t tell the bees how much honey to put in a box!”

incorporation via the Ruapehu Recruitment agency in Ohakune. He had no experience in beekeeping but was willing to work and learn. “I fi nd it interesting to learn more about the bees,” says Kevin. Some bees have been raised to be more docile and can be handled without gloves, he explains, but don’t expect not to be stung. “It takes a few thousand stings to get over it, but it’s not too bad,” he jokes. Sam has been part of the team for one year but is no stranger to the incorporation, having received an Ātihau Ravensdown Scholarship which helped him graduate from Massey University with a Bachelor of Agri Commerce. Being of Te Ātihau-nui-a-Pāpārangi iwi and with shareholder parents in Heni Hipango and Gerard O’Donnell, Sam epitomises what Ātihau hopes to achieve through giving uri good employment and training opportunities.

Below (l-r): Head Beekeeper Ethan Paulsen with Junior Beekeepers Sam O’Donnell and Kevin McDonnell.

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TOITŪ TE WHENUA

While job seeking in the fi rst half of 2016, he came across the Ātihau position and called Andrew Beijeman to discuss the role. “With the way that honey was going at the time, it was a good opportunity to have a crack at it,” he recalls. Part of the attraction for Sam was the opportunities for professional development and a career path beyond a primarily labour-intensive role. Ethan explains how junior Ātihau beekeepers can take on a variety of different tasks in the future, such as liaising with landowners for honey sites, mapping out floral sources, site maintenance, fi nding winter and spring sites for hives and planting new floral sources. Both Kevin and Sam attended the recent Apiculture New Zealand Conference in Rotorua, a national event for beekeepers that offers workshops, seminars and the chance to meet others in the industry. They will also have access to further apiary training on offer through polytechs, where they will learn on the job and also attend a theory class.

With the bees currently dormant, winter is a slower period but there is still maintenance and building of honey boxes to keep the keepers busy. It is also time for planning the next season, as once spring and summer arrive, things speed up considerably. Hives are placed where there are good floral sources – the more flowers, the more hives that Ethan and his team will place. In the fi rst three to four weeks of the season 10-hour days are not uncommon, says Ethan. The work is physically demanding but with new technology such as cranes handling most of the heavy lifting, it’s clear that Sam and Kevin entered the industry at the right time. Ethan reflects: “Back in the day you needed two people to lift by hand as there could be hives weighing 80kg to 100kg. You can’t tell the bees how much honey to put in a box!” Cranes reduce the need for great strength. “But you still need to be be able to lift 25-30kg,” adds Ethan, who has been in the industry for 11 years and was looking after 3,000 hives in the South Island town of


“It takes a few thousand stings to get over it, but it’s not too bad.” Gore before coming to Ātihau. The incorporation’s beekeeping ambitions have increased substantially since he joined the team but the company is not afraid of investing in staff. Being physically fit and hard working are good traits for potential beekeepers, along with some knowledge of farming and the ability to ‘take a sting’.

Careful handling of the bees is an absolute must, not only to minimise stings but also to save money, as the accidental squashing of a queen can destroy a hive, resulting in $600 to $700 of foregone revenue. “Having an understanding and a caring side for the bees is crucial, as they are what pay your wages,” Ethan says. In the short-term, Ātihau aims

COMING TO YOUR PLACE SINCE 1983

to double its hives to 2,400 this summer. The incorporation has excellent floral sources that produce a high-grade Manuka honey. Further sources may be planted to yield more honey and there is also the possibility of diversifying into other floral sources like clover, rewarewa and kamahi, which would enable Ātihau to offer a wider range of honey and increase its market share. Watch this space…

MAKE SURE YOU’RE COVERED

CALL US TODAY ON 06 349 0091

TOITŪ TE WHENUA

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TE ĀTI HAU TRUST SCHOLAR PROFILE

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TOITŪ TE TANGATA WHENUA


Images supplied by the University of Auckland.

A grant from Te Āti Hau Trust has helped Charlotte Connell take opportunities she would otherwise have missed.

When Charlotte Connell’s Aunty Sheryl told her about the Te Āti Hau Trust’s education grants, it was the first step towards receiving the major academic accolade of being named on the Dean’s List.

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his honour recognised the excellence of Charlotte’s PhD thesis and is only awarded to a select few of the large number of doctoral students at The University of Auckland. “That was an incredibly exciting letter to receive,” the 27-year-old says. “It came after receiving the news that my thesis had passed the examination with no corrections needed – most people are required to make at least minor revisions so I was very pleased and happy with that! To then get the news about being placed on the Dean’s List was very satisfying indeed.” Charlotte received a grant of $3,000 a year from 2013 to 2017 from the Te Āti Hau Trust, and credits it with enabling her to take advantage of opportunities that she would have otherwise had to miss. “My connections with Ātihau go back through my father, Brian,

and my grandmother Ngapera Hunaitemoa,” she says. “Dad’s sister, Sheryl Connell, told me that I should apply for a grant and I was very grateful when I received one. I would like to thank everyone for their support.” Although Charlotte has lived in Auckland all her life, she makes regular trips back to her Ngāti Uenuku hapū marae in Makaranui, just outside Raetihi. “It’s great place to be able to access all the activities on the great Central Plateau as well as maintaining all those connections which are so important,” added Charlotte. Maintaining connections is a key part of the Trust’s work and Te Tiwha Puketapu, Te Āti Hau Trust Chair, feels that the grants are more than just handing out money. “To receive this type of support from our people is a real privilege,” he says. “And I know that the recipients really acknowledge that.” >>

TOITŪ TE TANGATA

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“The grant creates another connection between the scholar and their people, and also reminds them of the responsibility to make their contribution back in return.” Charlotte’s PhD studies looked at the impact of fatigue on the brain and central nervous system and were undertaken at the University of Auckland’s Department of Exercise Sciences. “The first thing the grant enabled

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“There is a world of opportunity there for me, I will just have to see what happens!” me to do was purchase a laptop,’ she says. “I did my entire Honours degree without my own computer and the difference it made to be able to study and write was amazing.” “The other really big thing it has enabled me to do is attend international conferences. This

meant I could gain experience in presenting my research to scientific peers and reap the benefits of being able to talk with them. So many PhD students do not get that advantage in their studies.” Charlotte was always interested in the sciences while at school and that


developed into a focus on sports performance and exercise, which led her to study for a BSc in Science majoring in Exercise Sciences. Her love of academia and research led her to do an Honours degree that she passed with fi rst class honours, enabling her to move straight into the PhD programme of study. “Neuroscience and the way the body responds and changes with exercise has become a favourite area

of research for me. My journey has been a really enjoyable one, and one that has led me to face some challenges, too.” Charlotte says. “I would encourage anyone to apply for a Te Āti Hau Trust grant to make their ambition of pursuing study possible.” Charlotte is now deciding what she may do next. “I could stay in the world of

academic research, which I enjoy,” she muses. “Or there is also the option of going into industry. There is a world of opportunity there for me, I will just have to see what happens!” Applying for a grant from the Te Āti Hau Trust is a straightforward process and Trust secretary Paul Maguire and office administrator Keri Browning are always willing to help with applications.

EDUCATION & GENERAL GRANTS Te Āti Hau Trust invite applications for Education and General Grants for 2017 Closing Date

Round 3 29 September PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU MAY ONLY APPLY ONCE WITHIN A CALENDAR YEAR. To apply, download the appropriate application form from the Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation website (Te Āti Hau Trust page) or follow the link: goo.gl/ekFclV Complete and attach all the required supporting documentation, as noted on the application form. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Print and sign the application form then submit either by mail or email to: Te Āti Hau Trust, PO Box 4035, Whanganui 4541 office@atihau.com Eligibility relationship of applicant to Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation You will need to get the person from whom you descend, who is an Ātihau shareholder, to verify your relationship. If you are a beneficiary of a trust or estate that holds shares in Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation, you will need to get one of the trustees or administrators to verify your status and eligibility. If you are unsure whether you or your whānau are current shareholders in Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation or if you have any other queries, please contact the Whanganui office on 06 348 7213 between 8:30am and 4:00pm weekdays or email office@atihau.com

www.atihau.com/te-ati-hau-trust TOITŪ TE TANGATA

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WELCOME CHARMAINE Charmaine Teki’s new role in the Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation offi ce is turning out to be less of a job and more of a family reunion!

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harmaine is the new Stakeholder Engagement Assistant, joining the organisation at the beginning of May after the retirement of Frances Te Porana earlier this year. “I wouldn’t say I am fi lling Frances’ shoes,’ she laughs. “I think I’ve just got slippers on at the moment!” Born and bred in Whanganui, Charmaine joins Ātihau after a short spell at the Aotea Māori Land Court where she held roles in Advisory and then Court Support. “The Advisory role was very much a people-focused role,” Charmaine says. “I enjoyed it because I am a people person. I enjoy helping people and supporting them in whatever it is they are trying to achieve.”

It was through her job at the Court that she met Frances and Keri Browning, Ātihau’s other office administrator, and it became apparent she was ideal for the role. “It all just sort of happened,” she said. ‘It just seemed so right, like I was meant to be here. I love the administration side of it and maintaining the share register, but the real bonus is making those connections with the shareholders.” And that is because many of those shareholders are actually family or well-known families in the rohe! Charmaine has very strong affi liations to Ātihau through her father David Teki, who was a shareholder before constituting a whānau trust of which Charmaine is a trustee. “It’s really wonderful being able to meet and put faces to names or catching up with old friends and their families that I haven’t seen in a very long time.” she says. “My roots are very fi rmly here. It’s my home, and every day I meet someone who reminds me of that very fact.” Learning about Ātihau Wanganui Incorporation is proving to be a

journey of discovery for Charmaine. “Dad was always the one who went to the AGMs so I didn’t really know much about the work that Ātihau did overall.” she explains. “There is so much more to the organisation than I knew – what with the work of the Board, the Trust, the farms, the whenua and so much more.” She says that she has been made very welcome and feels very much part of the organisation already. “Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation is all about doing its best for the people.” “I see that every day and I think that’s why I have fitted in so well, because I am all about working for the people and doing my best for them.”

TE ĀTI HAU TRUST

CALLING FOR APPLICATIONS FOR INDEPENDENT TRUSTEE The Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation invites applications from persons interested in becoming an Independent Trustee of the Te Āti Hau Trust. The successful candidate will be appointed for a period of two years. Information about the Trust and its activities can be found on the Incorporation website at atihau.com and the AWHI magazine.

Applications close at 5pm on Friday, 22 September 2017. Please register your interest by providing your CV/brief resume and a covering letter to Ātihau-Whanganui Incorporation, 16 Bell St, Whanganui, 4541 or by email: keri@atihau.com

www.atihau.com 28

TOITŪ TE TANGATA


Aroha Tauariki at home in Ngakuru.

CONNECTIONS MORE IMPORTANT THAN CASH A very old cheque and an equally old piece of paper are what it finally took to connect Aroha Tauariki with her unclaimed Ātihau dividends.

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he name on the shareholder list wasn’t hers, but the dividends were. Aroha, born Aroha Brooks, had to prove that the Aroha Church on the list was actually her. “It was a bit of a hard case,” she says from her Ngakuru home, about 30 minutes’ drive from Rotorua. After her mother died, someone – Aroha thinks it may have been an aunty who has also since passed

away – eventually completed the succession process for her and her brothers.

“I had no idea until my brother rang me from Australia and said ‘Sis’, your name is on the list’.”

By that time Aroha had married her husband, who was born into the Church whānau but was a whāngai in the Tauariki whānau, so it had to be someone who knew his whānau too.

Proving she was the same Aroha should have been near impossible, but amazingly she still has a cheque which was her eventual share of her mum’s estate, also made out to Aroha Church. She never cashed it and has kept it for decades.

But she thought all the shares had gone to her brothers.

That went halfway to proving

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her identity, confirmed by a piece of paper discovered in the incorporation’s files by Ātihau Administrator Keri Browning. It showed her name, Aroha Brooks, had been struck out and replaced with Aroha Church. Aroha credits Keri with making it all come together and says her help and enthusiasm made the whole process much easier. “I wasn’t even going to bother. I thought I was never going to be able to prove it. But with my stuff that I sent her and her hard work and research, she found it all.” Aroha is thrilled to be reconnected with her Ātihau roots but wonders how many others like her are out there. “There must be others who don’t know how to go about it or don’t even know they have dividends owing.” Two other wāhine have also recently reconnected with Ātihau, reclaiming their whakapapa links as well as their dividends. Pikiwai Hurinui-Te Maro, who lives in Hastings, says finding out about her unclaimed pūtea was “ just a shock.” She and her sister inherited their shares from their kuia, Noema Hirini, but Pikiwai said they never really bothered following up because the last time they received their dividends − at least 20 years ago − it was hardly worth claiming. “It wasn’t worth sending out; I think the stamp was worth more than the cheque,” she says. “The last we heard it was all just in gorse.” But a twist of fate brought them back into the loop. A friend, who was also a shareholder, had passed away. Her 30

TOITŪ TE TANGATA

son’s father, who was helping with the paperwork, had seen the list and called her. “He said ‘I think you need to ring these people’ so the next day I got on the phone, and what a lovely surprise!” Pikiwai is very happy to be reconnected to the Ātihau whānau and now regularly receives the pānui which keep her and her whānau, including her three tamariki, up-todate. “It’s good to know what’s happening now; I thought it was cool after all these years.” But for Wellington’s Steph Osborne, the unclaimed dividends only came after making enquiries about an Ātihau education scholarship, when Keri asked her if she knew she had money sitting there.

“I should have known, my mum (Mary Phillips) used to collect it but it was the last thing on my mind,” says Steph. She had been living in Australia but came home in late 2015, and this year will complete her Masters in Business Administration majoring in technology, hence the initial scholarship application. Steph says she is really impressed with the financial support the incorporation makes available to the Ātihau whānau and how supportive the staff are, especially after also securing a significant grant to help upgrade their papakāinga at Pipiriki. “It made me realise how relevant our whakapapa is for all the shareholders, and nothing is too hard for those ladies in the office; they make it simple.


reconnect with its people, is literally paying off. Since the last unclaimed dividends list was published in this magazine last year, nearly $70,000 has been distributed to shareholders or is in the process of being succeeded to. Keri says both hers and colleague Charmaine Teki’s sole focus is on shareholder engagement, which can be challenging but rewarding work. “It was really easy to work with them.”

Left: Keri and Charmaine in the Whanganui office. Above: Steph Osborne.

They are both easily accessible in the office and are really keen to

Keri says of the 8500 shareholders on the Ātihau register, about 45 per cent had details that needed updating or succession hadn’t been completed, meaning the incorporation couldn’t make contact or distribute their dividends to them.

reconnect the wider Ātihau whānau

But the committment by Ātihau to

“We’re here to help.”

to each other, not just to their pūtea. “Charmaine is the first point of contact. She answers the phone and meets people at the counter,” she says.

MISSING SHAREHOLDERS We’re missing some shareholders with outstanding dividends of $2,000 or more, and need your help to find them. These shareholders may be missing because: • Shareholder has passed away (and succession has not been done and/or family not aware of the shareholding) • Shareholder has passed away and the family are not ready to arrange succession • Shareholder may not be aware that they are shareholders

• No bank account details for shareholder  hareholder or their whanau are more than welcome to S contact Keri or Charmaine at the office as follows: Email: office@atihau.com Mail: PO Box 4035, Whanganui 4541 Visit us: 16 Bell Street (upstairs), Whanganui Call: 06 348 7213 between 8.30am and 4pm weekdays

• No address for shareholder Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

14483

Celia Te Huia

Akapita

12628

Taiwhare

Ariiti

10375

John

Albert (Deceased)

19807

Charles Gabriel

Ashford

4114

Miriama

Albert Estate

17306

Henry

Ashford

4415

Trevor James

Albert

17305

Isaac

Ashford

6514

Paul

Amorangi

2720

Anna Anita

Austin

10976

Anne

Anderson

3929

Na

Baker

12580

Sally

Anderson

7042

Dorothy May

Beard

TOITŪ TE TANGATA

31


Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

3166

Reihana Lei

Bevan

11554

Percy

Kingi

5829

Mary

Bishop

11314

Kahu

Kireona

6741

Pauline Ngahuia

Borlace

12817

Hera

Kireona

15056

Wiremu

Broughton Estate

10276

Tukotahi

Kirkwood Estate

8382

Riana Eileen

Bublitz

12167

Mary Taria

Konui (Deceased)

2811

Caroline Margaret

Byrne

18992

Papa

Konui Whanau Trust

11577

Kamiria

Clarke

4997

Hone and Mereana Te Pau

Kopeke

10479

Wenerau Rukuwai

Cooper Estate

8079

Turama

Kurukaanga Whanau Trust

12557

Roy

Donald Estate

3358

Juanita

Lacy

14404

Ngarongo Mary

Edmonds Estate

9457

Marie Daisy

Leerhoff

11679

Koromatua Bishop

Edmonds

5690

Ani Raukawa

Lemon

12899

Wahinekino

Edmonds

16464

Erina Tangiwai

Macdonald

3139

Hirita Ruma

Edwards

9265

Annie

Machin

12009

Moti

Eruera

11916

Mere

Manga

19806

Patricia Mary

Forrest

7886

James

Manukonga

7713

Charmaine Tapakura

Fowler

8293

Deane

Manunui

17311

Francis

Goff

8295

Desmond

Manunui

2869

Elizabeth

Gray

20525

Luke

Manunui

5235

Wiremu

Gray Estate

4158

Pare Horohanga

Mare Estate

5128

Leslie

Gray

4159

Pare Horohanga

Mare Estate

9535

Merania Whango

Gully

6359

Te Mamaeroa

Mareikura Estate

Haami

4668

Rosina

Martin-Mason

8403 8404

Howard Lester Te Hira F

Haami

3167

Hoeroa Bailey

Marumaru Estate

17690

Neil Hohepa

Haddon Whanau Trust

17181

Paul Stewart

Marumaru

5551

Charles

Haira

12613

Tahutahu Potiki

Marumaru

17705

Rangi Hinepua

Hamilton

12562

Ruamatera

Matataiaha Estate

12093

Lester

Harris

3073

Gladys Rawinia

Matoe

11236

Ngawai Motete

Hartley

2799

Bevan Ross

McDonnell

12310

Gordon Ruha

Haunui

2873

Ellen Raukura

McDonnell

17903

Puhinga

Herewini

11544

Patrick Colin

McDonogh

12491

Paul Eria

Himaki

5846

John Nicholas

McMullan

7297

Rihara Tamaikumu

Hina

5878

Fachtna Michael

McSweeney

2808

Elizabeth

Hopkins

17555

Rana Phyllis

Melvin

18267

Carl Richard

Houra Whanau Trust

10243

Tamatea Tom

Menehira

Huna Estate

11847

Matakaurihau

Mere

10221

32

3323

Taita

Hunia Estate

12089

Ngaurupa

Mere

4984

John Henry Colebourne

Jury (deceased)

12870

Waewae

Mere

7057

Thomas

Jury

3183

Hohipera

Metekingi

11930

John Riwai

Kanui Estate

17634

Judy

Mildwater

17302

Mereana

Kapea

12204

Paul

Motu

4125

Jack

Karauria

3326

John

Murray

12599

Ruanui Wharepouri

Karipa

12145

Paetaha

Nepia

4718

Danny

Kelly Estate

11662

Koha

Ngahuia

2754

Sonny

Kerei Estate

11937

Meretini

Ngakuru

4876

Atamira

Kerei

20260

Apirana Turupa Maihi

Ngata

12745

Teri

Kereopa Estate

8875

Moana

Nicholson

12687

Tihoni

Kereru

9624

Moira

Nock

4239

Tauri

King

8997

Hinerau

Paetaha Estate

TOITĹŞ TE TANGATA


Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

11681

Koroneho

Pakatua

6197

Ria

Taiwhati

10988

Aokehu

Paki

3299

James Wilson

Takarangi

2862

Edward Albert

Paraone Estate

5047

Urutahi

Tamaka Estate

11708

Leo

Parata Estate

12425

Rapera

Tamehana Estate

4400

Rakera Marie

Park

17237

Mangu and Tirita

Tamou Whanau Trust

6331

Zita Ripeka

Patu

4419

Rangi

Tanoa Estate

11785

Manu

Pekamu

8309

Dorothy Polly Paretauhinga

Tanoa-LeGros Whanau Trust

5896

Peter

Pekamu

10212

Richard

Te Huna

5347

Mangu

Peneta

14581

Richard

Te Ture

7298

Hine Mihi

Petera

20558

Queenie Hoera

Te Ture Whanau Trust

10631

Phillippa

Pikimaui

3567

Claudine

Te Weehi

4814

Tapuae

Piripi Estate

11316

Hera

TeAra

12128

One

Pohio

12478

Retihia

TeAwheto

5435

Andrew

Porana(Decd)

11435

Matthew

TeHuia

11736

Maata

Potaka

4327

Pomare

TeHuna Estate

11883

Matiu

Potaka

12843

Tuturi

TeHura

3845

Mihi

Pratt

11379

Hira

Teo

5088

Hori John

Pukehika

9939

Pukeke

TeTaipu Estate

12712

Teori

Rahira

12464

Reimana

Tete

5013

Tutahanga

Rangiao

7293

Major

TeTure

18919

Edward Crombie

Ranginui

7292

Rakai

TeTure

9912

Poihipi

Rangirangi

7290

Rangitu Charlie

TeTure

11446

Te Huinga

Rangiuia

12327

Puti

TeUrutahi

11161

Epedemic Mangumangu

Rauhina Estate

12015

Mutu

TeWaati

7932

Pani TeMihinoa

Raureti

5051

Peggy Miriama

TeWaati

4488

Raukura

Rego

4973

Tuhi

TeWhiti Estate

12443

Rawinia

Rehu

5042

Urianga Wiremu

Toitaha

5580

Ngapera Isobel

Reihana

5328

Dennis Michael

Tonga

7824

Elizabeth

Rerekura

18035

Tyler-Tauri

Trust

12086

Ngauira

Reti

9587

Losi

Tuaolii Estate

16523

Patrick

Rikihana

4166

Pollyanne

Tunga Estate

18906

Henry

Roach

11433

Alice

Turanga

3053

Herbert

Robertson

2670

Albert Victor

Waetford

5875

Oneheke Kauirangi

Ropata

10990

Tracey Ani

Wairau

9271

Karewai Huna

Ryan

12626

Taituha

Waitere

12846

Henry

Samuels Estate

3453

Kawai

Wallace Estate

5133

Patricia Kaye

Schicker

10352

Te Tohe Victor

Wallace

2678

Alice Jean

Shute

5942

Ann Marie

Walton

3020

Helen May

Skelton

13682

Tahana Campbell

Waretini Estate

18111

Mark Karihi

Smith

14345

Panico Frances

Waretini

3338

Hepetema Eru

Stoupe

4107

Te Otinga George

Waretini

5085

Waipurukamu

Stringer

13332

Mark Anthony

Whetu

11912

Mere Hori

Taha

12911

Tony Tohungia

Whetu

8418

Te Rakei Hiko

Tahana

4507

Rawinia

WiKeepa

2788

Beatrice Valma

Tahau

5567

George Henry

Wilson

4355

Pumipi Rangi

Tahuparae

11167

Erana

Wire

12625

Taitema

Taiaroa Estate

17657

Albert Garthrus

Wiremu

6275

Miles Medley

Taiaroa(Deceased)

TOITĹŞ TE TANGATA

33


-WHANG A

AT I

I NU

U HA

IN

CO

RPORATI

ON

Toi tu te whenua 16 Bell Street, Whanganui 4500, New Zealand Postal Address PO Box 4035 Whanganui 4541 New Zealand © ATIHAU-WHANGANUI INCORPORATION 2017

AWHI Magazine - Issue 6  

Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation magazine. In this issue we meet Ātihau shepherd and Ahuwhenua finalist for the Young Māori Farmer Award 2017,...