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OUR MISSION The mission of our school is to create a dynamic learning environment that inspires each member to achieve black belt excellence through quality training, active goal setting, and character development. OUR SCHOOLS Our schools are a cooperative of likeminded people who come together to promote common “universal” values. We believe that the success of our schools is achieved solely through the growth of the individuals in the schools. OUR STUDENTS AND PARENTS Each student, parent, instructor and staff member shares an equal responsibility for maintaining an environment that will produce students and citizens who are supreme in merit and excellence. OUR BLACK BELTS A Paragon Black Belt is an individual who makes a difference in the world around them. Paragon Black Belts are dedicated to “giving back.” That is why each black belt is charged with some level of leadership responsibility, either within the school or in a leadership role outside the school. OUR STAFF Our staff is dedicated to working to achieve each student’s goals with the martial arts. We endeavor to train students both physically and mentally. THE WAY As in the usual course of life, the more a student puts into his or her martial arts training, the more s/he will gain from the experience.


History


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The History of Taekwondo Taekwondo is an empty-hand combat form that entails the use of the whole body. Tae means "to Kick" or "Smash with the feet," Kwon implies "punching" or "hand or fist," and Do means "way" or "method." Taekwondo thus, is the technique of unarmed combat for self defense that involves the skillful application of techniques that include punching, jumping kicks, blocks, dodges, parrying actions with hands and feet. It is more than a mere physical fighting skill, representing as it does a way of thinking and a pattern of life requiring strict discipline. It is a system of training both the mind and the body in which great emphasis is placed on the development of the trainee's moral character." Taekwondo is a martial art that in "todays" form of self defense has evolved by combining many different styles of martial arts that existed in Korea over the last 2,000 years and some martial arts styles from countries that surround Korea. Taekwondo incorporates the abrupt linear movements of Karate and the flowing, circular patterns of Kung-fu with native kicking techniques. Over fifty typically Chinese circular hand movements can be identified in modern Taekwondo.(1) A few of the earlier martial arts styles that contributed to Taekwondo are: T'ang-su, Taek Kyon, also known as Subak, Tae Kwon, Kwonpup and Tae Kwonpup. There are also influences from Judo, Karate, and Kung-fu. "The earliest records of Taekwondo practice date back to about 50 B.C. During this time, Korea was divided into three kingdoms: Silla, which was founded on the Kyongju plain in 57 B.C.; Koguryo, founded in the Yalu River Valley in 37 B.C.; and Paekche, founded in the southwestern area of the Korean peninsula in 18 B.C.."(2) Tae Kyon ( also called Subak) is considered the earliest known form of Taekwondo. Paintings from this time period have been found on the ceiling of the Muyong-chong, a royal tomb from the Koguryo dynasty. The paintings show unarmed people using techniques that are very similar to the ones used by Taekwondo today. Although Taekwondo first appeared in the Koguryo kingdom, it is the Silla's Hwarang warriors that are credited with the growth and spread of Taekwondo throughout Korea. Silla was the smallest of the three kingdoms and was always under attack by Japanese

Pirates. Silla got help from King Gwanggaeto and his soldiers from the Koguryo kingdom to drive out the pirates. During this time a few select Sillan warriors were given training in Taek Kyon by the early masters from Koguryo. The Taek Kyon trained warriors then became known as the Hwarang. The Hwarang set up a military academy for the sons of royalty in Silla called Hwarang-do, which means "The way of flowering manhood." The Hwarang studied Taek Kyon, history, Confucian Philosophy, ethics, Buddhist Morality, and military tactics. The guiding principles of the Hwarang warriors were loyalty, filial duty, trustworthiness, valor, and justice.(3) The makeup of the Hwarang-do education was based on the Five Codes of Human Conduct written by a Buddhist scholar, fundamental education, Taek Kyon and social skills. Taek Kyon was spread throughout Korea because the Hwarang traveled all around the peninsula to learn about the other regions and people. During the Silla dynasty (A.D. 668 to A.D. 935) Taek Kyon was mostly used as a sport and recreational activity. Taek Kyon's name was changed to Subak and the focus of the art was changed during the Koryo dynasty (A.D. 935 to A.D. 1392). When King Uijong was on the throne from 1147 through 1170, he changed Subak from a system that promotes fitness to primarily a fighting art. The first widely distributed book on Taekwondo was during the Yi dynasty (1397 to 1907). This was the first time that Subak was intended to be taught to the general public, in previous years the knowledge was limited to the military. During the second half of the Yi dynasty, political conflicts and the choice to use debate instead of military action almost lead to the extinction of Subak. The emphasis of the art was changed back to that of recreational and physical fitness. The lack of interest caused Subak as an art, to become fragmented and scarcely practiced throughout the country. In 1909 the Japanese invaded Korea and occupied the country for 36 years. To control Korea's patriotism, the Japanese banned the practice of all military arts, Korean language and even burned all books written in Korea. This ban was responsible for renewed interest in Subak. Many Koreans organized themselves into underground groups and practiced the martial arts in remote Buddhist temples. Other people left Korea to study the martial arts in other countries like China and Japan. In 1943 Judo, Karate and


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"Glory is temporary. Wisdom lasts forever. Train for a deeper understanding of yourself." --- Hee Il Cho Kung-fu were officially introduced to the Korean resi- performance by Korean martial arts masters. He was dents and the martial arts regained popularity. In 1945 especially impressed when Tae Hi Nam broke 13 roof Korea was liberated. In the last few years before liber- tiles with a single punch. After the demonstration Rhee talked with Hong Hi Choi about the martial arts, ation, there were many different variations of Subak/ he then ordered his military chiefs of staff to require Taek Kyon in Korea. This was due to all of the other all Korean soldiers to receive training in the martial martial arts influence on it. arts. This caused a tremendous surge in Taek Kyon The first Taekwondo school (Kwan) was started in schools and students. President Rhee also sent Tae Hi Yong Chun, Seoul, Korea in 1945. Many different Nam to Ft. Benning, Georgia for radio communicaschools were opened from 1945 through 1960. Each school claimed to teach the traditional Korean martial tions training. While there, Tae Hi Nam gave many martial arts demonstrations and received considerable art, but each school emphasized a different aspect of media publicity. Taek Kyon/Subak. This caused different names to During this same time period in Korea, special emerge from each system, some of them were: Soo Bahk Do, Kwon Bop, Kong Soo Do, Tae Soo Do and commando groups of martial arts-trained soldiers were formed to fight against the communist forces of Kang Soo Do. North Korea. One of the most famous special forces The Korean Armed Forces were also formed in was known as the Black Tigers. The Korean war 1945 and in 1946 Second lieutenant Hong Hi Choi ended in 1953. In 1954, General Hong Hi Choi orgabegan teaching Taek Kyon at a Korean military base nized the 29th Infantry on Che Ju Island, off the called Kwang Ju. Americans were first introduced to Taek Kyon when Choi instructed Korean Army troops Korean Coast, as a spearhead and center for Taek Kyon training in the military. and some American soldiers stationed with the 2nd On April 11, 1955 at a conference of Infantry Regiment. Later in 1949 Hong kwan masters, historians, and Taek Kyon Hi Choi attended Ground General The Kukkiwan promoters, most of the kwan masters decidSchool at Ft. Riely near Topeka, Kansas ed to merge their various styles for mutual in the United States. While in the U.S., benefit of all schools. The name "Tae Soo Choi gave public Taek Kyon demonTraditional Taekwondo Do" was accepted by a majority of the kwan strations for the troops. This was the first display of Taek Kyon in America. School in Seoul, Korea masters. Two years later the name was changed again, this time to "Taekwondo." (4) The name was suggested by General Hong The greatest turning point for Korean Hi Choi (who is considered the father of martial arts started in 1952. During the Taekwondo). "Taekwondo" was suggested height of the Korean War, President by Choi because of its resemblance to Taek Syngman Rhee watched a 30 minute


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ing all over the country. During his years in Omaha, Eternal Grand Master Lee wrote the first instructor manual, which was introduced in 1973. This manual provided information and procedures that standardized the inner workings of each ATA school. With the growing number of schools in the ATA, Eternal Grand Master Lee recognized that to help support all the new school owners and to enhance their ability to succeed, business support was going to be very important. In 1978, he introduced the first ATA School Operations Manual and started to provide more professional and complete business support. This support has continued to grow and expand through the years. Through the early years of the ATA, the Chang Hun style of forms (used by the International Taekwondo Federation) was used as part of the curriculum. Even though this style was widely accepted in the Taekwondo community, Eternal Grand Master Lee knew that these forms were strongly influenced Grand Master Heaung Ung Lee and the by the Japanese style of martial arts and did not truly reflect Taekwondo or the strength and beauty of its Sohng Ahm Style of Taekwondo kicking techniques. After much research and input from association seniors, Eternal Grand Master Lee Grand Master H.U. Lee was born in Manchuria, introduced the Songahm style of Taekwondo to the China on July 20, 1936, with his family relocating back to Korea soon after World War II. Beginning his world. It was a very early Saturday morning, August 13, 1983 atop Songahm Mountain in Arkansas that martial arts training in 1953, he received his first Grand Master Lee taught the first group of 300 masdegree black belt in 1954. He graduated ters and instructors Songahm #1 (white from high school and entered the Korean belt), Songahm #2 (orange belt), and Army as a Taekwondo trainer for special Songahm #3 (yellow belt). He continued troops in 1956 retiring from the army to develop and improve the complete curthree years later to open a Taekwondo riculum of Songahm Taekwondo throughschool at Osan Air Force Base. out his life. While teaching at his school on the In 1990, then Master H.U. Lee, tested military base, Eternal Grand Master Lee before his Songahm family for the distinmet and trained American serviceman guished rank of 9th Degree Black Belt. A Richard Reed. When it came time for petition was signed by over 100,000 memReed to return to the states, he invited bers of the ATA for Master Lee to be honEternal Grand Master Lee to join him. ored with the title of Grand Master. The Eternal Grand Master came to the United year of 1990 was significant because it States in 1962, established himself as a marked the completion of the developTaekwondo instructor in Omaha, ment of the 17 Songahm Taekwondo 1979: Hauptman with Nebraska where he and (now) Senior Grand Master H.U. Lee forms that would take a student from Master Reed became partners in a martial White Belt through testing for 9th Degree arts school, and became a U.S. citizen in Black Belt. It had taken Grand Master Lee 20 years to 1973. complete this part of his vision for traditional In 1969, he founded the American Taekwondo Taekwondo. Let it be understood by all that he was Association (ATA). Taekwondo schools began opennot "given" this title, he earned it. Eternal Grand Kyon, and so provides continuity and maintains tradition. Further, it describes both hand and foot techniques. Dissension among the various kwans that did not unify carried on until September 14, 1961. Then by official decree of the new military government, the kwans were ordered to unify into one organization called the Korea Taekwondo Association (KTA), with General Hong Hi Choi elected as its first president. In 1962, the KTA re-examined all the black belt ranks to determine national standards and also in 1962, Taekwondo became one of the official events in the annual National Athletic Meet in Korea. The KTA sent instructors and demonstrations teams all over the world. Jhoon Ree (who is considered the father of American Taekwondo) attended San Marcos Southwest Texas State College, and later taught a Taekwondo course at the college and formed a public Taekwondo club.


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est Humanitarian Award possible, and the President of Master H.U. Lee is now heralded by the world to be the first and only Master in history to acquire the rank the United States, Bill Clinton, sanctioned close advisor, Mayor Jim Dailey, to messenger a personal letter and honor of 9th degree Grand Master under public to the family of ATA at Grand Master Lee's funeral. documentation. The international media recognized his presIn 1988, Grand Master received tigious feats as a human being and his humanithe High Profile Award from tarian efforts. The Korean media has produced Arkansas Business. Through the many shows and full-length documentaries, years he also received other honors including the award winning "Success Story," including Key of the City Awards by KBS on the life and achievements of Grand from Omaha, Nebraska; Corpus Master Lee. In the United States, he made Christi, Texas; Little Rock, Arkansas; appearances on many news programs and talk Evansville, Indiana; Tallahassee, shows including "Live With Regis and Kathy Florida; and Panama City, Florida. Lee!," The Jerry Lee Lewis Show, and ABC's Because of his support of the city of "Good Morning America." His son, L. Taekwon Little Rock with his many civic Lee produced and finished a full hour docuactivities and the impact that the mentary film on Grand Master Lee's life and Songahm Taekwondo World the story of the ATA titled "Today Not Possible, Championships has on this city, the Tomorrow Possible," which has not been Little Rock Convention and Visitor’s released to the public. He is now in the works Bureau presented Eternal Grand of producing a full-length feature film on his Master with the Kaleidoscope Award legendary father. in 1994 and the Crystal Award in After 64 years of humanitarian efforts and 1996. achievements, Grand Master Lee passed away Grand Master Lee was presented on October 5, 2000 after a valiant battle against with the most prestigious Highest cancer. Over 3,000 students and members of his Profile Award of any Korean outside international family gathered in his beloved of Korea by the President of the hometown of Little Rock, Arkansas to wish him Republic of Korea (1996); and was farewell at his beautiful funeral ceremony. the recipient of the Korean Eternal Grand Master Lee is survived by his Broadcasting System’s Cultural wife Mrs. Sun Cha Lee and four children, Promotion Award (1997) which is David, Flora, Lisa, and L. Taekwon. Many valued at approximately $100,000. In Grand Masters of martial arts including Grand November of 1997, Grand Master Master Joon Rhee and Grand Master Bong Soo Lee was named to the Arkansas Han, gathered to pay respect to Eternal Grand Athletic Commission. In 1999, after Master H.U. Lee They formally sanctioned a being a nominee for several years, petition to elevate the Songahm Grand Master the ATA and Grand Master Lee were to 10th degree black belt, Eternal Grand Master, awarded the prestigious Arkansas the highest position attainable outside the phiBusiness of the Year Award by the losophy of Songahm Taekwondo. state of Arkansas. Today not possible, In 1999, Eternal Grand Master Lee acted on his motto, "Today not Tomorrow possible possible, Tomorrow possible," when he escorted a group of instructors to the communist state of North Korea. He is recognized by state officials as being one to help bring peace between the two Koreas. The President of Korea, Dae Jung Kim awarded Grand Master Lee with the high-


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History: Hauptman & The Paragon School System A history of our schools has to begin with the history of Master Hauptman. He started his taekwondo training in Iowa in 1977 under the instruction of Master Robert Jager. Master Jager was one of Grand Master Lee’s first students when he started teaching in Omaha, Nebraska. After earning his 1st Degree Black Belt in 1978, Master Hauptman joined the United States Air Force where he traveled to Eskishehir, Turkey. In Turkey, he trained with the Turkish Taekwondo Federation with a fellow instructor, Jokun Ektifen. He also started a Taekwondo club on the detachment where he was stationed. He and his club students traveled all over Europe competing in open tournaments. The U.S. Air Force awarded him a Commendation Medal for teaching martial arts the Turkish military the martial arts. After his tour of duty in Turkey, Hauptman spent the next three years at the Little Rock Air Force base in Little Rock, Arkansas. He chose this base specifically to train with Grand Master H.U. Lee. During that time, Hauptman trained under the instruction of Master Jee Ho Lee at the original ATA Headquarters. It was at that time that the headquarters moved to its current location. He started the first classes in the new headquarters. Also, during that period, Grand Master Lee and his seniors were in the processor developing the new Song Ahm style. Often times Master Hauptman would be called into Grand Master H.U. Lee’s private workout area to preview the new Song Ahm forms. After a year of working at headquarters, Master Hauptman had an

1984: Hauptman and Jager with Hauptman’s Grand Champion Trophy

1987: Hauptman with Master Robert Jager and Dale Craig

1987: Hauptman with Master Robert Jager and Larry Hoover

1983: Master Hauptman & Master Jee Ho Lee with Hauptman’s Grand Champion Trophy

opportunity to teach at a new school in North Little Rock with one of the nation’s top female masters. Master Tammy Harvey’s school was one of the premier schools in the nation, so he jumped at the opportunity to train and teach there. After two years of intensive training with Master Harvery, Hauptman’s time in the Air Force was up. Although Grand Master H.U. Lee offered to finance a school for him, it was Master Hauptman’s desire to go back and earn his college degree. He moved back to Spencer, Iowa where he assumed teaching responsibilities from Master Jager at his original club. During that time he grew the club to over 100 students and started three new clubs in the area. He continued to stay very close with Grand Master H.U. Lee. During this time Hauptman held many Regional instruction positions for the ATA and competed in national tournaments, eventually earning a National Championship title in 1986. At that time, this title was equivalent to the World Champion title. In 1989 he graduated from Iowa State University with a degree in Mass Communications and moved to Denver, Colorado. In Denver, he pursued an advertising career working as National Director of Adverting for Big O Tires, Inc. international headquarters and as a creative director for Hamilton Sweeney Advertising, one of Denver’s leading advertising agencies at the time. During these years, he opened clubs in Conifer, Colorado. However, his work schedule forced him to close the club. In 1990, Hauptman met his wife while they were co-workers at Big O Tires corporate office. Faun was the company’s Investor Relations and Corporate Communications Director. The two eventually married in June of 1993 in Winter Park, Colorado.


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Bill & Faun Hauptman

World Demo Team Photo

The school system started on November 17, 1994 when the Hauptmans re-opened a martial arts studio located in the Aspen Park Village Center in Conifer. The school held its first testing in December of 1994 and started its first full session in January of 1995 with about 40 students. The school quickly grew to over 200 students. In1995 the Hauptmans converted the Lakewood Club into the Golden school. Ms. Joslyne Giles was the main instructor and it wasn’t long before that school grew to over 100 students. The two schools were thriving and enjoying their “cross-town” rivalry. In 1996, the Golden school was sold to another instructor and the Hauptmans turned their attention to Evergreen. With the help of Jody Horn, they opened a club in a fitness center in Bergen Village. With the addition of an after school program at a local school, the Evergreen club quickly grew to about 50 students. In August of 1999, the club was moved to the Safeway Shopping Center in Evergreen and converted into a commercial school. It wasn’t long until the Evergreen school grew to over 100+ students.

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In 1998 the Conifer school was moved to the Aspen Park Terrace Building to enhance its visibility from Highway 285. Ms. Lura Roberts joined the staff of the Conifer school in 1997 and was an important part of the Conifer school’s success for many years. In 2003 two major changes occurred for Paragon Martial Arts. The first was the renaming of the system to reflect the mission and achievements over the prior eight years. Again setting its sights on West Denver, Paragon opened another club in Lakewood with Mr. R.J. Kern and another club in Bailey with Mr. Jerry Golder. The new Bailey and Lakewood clubs have grown quickly and has enabled Paragon to pursue its mission of creating better future citizens, while providing growth and leadership opportunities for Paragon Black Belts and Instructors. The Paragon system will continue to add clubs in areas where it can enhance and pursue its mission.


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The Paragon School system has hosted five regional tournaments in Conifer with up to 700 competitors. To date, these tournaments are the largest regional event in our region’s history.

1996: Zach Wells, one of the school’s first Black Belts, with Master Hauptman 1996 Zach Wells named Jr. Leader of the Year

1995 Paragon’s First Testing Master Hauptman promoted to 6th Degree Black Belt

Lura Roberts was the first Black Belt in the school to win a National Championship. If fact, she was the first in the ATA to compete and win at a national level. 1998 Lura Roberts and Tim Nice win ATA National Weapons Champ Title

1997 Master Hauptman receives Master’s Title, National Instructor of the Year and position as World Demo Team Coach Jody Horn wins State Olympic Champ and Mile High Karate Grand Champion

2000: Casey Wilkes poses with a trophy. That year he became an ATA National Champion 2000 Jody Horn wins ATA World Champ

1999 Tony Fernandes named Demo Team Coach & Jr. Leader of the Year Jody Horn & Bill Twyford win ATA World Champ

2001 Tony Fernandes & Casey Wilkes and Roy Lang win National Weapons Champ Jody Horn appointed to World Demo Team Joel

Joslye Giles was the first trainee instructor in Conifer Tony Fernandes, Paragon 3rd Degree was Regional Demo Team Coach, Jr. Leader of the Year and is a National Weapons Champion

1997: Master Hauptman performs at the Walt Disney World Event Center with the World Demo Team.

Jody Horn is the only Black Belt in the region to earn Two World Champion titles.

Joel Bass was the only 4th Degree in the region to be appointed to a National Training position in 2001

2003 Lakewood Club opens Bailey Club opens

R.J. Kern was the first Black Belt to open a Paragon Club in the Denver area.


Grand9thMaster H.U. Lee Degree Black Belt 1936 -2001

Senior Master Tammy Harvey-Lamberson 7th Degree Black Belt

Senior Master Robert Jager, 7th Degree Black Belt, has been teaching Taekwondo since 1969. By profession, he is a farmer, however, with Taekwondo as a hobby, he has taught over 5,000 people, and currently has the 2nd largest martial arts lineage in the ATA.

Grand Master Soon Ho Lee 9th Degree Black Belt

Master Jager has been honored with numerous Instructor of the Year titles and is one of the few ATA instructors who has been inducted into the ATA Hall of Fame.

Senior Master Robert Jager

7h Degree Black Belt

Grand Master H.U. Lee, Senior Master Tammy Harvey-Lamberson, and Master Hauptman in 1982. Master Harvey-Lamberson started Taekwondo at age 12 and opened her first full-time commercial school at age 16. She was the ATA’s first female Master Instructor and an inspiration for women martial artists all over the world. In 2001 Senior Master Harvey-Lamberson formed her own organization, United States Traditional Taekwondo. She has schools and instructors around the world. Master Hauptman still considers her as one of his instructors.

Master William Hauptman 6th Degree Black Belt

Mr. Mike Buckingham 5th Degree Black Belt

Ms. Lura Roberts 4th Degree Black Belt

BLACK HILLS, SD

PARAGON CONIFER

Mr. Joel Bass 5th Degree Black Belt

Mr. Tony Collett 4h Degree Black Belt Mr. John Addison 4th Degree Black Belt CASTLE ROCK

STAPLETON Mr. Chet Barnett 4th Degree Black Belt FORT COLLINS

Mr. Jarod Zwingler 3rd Degree Black Belt

Ms. Robin Buckingham 4th Degree Black Belt SPEARFISH, SD HOT SPRINGS, SD

Mr. Mark Reynolds 3th Degree Black Belt BENNETT

PARAGON EVERGREEN

Mr. Wayne Luckert 3rd Degree Black Belt

Mr. Jerry Golder 3rd Degree Black Belt

BREWSTER, KS

PARAGON BAILEY Mr. Kenny Overby 3rd Degree Black Belt

Mr. R.J. Kern 2nd Degree Black Belt

FORT COLLINS

PARAGON LAKEWOOD Your Immediate Instructor

GOODLAND, KS Ms. Christine Zjeda 3rd Degree Black Belt COLBY, KS VICTORIA, KS


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REGIONAL JR. LEADER OF THE YEAR ZACK WELLS 1996

NATIONAL INSTRUCTOR OF THE YEAR WILLIAM HAUPTMAN 1997

WILLIAM HAUPTMAN 1997-2000

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LURA ROBERTS

TIM NICE

1997

1997

SAHNG JEOL BAHNG

BAHNG MAHNG EE

REGIONAL JR. LEADER OF THE YEAR TONY FERNANDES 1999

JODY HORN 1999


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BILL TWYFORD

JODY HORN

JODY HORN

TONY FERNANDES

1999

2000

2000-2003

2001 DOUBLE BAHNG MAHNG EE

SPARRING

ROY LANGE

CASEY WILKES

JODY HORN

2001

2001

2003-2006

SAHNG JEOL BAHNG

DOUBLE SAHNG JEOL BAHNG


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The Wha Rang Youth Group The Wha rang (Flowering Youth) warriors were first envisioned by King Chinhung of Silla in 579 A.D. The Kingdom on Silla had its army but the soldiers were not of an exceptional nature and the king could not defeat the armies of Koguryo and Paekche. Therefore he set about to organize a group of young talented noblemen that were loyal to the throne and could be trained in all forms of warfare and then successfully go into battle against Koguryo, Paekche and the Chinese Tang dynasty. Those who were chosen became Hwarang and were guided by a code of ethics prescribed by the eminent Buddhist monk, Wongwang. It was believed that if young men could be gathered into groups and taught about Buddhism, honor and the arts, the exceptionally talented ones among them would overshadow the rest. King Chinhung chose handsome male youths of noble birth, some of them as young as twelve years old. They were dressed in the finest clothing. They were extensively instructed in Buddhism, poetry and song. It was believed that those who fared well in these activities had the grace to become competent warriors. A certain amount of them were recommended to the Hwarang court. Those chosen individuals, now referred to as Hwarang, were trained in many forms of martial combat and continued their studies in Buddhism and the arts. The training program included climbing rugged mountains and swimming in turbulent rivers during the coldest months of the year. They trained in such weapons as the sword, staff, hook, spear and the bow and arrow. The Hwarang are believed to have developed an unarmed martial art named Su Bak. The Hwarang fell into decline by the end of the seventh century until they became virtually non-existent. They became known more as a group specializing in healing, Buddhist philosophy and poetry than as warriors.

The Hwarang Sprit

The Hwarang was a martial arts corp that practiced self discipline. Hwarang youth cultivated their patriotism by training their body and spirit through the practice of martial arts. Visits to scenic spots also contributed to this training. Out of the Hwarang emerged many wise and loyal ministers as well as flamboyant generals who con-

tributed magnificently to the unification of three kingdoms In this era , the famous scholar Ch*oe Ch*I-won left an epitaph on the tombstone of a Hwarang cadet named Nallang, which reads as follows: Our country had a profound truth refinement. The origins of this teaching were detailed in the History of Immortals. Containing Confucianism, Buddhism, and Taoism, it makes a deep impression on all living things. The Hwarang, when at home, were filial to their parents and when outside were loyal to the king just as in the teachings of Confucius. They did not force matters but allowed them to unfold naturally as in the teaching of Lao Tzu. They did not commit evil acts, only good ones, as prescribed by Buddha. Thus, we can see that the Hwarang were characterized by the traditional ideals of respecting human beings as well as the values of Confucianism, Buddhism and Taoism. In addition, the Hwarang promoted three kinds of virtue; modesty, frugality and generosity. These virtues manifest the true nature of the Hwarang.

Wha

Code of Chivalry

Rang

Be loyal to your country, Honor your parents, Be loving between husband and wife, Be cooperative between brother and sister, Be faithful to your friends, Be respectful to your elders, Establish trust between teacher and student, Use good judgment before taking action, Always stand for justice, Always follow through


The “do� of Taekwondo

Philosophy PARAGON DEFINED

From the Oxford Old English Dictionary A pattern or model of excellence. A person supreme in merit or excellence. A thing of supreme excellence. A match, a mate, companion, a consort in marriage, a rival, a competitor. Comparison, competition, emulation, rivalry. Of surpassing excellence, perfect in excellence. To excel, surpass. To set forth as a perfect model. To serve as a paragon or model of, to typify, exemplify. IMAGES: A perfect diamond; now applied to those weighing more than a hundred carats. Only six very large diamonds (called paragons) are known. The diamond, without spots or foulness is call a paragon-stone. A kind of black marble. A touchstone. "To sharpen, or whet one thing against another." "To compare by rubbing together." A pure fine black. A smooth hard stone used to polish gold.


Spirit of Taekwondo Before Class: Sir/Ma’am: I will practice in the spirit of Taekwondo With courtesy for fellow students Loyalty for my instructor And respect for my juniors and seniors, Sir/Ma’am! After Class: Sir/Ma’am: I will live with perseverance in the spirit of Taekwondo having honor with others Integrity within myself And self control in my actions, Sir/Ma’am! Karate for Kids' Oath Each Day I will live by Honoring my Parents and Instructors, Practicing to the best of my Abilities, and by having Courtesy and Respect for Everyone I meet. Tiny Tigers' Oath To be a good person I have knowledge in my head Honesty in my heart And strength in my body. Instructor: And someday, if you work hard, you’ll be a . . . “Black Belt Sir/Ma’am!”


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The Tiger: Korean History and Mythology Tiger: Commanding Dignity and Sternness, Courage and Fierceness

People looked at tigers with two different perspectives. They were seen as fierce, brave and dignified, and also respected as a symbol of good luck and protection from disease. It is the tiger that represents the spirit of Paragon Martial Arts. Until a generation ago, the wild tiger roamed the KoreanManchurian mountains, as it had from Neolithic times. According to myth and folktale, the tiger symbolized the absolute among the great forces of nature -- absolute power in tangible form -comprehensible, terrifying, and challenging. Reality was underThe symbol stood in terms of man against the for Tiger universe; all the odds were against man, but with prowess and luck it was possible to win any contest--even one with the powerful tiger. As Koreans see it, the symbolism centered on the tiger, which seems appropriate when applied to martial arts.

Terrifying yet precious beast

Historically, the tiger symbol appeared on most Korean military paraphernalia as far back as formal warfare existed. It was used on war flags, shields and breastplates, on gates and shutters of fortresses, on bows of war junks, on insignia of rank. At times warriors even went into battle dressed in tiger skins. The bloodcurdling tiger roar was imitated in war cries, and tiger skins were used in ceremonies to denote the rank and status of all officials, civilian and military alike. Thus the might of the tiger was borrowed by powerful people to underline and enhance their own status. To all sectors of Korean society, the tiger's dual role of terrifying threat and potential benefaction symbolized the extremes under which life had to be carried on. Koreans acknowledged and accepted this contradiction with wry humor, while not, it appears, letting down their guard. Evidence of the humorous approach is best seen in their folk paintings and folktales, especially those of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The tiger could be and was used as a symbol of anomaly, of mystery subject to imagination and magic, and to myth and drama. Moreover, the Koreans' use of the symbolism differed from that of their neighbors in that the strength of the tiger was invoked against invaders from China and Japan. The Korean attitude was an unremitting "tigerish defiance" of either armed attacks or unwanted cultural intrusions.

Often in Korean literature and in Korean folk painting, wise men and sages are pictured with tigers.


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The Scrolls of SongAhm Children of Songahm: Listen as I tell about the old times and the new dawn. In those unwritten years, thousands of lives ago, the first Ssu Suhng also came to the mountain. His disciples and most loyal students followed his journey. He was a Master of martial art. Ssu Suhng's vision was that mortal life is short, yet he had much to do and teach. Would his technique and tradition be lost as the morning mists? There were thousands of techniques and postures for the body in movement. There was a steel-tempering of the heart that could change a man's way of life. He studied how these lessons could live beyond written words or twice-told tales of olden ways. As a Master Weaver looms fine-spun thread, he wove thoughts across techniques in patterns of art with life. As his students learned the fabric of his art, they could see techniques crossed with spirit... the art would remain in spirit and force long after the weaver was dust. Disciples of Ssu Suhng practiced these patterns woven for them by their Master. And they, in turn, passed them to their juniors, generation after generation. Did that first Master martial weaver realize he had wrought so well his art would live millions of days? Did his spirit touch us as he wove those first patterns for hearts of future generations? For he is with us even today. The techniques are the same in spirit as when he taught them. The tree has grown, but holds the same roots. Other Masters grafted their hearts into the great design. The added new life as parents, and in new generations added to the life of their family; and by adding, making it greater, not less.

With dawn drawing light across the sky, I, Haeng Ung Lee, invite you, my disciples, students and family, to join me in a journey through our new day. Families need new generations to live: the spirit of Ssu Suhng needs new enthusiasm and growth to be nourished in us. I am duty-bound by the mantle of mastership to refresh tradition of spirit with knowledge and skills of our new age. A sage said ages past, nothing new lies under the sun. Even in my bound duty to keep Songahm at the peak of this age, it is the technique and tradition of the ages... only the patterns of their weaving are new. As given by that first Master to your seniors, his disciples, I offer this new weave for your futures. Your seniors, too, soon will be with you only in the weave and form created of their spirit for you. I dream that you learn to enjoy each day without thought to merely relieve yesterday for its comforts. To climb the ladder of life or art, the security and warmth of the first step must give way to find a higher level. Come, witness with me this affirmation of our art, heritage and renewal. In the spirit of Ssu Suhng, I bring you "Songahm" to join the east and the west, north and south... a new wellspring to mix and join in a voyage to the stars. Master Haeng Ung Lee: Saturday, August 13, 1983


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White Belt Life Skill

Orange Belt Life Skill

Yellow Belt Life Skill

Camo Belt Life Skill

"Don't be afraid to take a big step. You can't cross a chasm in two small jumps."

"Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t -you’re right"

"Nothing is particularly hard if you break it down into small steps."

Respect

Green Belt Life Skill

"To treat yourself, your possessions, other people, and their possessions with care, in recognition of the importance and value of each.”

"No one can make you feel inferior without your permission."

Purple Belt Life Skill

Blue Belt Life Skill

Brown Belt Life Skill

Red Belt Life Skill

Black Belt Life Skill

"Fall seven times, get up eight."

"Your greatest power comes from focusing your power in one direction"

Confidence

Persistence

Attitude

Focus

Goals

Discipline "Gain control of yourself before seeking to control others."

Integrity "Strong character is better than any weapon.”

"Integrity is doing what’s right, even when no one is looking.”

Esteem

Leadership "A leader is someone who helps other people achieve their goals.”


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The Paragon Tiger Patch The Nine Colors

Goals The nine colors represent the nine belts on the path to Black Belt. White, orange, yellow, camo, green, purple, blue, brown and red are found throughout the patch. Each belt color is also depicted within the patch’s design representing the student’s path to mastery The dominant colors are blue and red as seen in the ying yang symbol in the background of the tiger.

The Paragon Tiger in the Circle

Perseverance The word paragon itself means: a model or pattern of excellence and perfection. A person who is the paragon of any art is the person who represents the best of that art. A paragon Black Belt should represent the best of the martial arts. The tiger represents the absolute among the great forces of nature. The tiger symbolizes the traits of courage, optimism, tolerance and generosity. Tigers are also revered for their great power and grace. The paragon patch ties all these elements together to create unity within the dojang, and symbolizes traits that are revered within our schools.

The Background Ying Yang

Excellence The ying and yang in the background symbolizes balance and the duality of everything. Yin and yang are opposite and struggle with each other while they cooperate in harmony. The harmonious state of the movement of yin and yang is called Taeguki, or Taikukkki, Taichi in chinese, which is also the name of the Korean national flag, i.e. Taegukki. The upper half circle, red, of Taeguk means yang and the lower half circle, blue, means yin. They stand for the state of harmony of yin and yang. The harmony of yin and yang symbolizes excellence because it combines opposing forces for the greater good.

Goals Perseverance Excellence

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The Shadow Dragon Patch The Paragon Shadow Dragon

Contains the Color Belt Life Skills

Integrity In the asian culture the dragon represents power, good luck and kings. The dragon has been believed to control natural phenomenon of floods and draughts, repelling evil spirits and giving good luck in our lives. In palace, it was compared to a king, being used in things for a king According to legend, a dragon was born from the mating between a phoenix and a crane, having incredible power and capability. It has snake's head, deer's antlers, ghost's eyes, cow's ears, snake's neck, big clam's belly, carp's scale, hawk's claw, and tiger's sole of the foot. The dragon is in “shadow” because it is still a “goal” to the color belt student. Upon achievement of the rank, the student’s dragon will fill with the colors of all the belts he/she has achieved. The colors can emerge only if the student trains and lives with integrity.

Grand Master’s Spirit

Possibility Grand Master H.U. Lee’s most quoted saying is “Today not possible, tomorrow possible.” These words were heard by thousands of martial artists who sought Grand Master’s wisdom when they were struggling with a challenge. His words are given to you to inspire you to have success on each step of the path to becoming a Paragon Black Belt.

The Dragon Symbol and Life Skills

Loyalty The shadow dragon is clutching a black pearl that contains the symbol of the dragon and is surrounded by the skills necessary to become a “Dragon of Nine Colors.” The skills of the martial arts are contained in the pearl and it is only through loyalty that a student can master these.

Goals Possibility Loyalty


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The Nine Colored Dragon Patch The Nine Colored Dragon

Contains the Black Belt Life Skills

Achievement The dragon shows its colors. The nine colors represent the achievement of the skills on the path to becoming a Paragon Black Belt. The Dragon in Korean culture represents possibility and potential. By wearing a full color dragon we honor our prior achievements and leave room for future ones, by acknowledging our ongoing potential for improvement.

The Dragon’s Mane

Pride The dragon’s mane represents pride in one’s efforts and achievements, and the desire to live up to one’s own expectations. The mane, or mantle of the dragon, is the most vibrant and visible feature, and therefore, it’s pride. It is important to wear our pride and nurture the things that make us proud of ourselves. In so doing, we avoid the pitfalls of false pride and continue to grow into our “mane.”

The Pearl

Mastery The pearl represents the journey to mastership. In mythology, the dragon came from the depths of the ocean to deliver the pearl to the Grand Master. The pearl gave the power to the Master to be an example to all and to show “the way.” Master Instructors are given a ring upon attainment of mastership that has a diamond set against a black onyx stone. The journey to mastership in the martial arts takes on a special poignancy, a quality akin to poetry or drama, where muscles and mind come together in graceful and purposeful movements through space and time. In the martial arts students will encounter temptations to take shortcuts toward quick results in performance and winning rather than staying on the path to mastery.

Achievement Pride Mastery

Other Paragon Patches DECIDED PATCH Worn on the right side of belts of advanced students denoting “Decided” or “high” rank for that color belt When you receive this patch some permanent glue should be used to attach it to your belt.

BLACK BELT AND PARAGON PATCH Worn on the left side of a student’s belt representing their membership in “Black Belt Club” or “Paragon Club” When you receive this patch some permanent glue should be used to attach it to your belt.

PARAGON LEADERSHIP PATCH Worn by Leadership Team members who have taken and passed the Leadership test including all color belt material. This patch is worn on the left shoulder of the dobok.

ATA PATCH This patch signifies our membership in the American Taekwondo Association. The ATA Patch is worn on the right chest of the dobok.


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The Leadership Team Patch The Eagle

Contains the Leadership Life Skills

Enthusiasm Throughout history the eagle has been associated with sun, fire, air, life, sky, and sun gods. The eagle is sometimes referred to as the "lion of the air," that is, the king of birds as the lion is the king of animals. As a high-flying bird the eagle has come to represent success, power, triumph, royalty (imperialism) or social status, and omniscience. The Paragon Eagle represents the wearers dedication to flying above normal expectations. The person wearing this patch should show an “authentic enthusiasm” for the art and for those he/she was chosen to lead.

The Inner Circle

Humility On no other patch in the Paragon system is there a life skill that is located inside the circle of the patch. However, here, leadership is placed right next to the eagle. The leaders of the Hwarang were elite warriors comparable to the knights of medieval Europe. The title of Hwarang warrior was only given to the most accomplished of the group. With the title of warrior, they were held to a much higher standard of conduct and ability. The Paragon leadership team should be the warriors of the school. They are the “elite” and should show great humility, strength and vision. The skills that surround the leader are those found surrounding the eagle and should be evident in the wearer of the patch.

The V

Vision The wings of the eagle form a “V.” A leader’s primary function is to provide a cohesive vision. When vision is successfully formulated and conveyed, a new generation of leadership is constantly being created. Each new generation will share the original vision of the preceding ones, and will contribute to the growth of the vision. Therefore, the vision is never static but, in fact, continues to emerge as each generation of leadership emerges.

Enthusiasm Humility Vision


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The Dobok: The Traditional Taekwondo Uniform In the beginning of Taekwondo training, the practitioner encounters the dobok and learns etiquette from the Sabomnim. The dobok is a special clothing for training the mind and body in which the spirit of Korea and the centuries-old tradition is alive. So it is called a "handobok." The dobok consists of trousers, upper garment and belt, which is called "hanbul." The dobok has a similarity with traditional Korean clothes "hanbok." The origin of the hanbok is not known. There are, however, records that show the use of costumes in the period of Shilla (Samkuk Sagi), Kaya (Samkuk Yusa), and Koguryo-Paekche-Shilla periods (Saso, China). It is written in the "Koguryo Tokyong" by Sukyong of Early China that "People in the Koguryo Kingdom wear white costumes with black silk belts around the waist." It seems that the white uniform could be daily clothes for the Koguryo people. It also seems that the long upper garment and trousers must have been the same type of cloth that were found on the wall paintings in the tombs of the three kingdoms. Taekwondo doboks are similar to the traditional Korean clothing in the method of making, having three kinds of shapes: circle, square, and triangle. The waist line of the uniform is circular shape, the cuffs square and the hip area triangular. The upper garment is made according to the same manner. The numeric concept of the Ch'onbugyong, which contains the principles of the heaven as one, the earth as two, and the man as three, brought the complete theoretical background for the formation of the traditional Korean costumes. From these conclusions, it can be reasoned that dobok has the same historical records of transformation as the traditional Korean uniform has had.

According to the theory of the "Yin" and "Yang", the trousers represent Yin (the earth), upper garment represents Yang (the heaven), and the belt represents man himself, which stems from the spirit of Samjae. The spirit of Samjae, which explains the principle of the heaven, the earth, and the man, applies to every aspect of Korean life including the production of all different sorts of costumes. The white color in the uniform symbolizes the background of the universe. According to the philosophy of the Korean tradition, the origin of the universe is the oneness which pronounced in Korean as Han. Han stems from the color of white. The white is the essence of the universe in Korean belief. A dobok is not only the uniform for daily practice in the dojang, but also a competition uniform for ATA tournaments as well as the Olympic Games. The philosophical significance of the dobok is in keeping it clean and having proper respect and etiquette toward it. You will learn many important lessons wearing your dobok. Treat it, and the things you learn wearing it, with respect. Please keep your uniform and body clean and neat. Uncleaned doboks are a sign of disrespect to you, your art and your instructor.


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PARAGON PATCH: Left side of uniform. Across from ATA patch, centered in space. Put the uniform on to help with placement prior to sewing!

DRAGON PATCHS: Dragon always faces forward. For color belts, the shadow dragon will be on the right side with the ATA patch. For Black Belts, on the left with the Paragon patch.

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ATA PATCH: Right side of uniform. Always cross the uniform from left to right and have the ATA patch on the inside fold of the uniform.

Appearance: Uniforms should never be word while eating. A sharp appearance shows respect for your art and your instructor. Instructors may ask students with dirty unforms or uniforms that are too small to leave class.


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T'aeGuk-Ki (the Korean Flag) Many people wear the Korean Flag on their uniforms (as part of the ATA Patch), without knowing Origin that it has a more meaningful background than most The oldest 'Yin/Yang'-symbol, which was common flags. On this page you can find a short described in stone, was found in Korea. At the end of overview. the 19th century, Korea needed their own flag. It is The meaning of Korean National Flag is very phil- believed that Young-Hyo Park came up with the first osophical. The origin comes from the Oriental philos- concept. At that time, Korea was under the influence ophy called Eum-Yang, in Chinese pronunciation Yin- of all sorts of colonists like the Japanese, Chinese and Yang. In Korea, the symbol of 'Yin and Yang', and Russians. sometimes the flag itself, is called Taeguk and summaThe symbols rizes the thoughts of 'I Yin means dark and cold, Ching' (called 'Yeok' in while Yang means bright and Korean). The name transhot. A very old book called lates to “flag of Great Choo-Yuk which is written by a Extremes.� Chinese claims all objects and The flag consists of three events in the world are parts: The white backexpressed by the movement of ground, the red and blue Yin and Yang. For example, the circle in the center and four moon is Yin while the sun is trigrams, one in each corner Yang. The earth is Yin and the of the flag. sky is Yang. The night is Yin The white background of and the day is Yang. The winter the flag means peace. The Kun Heaven Kam Water is Yin and the summer is Yang. red and blue circle in the Ying Yang Yin and Yang are relative. Yi Fire Kon Earth center is called 'Taeguk', the The top of the flag does not origin of all things in the necessarily mean the north. The universe. The central Yang part of TaeKuk, i.e. the thought is perfect harmony red half-circle, is positioned on top of Yin, i.e. the and balance: A continuous movement within the blue half-circle. In other words, the north (Yin, Blue) sphere of infinity, resulting in one unit. The blue part of 'Taeguk' is called 'Eum' (or 'Yin') and represents all and south (Yang, Red) seems to be up-side-down, but it's not up side down; Yang is supposed to be above negative aspects of the balance that is typical for the symbol. The red part is called 'Yang' and describes all Yin. For example, sky (Yang) is above the earth (Yin). positive aspects. Traditionally, a king or a god was supposed to sit The four trigrams at the corners (called 'Kwe' in facing the south. So, when you are talking about "left" Korean) also represent the concept of opposites and it really means the east while the west is on your balance. The trigrams are heaven (upper-left) and at "right" hand side. Applying the same logic to the other corner earth, water (upper-right) and at the other corner fire. Looking at symbols of the trigrams, TaeKukKi, top (Red) of the flag stands for the south. The central symbol is often referred to as the yin/ you can see that they are opposites as well. Three yang. It consists of a circle divided in two equal parts unbroken bars (heaven) vs. three broken bars (earth), which blend into one another. The upper part, in red, etc. For the Korean people their flag of T'aeGuk-Ki is a represents the Yang and the lower, in blue, represents the Um, an ancient symbol of the universe. The two source of pride and inspiration. During the Japanese express opposite dualism between any of the Earth's occupation period beginning in 1910 the Korean flag elements; water and earth, masculine and female. was outlawed in public places and for about thirty There is a constant movement in the balance which five years. The T'aeGuk flags were kept hidden until only over eternity can there be perfect balance. This is Liberation Day in1945. The Korean flag has been a balance and harmony. symbol of this country's struggle for independence and freedom.


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What the Various Instructor Collars Represent GOLD COLLAR WITH BLACK STRIPE

Grand Master Instructor: 9th Degree Black Belt

BLACK COLLAR WITH GOLD STRIPE BLACK COLLAR WITH SILVER STRIPE BLACK COLLAR WITH BLUE STRIPE

Instructor with over 1,000 students Instructor with over 500 students Instructor with over 250 students

THICK BLACK COLLAR THIN BLACK COLLAR

Certified Senior Instructor Certified Assistant Instructor

BLACK COLLAR WITH RED STRIPE RED / BLACK COLLAR RED COLLAR

Specialty Trainer Level 3 Certified Certified Trainer Level 2 Trainee Instructor Level 1 Trainee

RED / WHITE / BLUE COLLAR

Junior Leader Under 14 years old

BLACK UNIFORMS

Black uniforms are awarded to all leadership team members who are actively assisting in classes at a school or club


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Philosophy of the Three Levels of Training Although the literal translation of Taekwondo is "the way of the hand and foot ", this is no more than a superficial translation. “Do” in Korean implies the philosophical approach to a way of life, a pathway to achieve enlightenment. The students of Taekwondo, through rigorous physical training, improve themselves physically, mentally and spiritually. The training will be divided into three different levels of training:

Basic Ranks

Phase 1: White, Orange and Yellow

The true Taekwondo student is the one that knows how to behave in any place and at any time. It is very important to stress the need that our world has of trustworthy and sincere people. These are the kind of people that Taekwondo is most probably associated to. At this rank the student will learn the philosophies of the art and the basic forms and stances.

Intermediate Ranks

Phase 2: Camo, Green and Purple

Respect, humility and a high sense of morality are also important teachings that all of those who practice Taekwondo should learn. Respect could never be over stressed, because it is respect that maintains a healthy instructor-student relationship. If the student does not respect his instructor, he will never become worthy of the instructors trust, and therefore his presence in the Dojang will not be welcomed. Respect is an important subject in Taekwondo. Respect is expected from all students toward their parents, their nation, their instructor and fellow students, and in general toward all human beings. At this level the student should have a solid grasp on the basics of the art. More complex techniques are introduced and more perfection is expected.

Advanced Ranks

Phase 3: Blue, Brown and Red

Humility is a quality that all serious Taekwondo students should possess. Although it is true that practicing the art of Taekwondo boosts your self confidence, this should not convey the false sense of superiority. On the contrary, the good student should be humble and considerate. In the same way, the highest regard for morality and ethics should be observed by all Taekwondo practitioners. At these ranks true leaders emerge. The student starts learning the hardest of the techniques and his/her skills become honed. Most everything at this rank is geared towards preparing to be a Black Belt. At these ranks progression may slow for some and accelerate for others. The path truly becomes the student’s.

Black Belt Candidate Red/Black

Everything at this rank is geared toward the student’s Black Belt Testing. At this point, the student should be trustworthy, respectful and show great skill and pride in their training. A student’s concerted effort should be obvious in every class and a parent’s support at this critical time will have a tremendous impact on a student’s success. At this rank the answer to the question, “How would a black belt act?” is shown in every class. Parents can best support their children by being excellent role models of Black Belt attitude and ensuring their child understands what will be expected of him or her to advance to Black Belt.

Black Belt Students Leadership Team Members


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The Belt Rank System Dragon White Belt "Pure and without knowledge of Taekwondo. As with the Pine Tree, the seed must now be planted and nourished to develop strong roots." The student has no knowledge of Taekwondo and begins with a clean (pure) slate. Purity is often signified by the color white. Orange Belt "The sun is beginning to rise. As with the morning's dawn, only the beauty of the sunrise is seen rather than the immense power." The beginner student sees the beauty of the art of Taekwondo but has not yet experienced the power of the technique. Orange is found among the many colors of the sunrise. Yellow Belt "The seed is beginning to see the sunlight." The student begins to understand the basics of Taekwondo. The sun appears to be yellow.

Camouflage (Camo) Belt "The sapling is hidden amongst the taller pines and must now fight its way upward." The student begins to realize his/her place in the world's largest martial art. The student must now begin to spar in order to promote in rank. Camouflage (greens) is used to hide among the trees in the forest.

Blue Belt "The tree reaches for the sky toward new heights." Having passed the mid-way point, the student focuses his/her energy upward toward black belt. The sky appears as blue. Brown Belt "The tree is firmly rooted in the earth." At this point the student has mastered the basics and developed deep roots in Taekwondo. Brown is known as an earthy color, such as dirt.

INTEGRITY

DISCIPLINE

FOCUS

PERSISTENCE SELF ESTEEM

Red Belt "The sun is setting. The first phase of growth has been accomplished." The first day (the period of time from white belt to red belt) of growth is coming to an end. The physical skill has been developed but lacks control; therefore, physical and mental discipline must now be achieved. Variations of red are found among the many colors of the sunset.

RESPECT

GOALS ATTITUDE CONFIDENCE

Green Belt "The pine tree is beginning to develop and grow in strength." The student's technique is developing power. The components of the basic techniques are beginning to work in unison. As the pine tree develops, it sprouts green pine needles. Purple Belt "Coming to the mountain. The tree is in the mid-growth and now the path becomes steep." The student has crossed over into a higher level of Taekwondo. The techniques, poom-sae (forms), and level of gyeo-roo-gi (sparring) becomes more difficult, creating a "mountain" that must be overcome. Mountains are often depicted as being purple.

Tiger

Black Belt Candidate (Red/ Black) "The dawn of a new day. The sun breaks through the darkness." The previous day has ended, giving way to a new dawn. The student must begin a new phase of training; that of being a black belt. The red is the sun (in a sunrise) as it breaks through the black of night.

Black Belt "The tree has reached maturity and has overcome the darkness... it must now 'plant seeds for the future.'" The color black is created when all the colors of the light spectrum have been absorbed into an object. That object has "taken control" of the colors and retained them. If one color was to "escape", the object would no longer be black but would appear as that color. The student has mastered the nine geup (grades) of Taekwondo. He/she has "absorbed" all the knowledge of the color ranks and overcome or "mastered" that level or training. The colors of the spectrum are bound together and are not reflected off an object, resulting in the absence of color which we call black.


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Significance of the Patterns (hyung or poomse) A hyung or poomse is a prearranged series of different defensive, counter, and offensive techniques that must be performed in a precise, logical sequence with specific foot movements and stances in imaginary combat against a number of assailants. The student must systematically deal with several imaginary opponents who are attacking with various techniques from different directions. The student begins a pattern by standing at attention, bowing, and then stepping with his or her left foot in a certain direction using a specific technique. Some forms are performed solidly, some quickly with acrobatics, some gracefully, and some are performed very slowly with great muscle tension. The closest relatives of patterns are shadow boxing, dancing, or a gymnastics floor routine. Forms help students develop: Stronger, faster, and more effective kicks, blocks, and strikes Stronger and more secure fighting stances and positions Sparring techniques Defensive and offensive moves for every self-defense situation Build endurance Condition muscles to be harder and stronger Rhythm and grace of movement Awareness of oneself and body Effective breathing techniques

Forms mark the progress of student development. Higher ranks require more complex forms that challenge them to increase their level of discipline and proficiency. As students progress in rank, the forms they are required to learn increase in complexity and difficulty. Traditionally, students must practice a form hundreds of times before learning the next one.. Hyung (connected moves) is the Korean term for a pattern/form. Other terms used are "poomse" and "tul" (Korean) and "kata" (Japanese). The American Taekwondo Association uses the English term "form." Through the practice of forms, students learn to apply various Taekwondo techniques in practical ways and to join the techniques into useful combinations. They improve their sparring skills by developing fluid, smooth, rhythmical, powerful movements. Forms also help students refine their coordination, flexibility, balance, timing, endurance, and breath con-

trol, all of which are essential to the proper execution of Taekwondo techniques. Forms enable students to practice techniques alone and to practice them against simulated attacks that are difficult to duplicate during class exercises or while sparring. While free-sparring enables students to compare their fighting skills to those of other students, forms permit students to critically evaluate their own individual techniques in a controlled situation. Just as individual letters form words, which are then used to compose sentences that express a thought; individual techniques and movements form patterns, which are then used to express the essence of Taekwondo. Just as students in elementary school first learn to print precisely and then to write in their own personal style, Taekwondo students first learn to perform each movement in a form in a specified manner, and then they begin to develop their own personal performance style. Forms are the link between technique training and actual fighting. 1. Forms should begin and end at exactly the same spot. This will indicate the performer’s accuracy. 2. Correct posture and facing must be maintained at all times. 3. Muscles of the body should be either tensed or relaxed at the proper critical moments in the exercise. 4. The exercise should be performed in a rhythmic movement with an absence of stiffness. 5. Each pattern should be perfected before moving to the next. 6. Students should know the purpose of each movement. If not, they should seek out the answer. 7. Students should perform each movement with realism. 8. Attack and defense techniques should be equally distributed among right and left hands and feet.

SongAhm Star

In each form of the SongAhm style, the patterns placed together will form a SongAhm star. There are nine points to the SongAhm star. Eight on the outside and the center point. It is at 6th Degree Black Belt that you touch all nine points of the SongAhm star -- representing that you have mastered the style.


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Knowledge


Parents – Your Role as Coach It is very important to remember that parents are also martial arts coaches. When children first start their training in the martial arts, especially in the case of very young children, we often find that they have not yet developed the self discipline to practice at home on a regular basis.

and develop the individual, not to compete with others.

How Our Program Works

Our curriculum is divided into sessions that are typically seven weeks in length. The goal of the session is to prepare the student for his/her next testing. The material a student learns throughout Practicing At Home the session is a building process. The Practicing at home greatly enhances following explains how the material performance at the school and it builds up to the testing: should be encouraged. We suggest Week One: Basics. Students learn that you talk to your child and agree new kicks, blocks and strikes that will on a daily practice time. It can be as be contained in their form. little as ten minutes per day, if that ten Week Two: More Basics, Forms. minutes is used for quality practice. Students refine the new skills learned in Developing the habit of setting a week one and begin to learn and memogoal (next belt) and working for it on rize their form. a regular basis will give your child life Week Three: Students are expected skills that go far beyond punching and to know segments of the form and can kicking. One of the easiest ways to now begin to focus on proper execution help your child is by simply showing of each technique. that you are interested in his or her Casey Joseph Wilkes perWeek Four: Students will begin to training and talents. Children love to forming in front of thousands learn One-Steps and continue memorizshow off what they have learned in in Little Rock, AR to earn his ing and perfecting the form. class and we encourage parents to ask National Weapons Title in Week Five: Students should know their child what he or she has learned 2001 their form, be able to execute it with every single week. proper stances and technique, and know the first One-Step. Encouragement Week Six: Students should be able to do their Show your encouragement by offering positive form with proper stances and technique, and know feedback, and compliment them in the areas where their first and second One-Steps. you can see improvement. This approach with chilWeek Seven: Students should be able to do their dren works wonders for their self-image and for their form and One-Steps with proper execution of stances motivation. and technique. In fact, if you use this approach in just about anyWeek Eight: Testing! This is where students demthing your child does, whether it be homework or chores, you will soon notice the difference. If children onstrate what they have learned and perfected over the prior seven weeks. believe that they are getting better it boosts their self It is vitally important that students attend classes confidence, which in turn encourages them to try during each of the eight weeks, to ensure their sucharder still. When children know that when they do cess. If your child cannot attend consistently due to well they will receive recognition and praise, they travel or illness, please notify us as soon as possible will want to do well because it makes them feel good. and make arrangements to attend extra classes or Children will rise to the level of your expectations, but only if they are encouraged and praised along the work with an instructor privately. The earlier in the session this is addressed, the better chance your child way. Testings and tournaments are an excellent opportunity for you to praise your child’s accomplish- has of catching up and learning the material in time for testing. We are here to help your child succeed. ments. Never compare the skills of your child with others. The goal of Martial Arts is to compete with one’s self


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School Etiquette and Member Standards

on the floor. You've spent so much energy earning them. They are a sign of your hard work and achievements. If you change clothes at the studio, please neatly fold your clothes and/or dobok.

1. Bowing (Kyung-Ye) is the customary act of greeting and respect in martial arts, the same way an actor bows to an audience, or the way we give a handshake.

2. Please address your black belt teachers as Mr. / Mrs. / Miss (last name) or Kyo-Sah-Nim, which is the Korean term for black belt. Instructors may be referred to as Sah-bum. The Master Instructor may be referred to by the Korean term of Sah-Bum– Nim. 3. Please pull your attendance card before each class and hand it to the instructor at the beginning of class. 3. Please be on time. If you are late, please pull your card and place it on the counter. Prepare yourself to enter class and remain by the training area edge with your arms raised in “permission” stance until acknowledged by the instructor leading the class. 4. Please do not use any bags, blockers, or other equipment without the instructor’s permission. Safety is our first consideration. If you indulge in any horseplay or unsafe behavior which could result in injury to other students. 5. Never fight outside the studio, except in selfdefense. Your ability to train here will be jeopardized if you fight or threaten others, or otherwise use what you are learning here in an inappropriate manner, except in a LEGITIMATE selfdefense situation. 6. Please don’t smoke, chew gum, eat, drink, or bring any food or beverage into the training studio. 7. Please introduce guests and visitors to the instructors at the earliest opportunity. 8. Please don’t wear jewelry during workouts. Keep your finger and toenails cut short. Long nails and jewelry are dangerous to your fellow students. We are not responsible for lost watches or jewelry and, therefore, we recommend you leave them at home. 9. Please help keep the studio clean and orderly. Hang up your clothes or fold them neatly and store them with your shoes in the shoe cubbies in the lobby. Please throw trash in the wastebasket. 10. Never throw your dobok (uniform) or your belt

11. Please keep your uniform and body clean and neat.U ncleaned doboks are a sign of disrespect to you, your art and your instructor.

Seize or traditional kneeling position

Without philosophy and manners, Taekwondo would be little more than another sport. At Paragon Martial Arts we teach and emphasize basic life skills that challenge our students not only in their Taekwondo training, but also in their everyday lives. Junior students are taught to be respectful and polite towards their parents, siblings, teachers and elders. They also learn the importance of learning and doing their best in school. Teens and young adults are taught to have achievable goals and that hard work does have its rewards. Through Taekwondo they become more confident and develop an attitude of self-reliance. This increase in confidence enables them to better cope with issues of peer pressure and helps them make correct choices. To show pride in our studio and to maintain a safe and positive learning environment, these rules must be adhered to at all times.

12. If you have to wait for your ride, please wait quietly until your ride appears. “Horseplay”, loud, undisciplined behavior, climbing on the chairs, running around the outside of the school, etc. makes a very poor impression on others. 13. There is a courtesy phone on the counter for your convenience. Please be considerate and keep your calls short. 14. Please do not wiggle, fidget, fall down, or otherwise display undisciplined body language in class. If you are not paying adequate attention during class your instructor may ask you to sit out for a while in order for you to regain your attention. 15. Only bare feet or white martial arts training shoes are allowed on the training floor while martial arts classes are in session. Street shoes deposit hard/sharp rocks onto the workout floor that can injure a barefoot student. 16. Female students must wear a white t-shirt or sports bra under their uniform. 17. All Paragon students should stand and recite the oath before and after class. Parents and spectators should also stand and observe silence or recite the oath, if they know it. 18. Students should request permission from their instructor before attending another martial arts school or competing in martial arts tournaments.


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Attendance and Motivational Challenges We suggest that you initially pick the two days that best fit your schedule, and stick to them on a consistent basis. We rotate the days that we teach the different categories of our curriculum. Consistent attendance will ensure that the student is taught each curriculum category needed for the next belt at least once per month. Be aware that the schedule will change after every session. This enables us to maximize the class schedule for each session. As the number at each rank will change, so will the requirements for the schedule. Also, if you miss a class or two (maybe due to vacation or illness), please try to make them up by coming an extra day for a week or two. Remember, contrary to what one might believe, coming too often to class could be counter productive. The key is to be consistent and balanced; if you spend too much time at Taekwondo, other areas in your life will become unbalanced. Students are expected to attend Paragon Martial Arts just like they are expected to attend regular school or work. In order to realize the long-term benefits of Martial Arts training it is important to train consistently.

challenging for parents to get their children to class. As long as the student still has fun while they are here, then there is not too much to be concerned about. We find that children often have trouble switching gears from one activity to the next, but as long as Taekwondo is still enjoyable for them, then a little difficulty getting them to class now and then is not a major issue. However, if a student complains excessively about coming to class, or says they don't enjoy coming anymore, then you should tell their instructor immediately so that we can find out what needs to be done to remotivate that student. We find that students may lose motivation simply because they have other activities (playing with friends or a favorite TV show) vying for their time or attention. If you make your child’s training a priority he or she will learn to set goals, stick to the plan, and derive the satisfaction of accomplishment.

WE ARE A BLACK BELT SCHOOL

Motivational Challenges

Occasionally a student won't want to come to class. If this occurs more than once or twice, please notify an instructor so that we can re-motivate, educate, and reaffirm the goals of Black Belt Excellence. It is important to remember that almost everyone who earns a Black Belt at some point during his or her training considers quitting. It is normal to have peaks and valleys in our training, especially since Martial Arts are a year round activity whereas most other activities are seasonal. We sometimes hear that it is

We are a Black Belt School

Being a Black Belt is a habit! It’s a habit of performing the best you are capable of every time you perform. It’s a habit of using the character guidelines of a Black Belt (humility, respect, honesty, etc.) not only when you’re in the school, but all the time. These character traits become a habit so you not only earn a Black Belt but you become a Black Belt.


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Sparring Rules and Regulations Sparring is an exciting and dynamic facet of your Taekwondo training. We understand that most people have a fear of getting hit, and an even greater fear of hurting others. This fear is why we practice a progressive sparring philosophy. Sparring is conducted here at Paragon Martial Arts because it is a part of the Taekwondo experience. Sparring lets us practice our techniques in a more dynamic setting, and helps to develop your speed and timing, as well as improving your cardiovascular condition and reflexes. You are challenged under somewhat stressful conditions, which helps you to develop a calm mind under pressure. Sparring is not fighting. Fighting is an aggressive and unpleasant act done out of fear or anger. Sparring is a test of skill, or game. Many have called it a game of “kinetic chess”. Participants are taught to assist each other, not trash each other. When we spar, we have rules to insure that everyone will be safe, so everyone can learn from the experience. These rules and regulations must be strictly adhered to by all persons engaged in free sparring. All participants must have and wear the following protective items while sparring: A. Groin Cup (Men) B. Mouthpiece C. Foam Headgear D. Foam Hand Protectors E. Foam Foot Protectors F. Shin & Instep Protector G. Forearm Protector H. Chest Protector

Rules of Sparring Contact and Control

Beginning students do not spar. They will practice controlled defensive techniques to prepare for sparring as an intermediate student. Intermediate students are introduced to sparring when they receive their camoflauge belt. Paragon Martial Arts teaches three kinds or styles of sparring. “Class” sparring is minimal to moderate contact and is designed to challenge the student while maintaining safety at all times. “Testing” sparring is light or no contact and is designed to demonstrate the student’s abilities in a “give and take” approach. “Tournament” sparring is competitive and usually moderate contact is expected. ATA tournaments operate under a strict set of rules for contact and are some of the safest martial arts tournaments available to competing students. With proper gear, it is possible to spar in class or competition without the worry of being injured. It is very important to learn the differences in these three types of sparring and to employ a sparring style that is appropriate to the situation. Use common sense and adjust intensity as appropriate to the abilities of your partner. If you find that your sparring talents are much better than your partner, lighten up and become a teacher. In class and testing situations, it is always the responsibility of the higher rank partner to ensure that the sparring does not exceed the ability of the lower rank partner. On the other hand, any time a student is sparring with a partner and feels their partner is sparring too hard, it is that individual’s responsibility to politely indicate to “notch it down”. If you have any concerns about sparring, please notify your instructor(s).

SPARRING IS NOT FIGHTING


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The Theory of Power The beginning student may ask; “Where does one obtain the power to create the devastating results attributed to Taekwondo?” This power is attributed to the utilization of a person’s full potential through the mathematical application of Taekwondo techniques. The average person uses only 10 to 20 percent of his potential. Anyone, regardless of size, age, or sex who can condition himself to use 100 percent of his potential can also perform the same destructive techniques. Though training will certainly result in a superb level of physical fitness, it will not necessarily result in the acquisition of extraordinary stamina or superhuman strength. More important, Taekwondo training will result in obtaining a high level of reaction force, concentration, equilibrium, breath control and speed; these are the factors that will result in a high degree of physical power. It is very important that you not unleash all your strength at the beginning but gradually, so that you can develop proper control while you develop your power. Power without control is dangerous and often counterproductive.

yours, which is small is quite impressive. Another reaction force is your own. A punch with the right fist is aided by pulling back the left fist to the hip.

Concentration (Jip Joong)

By applying the impact force onto the smallest target area, it will concentrate the force and therefore, increase its effect. For example, the force of water coming out of a water hose is greater if the orifice is smaller. Conversely, the weight of a man spread out on snow shoes makes hardly any impression on the snow. The blows in Taekwondo are often concentrated onto the edge of the open palm or to the crook of the fingers. The shorter the time for the concentration, the greater will be the power of the blow. The utmost concentration is required in order to mobilize every muscle of the body onto the smallest target area simultaneously. In conclusion, concentration is done in two ways: one is to concentrate every muscle of the body, particularly the bigger muscles around the hip and abdomen (which theoretically are slower than the smaller muscles of other parts of the body) towards the appropriate tool to be Reaction Force used at the proper time; the second (Bandong Ryok) way is to concentrate such mobilized According to Newton’s Law, muscles onto the opponent’s vital every force has as equal and spot. This is the reason why the hip opposite force. When an automoOnly a single blow is and abdomen are jerked slightly bile crashes into a wall with the before the hands and feet in any sufficient for victory force of 2,000 pounds, the wall action, whether it be attack or will return a force of 2,000 defense. Remember, jerking can be pounds; or forcing the end of the executed in two ways: laterally and vertically. seesaw down with a ton of weight will provide an upward force of the same weight; if your opponent is rushing towards you at a high speed, by the slightest Equilibrium (Kyun Hyung) blow at his head, the force with which you strike his Balance is of utmost importance in any type of athhead would be that of his own onslaught plus that of letics. In Taekwondo, it deserves special consideryour blow. ation. By keeping the body always in equilibrium, The two forces combined; his, which is large, and that is, well balanced, a blow is much more effective.


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Conversely, the unbalanced one is easily toppled. The stance should always be stable yet flexible, for both offensive and defensive movements. Equilibrium is classified into both dynamic and static stability. They are so closely inter-related that the maximum force can only be produced when the static stability is maintained through dynamic stability. To maintain good equilibrium, the center of gravity of the stance must fall on a straight line midway between both legs when the body weight is distributed equally on both legs, or in the center of the foot if it is necessary to concentrate the bulk of body weight on one foot. The center of gravity can be adjusted according to body weight. Flexibility and knee spring are also important in maintaining balance for both a quick attack and instant recovery. One additional point; the heel of the rear foot should never be off the ground at the point of impact. This is not only necessary for good balance but also to produce maximum power at the point of impact.

Breath Control (Hohup Jojul)

Controlled breathing not only affects one’s stamina and speed but can also condition a body to receive a blow and augment the power of a blow directed against an opponent. Through practice, breath stopped in the state of exhaling at the critical moment when a blow is landed against a pressure point on the body can prevent a loss of consciousness and stifle pain. A sharp exhaling of breath at the moment of impact and stopping the breath during the execution of a movement tense the abdomen to concentrate maximum effort on the delivery of the motion, while a slow inhaling helps the preparation of the next movement. An important rule to remember; Never inhale while focusing a block or blow against an opponent. Not only will this impede movement but it will also result in a loss of power. Students should also practice disguised breathing to conceal any outward signs of fatigue. An experienced fighter will certainly press an attack when he realizes his opponent is on the point of exhaustion. One breath is required for one movement with the exception of a continuous motion.

Mass (Zilyang)

Mathematically, the maximum kinetic energy or force is obtained from maximum body weight and speed and it is all important that the body weight be increased during the execution of a blow. No doubt

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the maximum body weight is applied with the motion of turning the hip. The large abdominal muscles are twisted to provide additional body momentum. Thus the hip rotates in the same direction as that of the attacking or blocking tool. Another way of increasing body weight is the utilization of a springing action of the knee joint. This is achieved by slightly raising the hip at the beginning of the motion and lowering the hip at the moment of impact to drop the body weight into the motion.

Speed (Sokdo)

Speed is the most essential factor of force or power. Scientifically, force equals mass multiplied by acceleration (F = MA) or (P = MV2). According to the theory of kinetic energy, every object increases its weight as well as speed in a downward movement. This very principle is applied to this particular art of self-defense. For this reason, at the moment of impact, the position of the hand normally becomes lower than the shoulder and the foot lower than the hip while the body is in the air. Reaction force, breath, control, equilibrium, concentration, and relaxation of the muscles cannot be ignored. However, these are the factors that contribute to the speed and all these factors, together with flexible and rhythmic movements, must be well coordinated to produce the maximum power in Taekwondo.


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Nine Keys to Mastery It’s easier to get on the path of mastery than to stay on it. The mot dedicated martial artist will find pitfalls as well as rewards along the way. You might not be able to avoid all the pitfalls, but you can master the keys to mastership.

all know as practicing -- doing your side kick, or form over and over. The noun is having a practice as a life’s path, what the Koreans call do or “the way.” When you practice for nothing in particular, but simply because, in some way, your practice defines you.

Key 1: Instruction

Key 4: Mental Discipline

Your relationship with your instructor is paramount. Your instructor will teach you as much as you want to learn, however, he/she cannot teach you anything you are unwilling to learn. There are many different ways to do the techniques of taekwondo. One instructor may approach the technique from a self defense aspect, while another will take a more philosophical approach. All are worth learning. Your instructor is there every day anxious to teach, if you are willing to learn. The most frustrating experience for any instructor is to teach the same student, the same thing time and again. The student who learns one concept and applies that concept to every technique, form and sparring combination is the student that the instructor loves to teach.

Key 2: Surrender

In the Master’s ceremony it is tradition that the Grand Master pour water into the master’s bowl until the bowl overflows. The symbolism that there is an endless amount of knowledge and you are never done is understood by both. You do things your instructor’s way, however, you retain your own authority. Wholeheartedness does not mean giving up your intelligence, or your ability to question what is going on. You come to know which techniques are best for you and which aren’t. You take the teaching and you make your own decisions. Surrender means balancing. Master means balancing, ever balancing. A student who looks at me and says, “I don’t have to work on that, because I already know it,” is not on the road to mastery.

Key 3: Practice

Practice 5000 times. Perfect practice makes perfect. After 5000 repetitions of one technique you can say that you know the technique. Then you can master. The word practice has a couple of uses. You might call on a verb and the other a noun. The verb is what

At one level, all martial arts refer again and again to attitude, the mental set that we knew in more innocent times as character. It takes character, discipline and mental toughness -- all good old virtues -- to keep working and learning when you are stuck on a plateau, when it would be so easy to slip, stop, get bored and quit. I see many martial artist and I can break them down into four types of students. You will fit one of these archetypes. Needless to say, the mastery curve is the best path to perfection of any task. Approaches may differ, even compete, but that does not cancel the fact that mental discipline and development, on a misty landscape of interest to only the mystical of athletes, is now in clear view for all of us. The martial arts have for decades been a vehicle for millions of martial artists to master the art and themselves.

Key 5: Don’t Obsess with Goals

The desire of most Americans for quick, sure, and highly visible results is perhaps the deadliest enemy of mastery. It’s fine for a person to have ambitious long-term goals, but the best way of reaching them is to cultivate modest expectations at every step along the way. When you’re climbing a mountain, in other words, be aware that the peak is ahead, but don’t keep looking up at it. Keep your eyes on the path. And when you reach the top of the mountain, as the Zen saying goes, keep on climbing.


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Key 6: Compete

Competition provides spice in the the martial arts as in life; it’s only when the spice becomes the whole diet that the athlete gets sick. Competition helps us hone our skills. Not to participate wholeheartedly with a will to win degrades the martial arts and insults the opponent. Take competition as an opportunity to hone your hard won skills to a fine edge. Winning is an essential element in the journey, but it isn’t the only thing. Winning graciously and losing with equal grace are the marks of a master. Competition has offered me some of the highlights of learning on my path. I had just finished an undefeated year at the national level in 1986, when the person who I had just defeated in the finals at nationals received the title due to a mix-up in the newly established point system. I watched as my opponent received the title for that year. I was later offered to share the title, but pride would not allow me to do so at that time. My instructor, Master Jager, claims that it was at that point that I became a true martial artist. My training turned from training to win competitions to training to improve myself and my students. I now wear the title uniform after over a decade. But the lesson of the competition was far more valuable than the uniform.

Key 7: Play

Some of our best workouts happen when we aren’t even looking. We all started the martial arts for fun and fitness, but sometimes we get a little too serious and forget that we aren’t the Wha rang and we don’t need to train to defend our nation from invaders.

Key 8: Avoid Vanity

One of the reasons you took up a new art was to look good. But to learn anything new, you have to be willing to look foolish. Even after years of practice, you will take pitfalls. If a Black Belt can lose his balance and fall on his duff, in front of a group of students, you should be willing to do it in the presence of your instructor and a few friends. If you’re always thinking about appearances, you can never attain the state of selfless concentration that’s necessary for effective learning and top performance.

Key 9: Have a Beginner’s Mind

Forget your rank. I cannot tell you how many black belts have quit trying, because they’re black belts.

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They think somehow that their rank proves they have nothing left to learn. Having a beginner’s mind means that you go into each class with the idea that you have something more to learn and you’re willing to learn it. If you can find the enthusiasm that you had on your first day in class, and carry that into every class, you would enjoy the art much more.

Good Horse, Bad Horse: The Trap of Talent

Talent goes along with mastery. Or does it? Often, yes. But sometimes, strangely enough those with exceptional talent have trouble staying on the path of mastery. Most of the masters in Taekwondo have stressed hard work and experience over raw talent. I have seen so many martial artists with innate ability who just didn’t want to work. They were soon gone. I’ve seen others with no ability to speak of who stayed in the arts and achieve great things. In Zen Mind, A Beginner’s Mind, Zen master Shunryu Zuzuki approached this question in terms of horses. “In our scriptures, it is said that there are four kinds of horses: excellent ones, good ones, poor ones, and bad ones. The best horse will run slow and fast, right and left, at the driver’s will, before it sees the shadow of the whip; the second best will run as well as the first one, just before the whip reaches it skin; the third one will run when it feels pain on its body; the fourth will run after the pain penetrates to the marrow of its bones. You can imagine how difficult it is for the fourth one to learn how to run. “When we hear this story, almost all of us want to be the best horse. If it is impossible to be the best one, we want to be the second best.” But this is a mistake, Master Suzuki says. When one learns too easily, one is tempted not to work hard, not to penetrate to the marrow of a practice. “If you study the martial arts you will find that those who are not so clever usually become the best martial artists. Those who are very clever with their talent often encounter great difficulty after they have reached a certain stage. This is also true in art and in life. “Sometimes, he argues, the worst horse is the most valuable one.” This leaves a clear challenge for those with exceptional talent; to achieve your full potential, to get to the marrow of your martial art, you have to work just as diligently as those with less innate ability.


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The Pilsung Foundation The Pilsung Foundation is a 501 (c)(3) organization. Although our schools are in no way tied to the Foundation, we believe in its cause and have seen it achieve positive results for some of our students....

The Pilsung Foundation’s Mission To educate youth and adults in martial arts by promoting sound positive educational programs and training that encourages having fun while learning practical skills in martial arts, stimulates members’ personal growth and development, develops effective leadership, encourages nonviolence, promotes the development of positive character traits, develops responsible citizenship, encourages members to share in community development efforts and provides learning experiences for members to practice and evaluate their growth. To educate the community in the martial arts by promoting public acceptance and awareness of the benefits of the development of positive character traits learned in martial arts, expanding the positive impact of martial arts in our communities and developing partnerships with local schools and community organizations. To provide scholarships to those who demonstrate financial need, scholastic excellence, outstanding community service or to encourage positive character development. To sponsor and encourage cultural, charitable and educational activities in the martial arts arena.

Service "Good leaders must first become good servants."

"The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it."


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Fundamentals of Self Defense Beyond Physical Skills Taekwondo strives to teach the student that fighting, even if for self defense, is not the goal. Learning to avoid situations where there is a need to defend oneself— learning to have enough confidence in who you are to walk away from confrontation rather than escalating it— is the essence of Taekwondo. In order to do this, broaden your perspective of self defense to that of maximum personal well-being. This involves more than knowing how to fight or defend oneself against an attack. It starts with a strong, positive physical, mental and spiritual grounding. It includes such things as a good diet, exercise, poise and high self esteem. It means keeping yourself physically and mentally fit. If you carry yourself in a confident manner, it is far less likely you will ever be attacked. High self-esteem also will allow your good sense to prevail and keep you away from dangerous situations. Daily practice of Taekwondo will not only give you the necessary self-defense skills, but also build selfconfidence to maximize your personal well-being. Preferred ways to maintain maximum personal wellbeing are: 1. Stay away from potentially dangerous places or situations. 2. If you wander into such a situation, do not panic, but leave promptly.

3. If confronted, don’t encourage an escalation of the conflict. Keep your cool. 4. If an attack is imminent, get away fast, if that is possible. 5. If you cannot get away, shout. Draw attention to your predicament and attempt to scare away your assailant. 6. If it becomes apparent that you absolutely can not elude the attacker in any other way, you have no other choice than to defend yourself. Maintaining your personal well being, both physically and mentally, requires continuous commitment. To have effective power, speed and technique, one must practice regularly and diligently. Likewise you must constantly strive to be a better person on a mental/spiritual level. Classes build strength, stamina and flexibility, which can be maintained over a long lifetime if the student practices on a regular basis each week. Classes also seek to instill a positive, proactive mental outlook— one where students are encouraged to reach for their full potential—not to realize their limitations. There is no quick-fix solution to obtaining a state of maximum personal well being. A constant maintenance, or total way-of-life approach is preferred. Taekwondo — it is a way of life.

Self Confidence Through Intuitive Awareness


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Technique: Accuracy, Speed and Power In order for kicks and strikes to be effective, one must use the proper technique for delivery. Body position, breath control, muscle relaxation/tension must all be employed properly. When a kick (or strike) is delivered using proper technique, it carries with it accuracy, speed and power.

Accuracy:

You need to hit what you’re striking at. Know your target, and concentrate your focus on that target. When breaking a plastic practice board, concentrate on the center of the board. When breaking real boards for you Black Belt testing, concentrate on the weakest part of the board -- usually defined by darker areas. Note: At Paragon Martial Arts we are aware of how our actions affect our environment, so we use plastic practice boards until Black Belt testings.

Speed:

Speed enhances power (and also makes it more difficult for your opponent to grab your arm or foot when throwing a punch or kick). You can gain speed by becoming more flexible. A good stretching program helps. You must always stay relaxed, because anxiety tightens muscles and makes them slower.

Master Tammy Harvey-Lamberson jumps and chambers for a board break through 4 boards.

Power:

The ability to execute techniques with maximum force. To put the most power into your techniques, use the most muscle groups. When you punch, turn your hips, shoulders and wrist to get your entire body into the punch. Kicks which involve a pivoting foot derive much of their power from that pivot motion...a side kick which is delivered without pivoting the planted foot has much less power than when it is executed properly.

Accuracy, speed and power!


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Board Breaking Breaking techniques are not a goal in themselves. They must be part of the total study of Taekwondo. There is good reason why students do not begin to break boards until they have attained a high intermediate rank. The beginner does not yet have the knowledge of proper technique required for breaking. Breaking techniques are the means whereby you demonstrate your confidence in your techniques. As with sparring, breaking techniques require a great deal of accuracy and control—perhaps even more so. With breaking, you either do or you don’t. There is no question as to whether a technique was delivered properly. Power, too, comes through the perfection of breaking. Therefore, accuracy, speed and power are the essentials for breaking techniques. Your accuracy must be right-on; your aim must ensure that your weapon goes through the target at the exact point required. Properly done, you will know how effective your strikes are. You will know that if your target had been a point on an assailant’s body, you would have shattered it. As noted, breaking techniques develop confidence. In breaking you have the opportunity and the obligation to strike an exact spot—to focus and concentrate on a non-moving target. You must learn where to strike a target. If you don’t hit the right spot on your target, you will be very aware of it, as it simply will not break. Avoid psyching yourself up to the point where you

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become tense. Do not allow yourself to get “mad” at the target. Your mind must stay calm in order for your body to be relaxed and at a maximum state of readiness. Do not rush the kick/strike in an attempt to break the target. Control your technique. It will help you develop focus. Also avoid the tendency to simply aim for the surface of the target. All materials have flexibility —some more than others: Bricks bend very little; wood and bones have a great deal of flexibility. Oddly enough, it is these materials which have the most bend in them that are the hardest to break. Everything breaks only after it is pushed past the limit of how far it bends. You must have the power and speed to push it past that limit before it has a chance to recover. You must aim for the wall behind the target. Penetrate the target. Omitting a loud “ki-yap” as you strike your target helps focus the simultaneous burst from all of your muscles at the point of impact. You may have power and speed behind your strikes, but without concentration you will have neither focus nor penetration. If your mind is somewhere else, your concentration wanders and your worries about injury swim into your thoughts. When this happens, you cannot focus your mind on the target. Concern yourself only with the task at hand, which— when breaking—is pushing your technique through the target. This way of thinking is also applicable in daily life as well as the martial arts. Do not overex-


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TAE KWON DO

Hand

Your Instructors

Kwan-jan-nim . . . . . . Head of a school system Tae-Sah-bum-nim . . . . . . . . . . Master Instructor Sah Bum nim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Instructor Bo sah bum nim . . . . . . . . . . . Trainee Instructor Kyo-sa-nim . . . . . . . Student who is a Black Belt Cho-dan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1st Degree Black Belt E-dan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2nd Degree Black Belt Sam-Dan . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3rd Degree Black Belt Jeja . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Student

Weapons

Ssahng Jeol Bahng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nunchuca Bahng Mahng Ee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stick Jahng Bahng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Long Staff

Misc. Words

Tae kwon do . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hand Foot Way Ti . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Belt Dan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Degree) of Black Belt Gup . . . . . . . . . . . . . (Grade) Rank of Color Belt Dojang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Training Hall Dobak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taekwondo Uniform Ki-hap . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yell Poomse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Form Joe-mahk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fist Jee-reu-gi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Punch Gyeo-roo-gi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sparring Pilsung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Victory Mo-ah Seo-gi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Attention Stance Shim-sah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing

Basic Commands

Cheryut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Attention Position Kyung-Ye . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bow or Respects Choom bee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ready Position Baro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Return to Ready Position Shia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . At-Ease Shi-Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Start or begin Goman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stop Dora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About Face

Basic Kicks and Blocks

Chah-gi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kick Ap-Chah-gi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Front Kick Yeop-Chah-gi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Side Kick Dol-Reyo-Chah-gi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Round Kick Makki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Block Arae-Makki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Low Block Eugool-Makki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . High Block

Foot

Way

Counting

1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hanna 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dool 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Set 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Net 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dah Saut 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ya Saut 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Il Gop 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yo Dual 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Hop 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yoll

Basic Greetings & Acknowledgements Yobosaeyo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hello Suo-gohe-sum-nida . . . . . . . You have done well Anya-ngi h-asaeyo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Goodbye Nha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Yes Aeh ne yho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No Kam sa hahm nih dah . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thank you Chun mun a yoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . You’re wecome Korean Pronunciation Guide eo = is the same as the u sound in "suffer" eh = is the same sound as the ea in "death" o = the long o as in "go" g = g as in "good" oo = as sounded in "zoo" y = always used as its sound in "yell" ee/i = as the ee in "see" ah = as in "father" eu = the oo as in "Good" r = to "roll" the r as used in Spanish At testing, always reply "Sir, the Korean word for Ready is June-bee!" “Sah-bah-nim Kohm-sah-hahm-nih-dah” Thank you Instructor.” “Chun-Hun-A-Yoe” “You’re Welcome” To bow: “Cher-yut Kyung-yeh” “Attention Bow”


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Basic Stances Back Stance 70% of your weight is on your back leg

70% of your weight is on your front leg

50% of your weight is on each leg

Foot position makes an “L� 70% of your weight is on your back leg 30% on your front leg Back Shoulder, hip and back foot are on one plane Both knees are bent

Front Stance

Feet are 1 1/2 shoulder width wide 70% of your weight is on your front leg 30% on your back leg Back let is straight Front knee is bent

Sparring Stance

Feet are parallel 50% of your weight is on your back leg 50% on your front leg It is basically a middle stance at a 15 Degree angle


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Basic Kicks

Front Kick

Striking Tool is the ball of the foot

Side Kick

Striking Tool is the heel of the foot

Round Kick

Striking Tool can be either the ball of the foot or the instep

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Kicking Basics Chamber Direction Execution (of the kick) Rechamber Return


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Basic Blocks and Strikes

Copyright 2004 Paragon Martial Arts

Double Knifehand Block Knifehand Strike

01-2004

Basics of Hand Techniques Starting Position Direction Execution (of the strike) Ending Position

Punch

Knifehand High Block

Advanced Arm Base

Backfist in Advanced Arm Base


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Nine Steps to Testing for 1st Degree Black Belt LEADERSHIP

1

Students must demonstrate their proficiency of color belt material: The proper execution of these forms will constitute a large portion of the Black Belt candidate’s testing grade. Judges will be looking for "Black Belt" chambers, stances and execution of each move. Song Ahm 1 - Song Ahm 2 - Song Ahm 3 - Song Ahm 4 Song Ahm 5 - In Wha 1 - In Wha 2

This is the first level where students can 'earn' and 'lose' stripes on their belt. This has been a tradition in our schools for over 10 years. Do not view 'losing' a stripe as a failure - but as an opportunity to progress and learn. Remember that even if you perform your best and lose a stripe - that means your instructor believes you can do it even better. You can receive no higher compliment!

2

ALL OR NOTHING TEST

After achieving two or three stripes, the student will be asked to perform a poomse of the instructor’s choice. If the student does not perform that form at a Black Belt level, he/she will lose all of his/her stripes earned. Within the following week, the student will have the opportunity to earn them all back either in another 'all or nothing test' or individually. Be bold with your stripes. Enjoy, and ask to be challenged. When your instructor asks who wants to 'defend their stripes' be the first to volunteer. If you truly earned your stripes the first time -- it should be easy to get them back. In the words of President Theodore Roosevelt ... “The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short and again, who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best, knows the triumph of high achievement; and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”

3

AMBASSADORSHIP

When a student becomes a Black Belt, we feel that they should represent the Black Belt beyond the walls of the dojang. It is important that these new Black Belts represent their school and their instructor in the community. The Black Belt candidate must find a community venue and put together a demonstration (solo, with other students or with the demo team) and

perform a demonstration to represent Taekwondo, Paragon Martial Arts and his or her instructor. The demo should include physical skills and a presentation designed to inform the group about Taekwondo. Some venues for ambassadorship: Chamber of Commerce, Church groups, Summer Festivals, Boy/Girl Scouts, other martial arts organizations. Members of the school's demonstration team are always available to help with this part of your requirements.

4 5

RED BELT FORM

Choong Jung EE-Janhng (#2)

VOLUNTEERISM

It is important for Black Belts to be a positive influence in their community. We ask that you donate 6 - 8 hours to a local non-profit organization. Pick an organization that has meaning for you! Document your service. An example would be to donate time to the Board of the Pilsung Foundation helping organize their next fundraiser or auction. Following are a few other nonprofit organizations in the mountain area: The Pilsung Foundation, Habitat for Humanity, People Comforters, Friends of Park County Animals, Humane Society, Wilderness on Wheels, your local church. Your volunteerism can be done at any time during your Red/Black Belt training. Documentation need only consist of a note or some other written form of verification of your participation. Provide the documentation to your instructor to put in your file.

6

KOREAN LANGUAGE

A Black Belt should have knowledge of the culture that developed our art. The following are some basic Korean words that will be asked on your testing day. Please be prepared to interpret . . . Count to ten Ready Punch Side Kick Form Victory Degree (rank) Grade (rank) Attention Stance

Master Master Instructor Fist Round Kick Sparring 1st Degree Black Belt Start Strike Testing

Thank you, Instructor Yell Front Kick Stop Taekwondo facility Uniform, At Ease, Block Tae kwon do

You may want to add to the list or learn a series of sentences or phrases in Korean. If you choose to do this, please give a list to your instructor for testing


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advanced level sparring.

day.

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MARTIAL ARTS / KOREAN PHILOSOPHY

The following are questions that a new Black Belt should be ready to answer at his/her testing. The questions are designed to help the Black Belt better understand his/her martial art and to provide an avenue for the new Black Belt to educate the lower ranking students on some areas of history and philosophy. Under each questions are some resources to help you best answer the questions.

9

BOARD BREAKING

1. Elbow strike, jump reverse side kick 2. Jump side kick (1 obstacle)

NOTE: The board breaks above are those required by the American Taekwondo Association. Your instructor may give you a variation for your testing.

KARATE FOR KIDS 1. Recite the Wha Rang Code of Chivalry. 2. Be prepared to explain who the Wha Rang were and their role in Korean history. 3. Explain the various symbols on the Korean flag. 4. Explain what the various colored belts symbolize. 5. Explain what the Black Belt symbolizes. 6. Explain the elements and symbolism of the Paragon Patch 7. Recite the nine color belt life skills 8. Be prepared to explain what each life skills mean. 9. Optional: question written by parents ADULTS 1. Explain the symbolism of the Song Ahm Star 2. Give an interpretation of the Scrolls of Song Ahm 3. Explain what the Black Belt symbolizes. 3. Explain how a black belt achieves power. 4. A good Taekwondo technician measures his technique not only by whom he defeats, but rather by his defeat of his own imperfections in technique and training. How does this proverb differentiate an athlete from a martial artist? 6. Explain the elements and symbolism of the Paragon patch 7. “Self Confidence through intuitive awareness� How does this help in self Defense? 8. ______________________________________ 9. ______________________________________

8

FREE SPARRING

Black Belt candidates will usually spar a high ranking instructor or Black Belt at testing. This will allow the new Black Belt to relax and demonstrate

"The sense of achievement in Taekwondo is not about getting the next belt -- it's about earning it!" Master Bill Hauptman

"A black belt certificate is as good as the training that went into it, the standards that were met to earn it and the instructor who awarded it" Master Bill Hauptman


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What is a Paragon Excellence? Visualization:

Paragon Black Belts learn to practice, mentally rehearse, and visualize the successful outcome of activities. The mind cannot tell the difference between what is real and what is vividly imaged. They learn to pre-play and re-play performance to anchor success and eliminate failure. Winning Black Belts learn to control their physical and mental state and create an ability to maintain relaxed alertness and to maximize their flexibility and ability to respond quickly and appropriately.

Attitude:

Paragon Black Belts learn to have an overall attitude of personal optimism and enthusiasm. Winners understand that life is a self-fulfilling prophecy – a person usually gets what he or she actively expects over the long run. Winners have HIGH EXPECTATIONS of themselves and work to achieve those outcomes.

Positive Mental Attitude:

Paragon Black Belts learn to control their “inner dialogue.” They create a supportive conversation with themselves that support their goals and their energies.

Respect:

Paragon Black Belts have the ability to be happy and to function in the world, while showing appropriate conduct and good manners. Respect represents a sincere appreciation of values and the rights of other people. To respect one’s self it is vital to avoid habit, and behaviors that are unhealthy or destructive.

Self-Confidence:

Paragon Black Belts have the ability to accomplish anything they are willing to work to achieve. They are not intimidated by the negative reactions of others – nor, do they get mired in mediocrity. They rise above the crowd and achieve great heights.

Honesty:

Paragon Black Belts know who they are and where they are going. They effect their environment rather than letting their environment effect them. They make decisions based upon their own moral compass, not based upon the tides and whims of those around them. Events don’t alter their understanding of right and wrong or of truth and falseness. Winning Black Belts understand that honesty is more than simply avoiding lies. It includes a belief in, the pursuit of the truth. In order to have healthy relationships with other people, honesty must be present. Winning Black Belts take responsibility for their own actions. Paragon Black Belts accept 100% responsibility for the outcomes in their own life. Winners take credit or the blame for their own performance. They never “externalize” their failures – but, take responsibility for their own performance and results. Success Attitude - Positive Self-Motivation with Definite Commitment. Winning Black Belts dwell on the rewards of success not on the penalties of failure. We always move in the direction of our currently dominant thoughts. Positive self-motivation arrives through visualizing your desires while limiting fears. Motivation also comes from focusing on the long-term results desired, not the daily disappointments and struggles.


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Evaluations by Rank


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White Belt Test

Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your first testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ Form for the session? ____________ No. of Moves? _____ What is the meaning of White Belt? _____________________________________________________ History 1. Taekwondo literally means? Tae:______________ Kwon: _________________ Do: ________________ 2. Taekwondo originated in what country? ____________________________. 3. A traditional taekwondo school is called a _______________. Philosophy 4. Ancient Koreans thought of the tiger as having absolute ________________. 5. The school’s “Tiger” patch represents what three virtues? __________, ____________ & ___________. 6. The white uniform that a Taekwondo student wears is a ___________________. Knowledge 7. _______________ is the customary act of greeting and respect in martial arts, the same way an actor bows to an audience, or the way we give a handshake. 8. Practicing at home greatly enhances _­ ______________ at the school and it should be encouraged. 9. Throwing your dobok on the floor or having a dirty dobok shows disrespect for: _____________, _________________ and ________________.


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Orange Belt Test Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your Orange Belt Testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ Form for the session? ____________ No. of Moves? _____ What is the meaning of Orange Belt? _____________________________________________________ History 1. In the oaths we say every day, please explain the following lines:

Karate for Kids: “Practicing to the best of my ability.” ___________________________________

Adults: “Integrity within myself.” ___________________________________________________

2. What does Paragon mean? _________________________________________________________ 3. List your Instructors from your immediate instructor to our Grand Master: ___________________

_______________________________________________________________________________

Philosophy 4. The “shadow dragon” patch represents what three virtues? _________, __________ & __________ 5. The symbol in the center of the Korean flag is the ________________________________. 6. What does the symbol on the upper right hand of this page represent? ______________________ Knowledge 7. The 5 kicking basics are ___________, ___________, ___________, __________ & ________. 8. In a back stance, _________________ percent of your weight is on your back leg. 9. According to “the way,” we practice because in some way our practice ________________________.


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Yellow Belt Test Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your Yellow Belt Testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ Form for the session? ____________ No. of Moves? _____ What is the meaning of Yellow Belt? _____________________________________________________ History 1. The Silla’s _________________ warriors are credited with the growth and spread of Taekwondo throughout Korea. 2. How many World Champions have come from Paragon Martial Arts: __________________________ 3. Sr. Master Robert Jager is one of the few people to be in the ATA’s Hall of __________________. Philosophy 4. The image of the tiger was used on ______________, _______________ and _________________. 5. On the school’s tiger patch, how many colors are there? _______ What do they represent? _________. 6. The responsibility to learn taekwondo is yours. What did an ancient sage write about this?

______________________________________________________________________________.

Knowledge 7. A punch with the right fist is aided by the left fist ________________________________. 8. After _______________ repetitions you can say you know a technique. 9. In a front stance, you feet are ______________________________ apart.


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Camo Belt Test Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your Camo Belt Testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ Form for the session? ____________ No. of Moves? _____ What is the meaning of Camo Belt? _____________________________________________________ History 1. The first Taekwondo school (kwan) was started in Yon Chun, Seoul, Korea in what year? ____________ 2. Today the ATA’s Grand Master is the brother of Grand Master H.U. Lee, the founder of SongAhm

Taekwondo. What is our Grand Master’s name? _________________________________

3. Master Hauptman achieved what title in 1986? ________________________________ Philosophy 4. In Asian culture the dragon represents ________________, ______________ and _______________. 5. What are the three life skills for an intermediate student? ____________, _________ and __________ 6. At the intermediate level, a student should have a solid grasp of ______________________________. Knowledge 7. In order for kicks and strikes to be effective, one must use the proper _______________________. 8. A sparring stance is a ________________________ at a 15 degree angle. 9. In advanced arm base, both hands are _______________________________________.


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Green Belt Test Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your Green Belt Testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ Form for the session? ____________ No. of Moves? _____ What is the meaning of Green Belt? _____________________________________________________ History 1. The earliest records of Taekwondo practice date back to about _______ B.C. 2. How many National Champions have come from Paragon Martial Arts? ________________________ 3. Grand Master H.U Lee’s first school was located in ___________________________. Philosophy 4. The Korean word for bow is _____________________________. 5. A student who uses Taekwondo outside the school for anything except a “legitimate” self defense situation may be ___________________ from the school. 6. What does the symbol in the center of the Korean Flag represent? ______________________________ Knowledge 7. To gain speed you must stay _____________, anxiety tightens muscles and make them slower.

2

8. A beginner’s mind means that you go into each class with the idea that you have ______________. 9. Power = __________________ X _________________________


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Purple Belt Test Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your Purple Belt Testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ Form for the session? ____________ No. of Moves? _____ What is the meaning of Purple Belt? _____________________________________________________ History 1. He is called the father of Taekwondo. ________________________. 2. She was the first woman to achieve the title of SongAhm Master. _____________________________. 3. Of the 24 Black Belts who have been on the World Demo Team, how many of them have come from Paragon Martial Arts? ___________. Philosophy 4. The Nine Colored Dragon patch is worn by what rank student? _____________________________ 5. The “kwe” or trigrams in the corners of the Korean flag represent

_____________, ________________, ________________ and ____________.

6. Most everything at the Advanced level is geared towards preparing to be a _____________________. Knowledge 7. When a kick is delivered using proper technique, it carries with it __________, _______ & ______. 8. Without concentration you will have neither ________________ nor ____________________. 9. The four basics for all hand techniques are __________, __________, __________ & ___________.


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Low Blue Belt Test

Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your Low Blue Belt Testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ Form for the session? ____________ No. of Moves? _____ What is the meaning of Blue Belt? _____________________________________________________ History 1. Grand Master Lee was born in what country? ________________________________. 2. Taekwondo incorporates the abrupt linear movements of _______ and the flowing patterns of _________. 3. ____________________ was the first person to bring Taekwondo to the U.S.

Philosophy 4. The Korean word for “Thank you Instructor is” _____________________________________. 5. The Korean word for instructor is _______________________________. 6. What three virtues are represented by the “Nine Colored Dragon” patch?

________________________, _____________________ and _________________________

Knowledge 7. As with sparring, breaking techniques require a great deal of _____________ & ______________. 8. To put the most power into your techniques, use the __________ ______________ _________. 9. If you carry yourself in a confident manner, it is far less likely you will ever be ________________.


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High Blue Belt Test

Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your High Blue Belt Testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ Form for the session? ____________ No. of Moves? _____ What is the meaning of Blue Belt? _____________________________________________________ History 1. Grand Master Lee tested for 9th Degree in what year? ___________________ 2. Master Jager and Master Harvey-Lamberson are Senior Masters. What rank is a Senior Master? _____. 3. When Grand Master passed away on October 5, 2000, he was elevated to what rank by

the other Grand Masters of Taekwondo outside the ATA? _____________________.

Philosophy 4. The Korean term for the Korean flag is ____________________________________. 5. The Korean word for taekwondo uniform is _____________________. 6. Patterns, or _____________, are various fundamental movements, most of which represent either attack or defense techniques, set to a fixed or logical sequence. Knowledge 7. What seven forms are required for a Black Belt Candidate to test for Black Belt?

___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________

8. Step 5 of the requirements for a Black Belt Candidate is __________________. 9. To reach mastery, people with talent have to work just as ______________ as those with less ability.


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Low Brown Belt Test Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your Low Brown Belt Testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ Form for the session? ____________ No. of Moves? _____ What is the meaning of Brown Belt? _____________________________________________________ History 1. Grand Master H.U. Lee is best know for what saying? ___________________, ____________________. 2. The Paragon school system held their first testing in what year? ____________________. 3. The SongAhm style of Taekwondo was introduced on _____________________ at the top of SongAhm Mountain in Little Rock, Arkansas. Philosophy 4. What does the symbol on the upper right hand of this page represent? 5. What are the three life skills studied at the Advanced ranks? _________, __________ & ____________ 6. The red/black belt represents __________________________________________________. Knowledge 7. Step 4 of the requirements for a Black Belt Candidate is __________________. 8. The nine patterns of color belt touch how many points on the SongAhm star? ________________ 9. To know others is wisdom, knowing the self is __________________________.


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High Brown Belt Test Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your Red Belt Testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ Form for the session? ____________ No. of Moves? _____ What is the meaning of Brown Belt? ______________________________________________________ History 1. In the definition of Paragon, there are two images that represent “a model of excellence.”

___________________________ & ________________________.

2. In 1909 the ___________________ invaded Korea and occupied the country for 36 years. 3. The Kukkiwan is a large ________________________ located in Seoul, Korea. Philosophy 4. The Korean word for taekwondo school is __________________________. 5. Explain the various symbols of the Korean Flag: ___________________________________________ 6. The sense of achievement in Taekwondo is not about getting the next belt -- it’s about ___________________________. Knowledge 7. Step 2 of the requirements for a Black Belt Candidate is __________________. 8. Explain where a martial artist gets his/her power. __________________________________________

_________________________________________________________________________________

9. Maintaining your personal well being, both physically and mentally, requires continuous __________.


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Low Red Belt Test

Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your Low Red Belt Testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ Form for the session? ____________ No. of Moves? _____ What is the meaning of Red Belt? ______________________________________________________ History 1. What weapons were the Wha rang trained in? ______________________________________________ 2. In the Spirit of SongAhm, what does it mean to have “Courtesy for Fellow Students?” ______________

__________________________________________________________________________________.

3. The ATA started using the _______________ style forms, but now uses the _______________ style developed by Grand Master H.U. Lee. Philosophy 4. The Korean word for round kick is ___________________________________. 5. Explain the elements of the Paragon patch: ____________________________________________ 6. There are ______________ points to the SongAhm star. Knowledge 7. To break a board, you must avoid the tendency to simply aim for the ______________ of the target. 8. What are the Tenets of Taekwondo? ________ ________ _________ _________ ________ ______ 9. Wha rang code of Chivalry : __________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________


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High Red Belt Test

Please fill this out and show your instructor prior to your High Red Belt Testing

This session’s life skill?_______________ What is the meaning of Red/Black Belt? _____________________________________ History 1. What is the Wha rang Code of Chivalry? ________________________________________________

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2. Wha rang means? _________________________________________________________________ 3. What does Black Belt represent? _____________________________________________________ Philosophy 4. A black belt has “absorbed” all the knowledge of the color belt ranks and overcome or ________________ that level of training. 5. The leadership patch is represented by what three virtues? __________, _________ & _____________

6. The Nine Colored Dragon Patch represents our past accomplishments and our ____________________.

Knowledge 7. A Black Belt Candidate can both ____________ and ___________ stripes on their belt. 8. Loyalty is a way of acknowledging the _______________________ that people have in your life. 9. ___________________ is the ability to calmly proceed when things become slow or difficult.


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__________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________

Master __________________ Thank you, Instructor __________________ Ready __________________ Master Instructor __________________ __________________ Yell Punch __________________ __________________ Fist __________________ Front Kick Side Kick __________________ Round Kick __________________ Stop __________________ Form __________________ __________________ Sparring Taekwondo facility __________________ Victory __________________ 1st Degree Black Belt __________________ __________________ Uniform, Degree (rank) __________________ __________________ Start __________________ At Ease Grade (rank) __________________ Strike __________________ Block __________________ Attention Stance __________________

Testing __________________ __________________ Tae kwon do KARATE FOR KIDS 1. Recite the Wha Rang Code of Chivalry. _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ 2. Be prepared to explain who the Wha Rang were and their role in Korean history. 3. Explain the various symbols on the Korean flag. 4. Explain what the various colored belts symbolize. 5. Explain what the Black Belt symbolizes. 6. Explain the elements and symbolism of the Paragon Patch 7. Recite the nine color belt life skills 8. Be prepared to explain what each life skills mean. 9. Optional: question written by parents

ADULTS 1. Explain the symbolism of the Song Ahm Star 2. Give an interpretation of the Scrolls of Song Ahm 3. Explain what the Black Belt symbolizes. 3. Explain how a black belt achieves power. 4. A good Taekwondo technician measures his technique not only by whom he defeats, but rather by his defeat of his own imperfections in technique and training. How does this proverb differentiate an athlete from a martial artist? 6. Explain the elements and symbolism of the Paragon patch 7. “Self Confidence through intuitive awareness� How does this help in self Defense? 8. ______________________________________ ______________________________________ ______________________________________ 9. ______________________________________


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Paragon Martial Arts Student Handbook

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Copyright 2004 Paragon Martial Arts

01-2004


Paragon Martial Arts Student Handbook