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ISSUE 04

ĀTIHAU WHANGANUI INC. MAGAZINE

WHIRINGA-Ā-NUKU 2016

AWHI

SHAPING THE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR PROGRAMME

Francene Wineti

MAI I AOTEA KI ĀTIHAU WHANGANUI TOITŪ TE MANA

Ātihau working with NZM

TOITŪ TE WHENUA

AWHI Dairy Update

TOITŪ TE TANGATA

Te Āti Hau Trust Grant Applications


Helping grow the country

Proud to partner AWHI and share your vision Toitu te whenua, Toitu te tangata, Toitu te mana Productive land - Prosperous people - Happy customers At PGG Wrightson we do our part each day in helping grow the country. We work with customers across New Zealand to source the right products and services. Our focus is on leading thinking to enable customers to concentrate on growing their business on a profitable and sustainable basis.

Freephone 0800 36 77 44 www.pggwrightson.co.nz

> > > > >

Rural Supplies Fruitfed Supplies Finance Insurance Real Estate

> > > > >

Livestock Wool Water Seed and Grain Training


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CONTENTS

ISSUE 4 / 2016

TOITŪ TE MANA

TOITŪ TE WHENUA

TOITŪ TE TANGATA

3 2016 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING REVIEW

17 PROGRESS AT AWHI DAIRY New shed improvements

4 SHAPING THE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR PROGRAMME Profiling Francene Wineti

20 USING TECHNOLOGY TO GET THE MOST OUT OF OUR FARMS

9 ĀTIHAU AND NZM WORKING TOGETHER Building international market opportunities

22 PROTECTING WATERWAYS

28 PROCESSING OF EDUCATION GRANT/ SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS AWHI staff give insights into what it takes to be a successful grant applicant

11  MAI I AOTEA KI ĀTIHAU WHANGANUI The history of the first resumptions made by the incorporation

23 AWHIWHENUA CADETS The on-farm training course continues to grow the future workforce

31 MISSING SHAREHOLDERS Can you help us update our shareholder register?

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AWHI ĀTIHAU WHANGANUI INC. MAGAZINE

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EDITOR’S PĀNUI AWHI MAGAZINE Editor Mavis Mullins Deputy Editor Amokura Panoho Creative Director Sheree Anaru Photography Quentin Bedwell Graphic Design Dave Pope

ĀTIHAU WHANGANUI INCORPORATION Postal PO Box 4035, Whanganui 4541 Physical 16 Bell Street, Whanganui 4500 Ohakune 22 Ayr Street, Ohakune 4625 Telephone +64 (6) 348 7213 Fax +64 (6) 348 7482 Email office@atihau.com www.atihau.com

ISTUDIOS MULTIMEDIA LTD Postal PO Box 8383, New Plymouth 4342 Phyisical 77B Devon Street East, New Plymouth 4310 Telephone +64 (6) 758 1863 Email info@istudios.co.nz www.istudios.co.nz

Tēnā koutou With only two issues of AWHI a year we find it an interesting process to know what stories we should present to ensure we give shareholders a good overview of the incorporation and Te Āti Hau Trust business. This issue we profile our Associate Director Francene Wineti to represent our aspirations for future leadership alongside an in-depth feature related to resuming control of our land and the cultural history we have a responsibility to maintain. We also report on improvements at our dairy unit, the new technology we use in our organisation alongside our growing relationships in international markets, and the continuing positive outcomes of the Awhiwhenua training programme, to reflect our growing capacity for future growth.

COVER PHOTO

However the one major constraint we continue to face alongside of many other Māori incorporations continues to be the growing number of missing shareholders. We have been listening to your concerns, so at our forthcoming AGM we will be promoting this issue and your support would be appreciated. Hei konei rā Mavis Mullins Chairperson

Francene Wineti is proud to be at the board table.

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NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING 2016

H U-W ANGA

AT I

I NU

ĀTIHAU WHANGANUI INCORPORATION

HA

IN

CO

RPORATI

ON

Toi tu te whenua

Notice is hereby given that the Annual General Meeting of shareholders of the Ātihau-Whanganui Incorporation will be held at the Wanganui Racecourse, Purnell Street, Whanganui on Friday 2nd of December 2016 commencing at 8.30 am.

INTERIM AGENDA 1

Karakia

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Mihimihi

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Apologies - written

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Committee of Management

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Committee of Management Report

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CEO Report

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Financial Report

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Dividend

To adopt the recommendation of the Committee of Management: That a dividend of 55 cents a share be paid in December 2016 pursuant to section 259 (1) (c) of Te Ture Whenua Maori Act 1993.

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Appointment of Auditors

Sewell & Wilson are automatically re-appointed pursuant to section 277(2) of Te Ture Whenua Maori Act 1993.

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Appointment of Share Valuer

To appoint Balance Chartered Accountants Limited as Share Valuer.

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Kaumatua Grant

To approve a Kaumatua grant of $100 to kaumatua for travel costs associated with the Annual General Meeting.

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Te Āti Hau Trust Grant

To authorise a grant to Te Ati Hau Trust of $380,000 for the 2016/2017 financial year for its charitable purposes.

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Minutes

4th December 2015 AGM.

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Te Āti Hau Trust Report

Te Āti Hau Trust Chairpersons report.

VOTING PROCEDURAL NOTES Shareholders may exercise their right to vote on all or any matters to be voted on at a meeting in a number of ways, as set out below. Postal Voting Shareholders may cast a postal vote by completing and sending the Postal Voting Form (included in the Annual Report) to the Secretary. Postal Votes must reach the Secretary no later than 8.30 am on Wednesday 30 November 2016. Immediately after the closing time for the receipt of Postal Votes, the Secretary shall count the number of shareholders voting and the number of votes cast in favour of, and against, each resolution. A certificate attesting that this has been done shall be made available to the Chairman of the meeting.

To fill 3 vacancies: Mavis Mullins, Whatarangi Peehi-Murphy and Jim Edmonds have retired by rotation and seek re-election. Nominations close on Friday 30th September 2016 and candidate details will be included in the Annual Report.

Voting at the Meeting For resolutions on which postal votes have been cast, the Chairman may choose to call for a vote on shareholding at the meeting for these resolutions. A vote on shareholding must also be held if not less than five persons present in person at the meeting, and having the right to vote, so demand. A shareholder who has sent in a Postal Vote on a resolution by the due date may not also vote at the meeting. For a vote on shareholding at the meeting, the Voting Form included in the Annual Report will be used. Completed Voting Forms will be scrutinised to determine whether shareholders have earlier exercised their right to vote via Postal Voting. The Secretary shall count the number of votes cast in favour of, and against, each resolution.

The votes cast at the meeting shall be combined with the Postal Votes to give the final result. For all other matters to be voted on, voting shall be by a show of hands. Proxies: The Constitution permits shareholders who are unable to attend the meeting to appoint a proxy. Forms for appointing a proxy are included in the Annual Report. No person shall vote as attorney or proxy at the meeting unless a copy of the power of attorney, or notice of appointment of proxy properly completed, is lodged at the office of the Incorporation no later than 8.30 am on Wednesday 30 November 2016.

IF YOU ARE ATTENDING THE MEETING PLEASE BRING ALL PAPERS IN THE ANNUAL REPORT WITH YOU

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SHAPING THE ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR PROGRAMME

Learning Japanese is just one of the many skills Francene Wineti has acquired on her career path to date. Nick Maybury reports for AWHI on how Francene’s diverse background brought her to Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation’s board table, as part of a broader succession plan.

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Image supplied by Aaron Smale.


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t’s nose-to-tail on State Highway 1 out of Wellington as Ātihau Associate Director Francene Wineti heads to Ōhākune for some family snow-time. Francene takes time out from the traffic jam to speak with me on her cell phone while her partner, Pereri Hathaway, handles driving duties. The couple’s nearly four-year-old daughter, Te Paea, takes care of chattering duties in the back seat as Francene tells me the story, so far, of a very busy 36 years. Francene Yvette Georgina Avery Wineti (she says her parents were indecisive in the naming process!) was excited when she heard about

the Ātihau associate director programme. After assuming her late father’s Māori land interests ( John Wineti was an Ātihau shareholder from Koriniti), Francene had developed a desire to play a leading role in the organisation. “The associate director programme really grabbed my attention,” says Francene, who is also a director of Whanganui Iwi Fisheries Limited. “I knew that I wanted to be more than just a shareholder and to use my skills to help grow the incorporation.” “I started last October so I’ve pretty much done my first year.

I want to help shape up the associate director programme and get more shareholders engaged in what Ātihau do [sic].” “It’d be great to see more people putting their hands up for the associate director programme. It’s good to have diversity, fresh thinking and new ideas being thrown around the table.” Raised in Tauranga, Francene’s education and career to date have taken her to Vanuatu, Australia, Japan, Brussels, Washington DC, as well as a number of places in New Zealand. For the last two years she has been the Māori Business & Relationship Manager at Callaghan TOITŪ TE MANA

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Image supplied by Aaron Smale.

Innovation, a government agency supporting hi-tech businesses in New Zealand. Her role is to help Māori businesses, entrepreneurs and iwi access innovation services and take advantage of the latest technology and new inventions, with the ultimate goal of commercialising leading-edge ideas and new products. Francene travels a lot in her job, meeting clients in the Whanganui and Manawatū regions, as well as, Auckland, Taranaki and parts of the South Island. “We also provide grants to incentivise businesses into doing more research and development,” says Francene, who secured the Callaghan Innovation job in characteristically proactive fashion.” “I had become interested in working in the innovation system and knew that Callaghan Innovation would be a great place for me. So I walked 6

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up to the General Manager Māori Economy when I spotted him at the gym one day and introduced myself.” “The funny thing was that he’d already heard about me and had been told he should arrange to meet me for coffee. He took my approaching him as a sign and a short while later he offered me a role in the organisation.” “There was no job ad, or application form. It was a great example of the general Māori model of recruitment, being via recommendation.” The trigger for the recommendation had likely come during Francene’s eight-year stint as Policy Analyst - Aquaculture & Fisheries at Te Ohu Kaimoana, working to advance Māori interests in the marine environment, including customary commercial fisheries, aquaculture and providing policy and fisheries management advice

and recommendations to iwi and the wider Māori community. It was during this period in her career that Francene began a Masters in Business Administration (which she completed last year) and gave birth to her daughter. Francene acknowledges this as a significant time in her life given that she and Pereri had lost their first child, Te Awaariki, who passed away shortly after his birth in 2011. Francene’s role at Te Ohu Kaimoana was the result of a keen interest in sea life that began during a high school trip in the late 1990s. She fondly recalls: “We went up to Leigh Marine Reserve at Goat Island north of Auckland, and I remember being completely captivated by the teeming marine life during a snorkelling session.” Her mother’s death during Francene’s 7th-form year led to her being fostered by neighbours and


Image supplied by Callaghan Innovation

Francene applies her knowledge of the Primary Sector across her many roles.

missing out on University Entrance. Despite such significant loss and upheaval in her life, Francene went on to achieve a Diploma in Marine Studies from Bay of Plenty Polytechnic before securing a scholarship from Te Ohu Kaimoana (then the Treaty of Waitangi Fisheries Commission) to do a Masters Degree in Aquaculture at Deakin University in Melbourne. During her time in Victoria, Francene realised that she wanted to specialise in fish farming and came home to start work in Blenheim as a fish health performance scientist for New Zealand King Salmon. “‘I had to make sure the stocks were healthy and we were getting the best growth rates,” says Francene. “I worked and traversed across the company – from hatchery to processing. It was a great learning experience for me.” One great learning experience led

to another when, after two years with New Zealand King Salmon, Francene won a Te Ohu Kaimoana scholarship, providing international fisheries and aquaculture business training in Japan. She prepared diligently for her year in Japan, spending 20 hours-a-week learning Japanese for four months before leaving New Zealand.

“I really want to help grow our

“I absolutely loved being immersed in a different culture and learning how they do business,” says Francene.” At the end of the scholarship there was a graduation – Te Ohu Kaimoana came over to Japan and I had to deliver an hourlong presentation.

members – I feel privileged to sit

”It was probably the best presentation I have ever delivered, mainly because it was entirely in Japanese.” Looking forward, Francene believes she has much to offer the Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation.

people and get them thriving,” she says. “I want to connect more into Whanganui and this is an ideal way to do that. It’s an amazing opportunity to work and be mentored by the other board with these people and learn from their experiences.” “My role on the board is about giving back, after having received so much support from many people, including Whanganui kaumātua like John Maihi, Archie Taiaroa, Ben Pōtaka Snr and Uncle Niko Tangaroa – whānau from the river that have been significant in supporting my career and my personal development.” TOITŪ TE MANA

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Trusted partner of Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation for the safe and secure movement of stock. He mea whakamana te mahi ki te taha o Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation.

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TOITŪ TERailway MANA Road, Raetihi - 0800 385 4248


ĀTIHAU AND NZM WORKING TOGETHER

Tawanui Station

NZ Merino (NZM) have been working with Ātihau Wanganui incorporation for the last two years. NZM reports on what this relationship looks like.

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trong wool today is confronting the same issues fine wool faced 20 years ago. Generations have been educated out of wool as it has been replaced by sophisticated synthetic offerings. Yet, when we overlay global trends in end-user preferences: natural products; health and wellbeing; safety; verification of origin; connection with producers; and environmental integrity, wool clearly aligns with the modern mindset. We now have a great opportunity to reinvigorate a natural revolution. The market approach NZM is taking in partnership with Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation is similar to that employed in fine wool; select the leaders in existing market categories, in addition to identifying new uses for fibre based on a deep

understanding of how affluent endusers make their choices. Premium niche contracts have been secured with indoor shoe brand, Glerups (of Denmark), Best Wool (of Holland), US-based Dixie Carpets and Australian brand, Prestige Carpets. We are working with these brands to develop their wool value propositions in market. One thing is clear today: people connect with people. Brands are looking for emotional stories that their end-users engage with. We’ve seen it in food; we’re driving it in fibre. What does this mean? You’ll be the rock stars of the stories we take to market. As in apparel, the person on the shop floor is the gatekeeper to a

sale. Much effort has been applied to engaging sales teams in the ZQ Premium Wool story. Mavis Mullins supported the NZM team in re-igniting the appreciation of wool among Dixie Carpets’ flooring retailers on the West Coast of the USA recently. Much of our discussion around transforming the value of wool is centred around the question,,“Are floor coverings the highest value application for our wool?” Case in point is the partnership with Glerups. Jesper Glerup Kristensen of Glerups feels that, “Contracting wool gives us the rest to concentrate on our business instead of looking out for currency rates every second day and never knowing our costs.” TOITŪ TE MANA

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Images supplied by NZ Merino.

“The beauty of this is that it works both ways for the farmers too. And it works perfect in our production— NZM puts a lot of work in supplying us the right quality continually, season to season.” Ātihau Whanganui’s Tawanui farm hosted Jesper and co-owner, Allan Timm, helping them understand the people and places behind their wool. The partnership between Ātihau Whanganui and NZM is bolstered by the “Wool Unleashed (W3)” collaboration between NZM and the Ministry for Primary Industries. W3 is a seven-year, $22.1 million Primary Growth Partnership programme led by NZM that sets out to shift the dial for strong wool. W3 has been designed to:

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• Protect and enhance our industry’s social licence to operate; • Address the question of how to add value in the existing market space, and; • Develop new users and uses beyond carpets. Better connection between endusers, brands, value chains and growers is critical to success. This type of connection enables real market signals to guide fitfor-purpose production systems, education and talent development, genetic investment in productivity and brings traceability. On-farm we will be working with you to a) produce fibre fit for the contract opportunities that we have, and b) to optimise the value

of every farm’s wool clip through preparation. We understand that without clear market signals there has been little incentive to invest time in wool preparation. Our hope is that the transformation from commodity sales to long-term brand partnerships that result in stable and sustainably priced contracts will bolster pride in your wool clip, and ultimately ensure it is a credible contributor to Ātihau Whanganui’s farming business. Above: Denmark shoe brand Glerups visit Farm Manager Steve Tapa and CEO Andrew Beijeman at Tawanui Station. Below left: Glerups team at Ngā Mōkai Marae. Below right: Chair Mavis Mullins in market with US based Dixie Carpets.


MAI I AOTEA KI ĀTIHAU WHANGANUI

Director Toni Waho continues our series on the history of the Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation. In this article he talks about some of the first resumptions made by the incorporation

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tarting when the 1900 Māori Lands Administration Act was passed and the “mōrehu whenua” comprising just over 40,000 hectares (101,000 acres) was vested in the Aotea Māori Land Board, and then Council. Labelled the Aotea Vested Lands and sometimes referred to as the Ohotu Leases, by 1907 virtually all the land was leased. The Aotea Vested Lands would eventually become owned and administered by the Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation. In 1953 some of the Morikaunui lands were amalgamated and the Morikaunui Incorporation became our first Whanganui Māori land incorporation when it was formed in 1955, with the Whanganui Trust being established 10 years later. The Morikaunui committee of management not only cared for the land under its mantle, its leaders acted to ensure the Aotea Vested Lands would remain intact. They lead the charge through submissions to Parliament, a Royal Commission and through applications to the Māori Land Court and the Māori Trustee. Their efforts resulted in the creation of the Ātihau Whanganui Incoroporation – AWHI. The Morikaunui leadership challenged and tested the vesting and leasing regime resulting in Court of Appeal decisions that clarified the meaning of the unimproved and improved value of the land.

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Former long-serving secretary Lex Moodie explains. “The Land Valuation Court cases to settle the valuation for improvements were very complex and resulted in what became known as ‘The Phantom Trees Case’. This was because the Incorporation’s lawyer held that the native trees that would have been on the land prior to development would, at the day’s market value, be worth more than the value of the improvements made. Unfortunately this concept was too extreme for the court to accept.”

‘E kore e pau ngā mihi ki Morikaunui, he tuakana atawhai nā reira tōna teina ka tupu mai’ The decision to amalgamate the 40 blocks of land that make up AWHI was an easy one for our elders to make in concept. The complexity of the process that had to be followed to bring their vision into effect is mind-boggling. Imagine each of the 40 blocks being subdivided into smaller parcels or lots. There were 326 lots. From 1900 to 1907 the Aotea Māori Land Board/Council determined which lots would be grouped together to make up an area to be leased. Over time those groupings of lots formed farms that were named after historical land features or the original leaseholder. When AWHI was formed, the first

committee of management had the responsibility to oversee the entire 40,000 hectares most of which was leased except for the block known as Ohorea. Each leased area with its respective lots remained under the Māori Trustee leasing arrangement that was in place at the time of incorporation. The rents were now paid directly to AWHI. While the committee of management could decide to renew a lease and allow the leaseholder to remain on the land, their hope was that they would resume the land and farm the area under its governance and administration. Resumption was the vision that drove our elders to form AWHI. Resumption required the committee to pay the lessee compensation for the improvements made on the land. A lot of work had been done in the years preceding AWHI’s establishment. In 1965, an Advisory Committee worked alongside the Māori Trustee who was legally charged with administering the Aotea Vested Lands. Through their experience, the Advisory Committee communicated with owners at hui and tangi. Over five years they navigated their way through the legal quagmire. On 12 July 1969, 700 of our people gathered at the Whanganui Opera House. The Māori Trustee and Advisory Committee had


Map from AWHI archives

was able to show the Māori Land Court that in passing the resolution to incorporate unanimously, the vote represented a total of 623,145, or 49.6% of the shareholding of the proposed Incorporation. On 11 November 1969, the Aotea Māori Land Court, Judge Davis presiding, made an order immediately setting up the Ātihau Whanganui Block under the incorporation provisions of the Māori Affairs Ammendment Act 1967. The Court appointed the first management committee: W.R. Mete-Kīngi, H.K. Hīpango, H. Amohia, M. Gray, R. Peehi, N. Bates and H. Marumaru; Te Rangitākuku becoming the first chairman at the committee’s first meeting.

The committee of management had its attention diverted by an application from the King Country Electric Power Board to create a power-generating dam on AWHI lands. The project did not proceed – another story for another time. Another activity beyond farming was the negotiation of timber felling which provided a lucrative stream of funds.

Below: Ātihau-Whanganui Block, Committee of Management (1970) were (back row, l-r) N. Bates, R, Peehi (front row, l-r) M.Gray, H.B. Marumaru, H.K Hipango, W.R. Mete-Kingi (Chair), H. Amohia, J. Lloyd (Secretary). Bottom: Ohorea; the first area farmed by Ātihau-Whanganui.

calculated how each owner’s acreage would convert to shares in the proposed new Ātihau Whangaui Incorporation. In total, the AWHI lands were owned by 4000 individuals. It was later shown to the Māori Land Court that their ownership would be converted to 1,256,529 shares. Of the 700 in attendance, 400 were owners representing 327,707 shares. 341 absent owners had sent their proxies representing 295,449 shares. While the Incorporation was not formally in place the Advisory Committee

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Ohorea The Māori Trustee and Advisory Committee worked together from 1965 until 1970 to oversee the farming on the area known as Ohorea (also known as the Wright and Forsyth properties). The Māori Trustee had resumed this 4000-acre area of Ohotu 1C2 between 1958 and 1960 and advanced $272,000 at 5.5% interest, secured by a memorial of charge over the whole Ohotu 1C2 block. Ohorea became the committee of management’s first area it farmed, with George Johns as their first manager. The Māori Trustee advance was split as a mortgage for farm development and a sinking fund in the 1971 annual Ohorea accounts to be used to invest for future resumption. Ohorea is located in the heart of the Incorporation and as the first area farmed by our elders of the first committee of management, can be regarded as AWHI’s heart. Had Ohorea not been productive, the committee of management’s plan to grow the area they farmed through resumption would have failed. Thanks to Ohorea, it did not. The Resumption Plan The work the committee of management did to run Ohorea set the tone and pace of how AWHI would proceed. In his first report to shareholders in 1970, Te Rangitākuku announced the committee’s plan to resume 4000 acres in the Ōruakukuru valley known as the McGregor and Malpas properties. The work on those resumptions commenced in 1970 with a sub-committee investigating “the benefit of the resumption of the properties in 1975 and the purchase of a fattening farm having regards to the possibility of Britain entering the European Common Market and any other contingencies and report to the next meeting.” A report which appears to have been written by Te Rangitākuku in the 14

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incorporation’s archives indicates the direction in which the committee would head to achieve the resumption of the leased land to be farmed under its control: “The Resumption Reserve would include: (1) 35% Ohorea Profits (2) 50% Rents (3) 5/6 Miscellaneous” Lex Moodie recalls, “It was intended that each resumed property should be able to service its own debt so that future resumptions would not be compromised.” Gaining control of the leased lands to be farmed by the committee was not the sole concern. “Our thoughts for the people must include the provision for the preservation of those parts of Māori culture and other pursuits that can be salvaged, and in this regard our support should be given to the work carried out by the Whanganui Trust in support of the activities of our people in cultural and education pursuits.” It is important in understanding why AWHI was formed − that regaining control of our land was seen as the means by which our people could be helped to preserve our culture and be helped in the pursuit of education.

Resumption would become a fine art. In the years between 1900 and 1970, leaseholders tried to have the lands passed to their ownership. In some cases they were ferocious in their attempts − including approaches to Parliament and opposing the establishment of AWHI. Imagine, then, how the leaseholders who resided on our land were feeling when the land moved out of the Crown’s control through the Māori Trustee to the AWHI committee of management. Of course not all leaseholders opposed what our elders were trying to do. Te Rangitākuku advised the committee “...that direct informal talks (with leaseholders) will get further than lengthy formal letter writing. Having done this, I am sure we will reduce any tensions that may exist among our tenants on our resumption plans.” So, in 1970 the committee of management resolved that negotiations be commenced to resume the McGregor and Malpas leases in 1975. In 1971 they decided to add the Wilson’s property and approach the Māori Trustee for a loan of up to $250,000. Valuation reports were received in 1972 and 1973 leading to discussions with lessees. The Wilson’s initial offer to sell was declined. In 1975 the Māori


Trustee approved the loan and from 1975 to 1976 the committee was engaged in negotiations and hearings about the final valuations, upon which compensation to the lessees would be based. In his 1976 report to shareholders Te Rangitākuku said, “We have just completed a very busy year which was notable because of increasing our farming area by nearly 9,000 acres. The resumption of the Wilson, McGregor and Malpas leases was carried out in June 1975 as planned and we moved in to possession on July 1st 1975.” The areas resumed are known as Tawanui and Ōmerei. By this time, R Browning was the manager at Ohorea, K. Rihia managed Tawanui, and P. Roache managed Ōmerei.

Tawanui Named for the large number of Tawa trees, the Ōruakukuru Marae and Tārei whānau have close association with the area as descendants of Te Hā-o-te-Rangi. The skyline from Ōhākune is outlined by the Tawanui bluff. Ōmerei The land is named for the stream that runs through the property. The area is approximately 4,000 acres. Hotohotu ana... From Ohorea – te manawa – to

Tawanui and Ōmerei, 13,000 of the 100,000-acre original Ohotu block came under the care of the committee of management’s governance. The name of the block is a memorial to one of our principal ancestors, Tai-te-Āriki, whose death at Te Roro o Tai-te-Āriki at the summit of the desert road, rebounded through our iwi, and so, te hotuhotutanga i te matenga o Tai-te-Āriki – the sobbing at the death of Tai-te-Āriki. He is the ancestor of Tūtapu, a mokopuna of Paerangi. It is through Tūtapu and his descendants we connect to Ohotu and AWHI.

The Ohorea farm is dissected by the Mangawhero River. The Tuhi Āriki marae is located to the south next to Ohorea. The Te Wiki whānau have maintained their ahi kā there. Opposite from the Ohorea homestead is the ahi kā of the Waara whānau.

Right: Map by Jacob Robinson Below Left: Tawanui Below Right: Ōmerei

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Shareholder Survey Results In the last Issue of AWHI and through an online form, Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation put forward a survey for shareholders to provide their views and to help guide some of the strategic issues facing the incorporation. 46 responded to the survey, mostly via post. This is the summary of the findings. Congratulations to Lance Douglas Te Patu, who won an Apple iPad for participating in the survey. SHAREHOLDER COMMUNICATION

INVESTMENT STRATEGY

The majority of shareholders wanted to receive information quarterly or half yearly, they knew what was going on in Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation but would like to know more. The AWHI magazine was by far the most popular way shareholders received and wanted to continue to receive information and as a paper copy along with the Annual report. The website and Facebook were less popular although were requested by some shareholders, along with a live-stream of the AGM. Some asked for clearer financial information.

Views were split on how profits at the end of the year should be used. Reinvestment of profit to make more money for future generations was the most popular selection, followed by the repayment of debt. Interestingly, most participants in the survey supported a reduced dividend payment to support re-investment and debt repayment strategies.

CONNECTION TO THE WHENUA

OVERALL PERFORMANCE

Most people felt connected to the land and would still like access more often to connect with Wāhi Tapu and for the collection of Kai. Collecting fibres for weaving was less important.

Shareholders were very positive about AWHI’s strategy focusing on diversification, production, value and shareholder connection and in the performance of management.

“love taking whānau, mokopuna on the land to share the privilege of being able to enjoy wāhi tapu. Also like to see the progress being made to the stock and land rather than reading about it. It gives me great joy to see.”

“Keep up with the quality communication, great governance and forward planning” “Excellent job all round”

CONCLUSION Shareholders are confident in the current strategies and management of AWHI. They have good knowledge of what is going on within the incorporation and this is supported through good communication and shareholder engagement. Some other areas of communication via online social media can be developed further to allow better access to information. AWHI magazine will continue in its printed form and we will look at ways to increase shareholder access to land, particularly for visiting Wahi Tāpu.

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PROGRESS AT AWHI DAIRY A lot of positive change has happened at AWHI Dairy over the last two years. CEO Andrew Beijeman reports.

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ilk production has increased over the last two seasons resulting in an increase in milk production. From 192,000 kg MS during the 2013/14 season to 247,000 kg MS in the 2015/16 season, this increase in production TOITĹŞ TE WHENUA

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has not come at the expense of increased costs, which have been maintained at similar levels over the last three seasons. Instead, this increase in performance has come about for a number of reasons, one in particular is a focus on increasing production per cow without sacrificing the amount of grass harvested off the farm. To achieve this, cows must be in good condition before they calve. This allows them to reach their potential milk production and helps get the cow back into calf. Cows are dried off through autumn based on their individual condition and calving date to ensure that each animal reaches the target before calving. This means that a lighter cow with an earlier calving date will stop milking before a cow with that is heavier and has a later calving date. Production has also lifted because there is now more grass on the farm at the start of calving. On

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most dairy farms, cows are eating more grass than is growing from the start of calving through to the middle of spring. If you don’t have enough grass on the farm at the start of calving you may run out of grass before it starts growing faster than the cows are eating it. Having more grass at the start means that this doesn’t happen−allowing cows to be fully fed right through spring and into early summer. This takes a lot of good planning, assisted by a feed budget which is run on the farm throughout the year.

Graham, Lisa and their team on the ground have been a big part of the improvement. They are responsible for making things happen on a daily basis, implementing the farms strategy which they have involvement in creating, along with AWHI’s Business manager and CEO. External advice from consultants and Dairy NZ has also contributed to the improvements.

Cow numbers have also been reduced from a peak of 770 cows down to 690 last season. This means more feed per cow, which translates to more milk. And at the same time we’ve continued with the regressing program that sees 10 percent of the farm regressed annually.

The farm also benefited from entering the Ahuwhenua awards in February 2016. Whilst we didn’t make the finals, being judged made the management team reflect on past performance and consider what could be done to improve things going forward. Entering the competition also gave AWHI access to some pretty smart people, such as Paul Bird (Dairy NZ) and Shay Moon (BNZ) who we wouldn’t normally have access to.

People have played a big part in the improvements at AWHI Dairy.

As we move into another season at AWHI Dairy, there is still more to


be done to improve profitability. During winter we installed an inshed feeding system which will feed cows as they are being milked. This replaces maize silage that used to be fed out in the paddock. The in-shed feeding system has two big advantages over maize silage. First, because the food is fed out in a trough rather than on the ground, less of it is wasted and more of it is eaten, which should translate into more milk in the vat. Secondly, feeding out takes less time through in-shed feeding and the use of a tractor is almost removed. This means lower tractor costs and that staff have more time to focus on other things. The last thing that has changed

this season is that all cows spend the winter in ĹŒhÄ kune rather than being trucked elsewhere. Whilst this means we need to feed them a bit more to keep them warm, it cuts down the cost of transporting the cows around the country, resulting in lower expenses and an increase in overall revenue. This season appears to be even more productive and we look forward to sharing more stories of success in the near future.

Far left: Contract milker Lisa Hicks with her son Andrew.

Left & below: The dairy shed with the new In-Shed feeding system.

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MAKING HARD DECISIONS EASIER

Getting the most out of multiple farms spread across an area the size of Lake Taupo is no easy task, especially when the farms vary so much in altitude, topography, soils and pastures, and when the weather can vary significantly from one year to the next. Welcome to the daily life of AWHI Business Manager Siwan Shaw who relies on technology to help manage her complex workload. Physical Weather stations

the physical weather station.

AWHI owns two remotelymonitored weather stations. These are located at remote sites on Te Pā and Papahaua. They supply live weather information to Siwan through the internet. The information supplied includes rainfall, air and ground temperature and soil moisture levels. Siwan monitors this information, using it to understand how fast or how slow grass is growing and whether this is going to affect production.

Ideally we’d have a lot more physical weather stations but this is just too expensive. Instead we subscribe to a network of virtual climate stations. These stations are located at regular five-kilometre intervals across the country and give estimates of rainfall, air and soil temperature and soil moisture, along with other things based on actual data made at physical weather stations across the country.

Virtual Weather stations Having two physical weather stations is a good first step, but because of the size of the incorporation the weather on one of the farms can be getting significantly different to that being monitored at 20

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The information from virtual weather stations is also accessed via the internet and is interpreted the same way as that from physical stations. Virtual stations provide Siwan with a more complete picture of the weather across AWHI, with a much lower upfront cost than physical weather stations.

Farmax One of the most important tools Siwan uses is Farmax, a computer program which allows her to monitor the performance of farms and forecast whether or not they will have enough grass to feed stock in the future. Siwan updates farmax on a regular basis, inputting data including stock numbers, live weights, crop yields and pasture covers received from farm staff. Forecasts are then made of future animal numbers and production, and pasture growth rates. These forecasts are based on historical information, farm targets and information received from the physical and virtual weather stations. From this information farmax produces a graph indicating whether the farm will have enough grass to carry the forecasted stock numbers over the coming months. Siwan can then make necessary adjustments − either bringing in more stock if a farm has a surplus of grass or


sending stock away if the opposite is true. Because Siwan is updating farmax regularly, if something changes onfarm that has an impact on future pasture conditions, she can react quickly to ensure it doesn’t have a significant impact on production. This is really important through summer when conditions can change so quickly. If things get dry, Farmax allows AWHI to forecast a shortage of grass early and react fast enough to reduce the impact on production. Siwan’s job is a difficult one; with tools such as weather stations (virtual and physical) and farmax her job is made a bit easier – resulting in more consistent performance regardless of the season.

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PROTECTING WATERWAYS AWHI is committed to protecting the environment for future generations. Ensuring that aquatic life is abundant in the waterways that flow through our farms is part of that commitment, reports CE Andrew Beijeman. When livestock have access to water in large numbers they reduce water quality by pugging and eroding the sides of streams and by defecating either directly in or alongside the watercourse. This leads to water which is less suited to supporting aquatic life, for swimming in and for drinking.

conjunction with Horizons Regional Council, just over seven kilometres of fences were constructed alongside the Mangawherawhera Stream. As a result, livestock owned by AWHI are almost completely prevented from accessing this watercourse, with only a few spots remaining to be fenced off in coming years.

An example of AWHI’s commitment to the environment is our protection of waterways flowing into the Whangaehu River. Surface water from Ohotu and the eastern end of Te Pā (formerly Pah Hill) flows into the Whangaehu River either directly or through the Mangawherawhera or Mangaehuehu Stream.

The next step is to finish off the remaining areas of fencing and encourage native trees and shrubs to return to the stream bank. As this happens the stream will become a corridor which native birds use to move from one section of bush to another. Trees and shrubs have other benefits too: they are a source of pollen and honey; they provide shelter to livestock; they reduce erosion; and they trap nutrients before the nutrients run into the stream.

In previous years, the Whangaehu River and Mangaehuehu Stream have been completely fenced off, preventing stock from accessing these waterways. This year, in 22

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AWHI is grateful for the assistance it receives from a number of organisations. This year Horizons Regional Council has contributed to just over 11 kilometres of fencing on both the Mangawherawhera Stream and in the catchment of the Mangawhero River. The Department of Conservation is working with AWHI to protect Kiwi on Ohorea and the Ngā Whenua Rāhui fund has assisted with fencing off bush blocks on Tawanui and Te Pā. In the near future we plan to start monitoring some of the streams that run through AWHI farmland. This will allow us to track the health of streams over time, making sure they can be enjoyed by future generations. More about this in the future.


AWHIWHENUA CADETS

This year’s Awhiwhenua cadets applied for the Land-Based Training (LBT) course after prompting from their mothers who had seen the course on Country Calendar. Dylan Ruki-Fowlie and Wipaki Toku Ratima Te Reimana Paora Pakai, both from Te Ātihaunui-a-Pāpārangi, have now been on the training programme seven months and have adapted well to their new farming environment. The two young men started training in February and have been learning the basics of farming, both in practical settings and in a theoretical classroom environment. TOITŪ TE WHENUA

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A

WHI caught up with the cadets as they worked at Te Pā station, where the majority of their handson farm training is applied. Dylan was driving a tractor feeding out to the beef cattle on Te Pā station, very much at ease operating the machinery and finding that the lifestyle suited him. Having grown up in Raetihi and Whanganui, Dylan, now 20 years old, moved to Auckland after high school, only to return to the central plateau given the hectic Auckland lifestyle was not to his liking. “It is great to be out in the wide spaces not looking at four walls every day. It gives me a sense of freedom,” Dylan says. Being hands-on in the job has appealed to Dylan, learning different skills from driving machinery, stockmanship and learning about different types of grass, just to name a few. He has confidence in his ability and strives to learn everything shown to him. When asked what he saw for himself in the future, he is confident he can improve his new skills and learn

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more about farm management next year. Although not sure what would happen after he graduates, a job in the farming industry is what he plans to achieve and laughs as he says, “I wouldn’t mind managing one of these farms for Ātihau one day.” This is the attitude Ātihau Whanganui has tried to instill in their cadets as they go through their training. In doing so AWHI is adding to the pool of talented Uri whuch could become future employees Travelling to the other side of the station, Wipaki was helping to set up a drench sheep unit in the Ōmerei stockyards with other shepherds. We arrived as Wipaki pulled up on a quad bike with his helmet on, as health and safety is an important part of farm life and students are taught about being conscious of their safety and what an employer may have as part of their health and safety policy. Wipaki is the younger of the two at 19 years of age, and is from Whanganui. Being on a sheep and beef course has been a challenge for

him as his only farming knowledge had been from work experience milking cows on a dairy farm. This continues to be part of his working week as he spends each Friday on a dairy unit in Ōhākune. He explains that some of the course training can be as simple as just knowing where to stand and how to do something the right way in order to make a task easier. Being left-handed has had some drawbacks as learning some skills has meant he has had to use his right hand as the shearing hand-piece used for dagging sheep is made for right-handed people. One of the highlights he has enjoyed is going out on a muster with the shepherd and watching how he and his dogs work together. Unsure of where he might go after the course, whether it is dairy or sheep and beef, Wipaki did know, however, that it would be in farming, and that he would make it his career. Watching him settle into his work drenching, he looked comfortable working as part of the team, going about his job with diligence and purpose.


The practical training is set by Whetu-Marama Mareikura, who is from Land Based Training. Whetu schedules with the farm managers and shepherds to make sure the cadets are gaining the practical skills of farming but are also immersed in farming life. It isn’t only farm work that is taught but also life skills, as cooking and cleaning are an essential part of farm life for the cadets. “You can’t start at 9am in the morning on a farm as the farmer could be on the other side of the station by then, so the cadets have to be ready to go when the farmer is, or when the work needs to be done.” says Whetu.” When asked about Dylan and Wipaki, Whetu said both cadets were going well. “Wipaki was very green when he first started and very shy, but now he Page 23: Dylan shifts the break for beef cattle. Right: Wipaki helps drench ewes. Below: Dylan feeding out to beef cattle.

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is often vocal both in the classroom and on the farm. He has really come out of his shell.” “Although he can sometimes take longer to finish a task, it is often completed very well as he is a good listener and seems to take it all in.” “Dylan is a good all-rounder and very studious and loves the physical stuff. You have to be careful as he asks questions and will try to catch you out,” grins Whetu. “Not all the training is done on the farm and every Wednesday the cadets spend 5 - 6 hours in the classroom at Ngā Mōkai Marae with Derek Priest, who has been a tutor for 20 years, tutoring the Awhi course the past four years.” “When the initial course first started

the cadets were too young and Ātihau needed to cast a wider net to capture people who truly wanted to pursue a farming career,” says Derek.

“This year there has been a real commitment from the cadets and they are a good team that work together.”

Impressed with Dylan from the start, Derek says that when an eye injury caused Dylan to have time off the course he not only kept up with his theory, he absolutely demolished it, completing each paper only to return for more. “It’s not something you would expect from a bloke,” adds Derek.

Derek explained that if, upon completion of the two-year course, the cadets can move onto jobs in farming outside of Ātihau and widen their experience in the industry, then return to Ātihau in the future, they will bring new skills and knowledge back to strengthen the incorporation’s farming business.

Recognising that Wipaki is younger, Derek says he has really grown a lot since he has been on the course. “He has had great personal growth. He loves farming and that’s what he wants to do.”

Awhiwhenua is growing, and in 2017 the course will be offering residential housing for up to six students on Te Pā station − allowing students to increase time training on-farm and learning more life skills.

AWHIWHENUA 2017 6 placements for year 1 students Year One, Level 3 National Certificate of Agriculture The Awhiwhenua agricultural training course is now seeking six applicants to join the 2017 intake.

Do you have a passion for agriculture, a strong work ethic and a give-anything-a-go attitude? Do you want to learn both the theoretical and practical elements of dairy, sheep and beef farming in a supportive environment? Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation has moved our on-farm training programme to a fully residential live-in course. Cadets are based mainly at Te Pā station for practical learning experience (improving the consistency and breadth of practical training) and study with their Land-Based Training tutor at Ngā Mōkai marae.

If you are keen, get in touch with LandBased Training on 0508 TRAIN ME (872 466) or go to www.landbasedtraining.co.nz to find out more information.

Applications close on Monday, 14th

Applicants must be at least 18 years old or over and have passed NCEA Level 2 Maths and English.

Land Based Training

November 2016 and can be emailed to: info@landbasedtraining.co.nz or posted to: PO Box 689 Whanganui

Tel: 0508 TRAIN ME (872 466) or www.landbasedtraining.co.nz

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Tomorrow’s farms are in the hands of today’s young people

Because you’re thinking about a degree in agriculture / horticulture, you know scoring $5000 a year will go a long way to help. To win this scholarship from Atihau Whanganui Incorporation and Ravensdown for 2017, just scan the QR code for an application form or go to ravensdown.co.nz for more details. The winner will also be offered paid holiday work with Ravensdown in a variety of roles to kickstart their career.

Call the Customer Centre on 0800 100 123

Applicants for 2017 academic year must be received by 30 November 2016.

ravensdown.co.nz

Farm with greater certainty

Applicants must be sons or daughters of Atihau Whanganui Incorporation shareholders.

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PROCESSING OF EDUCATION GRANT/ SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS

Frances Te Porana (foreground) and Keri Browning.

T

e Āti Hau Trust is registered as a charitable entity with the NZ Charities Commission. As the charitable arm of Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation we provide grants for a range of purposes. AWHI spoke with Keri Browning who along with Frances Te Porana ensures that applications are ready for the trustees to consider. AWHI also spoke to Paul Maguire, who is the Trust Secretary.

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The Trust offers education grants as well as general grants for community and cultural purposes. Filling in the application form is straightforward, though the process may not be so easy for some. Keri, Frances and Paul offer helpful hints and insights about the application process and content. We hope this helps you and others who wish to submit an application in the future.


“It helps that applicants are eligible to apply to Te Āti Hau Trust because they are a shareholder, or a direct descendent of a current shareholder or shareholding trust,” advises Keri “If the applicant is a shareholder we check the share register to confirm this. However, if they are not a shareholder the applicant will need to get the person from whom they descend, who is an Ātihau-Whanganui shareholder, to verify their relationship. If you are a beneficiary of a trust or estate that holds shares then you need to get a trustee or administrator to confirm you are related.” When you apply for an education grant or scholarship we need information to: • Confirm your acceptance and enrolment in a course of study with a recognised education provider. • Show the course fee has been paid. Usually a receipt or Study Link information would be okay. • Receive a bank deposit slip or bank statement showing your name and bank account number. • Receive your previous year’s academic results. All education grant applicants must submit a copy of their official transcript of results or school report which should be verified by a lawyer, JP, school principal or a member of Te Āti Hau Trust office staff, • Photo (copy of student ID with photo is sufficient) Keri says that “applicants should be careful to include all information because incomplete applications cannot be considered”. In her experience, incomplete applications occur when people do not follow the instructions on the form. After some years, Frances and Keri know that people might forget to send the right information while others rush at the last minute and miss the application closing date. Keri and Frances are not able to forward incomplete applications for the trustees to consider. Frances said they “try their best to assist applicants to provide the right information on time otherwise they set incomplete applications aside in the hope that they can be completed and re-submitted in time for the next round. Frances reckons, “applicants that start early and talk with them sooner usually get it right first time”. Keri says, “Applying for a general grants isn’t that different but the supporting information will be different. There are general grants for marae, kaumātua and other areas as well.” Frances explains, “For general grants the Trust requires details of the budget and the purpose the grant will be

Paul Maguire.

used for. The application form should be read carefully. Keri and I may be able to help applicants to get advice on how to put the application details and costs together.” Keri and Frances know that when applications are completed well the Trustees are ready to finish the approvals process and make good decisions. ” Frances and Keri say once they have checked and registered the complete applications, Paul Maguire, the Trust Secretary arranges the Trust meeting. “Normally I work closely with the Trust Chair, Tiwha Puketapu, to set the agenda and related items,” advises Paul. “I then talk with Frances and Keri to prepare the summary of completed applications for the Trustees attention.” “After the Trustees make their final decisions and the meeting is concluded I arrange for the office to pay the approved grants as soon as possible. I ensure there is a record of total funds distributed for those grants. This record is included in the minutes of the meeting.” Paul says that, “in most years the Trust receives applications for more money than what is available. The Trust tries to ensure all completed applications are supported however the amount received may be less than requested. Paul’s role is to support the Trustees as they work through the summary of applications and decide TOITŪ TE TANGATA

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what to approve and how much to distribute. He believes that Keri’s and Frances’ advice to all applicants about starting early and taking the time to carefully complete the form is right on the mark. Paul says, “If the positive letters thanking and appreciating the Trust for their support is anything to go by then our shareholders, our kaumātua, our marae, our tamariki and mokopuna are pleased that Te Āti Hau Trust is here for them.” “In my role as Trust Secretary I have to also ensure the list of approved grants lines up with what the Trust records in the Annual Report,” explains Paul, “Being able to show who received grants and what for is the level of information the Trust Chair, Tiwha Puketapu, expects to be available at the Annual General Meeting.”

ĀT

Tiwha Puketapu.

I H AU TRU ST

TE

The last word is from the Trust Chair, Tiwha Puketapu, “When you are ready to apply for an education or general grant please take the time to read the application form and related information on the AWHI website. Consider a phone call to Keri or Frances if you get stuck. But, more importantly, start early, read carefully and submit the application before the closure date. All the best.”

0800 480 062

Accounting Scholarship • 1st year accounting scholarship to the value of $1000 per annum for 3 years • In partnership between Te Āti Hau Trust, Balance and Deloitte • Successful applicants will be offered 8 weeks’ work experience Applicants should fill out an Education Grant/Scholarship form located at www.atihau.com/te-ati-hau-trust before the 31st of March

www.atihau.com/te-ati-hau-trust

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MISSING SHAREHOLDERS We’re missing some shareholders and need your help to find them. These shareholders may be missing because:

 hareholder or their whanau are more than welcome to S contact Keri or Frances at the office as follows:

• Shareholder has passed away (and succession has not been done and/or family not aware of the shareholding)

Email: office@atihau.com

• Shareholder has passed away and the family are not ready to arrange succession • Shareholder may not be aware that they are shareholders

Mail: PO Box 4035, Whanganui 4541 Visit us: 16 Bell Street (upstairs), Whanganui Call: 06 348 7213 between 8.30am and 4pm weekdays

• No address for shareholder • No bank account details for shareholder Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

14483

Celia Te Huia

Akapita

2841

Delphina Puteruha

Gilbert

4415

Trevor James

Albert

4892

Thomas Patrick

Gilbert

10375

John

Albert (Deceased)

17311

Francis

Goff

4114

Miriama

Albert Estate

17314

Gerald

Goff

6514

Paul

Amorangi

5128

Leslie

Gray

10976

Anne

Anderson

2869

Elizabeth

Gray

12580

Sally

Anderson

5235

Wiremu

Gray Estate

12628

Taiwhare

Ariiti

10658

William Himiona

Green Estate

19807

Charles Gabriel

Ashford

9535

Merania Whango

Gully

17305

Isaac

Ashford

17308

Les

Haami

17306

Henry

Ashford

8403

Howard Lester Te Hira F

Haami

2720

Anna Anita

Austin

8404

Neil Hohepa

Haami

3929

Na

Baker

17690

Charles

Haddon Whanau Trust

7042

Dorothy May

Beard

5551

Rangi Hinepua

Haira

6728

Raema

Beazley-Waara

17713

Lisa Kirin

Hamilton

3166

Reihana Lei

Bevan

17705

Lester

Hamilton

5829

Mary

Bishop

12093

Ngawai Motete

Harris

6741

Pauline Ngahuia

Borlace

11236

Gordon Ruha

Hartley

4236

Leonard James

Brooks

12320

Pungarehu

Hartley Estate

15056

Wiremu

Broughton Estate

12310

Puhinga

Haunui

8382

Riana Eileen

Bublitz

11112

Dianna Eunice

Hawkins

11052

Boydie Motu TePohu

Bush

11057

Carol

Hazel

2811

Caroline Margaret

Byrne

17903

Paul Eria

Herewini

5810

Aroha

Church

3895

Kevin

Herewini

11577

Kamiria

Clarke

12491

Rihara Tamaikumu

Himaki

10479

Wenerau Rukuwai

Cooper Estate

7297

Elizabeth

Hina

12557

Roy

Donald Estate

7295

Queenie Helen

Hoera

11679

Koromatua Bishop

Edmonds

2808

Carl Richard

Hopkins

12899

Wahinekino

Edmonds

3542

Kurupai

Horomona

14404

Ngarongo Mary

Edmonds Estate

18267

3139

Hirita Ruma

Edwards

10221

Taita

Houra Whanau Trust Huna Estate

5558

Ani Tatara

Edwards

3323

John Henry Colebourne

Hunia Estate

12009

Moti

Eruera

12264

Pikiwai

Hurunui

19806

Patricia Mary

Forrest

10857

Ruiha Patricia

Jackson Estate

7713

Charmaine Tapakura

Fowler

7055

Mereaina

Jury

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31


Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

7057

John Riwai

Jury

5846

John Nicholas

McMullan

4984

Thomas

Jury (deceased)

5878

Fachtna Michael

McSweeney

11930

Mereana

Kanui Estate

17555

Rana Phyllis

Melvin

17302

Jack

Kapea

10243

Tamatea Tom

Menehira

4125

Ruanui Wharepouri

Karauria

11847

Matakaurihau

Mere

12599

Danny

Karipa

12870

Waewae

Mere

4718

Sonny

Kelly Estate

12089

Ngaurupa

Mere

4876

Teri

Kerei

4217

Peeti

Meri

2754

Atamira

Kerei Estate

3183

Hohipera

Metekingi

12745

Tihoni

Kereopa Estate

2857

Violet Edna Daisy

Metekingi Estate

12687

Tauri

Kereru

17634

Judy

Mildwater

4239

Percy

King

11950

Mihi Teira

Miriama

11554

Kahu

Kingi

3697

Martha May

Moka Estate

5301

Tyrone Reo Irirangi

Kingi

12204

Paul

Motu

12817

Tukotahi

Kireona

3326

John

Murray

11314

Hera

Kireona

12145

Paetaha

Nepia

10276

Mary Taria

Kirkwood Estate

11882

Matiu

Nepia

16188

William Te Rangihouhiri

Konui

11662

Koha

Ngahuia

12167

Papa

Konui (Deceased)

11970

Miriama

Ngakati

18992

Hone and Mereana Te Pau

Konui Whanau Trust

11937

Meretini

Ngakuru

4997

Turama

Kopeke

12565

Ruhi

Ngapera

18554

Christine Maud

Kuru

20260

Apirana Turupa Maihi

Ngata

8079

32

Kurukaanga Whanau Trust

11895

Mavis

Niania

3358

Juanita

Lacy

8875

Moana

Nicholson

9457

Marie Daisy

Leerhoff

9624

Moira

Nock

5690

Ani Raukawa

Lemon Estate

10471

Wallace Matthew

Omahuru Estate

12035

Nga Hape A Paratuae Roy

Lomax

18452

Stephanie Rose

Osborne

16464

Erina Tangiwai

Macdonald

8997

Hinerau

Paetaha Estate

9265

Annie

Machin

11681

Koroneho

Pakatua

11916

Mere

Manga

10988

Aokehu

Paki

7886

James

Manukonga

16505

Dave Otene Tangihaere

Paki

8293

Deane

Manunui

11278

Harpua

Paki Estate

8295

Desmond

Manunui

18552

Ivor Robert Anthony

Paranihi

5901

Elizabeth Jane

Manunui

18553

Reginald Howard Mohuia

Paranihi

20467

Jaz Marie Te Ahu Dee's

Manunui

2862

Edward Albert

Paraone Estate

3285

Ruka Terrance

Manunui

11708

Leo

Parata Estate

5261

Sandra Leona

Manunui

4400

Rakera Marie

Park

3688

Albert Gene

Manunui

6331

Zita Ripeka

Patu

4159

Pare Horohanga

Mare Estate

5896

Peter

Pekamu

4158

Pare Horohanga

Mare Estate

11785

Manu

Pekamu

6359

Te Mamaeroa

Mareikura Estate

5347

Mangu

Peneta

4668

Rosina

Martin-Mason

7298

Hine Mihi

Petera

12613

Tahutahu Potiki

Marumaru

3195

Okirangi

Pihopa

3167

Hoeroa Bailey

Marumaru Estate

10631

Phillippa

Pikimaui

12562

Ruamatera

Matataiaha Estate

4814

Tapuae

Piripi Estate

2872

Ellen Isabel

McCarthy

11922

Mere

Piritene

2799

Bevan Ross

McDonnell

12128

One

Pohio

2873

Ellen Raukura

McDonnell

5435

Andrew

Porana(Decd)

12937

John

McDonnell

11736

Maata

Potaka

11544

Patrick Colin

McDonogh

11883

Matiu

Potaka

TOITĹŞ TE TANGATA


Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

Sh ID

First Name

Last Name

3845

Mihi

Pratt

5020

Maehe Ken

Te Waaka

5088

Hori John

Pukehika

3567

Claudine

Te Weehi

12712

Teori

Rahira

11975 Mischima Uru

TeAngina

5013

Tutahanga

Rangiao

11316 Hera

TeAra

18919

Edward Crombie

Ranginui

12478 Retihia

TeAwheto

9912

Poihipi

Rangirangi

11435 Matthew

TeHuia

11351

Hinemata

Rangitauru

4327

TeHuna Estate

11446

Te Huinga

Rangiuia

12843 Tuturi

TeHura

12423

Rania

Rania

11564 Kahuoterangi

TeMoa(Decd)

4120

Caroline Victoria

Rarere

11379 Hira

Teo

11161

Epedemic Mangumangu

Rauhina Estate

9939

TeTaipu Estate

7932

Pani TeMihinoa

Raureti

12464 Reimana

Tete

4488

Raukura

Rego

7290

Rangitu Charlie

TeTure

12443

Rawinia

Rehu

7292

Rakai

TeTure

5580

Ngapera Isobel

Reihana

7293

Major

TeTure

12865

Waaka

Reihana

7294

Peter

TeTure

7824

Elizabeth

Rerekura

12327 Puti

TeUrutahi

12086

Ngauira

Reti

5051

TeWaati

16523

Patrick

Rikihana

12015 Mutu

TeWaati

18906

Henry

Roach

4973

Tuhi

TeWhiti Estate

3053

Herbert

Robertson

5042

Urianga Wiremu

Toitaha

5875

Oneheke Kauirangi

Ropata

5328

Dennis Michael

Tonga

9271

Karewai Huna

Ryan

8530

Matthew David

Tonga Whanau Trust

12846

Henry

Samuels Estate

18035 Tyler-Tauri

Trust

5133

Patricia Kaye

Schicker

8512

Lester

Tuaine (Piripi) Whanau Trust

2678

Alice Jean

Shute

9587

Losi

Tuaolii Estate

3020

Helen May

Skelton

8311

Tuatini-Kerei Whanau Trust

18111

Mark Karihi

Smith

11205 Rachel Rahira

Tukiwaho

3338

Hepetema Eru

Stoupe

4166

Tunga Estate

5085

Waipurukamu

Stringer

11433 Alice

Turanga

11912

Mere Hori

Taha

14474 Antonia Waimatao

Tutaki

8418

Te Rakei Hiko

Tahana

2670

Waetford

2788

Beatrice Valma

Tahau

10990 Tracey Ani

Wairau

4355

Pumipi Rangi

Tahuparae

12626 Taituha

Waitere

6277

Ian Pohe Bosey

Taiaroa

10352 Te Tohe Victor

Wallace

12625

Taitema

Taiaroa Estate

3453

Kawai

Wallace Estate

6275

Miles Medley

Taiaroa(Deceased)

5942

Ann Marie

Walton

12500

Rio

Taipo

4107

Te Otinga George

Waretini

6197

Ria

Taiwhati

7101

Thomas Marcel

Waretini

3299

James Wilson

Takarangi

14345 Panico Frances

Waretini

12718

Terei Hoani Kataka

Takarangi

7749

Waretini

5047

Urutahi

Tamaka Estate

13682 Tahana Campbell

Waretini Estate

12425

Rapera

Tamehana Estate

10687 Atareta Mangumangu

Whakaruru Estate

17237

Mangu and Tirita

Tamou Whanau Trust

12911 Tony Tohungia

Whetu

4419

Rangi

Tanoa Estate

13332 Mark Anthony

Whetu

8309

Dorothy Polly Paretauhinga

Tanoa-LeGros Whanau Trust

4507

Rawinia

WiKeepa

7113

Martin Jnr

Taputoro

5567

George Henry

Wilson

5386

Ida Rahera

Taute

8423

Shane Douglas

Windle

10212

Richard

Te Huna

11167 Erana

Wire

14581

Richard

Te Ture

17657 Albert Garthrus

Wiremu

Pomare

Pukeke

Peggy Miriama

Pollyanne

Albert Victor

Karl Hunt

TOITĹŞ TE TANGATA

33


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I NU

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AWHI Magazine - Issue 4  

Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation magazine. In this issue we profile Associate Director Francene Wineti, provide an in-depth feature about some...

AWHI Magazine - Issue 4  

Ātihau Whanganui Incorporation magazine. In this issue we profile Associate Director Francene Wineti, provide an in-depth feature about some...