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CLINTON COUNTY, NEW YORK

This Week

Plan could save jobs at Plattsburgh Library

ELIZABETHTOWN

FERAL CAT FUND

Woman devotes her life to saving animals. PAGE 2

It means concessions, but jobs would be saved and the library strengthened

LIBRARY

By Stephen Bartlett stephen@denpubs.com

Plattsburgh Public Library’s Board of Directors discuss a plan that c ould save four positions and increase the library’s financial stability. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

Librarian could lose job to budget cuts.

PLATTSBURGH — Plattsburgh Public Library’s Board of Directors voted Dec. 20 on a plan that would save four positions that had been slated for elimination. The plan is contingent on the union and library employees agreeing to a number of concessions, including for going pay raises for the next four years and to a 15-

PAGE 3 EYE CLINIC

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Home for the holidays stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH — The holidays are about family. Some haven’t been together in a bit, others gather often, but when it comes to the holidays, people D enton Publications spoke with said being under the same roof is a priority. “It is important to be with family and to enjoy the time you spend together,” said Julia Everding. She’s up fr om Albany to spend time with her mother and while shopping in Plattsbur gh said ther e is something special about “Christmas time.” “This whole month is magical,” Everding said. “Even though I am older, it still feels magical.”

Military veteran opens eye clinic in Plattsburgh.

Rochelle Kral of Peru said the holidays ar e about getting together with family too. It is one of the first years in some time her entire family is able to get together during the holidays. “I can’t wait to get up at 6 a.m. and do stockings,” she giggled. Her sister , Sara Rauen, also of Peru, said they stay up all night like little kids. Of course, befor e that they eat a ton of food. “I cook for everybody ,” Rauen said. “Lots of sweets.” But the sweetest part, she said, is spending time with her sisters. Cliff McCarrell doesn’t get to see

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Look inside for the week in sports.

Pictured at right: Nanc y Frenyea recently helped raise money f or the M ake a Wish Foundation.

PAGE 14

Photo by Stephen Bartlett

Index

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By Stephen Bartlett


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December 24, 2011

A lifetime saving animals Woman runs rescue organization out of her home in Plattsburgh

The devotion turned For more information contact St. John Feral Cat into an Fund at 534-0824 or on the Web at http://memidea when bers.petfinder.com/~NY483/index.html or email she found at: madrose000@yahoo.com two feral cat colonies she fed every pay check. Her sister helped her build her first shelter. “I think that was the start of it.” In 2002, the media ranarticles on her eff orts and she raised nearly $1,800 and opened a business account, naming St. John Feral Cat Fund after her father. “In 2004 we incorporated and became a non-pr ofit,” St. John said. “I operate out of my house, and we have four board members.” St. John Feral cat Fund is not a shelter. “I d on’t b elieve i n s helters,” S t. J ohn s aid. “ It’s l ike a prison, wher e you hold animals in cages until they can be adopted.” Instead, the T own of Plattsbur gh r esident uses foster homes for a short time frame and “better adoption.” “I think I have taken one cat back in 10 years.” The non-pr ofit advocates non-lethal feline population control and raises awar eness by pr oviding the public with information on feral and stray cat issues, including controlling populations within colonies thr ough Trap-Neuter-Return. Under that management plan, stray and feral cats living outdoors are humanely trapped, evaluated, vaccinated, sterilized and ear tipped for identification by veterinarians. “We are adoption partners with PetSmart,” St. John said. She receives 75 to 100 complaint calls in a week. She fosters constantly, but it is mor e than she can handle. St. John

Volunteers needed

stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH — As a little girl, Victoria St. John wanted to know what it was like to be a cat. So she went outside and slept in the cat box. The founder and dir ector of the St. John Feral Cat Fund, referred to by many as the “cat lady,” rescued more than 300 animals this year . And while the non-pr ofit or ganization consistently r uns at a deficit, St. John has no plans to stop any time soon. “I’ve always rescued animals.” Born in South Carolina, St. John moved to theAusable area when she was four or five. She and her sister Amelia followed animals ar ound from as far back as she can remember. “My par ents would send us to the stor e to get milk and eggs, and we were trying to rescue cats,” St. John said. She once found a cat in a dumpster and br ought him home. Her parents said no, but she found ways around them. At 12, she found feral cat colonies in the Port Douglas ar ea and stole milk and ground beef from the refrigerator to feed them. At 13, the family moved to Ellenburg and St. John and her sister snuck cats in through the bedroom window. “I just thought they were suffering.” When her parents left she would feed them in the shed. Once, her parents backed over a cat. The animal was suffering and St. John drowned it. She knew then she was going to devote her life to making a difference for animals.

works seven days a week, with little time for friends beyond cats. There are some volunteers but no paid employees. “We just keep going from problem to problem,” she said. “We can’t catch up and are constantly doing fundraisers.” The toughest part of the job is walking away fr om situations that ar e legal but not ethical, such as when she came across 17 dogs chained to barr els. Of course, St. John doesn’t believe in leash laws. “Go chain your kids up,” St. John quipped. “Why are we chaining something?” The r eward is taming a feral cat, connecting with it and offering the animal a chance at happiness. “You do what you think is right,” St. John said. “But we can only do so much.”

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Librarian’s job on the chopping block By Stephen Bartlett

Kelly Sexton loves her job handling local history as a librarian for the Plattsburgh Public Library. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

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eral of the United States Army from May 29, 1828 to June 25, 1841. During the war of 1812, stephen@denpubs.com Macdonough commanded the naval for ces that defeated the British navy. PLATTSBURGH — It took Kelly Sexton a “I got the best job in the building,” she while to find her way to the library. But now that she’s ther e, the Plattsbur gh said. “It is fun to get into the old stuf f. You open a box and you ar e not sur e what you Public Library librarian loves her job. Sadly, Sexton’s position was eliminated in are going to find.” She spends much of her time at the r efera r ound of cuts to deal with a $150,000 deficit, and she is slated to lose her position ence desk, answering patrons’ questions. She’s been asked if people can sneeze unby the end of the month. “I don’t know what I am going to do at this derwater, and the answer is yes. “But you inhale when you sneeze, so you point,” said the 38-year-old single mother of have to be careful not to drown yourself.” two children. She has also been asked the re al names for Sexton graduated with a double major in professional wr estlers and why men wear psychology and anthr opology and a minor wigs in court in England. in archaeology. Some people simply need to find the forms Then, one day she got on the Civil Service list for a library clerk and landeda job at the required to sell their homes without the assistance of a r ealtor. Then ther e ar e some Plattsburgh P ublic L ibrary, t hough b y t he end of the interview for that job people were who need help with genealogy. “Sometimes I don’t have the answers, but pointing her in the direction of librarian. She returned to school and earned her master ’s I c an t ell t hem w here t o g o,” S exton s aid. “Not everything is available online. There is degree in library science. so much cool stuff in here.” “I think I was born a librarian,” Sexton She’s been at the library about 12 years said. “It was just a matter of getting a degr ee now, nearly two years as a librarian, and was and realizing it.” Today she takes care of local history at the blindsided when she learned her position Plattsburgh Public Library where she recent- was being eliminated. “I wonder what I am going to do,” Sexton ly organized a collection that was more than said. “I am putting my resume out there and 120-years-old, with some documents that were even older. The collection includes let- keeping my ear to the gro und. But I don’t really have a plan at this point. ters fr om Alexander Macomb and Thomas “If I could find something that dealt with Macdonough about troop movements. the history of this are a, that would be gre at.” Macomb was the field commander at the Battle of Plattsburgh and commanding gen-

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December 24, 2011

Willsboro native earns $1 million on ‘Survivor’ By Keith Lobdell keith@denpubs.com WILLSBORO — Since the inception of “Survivor,” 22-year-old Willsboro native Sophie Clarke has always wanted to be on the final stage of the CBS television show. On Dec. 18, Clarke not only r ealized that dream but also the dream of winning $1 million as the 23r d champion of the r eality show. Clarke, a Willsboro Central School graduate who starred for the Warriors on the field and court as well as in the classr oom, was crowned champion during a three-hour season finale. “My parents were here,” said Clarke, who spoke over phone fr om Los Angeles, where the finale was air ed. “Both my sisters wer e here along with a friend fr om college and a family friend.” Clarke said that she did her best to keep her family members in the dark, especially her older twin sisters, Edwina and Phoebe. “I was really cruel because about an hour before the finale started I texted my sisters and told them that I didn’t r eally win the million,” Clarke said. “So they watched the whole episode thinking that I didn’t win. I think they swore at me when I finally made it down to hug them after the show. “They knew my dad came out for the family visit, but they knew nothing after that,” Clarke added. Her father , Thurston, had been a guest on the show when one family member was allowed to visit. Clarke said that her phone started “blowing up” shortly after the winning moment. “Someone turned my phone of f as I was doing interviews after the show ,” Clarke said. “I had 100 texts and 200 Facebook messages. I still have my computer in fr ont of me. I don’t think anyone in my cast had so much support. It’s so nice to have it coming from your hometown and have it coming from people that you have known since you were 5 years old.” Clarke also got a chance to mention her

Willsboro’s Sophie Clarke was the winner of the CBS Television reality competition, “Survivor,” after a jury of fellow competitors voted her the champion during the Dec. 18 season finale. Clarke won $1,000,000 as the victor in the shows 23rd season. hometown during the finale. “It was so nice to mention W illsboro on national television when Jef f (Pr obst, the shows host) brought it up,” Clarke said. Clarke said that she was able to use the skills that she learned gr owing up in the small town of W illsboro to her advantage during the show, including learning how to be a part of a group with different ideals. “If you look at the alliance I created there, I had a pact with a rancher , a ‘dragon slayer,’ a dating coach and a 19-year -old with two kids, 50 tattoos and a wife. At times, it was hard group of people to be around.” Clarke said that W illsboro helped her to

Photo provided CBS

mix with that variety of people. “There’s not enough people to pick your friends,” Clarke said. “That was pr obably one of the weirdest alliances in Survivor history. I gr ew to r eally appr eciate everybody out there. Willsboro helped with that.” Clarke said that because of her alliance, the strategy was able to r emain the same throughout the season. “I realized I was in this alliance of people that were not going to go back on there word with me,” Clarke said. “I saw this very clear path to the final six. When I got there , it was like an onion; there were alliances within alliances, and I was fortunate to be a part of

each one of them.” While Clarke received a lot of support and well-wishes fr om W illsboro, she said that her friends at med school in New York City were a lot more aloof to her exploits. “People in my medical school wer e not that into the show,” she said. “A lot of them really didn’t know that I was on it. They know now. It was nice to do my thing and go to class and study, on Wednesday night be on national television and then go back to being with my friends the next day.” Clarke said that she felt her r oad to the prize was made complete in the final immunity challenge, when she beat her toughest competition and fan favorite, Ozzy Lusth, in a puzzle. “I knew that if I lost that challenge, I was going home that night,” Clarke said. “It was like penalty kicks in a soccer game. This was the last shot I had to win it or go home. Ozzy was going to walk away with it. That was a million dollar challenge for Ozzy , and it turned out to be a million-dollar challenge for me, too.” Clarke, who graduated fr om Middlebury College before enrolling in med school, said that the bulk of her money will go towar d college expenses, but that she will keep some to splurge. “I like the idea of just getting a ticket and going somewhere,” she said. “I would like to splurge and do something that I would have never done and just go somewhere.” As for a return to her hometown, Clarke, who made an appearance at Johnny’s Restaurant during Thanksgiving break, said that she will be home for the last part of the holidays. “I am going to be back after Christmas for a couple of days so I am excited to see everyone for New Year ’s,” she said. For mor e, including her secr et weapon contained in the water bottle for the final tribal council, listen to our interview with Survivor Champion Sophie Clarke online at www.thevalleynews.org.

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December 24, 2011

Opinion

A COMMUNITY SERVICE: This community newspaper and its delivery are made possible by the advertisers you’ll find on the pages inside. Our sixty plus employees and this publishing company would not exist without their generous support of our efforts to gather and distribute your community news and events. Please thank them by supporting them and buying locally. And finally, thanks to you, our loyal readers, for your support and encouragement over the past 64 years from all of us here at the Burgh and Denton Publications.

Viewpoint

Burgh Editorial

Experience the joy ... all year long

D

oubtlessly, most of our readers will be attending church this weekend, enjoying the melodic, memoryfilled strains of the classic Christmas car ols, hearing comforting wor ds fr om cler gy, and perhaps enjoying the warm glow of candlelight in the faces of parishioners at Christmas Eve services. These soul-stirring sights and sounds, which fill us with the spirit of love and hope, won’t be experienced again until next year. Or will they? With the pressures of employment, homemaking and other commitments, as many as half of those attending chur ch this weekend won’t be attending services until Easter or next Christmas — motivated by a sense of spiritual duty or adherence to tradition. But we at Denton Publications pr opose a challenge to those of us who belong to the above group of occasional church attendees. It’s a challenge that reaps many benefits — spiritually, emotionally and socially. Why not r eturn to chur ch the following week — and attend regularly throughout the year? Those who return to church on New Year ’s Day and continue the practice thr ough 2012 are likely to experience infusions of holiday joy, love, and hope over and over again, uplifting their pressured lives. It’s not only for raising one’s spiritual awareness and to build a foundation of faith, but to become more involved in such a vital element of the community. Church activities have for centuries been a mainstay of community life. Not only do local churches’ social events, and their youth programs provide vital lifelong gr ounding, but their various activities and missions are vital in connecting all of us in such crucial ways. Also important are the various community outreach pr ograms, whether it’s food pantries, clothing drives, or collections for families w ho’ve f aced ca lamities or m erely unfortunate circumstances. It’s important to be aware that the churc hes in the Adirondacks and other r ural ar eas

need our involvement more than ever. Studies by various denominations have confirmed that rural churches in America and Europe have been losing members at a substantial rate. The Adirondack Park Regional Assessment Project report, released in 2009 by theAdirondack Association of T owns and V illages, showed that the Adirondacks, particularly the central regions, have lost up to one-third of their population since 1970. The number of children living year-round in the Adirondacks have decr eased even more drastically, according to the report’s recent update. It’s likely due to the young adults moving out of the region for better job opportunities and launching their families elsewhere. This is particularly har d on the chur ches here, as it’s the young children that have traditionally drawn their par ents into chur ch life. The result of this population hemorrhaging has been a lot of empty pews, scarce attendance at Sunday schools, and elimination of many chur ch social events and outr each programs. Add to these tr ends the new attitude espoused by Baby Boomers and their offspring that str esses individualism and mor e and more people are interested in church only on their own terms. With this shift in demographics and attitude — and social media and electr onic media increasingly competing for our time and attention — the families who r emain her e have a n e ver-greater r esponsibility t o k eep the churches not only alive and solvent, but vibrant and influential. Let’s head back to church Jan. 1 and thereafter. We need our churches and their activities, and they need us.

This editorial is the collaborative opinion of a board comprised of Thom Randall, Fr ed Herbst, Lou V arricchio, Keith Lobdell, Stephen Bartlett, Andy Flynn and John Gereau. Comments may be directed to denpubs@denpubs.com.

Denton Publications, Inc. W e’re m ore tha n a n ew spa per.W e’re a com m un ity service. Our goal at Denton Publications is to publish accurate, useful and timely information in our newspapers, news products, shopping guides, vacation guides, and other specialty publications for the benefit of our readers and advertisers. We value your comments and suggestions concerning all aspects of this publication.

Denton Publications Founded By Wm. D. Denton PUBLISHER................................................................................................................................................................Daniel E. Alexander ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER................................................................................................................................................................Ed Coats OPERATIONS MANAGER..............................................................................................................................................William Coats BUSINESS OFFICE MANAGER...........................................................................................................................Cheryl Mitchell GENERAL MANAGER CENTRAL.............................................................................................Daniel E. Alexander, Jr. MANAGING EDITOR.............................................................................................................................................................John Gereau ASST. MANAGING EDITOR...............................................................................................................................................Andy Flynn GENERAL MANAGER NORTH.....................................................................................................................Ashley Alexander GENERAL MANAGER SOUTH.....................................................................................................................Scarlette Merfeld HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGER.......................................................................................................................Tom Henecker FINANCIAL CONTROLLER..............................................................................................................................................Nicole Pierce

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Christmas wishes 2011

T

his time of year my share some of what they family is always have with others less fortuasking for clues on nate. We all witness those possible Christmas gifts. I’ve who give from the heart reglearned over time that if I ularly even at times when don’t give them useful ideas they don’t have much. Just I end up with things I have imagine a world full of peolittle to no use for or even ple helping each other. worse must be seen wearing I wish our government the item in public. Despite and all governments could strongly advocating for buyput aside their bickering and Dan Alexander ing simple and not spending seek compromise for the Thoughts from much on me, I’ve learned if I people they govern by findBehind the Pressline don’t provide specifics, I’ve ing the common ground and got no one to blame but myself. recognizing the important leadership roles Christmas is all about hope, faith and they play in advancing society. love. It’s a time for giving and receiving, a I wish for those unemployed to find emtime for friends and family and it’s a time ployment in fields they find rewarding. to remember the true meaning of the seaEqually important I wish for all those curson and how a small child born in a rently employed to value their careers and manger over 2000 year ago changed our utilize a strong work ethic in the tasks they world forever. perform, understanding that the job they With that thought in mind, I thought I do is a direct reflection on the person they would use this week’s column to express are. I also wish that employers would place my Christmas wish list for the really imgreater value on the efforts of those they portant wishes in life. They are the wishes employ. most never really speak much about beI wish for Christmas 2011 to be another cause they are the type of wishes that can’t turning point in a world that seems to have be easily granted or fulfilled but yet in my lost its way. Despite remarkable technoloheart they remain the real wishes that I’m gy, advancements in the medical and sciensure many of us share. tific fields we need the saving grace of the I wish for greater respect for all humans. miracle child born so many years ago. That those who carry weapons, seek to do Many may say the wishes above are harm or hatred toward others, could just nothing but fanciful dreams, but not one of respect people of different views, faith, those fanciful dreams could not become reskin color or nationality. They call it world ality if each of us were to embraces them peace. I’m sure we all would love to witand make them our own. It’s amazing what ness it, if only for a day or even an hour. a little hope, faith and love can do in your I wish for greater opportunity for all life if you let them in and share with them children. To be raised in safe homes by lovwith all that you come in contact with. And ing parents, with food on the table, a warm let’s face it, with all of our running around, roof overhead, an education system that Christmas preparations and gifting this prepares them for fruitful lives full of season at the end of the day wouldn’t you promise and a lifetime of Christmases rather trade all those gifts under this year ’s everyday of their lives. tree for any of the wishes listed above? The I wish for the end to the many dreaded key to granting those wishes starts in each diseases, ailments and birth defects that afof our hearts and they are never more open fect the population. I see so many brave inthan at this time of the year. dividuals who face life with these burdens On behalf of the Denton Publications and do so with such courage. staff and our families I would like to wish I wish more people could experience you and your family a very joyous and safe faith in a supreme being and openly pracholiday, a prosperous new year and for my tice their faith, attending services regularly last wish, that you are granted all of your and recognize that only through our trust Christmas wishes. God bless us one and all. in God will we overcome much of what troubles our world today. Dan Alexander is publisher and CEO of Denton I wish more folks of good fortune would Publications. Reach him at dan@denpubs.com.


December 24, 2011

www.the-burgh.com - 7

Happy Holiday or Merry Christmas? Either way, family is the constant in all holiday celebrations this time of year

I

giving and a feast. t never fails to pop up. Each year, this time of year, Hanukkah is an eight-day Jewish holiday that commemthere's grumbling about being political correct and orates the rededication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem at the insistence by some, especially businesses, to subthe time of the Maccabean Revolt in the 2nd Century BCE. stitute “Happy Holiday” for “Merry Christmas.” Also known as the Festival of Lights, it is observed for In my opinion, it makes sense given the plethora of traeight nights and days at any time from late ditions out there and the fact you never November to late December, starting on the know which holiday an individual you 25th day of Kislev. come across celebrates. Hanukkah features the nine-branched At the same time, another major theme Menorah, traditional foods, a four-sided arises out of the holiday that appears nearly spinning top for children called the dreidel, all inclusive, and that is family. It seems no and more. matter which holiday people celebrate, they The winter solstice occurs when the axial say this is the time of year for loved ones to tilt of earth’s polar hemisphere is farthest come together. from the sun. It usually occurs on Dec. 21 I say near all-inclusive, because there are to 23 each year in the Northern Hemisome people out there without family or sphere, and various cultures interpret it diffriends to spend time with during the holiStephen Bartlett ferently, though the focus is usually on redays. Perhaps these individuals would benFrom the Editor’s Desk birth and can include holidays, festivals, efit the most from a little less focus on gatherings, rituals and other celebrations, including wording and more devotion to love and kindness. Christmas. The following is a small sampling of the holidays celeThe Dongzhi Festival, one of the most important celebrated each year: brated by the Chinese on or around Dec. 22 when daylight Kwanza was created by Maulana Karenga and was first is shortest, can be traced back to the yin and yang philosocelebrated in 1966. It honors universal African-American phy of balance and harmony in the cosmos. There are heritage and culture and is observed from Dec. 26 to Jan. 1. longer days with more light after the festival and an inKwanza features lighting seven candles and includes gift

crease in positive energy. These are just a few of the many celebrations that occur each winter. Christmas commemorates the birth of Jesus Christ and is celebrated on Dec. 25 as a religious and cultural holiday by billions of people worldwide. In largely Christian areas, it can be easy to think little of saying Merry Christmas and form frustrations over the perceived restrictions and happy-holiday replacement. But imagine what it must be like for minority populations, who are just as festive this time of year but participate in a celebration other than Christmas. I like to forget the controversy and imagine all the families and friends coming together this time of year. Talk about positive energy with all the love in the air. Then I think of those who don’t have family or friends. I wonder, are such individuals among those I come in contact with each day, and if so, are they in need of some extra cheer? So instead of assuming they celebrate as I do and perhaps contribute to their already poor spirits by issuing them a Merry Christmas when perhaps they celebrate Kwanza, I smile, look each one of them in the eye, remove myself from my vacuum and say, “Happy Holiday.” Stephen Bartlett is the editor for The Burgh. He can be reached at stephen@denpubs.com.

Lobdell: Christmas, Christmas, Christmas T

that. Too often, we see the word of the holiday shortened from Christmas to something else, which I will refuse to do because the Yes, it is the Christmas season, a time of first syllable word is the most important good will toward men and when people part. around the region turn their He was right, people are thoughts toward helping one more and more trying to another. take the “Christ” out of In a way, though, it is Christmas. something that people have It’s getting worse. As I been doing all year. talked about a month ago, Whether it was through there is now a movement acts of sacrifice or service in afoot also to try and take the face of illness, flooding the “Thanksgiving” out of or destruction, we have writThanksgiving with Black ten a lot of stories that have Friday sales now intruding dealt with people coming toKeith Lobdell into Thanksgiving Day and gether to help their fellow The Lobster Tank the promotion of more and man. more football and other We may try to help a little more this non-giving thanks to God events. month, but we have seen the proof of peoBesides, if you take the Thanksgiving out ple who can, as Ebenezer says, keep Christof Thanksgiving, then you’re not even left mas in their hearts all year. with a “mas.” So, back to the opening line. A friend of Back to Christmas though, and an admismine was at church Sunday and talked sion that I am a little hypocritical about about how at the school where his daughthis. Did I over-indulge this holiday seater goes, they have told them not to menson? Sure. But let me tell you what will tion Christmas, that “Secret Santa” has happen Saturday. been changed to “Secret Snowflake,” and We will start with a family dinner at my that the Christmas Tree has been changed parents, followed by the exchanging of to the Seasonal Bush, or something like his is for Clark — Christmas, Christmas, Christmas, Christmas.

Our Furry Friends Our Furry Friends is a weekly feature brought to you by Denton Publications. For more information about these and other fine pets available for adoption, contact: Adirondack Humane Society 134 Idaho Ave., Plattsburgh, 561-7297

Adirondack Humane Society

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ali is a beautiful lady born ar ound May 1st, 2003. She usually keeps to herself and lounges around. She would be a gr eat addition to any home. Cali has tested negative for FeLV & FIV. amara arrived at the shelter; her pr evious owner was no longer able to car e for the cat. Tamara has been spayed. She tested negative for FeLV/FIV and received all her vaccinations.

St. John Feral Cat Fund

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ack is the DMH white/gr ey spotted baby . He was rescued from Montcalm Avenue last month. He would not have made it much longer if V ic had not r escued them. He had sever e r espiratory issues and was severely matted. He has been on antibiotics and is improving in a foster home. his little sweetie doesn’t have a name yet. She was rescued with two other siblings in the City this month. She has been spayed and vetted and needs a name and a forever home!!

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St. John Feral Cat Fund (Located in PetSmart Adoption Center) 67 Consumer Square, Plattsburgh 534-0824 Elmore SPCA, 510 Arthur Road, Peru 643-2451

gifts between family members. bonds of families and the love for each othWe will then go home, where we will er through his example. read Luke 2, a child’s version of the Now, I know that everyone who is read“Christmas Story,” sing some Christmas ing this does not celebrate Christmas. My Hymns and talk about what Christmas true hope is that you celebrate the holimeans to each of us, days, but may celealong with another brate a very spiritual chance to express our holiday that strives to thanks to God. bring greater meanOn Sunday, we will ing to the hearts of its Did I over-indulge this start opening the presbelievers. holiday season? Sure. ents that Santa delivSo that is my mesers, and then it will be sage. Grab hold of But let me tell you what off to Church, where that spirit. Don’t let will happen Saturday. we will hold a Christcommercialism or inmas service which I tolerance or whatever will have the honor of you want to call it conducting, something come between you I have been able to do and the real meaning for the past seven years as a counselor in of the season as you see it. Live it to the my local branch. fullest and with the purest of intentions, Then, there will be more time with the and it will be a spiritual and uplifting exfamily, and more chances to express our perience each and every time. gratefulness to them and other loved ones. With that, I guess there is only one other The fact of the matter is, Christmas for thing left to say. Merry Christmas. me is about my family and my Savior. That (Oh, and Sophie, if you want to be more is what the day is intended to celebrate, the like your fellow competitor Dawn, I know birth of Jesus Christ, the Lord. He who can some people who can help with that). bring peace, togetherness, and a capacity for compassion and love among our fellow Keith Lobdell is the editor for the V a lley News. man. He who can help strengthen the He can be reached at keith@denpubs.com.

Polo

Bear

B P

EAR is a two year old male golden r etriever mix who was abandoned by his owners.. A very social animal, Bear loves to be ar ound people and enjoys playing with the other dogs. He is neutered and up to date on his vaccines. OLO is a male Pointer/Terrier mix about seven months old. He enjoys human companionship as well as the companionship of other dogs. He is neutered and up to date on his vaccines.


8 - www.the-burgh.com

December 24, 2011

Optometrist looks forward to eye care By Stephen Bartlett stephen@denpubs.com P L AT T S B U R G H — D o u g l a s Franz has been in charge of six different optometry clinics ar ound the world. Today, the optometrist is r unning his very own clinic in Plattsburgh. “This has been the culmination of four months of har d work and planning with many people helping out in the process,” Franz said at the grand opening of Adirondack V ision Car e, 2 Healey Avenue. But the dr eam started 22 years ago when he graduated fr om Optometry School. Franz joined the military after school and spent 20 years as an officer, thr ee in the Army and 17 in the Air Force. He worked at and ran clinics

around the world. “From my experiences in those clinics, I always was given the option to make that clinic my own,” he said. “To slightly tweak my patients schedule, to paint the walls, to run the clinics as I see fit.” After retirement three years ago, he and his wife, Renee, moved to the North Country to be near the mountains and enjoy the four seasons. “I found civilian life to be much more challenging and r egimented than military life,” Franz said. “While working for a corporation and a large group practice gave me experience, I realized that I couldn’t make the changes that I wanted to improve patient care.” Franz spent time as an optometrist for Eye Car e for the Adirondacks. “I r eally just needed to cr eate a clinic wher e I would like to have

Douglas Franz says this area needed another eye-care clinic. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

my eyes examined,” Franz said. “So Renee and I cr eated this, Adirondack Vision Care.” He thanked his best friend, spouse and business partner and said in r etrospect, the starting point was 31 years ago, when he met her.

“Now we are ready to tackle the next big chapter in our lives together,” Franz said. They did their r esearch and determined it was the right time, and the area needed another eye clinic. “What you see her e is all her ,” Franz said of his wife. “She was here every day checking on the contractors, making sure the walls were straight and the cut sheets were available for the electrician. “I have the easy part. I just have to do a good job seeing patients.” The team includes Thomas Becht, who brings mor e than 22 years of optician experience to the practice. “He is the best optician in the North Country,” Franz said of the Air Force veteran. Melissa Zielinski is a Plattsburgh State graduate with six years experience as a frame stylist. “The two of them will assure you

that you get the right frame and the best handcrafted lenses in the North Country.” Some of the services pr ovided include, r outine and diabetic eye exams, Glaucoma diagnosis and treatment, dry eye management, urgent eye care and exams for myopia, hyper opia, astigmatism, presbyopia, headaches, vision loss, cataracts, macular degeneration and more. Franz said this is his first experience as a small businessman, or job creator. “It’s people like us that will pull this country ahead, and I feel very privileged to be one of those individuals who can get America back on track again,” Franz said. “I want to cr eate a clinic wher e you don’t get a rushed exam. I want to leave the North Country with an eye clinic that will long outlive me.”

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December 24, 2011

www.the-burgh.com - 9

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10 - www.the-burgh.com

December 24, 2011

CVPH brings Christmas to families Community members sought to

help choose new superintendent sponsible for helping in the second ro und of interviews for a potential school superintendent. A. Paul Scott, the curr ent interim superintendent, said the members of the stakeholder committee will play an important role in the process. katherine@denpubs.com “It will be an important part of the ecruitr PERU — The Peru Central School Board of ment process and the board will take a great Education is inviting residents to come fordeal of value from input from the communiward to help in the sear ch for a new superty members and what this boar d will bring intendent. to the table,” Scott said. The boar d is looking for members of the The school boar d has several options r ecommunity that ar en’t employees at the garding selection of non-employee district school to fill four open seats on the school residents to fill the community seats. board’s winter 2012 ad-hoc stakeholder Paul said the district encourages commucommittee. nity members’ participation during this The committee will be made up of five process. groups of four members. The gr oups will Participants will be appointed from a list consist of four student representatives, four of those who expr essed inter est in January teachers picked by the faculty association, 2012. four members selected by the CSEA, four adIf mor e candidates expr ess inter est than ministrative positions, and four community there a re a vailable s eats, t he p articipants members who are being sought. will be picked at random in a lottery system. The search for superintendent candidates Those interested must be available for an will be facilitated by Craig King, the superorganizational meeting Feb. 15, and must intendent’s search consultant, who will con- also be available March 27, 28, and 29 for induct t he f irst r ound of i nterviews f or p erterviewing prospective candidates. spective candidates with school board memFor mor e information or to submit interbers. est in joining the committee, contact District The 20 committee members will be r e- Clerk Sherri Provost at 643-6002.

Peru residents asked to join committee

By Katherine Clark

Sandra Geddes, manager of community outreach at CVPH Medical Center in Plattsburgh, wraps presents for the hospital’s Adopt-a-Family project. CVPH adopted 42 families through the Clinton County Department of Social Services and Family Promise. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

This home on Oak Street in the City of Plattsburgh is decked out for the holidays. Photo by Stephen Bartlett

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December 24, 2011

www.the-burgh.com - 11

Police still looking for suspects in break-ins Home break ins continue in Peru, surrounding area By Katherine Clark katherine@denpubs.com PERU — A recent crime wave has fallen over the Peru ar ea and local businesses and homes ar e the targets. The latest crimes have included a br eak in at the Stewarts convenience stor e on 2997 Route 22, Dec. 5 and a home bur glary on Dec. 12 at a r esidence on Eccles Road. There have also been several crimes dating back as far as September. Several arrests have been made, including the arr est of M athew P elkey on D ec. 20. State Police arrested 18year-old Pelkey of Keeseville in connection with a burglary that occurr ed Feb. 26. I nvestigator L arry C ragle said Pelkey was arrested for the bur glary of a r esidence on Mark Way in Peru, where he and two others stole jewelry and antique coins. Cragle said Pelkey is not being looked at for the other burglaries. In a release issued on Dec. 15, State Police asked for the assistance of the public in solving the 21 r eported residential burglaries that have occurred in Peru, West Chazy, Altona a nd t he su rrounding areas. The r elease stated subjects involved appear to be targeting unoccupied homes stealing televisions, laptop computers, other electronic devices, tools and money. Town Supervisor Peter Glushko s aid t he b reak-ins are leaving residents feeling nervous about the safety of their personal property. “It’s got everyone on edge especially with the holiday season coming ar ound,”

Glushko said. “People like to feel secur e during the holiday season and right now they just aren’t able to because there are people out there who feel they’ve found an easy way to make some money.” Senior State Police Investigator Tracy Eggleston said the crimes seem to be similar based on close proximity to one another and similar items ar e being stolen, but each case is being investigated individually. “We are investigating suspects but right now we ar e looking at these crimes separately,” Eggleston said. State Police and the Clinton County Sherif f ’s Of fice are working together to pursue all leads in an ef fort to solve the bur glaries. Glushko said he advises all residents to make sure all their doors ar e locked including their garages and sheds to make sure that they aren’t inviting an easy bre ak -in. “I just hope the people doing it get caught as soon as possible,” Glushko said. Because many of these incidents are happening during the day , Eggleston said all neighbors should be looking o ut f or e ach o ther, and r eport any suspicious activity, vehicles or persons to authorities. Eggleston said eyewitnesses should obtain a complete description of the people involved and any vehicles including the license plate number if possible. The public is cautioned against confr onting anyone suspected of criminal activity, he said. “We don’t encourage anyone to engage someone they don't know but everyone should be looking out for each other,” Eggleston said. Anyone with information regarding t hese b urglaries, stolen pr operty or suspicious activity , is asked to call the New York State Police at 563-3761.

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12 - www.the-burgh.com

December 24, 2011

Mayor blasts Plattsburgh Public Library City lawmakers fault some library employees for library’s fiscal woes

By Stephen Bartlett

stephen@denpubs.com PLATTSBURGH — Plattsburgh City Mayor Donald Kasprzak weighed in on the contro versy surrounding the Plattsburgh Public library. At a Dec. 15 meeting of the Plattsburgh Common Council, he and other lawmakers blasted members of the union that r epresents library employees for its criticism of the Plattsburgh Public Library Boar d of Dir ectors. They said a generous contract, abuse of

sick time and weak management are to blame for the deficit. The lawmakers say they have been biting their tongue but will not stand by while a public demanding answers is provided with false or misleading information. “You have a cor e of library employees who don't cooperate and are selfish and don't care about the hard-working people ther e,” said Mayor Donald Kasprzak. Faced with a $150,000 deficit, the Plattsbur gh Public library's Board of Directors voted Dec. 5 to eliminate four positions. There has been much public outcry since then fr om library supporters, including suggestions from employees that they say would save the four positions. Those suggestions include several cuts elsewhere and asking the city of Plattsbur gh for mor e money ,

though members of the library's Board of Dir ectors have s aid the plan does not seem feasible. Library supporters, especially local leaders of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal E mployees, w hich r epresents l ibrary w orkers, h ave p ublicly criticized the Board of Directors, charging they may be responsible for the deficit and saying they’ve refused to work with them to save the four positions. Some city lawmakers took issue with these criticisms Thursday night and said they had to speak out. “It all has to do with the last contract that was negotiated and pay equity,” said Common Council member Chris Jackson. “The language in the contract is the craziest language I have ever seen.” One employee r eceived a 30-

percent raise, he said, and a stipend enables employees to avoid contributing to their health insurance. “Library employees accrue double the sick time than any other employee in the City of Plattsburgh.” Kasprzak said one employee has accumulated 636 sick days since 1982. “Someone is not r eally going to work when she is supposed to go to work and people have to go in her place and this all adds up,” Kasprzak said. They are contractually obligated to work Satur days and Kasprzak said employees instead call in sick. And if they don't get their way , the mayor said, they file a grievance. “Grievances cost money ,” he said. “This adds to the deficit

problem.” “I wouldn't lay off those four individuals,” he continued. “I would lay of f the people who have not been coming to work and abuse their sick time. But you can't do that because of seniority.” The library has had weak management for the past four or five years, Kasprzak said, and the contract was “very gener ous.” Those factors and selfish employees are why there is a deficit, he said. “To give mor e money to an enterprise that doesn't watch it right,” Kasprzak said, “that is not how I govern.” He clarified that the library remains open 55 hours and is not being gutted. But it is losing “four good people.” “This problem isn't going away,” Kasprzak said. “I tell the truth.”

Library from page 1 percent contribution towar d health insurance. Further, the Plattsbur gh Common Council would need to con-

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tribute $60,000. The plan alr eady has the support of several library employees, compar ed to a budget met with skepticism presented by local leaders of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, the union r epresenting library workers. “Everybody acr oss the board has to give in,” said Suzanne Barton. Barton’s position as a clerk for the Plattsburgh Public library is on the chopping block. “It means a sever e cut in pay for everybody,” she said. The Plattsburgh Public Library, faced with a $150,000 deficit, appr oved a budget that eliminated four positions. Since then there has

been much public outcry and suggestions to help the library financially. The plan presented by the union that r epresents the library employees would save four positions and included various concessions such as a zer o-percent pay incr ease for a year and a half, $12,6000 in health-insurance contributions and an end to overtime. It also included cuts in supplies, r epairs, printing, contracted services and the book budget. “Some of it makes sense, but ther e ar e ar eas I have a problem wi th,” said Plattsburgh Public library Boar d of Directors member Har old Brohinsky. “I am not pr epared to cut the book budget

by $38,000. That is what the library is all about.” “I am not pr epared to move this to action.” “This is a short-term solution,” said Boar d Chair Roland Lockwood. “We need longer than that to get the library back in shape.” Other board members felt the same as they moved on to the plan pr esented by T im Carpenter, Plattsburgh Common Council member and liaison to the Plattsburgh Public Library. Carpenter ’s four -year plan, among other things, would have the union work with the board to resolve the cost of overtime and only reduce the book budget $5,000 to $10,000. The union would have to

agree to dr op all grievances for a savings of $11,000. The union would further have to sign a four-year contract with 0-percent raises and a 15-per cent contribution toward health insurance from all employees. Library employees would only be able to earn 12 sick days instead of 24, and a new grievance pr ocess would be instituted. It would include a grievance committee of two union r epresentatives, two board members, one management and a facilitator. Carpenter said if the agreements can be approved by Dec. 28 with the union’s blessing he can request additional funding of $60,000 from the City of Plattsburgh. “I am extremely confident

I can get this money ,” he said. “All those pieces have to come out that way . The union is going to have to sacrifice a little.” Principal Library Clerk Jody Helfgott does not have a problem with that. “We ar e willing to make the sacrifice.” Carpenter admitted it wasn’t a g reat c ontract, b ut he said it keeps the library stable for four years. “Bring this budget back to the library and let them decide,” he said. “Let the workers determine their own fate.” If the plan is not appro ved, the library’s Boar d of Dir ectors indicated it would utilize its original budget, cutting the four positions.

Holidays

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infrequently. She’ll be up for the holidays, though. “I get to hang out with my family and friends,” McCarrell of Peru said.

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“I don’t get to see them together a lot.” This holiday is extra special for him and his family. “We don’t get to do it very often

now that we ar e all gr own up,” he said. “Family is not what it used to be.” Nancy Frenyea agreed that family is important, saying the holidays are about love and friendship. They a re a lso a bout s harJoin Mimi and Chef David ing with the less fortunate. for Our Annual Frenyea r ecently devoted some of her time to raising money for the Make a W ish Foundation. 5 Course Wine Pairing “But for me, ther e is one Dinner with Music thing that is most impor7 PM Start tant,” Frenyea said. “It is all (It’s midnight somewhere!) about the r eal r eason of Reservation only. Dinner Served Thursday thru Monday Christmas.” “It is about r emembering Fabulous Food in a Casual and Friendly Environment! this is the birthday of Jesus.” Turtle Island Café, 3790 Main St, Willsboro, NY • Call 518-963-7417 For Reservations

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December 24, 2011

www.the-burgh.com - 13

20825


14 - www.the-burgh.com • Sports

December 24, 2011

Beekmantown Eagles Week in review

Boys Hoops Saranac 45. Beekmantown 34

Keegan Ryan scoreed 20 points for the Eagles, while Chris McIlr oy scored 7 and Zach Towle added 6.

Plattsburgh High 54, Beekmantown 46

Keegan R yan scor ed 20 points to pace the Eagles scoring, while Chris McIlr oy scored 14, Zach T owle scor ed 7, Br ennan Pelkey 3 and Seth Pelkey 2.

Girls Hockey Beekmantown 3, Saranac Lake 0

Sara LoTemplio had a goal and assist, while Hanna Newgarden and Kiley Regan scored goals, Jess Huber r ecording 2 assists and Kallie V illemaire one. Christina Emery made 8 saves in net.

Beekmantown 4, Bellows Falls 2

Jess Huber, Cilee :LaPorte, Sara LoTemplio and Caitlyn LaPier each scored goals in the win, with LoT emplio, Huber and LaPier also picking up assists. Christina Emery made 10 saves in the win.

Beekmantown 7, Lake Placid 3

Bailey W aterbury scor ed thr ee goals, while Sara and Amy LoTemplio, Jess Huber and Amanda Peterson also found the back of the net for the Lady Eagles. Christina Emery made 10 saves in net.

Peru Indians

Boys Hockey Beekmantown 2, Niskayuna 1

Carter Frechette and Nate Foster scored goals while Dustin Plumador e made 25 saves o earn the victory.

Bowling Beekmantown 8-4, AVCS 2-0

Mike Deyo r olled a 629 series, while Ryan Douglas added a 624 and Cody Watts a 601 in the boys match. Paedyn Mattioti rolled a 586 series, with Makayla Long adding a 526 and Harley Wells a 506 for the girls.

Girls Hoops Saranac 57, Beekmantown 34

Shannon Ryan scored 11 points for the Lady Eagles, while Katrine Fogelstr oem scored 10, Emily Anderson 4 and Grace Kelly 3. Tori Barrettm Lexie Durosher and Rylei Porter each scored 2.

Beekmantown 60, PHS 50

Shannon R yan scor ed 42 points and grabbed 19 rebounds to help the Lady Eagles to a win, while Grace Kelly scored 8, Emily Anderson 6, Katrina Fogelstroem 2 and Rylei Porter 2.

Wrestling Saranac 46, Beekmantown 31

Hayden Head scor ed the lone pin for the Eagles, while Brandon Defayette scored a tech fall. Ethan Bacon scor ed a major 15-3 decision, while Dylan Peryea (7-2) also won by decision.

Mary Mazzella looks to drive to the basket. Photo by Keith Lobdell

Week in review

Boys Hoops Peru 49, Saranac Lake 43

Tim Remillar d scor ed 16 points in the win, as Conor Casey added 13, Br et Boyer 8, Mike Holdridge 7, Alex Barrett 4 and Taylor Rock 1.

Saranac 64, Peru 30

Tim Remillard scored 11 points for the Indians, while Mike Holdridge, T aylor Rock and Br et Boyer scor ed 4. Conor Casey added 3 points.

Plattsburgh High Hornets

Girls Hoops Peru 42, Saranac Lake 27

Mary Mazzella scor ed 12 points in the

Indians win, while Dani Dayton added 10 and Brianna Hackett 8. Maeghan Mazzella, Linzee W right and Emily Major each scored 4.

Saranac 52, Peru 29

Brianna Hackett led the Indians offense with 9 points, while Mary Mazzella scor ed 8, Dani Dayton 6, Maeghan Mazzella 3, Linzee Wright 2 and Emily Major 1.

Bowling Peru 2-4, AVCS 8-0

Brittany Bushey r olled a 518 series while Laura Rock rolled a 513 and Morg an Reyell a 505 as the Lady Indians scor ed a win. Jonathan Bowman had a 591 series for the boys, who also got a 589 series om fr Kyle Mendofik and a 572 fr om Cody Boudrieau.

Seton Catholic Knights

Ethan Votraw shoots a free throw as Ab Maknani awaits the next play. Photo by Keith Lobdell

Week in review

Boys Hoops PHS 48, NCCS 46

Ethan Votraw scored 18 points,Ab Maknani 15 and Rob Fout scor ed 9, including a last-second jumper , in the win. Nate Harrington, Damon LaBor de and Mike O’Connor each scored 2.

PHS 54, Beekmantown 46

Ethan Votraw and Rob Fout each score d 14 points as the Hornets beat the Eagles. Nate Harrington added 9 points, Ab Maknani, Mike O’Connor and Damon LaBorde each scored 5, with Keenan Hunt-Stone scoring 2.

Girls Hoops NCCS 45, PHS 42

Marle Curle led the Hornets with 20 points, while Kianna Dragoon scor ed 8,

Brinn Keyser 6, Olivia Carlsson 4 and Justine Rotz 4.

Beekmantown 60, PHS 50

Olivia Carlsson scored 17 points for the Lady Hornets, while Marle Curle scor ed 15, Kianna Dragoon 8, Brinn Keyser 5, and Cieara Duquette 2.

Bowling PHS 10-4, Moriah 0-0

Josh Shaf fer r olled a 705 series and Jonas Miller added a 572 series in the boys win, while Holly Peterson rolled a 510 series and Allison Beebie a 486 for the girls.

Boys Hockey Glens Falls 3, PHS 1

Eric Bechar d scor ed on a Jack T olosky assist for the lone Hornets goal against Glens Falls. Robbie Knowles made 34 saves in the net.

Kelli Ryan takes a shot.

Week in review

Boys Hoops Seton 68, Moriah 62

Adam Tedford led all scor ers with 19 points, while Carson Hynes added 17 points, Carlos Alvarez 14, Eddie LaRow 12, while Keagan Briggs, Cody Quantock and Chris Kustos each scored 2.

Girls Hoops Seton Catholic 55, Lake Placid 40

Kelli R yan scor ed 19 points as the

Photo by Keith Lobdell

Knights picked up a key Division II win, while Lyndale Nephew scored 10, Eva Zalis 9, Paige Spittler 9, Kate Schofield 6 and Maddison Murnane 2.

Moriah 46, Seton 41, OT

Kate Schofield scor ed 10 points for the Lady Knights, who got 9 points from Eva Zalis, 8 from Kelli Ryan, 4 from Paige Spittler and Maddison Murnane, and thr ee from Lyndale Nephew and Shannon Egan.


December 24, 2011

www.the-burgh.com - 15

Send events at least two weeks in advance by: • e-mail to northerncalendar@denpubs.com • fax to 1-518-561-1198 • snail-mail in care of “Calendar of Events” to 24 Margaret St., Suite 1, Plattsburgh N.Y. 12901 ...or submit them on-line at www.denpubs.com!

Friday, Dec. 23

ROUSES POINT—Children's Holiday Craft Project, Dodge Memorial Library,144 Lake St. 10 a.m.

Saturday, Dec. 24

CHRISTMAS EVE OBSERVED. ESSEX—Christmas Eve Candlelight Service, Essex Community Church Rte. 22. 11 p.m. TUPPER LAKE— Evolution of the Adirondacks, The Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, 1 p.m. WILMINGTON—Christmas Eve Candlelight Service, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 6 p.m.

Sunday, Dec. 25

CHRISTMAS DAY OBSERVED. ESSEX—Christmas Morning Worship Service, Essex Community Church Rte. 22. 10:15 a.m. WILMINGTON—Christmas Day Service, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 11 a.m.

Monday, Dec. 26

PLATTSBURGH — Scrabble game, Seniors Citizens Council of Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m.-12 p.m. 5636186, ext. 102. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123.

Tuesday, Dec. 27

PLATTSBURGH — RSVP performs, Senior Citizens Council of Clinton County, 5139 N. Catherine St., 11 a.m. ROUSES POINT —Preschool story time, Dodge Memorial Library,144 Lake St. 10 a.m. SARANAC — Saranac Hollow Jammers country music and dancing, Saranac Town Hall, 3662 Route 3, 6-9:30 p.m. 293-7056. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. PLATTSBURGH — Free Ice Skating Free time, SUNY Plattsburgh Field house, 167 Rugar St. 11 a.m.-noon. Skate rentals will be available and free of charge. CADYVILLE—Cross Country Skiing & Snowshoeing sessions, Cadyville Recreation Park, 114 Goddeau Road, 1-3p.m. weather permitting. Pre-registration required. 562-6860. WILMINGTON—Bible Study & Potluck, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 6 p.m. WILLSBORO —Open mike night, Toto’s at Willsboro Bowling Center, 3922 NYS Route 22, Every Tuesday, 7p.m. SARANAC —Senior citizen dance, Saranac Town Hall, 3662 State Route 3, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Round and square dancing. Admission: nonperishable food item for local food shelf. 2937056.

Wednesday, Dec. 28

REDFORD — Saranac fiddlers performance. Assumption of Mary School. 6:30-9:30 p.m.. $2. 293-7031. ROUSES POINT —Movie Matinee; 10am; "Beethoven's Christmas", Dodge Memorial Library,144 Lake St. 10 a.m. PLATTSBURGH — Free Ice Skating Free time, SUNY Plattsburgh Field house, 167 Rugar St. 11 a.m.-noon. Skate rentals will be available and free of charge. CADYVILLE—Cross Country Skiing & Snowshoeing sessions, Cadyville Recreation Park, 114 Goddeau Road, 1-3p.m. weather permitting. Pre-registration required. 562-6860. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. WILMINGTON—Teen Night Group, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 7-8 p.m.

Thursday, Dec. 29

LAKE PLA CID — Story hour, Lake Placid Public Library, 2471 Main St., 10:15 a.m. Free. 523-3200. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. CADYVILLE—Cross Country Skiing & Snowshoeing sessions, Cadyville Recreation Park, 114 Goddeau Road, 1-3p.m. weather permitting. Pre-registration required. 562-6860. PLATTSBURGH — Free Ice Skating Free time, SUNY Plattsburgh Field house, 167 Rugar

St. 11 a.m.-noon. Skate rentals will be available and free of charge. DANNEMORA — Free gym-time for children, former Dannemora Elementary School, 40 Emmons St. 10 a.m.-noon. 561-4999. PLATTSBURGH — Journey Into Reading, Champlain Centre Mall, 60 Smithfield Blvd., 4:30-6:30 p.m. Reading for children up to age 16 with free book provided. Hosted at center court. www.journeyintoreading.org. AU SABLE FORKS — Holiday Open House, The Tahawus Lodge Center, 14234 Rte. 9N, Main St, 4p.m.-7p.m. LAKE PLA CID — Ski jumping excellence and the Art Devlin Cup, Olympic Jumping Complex, 52 Ski Jump Lane Rte. 73. $15 Adult, $9Junior/Senior, 523-2202, www.whitefacelakeplacid.com. LAKE PLACID —International Youth Hockey Tournaments, Olympic Center 2634 Main St. www.chehockey.com 523-1655

Friday, Dec. 30

KEESEVILLE — Fish Fry Friday, Elks Lodge 2072, 1 Elks Lane, 5-7:30 p.m. Take-outs available. Fish or shrimp. $6.95. 834-2072. LAKE PLA CID—STARS ON ICE, Olympic Center Box Office, 2634 Main St, 7:30 p.m. LAKE PLA CID—Ski Jumping Event, Olympic Jumping Complex, 52 Ski Jump Lane Rte. 73, 12:30 p.m. -2 p.m. http://nysef.org/ 523-2202

Saturday, Dec. 31

CHAZY— Chazy Lions Club Meetings, Weathercock Restaurant,9688 State Route 9, 7 p.m.

Friday.Jan.6

PLATTSBURGH— Open Family Swim, Wellness Center, at PARC,295 New York Road. 7-9 p.m. $2 charge per person for all participants. Children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 562-6860. SARANAC LAKE— Mapping the Familiar: Artist Maps of Saranac Lake, Adirondack Artists’ Guild, 52 Main St. 5-7 p.m.

Saturday.Jan.7

TUPPER LAKE— Meet a Live Porcupine, Flammer Theater, the Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, 1 p.m.

Sunday.Jan.8

TUPPER LAKE— Meet a Live Porcupine, Flammer Theater, the Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, 1 p.m.

Monday.Jan.9

PLATTSBURGH — Scrabble game, Seniors Citizens Council of Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m.-12 p.m. 5636186, ext. 102. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123.

Tuesday.Jan.10

NEW YEAR’S EVE OBSERVED. MORRISONVILLE — North Country Squares Dance Club meets, Clinton County Fairgrounds, 84 Fairgrounds Road, Morrisonville. 7 p.m. Caller Bob LaBounty and cuer Carl Trudo. 561-7167 or 492-2057. TUPPER LAKE— All about Owls, Flammer Theater, the Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, 1 p.m. PERU—Peru Memorial VFW New Year's Eve Party, 710 New York 22B, 8 p.m.-1 a.m. $25 a couple or $13 a person.

SARANAC — Saranac Hollow Jammers country music and dancing, Saranac Town Hall, 3662 Route 3, 6-9:30 p.m. 293-7056. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. WILMINGTON—Bible Study & Potluck, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 6 p.m. KEESEVILLE—Open archery shooting, The Chesterfield Fish and Game Club, 359 Green St. 7-10 P.M. Open to all ages. 643-8754 or 6432651.

NEW YEAR’S DAY OBSERVED. WILMINGTON—Teen Night Group, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 7-8 p.m. ROUSES POINT —After glow party, American Legion Post 912, 29 Pratt St. noon-4 p.m.

REDFORD — Saranac fiddlers performance. Assumption of Mary School. 6:30-9:30 p.m.. $2. 293-7031. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. WILMINGTON—Teen Night Group, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 7-8 p.m.

Sunday, Jan. 1

Monday.Jan.2

PLATTSBURGH — Scrabble game, Seniors Citizens Council of Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m.-12 p.m. 5636186, ext. 102. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123.

Tuesday.Jan.3

SARANAC — Saranac Hollow Jammers country music and dancing, Saranac Town Hall, 3662 Route 3, 6-9:30 p.m. 293-7056. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. WILMINGTON—Bible Study & Potluck, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 6 p.m.

KEESEVILLE—Open archery shooting, The Chesterfield Fish and Game Club, 359 Green St. 7-10 P.M. Open to all ages. 643-8754 or 6432651.

Wednesday.Jan.4

REDFORD — Saranac fiddlers performance. Assumption of Mary School. 6:30-9:30 p.m.. $2. 293-7031. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. WILMINGTON—Teen Night Group, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 7-8 p.m.

Thursday.Jan.5

PLATTSBURGH — Senior Zumba, Town Office building on Banker Road, 5-5:45p.m. $5 per night and class size is limited to 40 participants. PLATTSBURGH —Zumba, 6-7p.m. right at the Town of Plattsburgh Office building on Banker Road. $5, limited to 40 participants.

Wednesday.Jan.11

Thursday.Jan.12

LAKE PLA CID — Story hour, Lake Placid Public Library, 2471 Main St., 10:15 a.m. Free. 523-3200. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. DANNEMORA — Free gym-time for children, former Dannemora Elementary School, 40 Emmons St. 10 a.m.-noon. 561-4999. PLATTSBURGH — Journey Into Reading, Champlain Centre Mall, 60 Smithfield Blvd., 4:30-6:30 p.m. Reading for children up to age 16 with free book provided. Hosted at center court. www.journeyintoreading.org.

Friday.Jan.13

TUPPER LAKE— Raptors of the Dacks, Flammer Theater, the Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, 1 p.m.

Saturday.Jan.14

TUPPER LAKE— Meet a Live Porcupine, Flammer Theater, the Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, 1 p.m.

Sunday.Jan.15

TUPPER LAKE— Family Art & Nature: Nature Detective, Flammer Theater, the Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, noon.

Monday.Jan.16

PLATTSBURGH — Scrabble game, Seniors Citizens Council of Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m.-12 p.m. 5636186, ext. 102. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123.

Tuesday.Jan.17

KEESEVILLE—Open archery shooting, The

New Year “Ring in the o m e e t 3D TV Giveaway at a p l a c e t N e w ” (must be present to win) old friends &

Chesterfield Fish and Game Club, 359 Green St. 7-10 P.M. Open to all ages. 643-8754 or 6432651. SARANAC — Saranac Hollow Jammers country music and dancing, Saranac Town Hall, 3662 Route 3, 6-9:30 p.m. 293-7056. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. WILMINGTON—Bible Study & Potluck, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 6 p.m.

Wednesday.Jan.18

REDFORD — Saranac fiddlers performance. Assumption of Mary School. 6:30-9:30 p.m.. $2. 293-7031. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. WILMINGTON—Teen Night Group, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 7-8 p.m.

Thursday.Jan.19

LAKE PLA CID — Story hour, Lake Placid Public Library, 2471 Main St., 10:15 a.m. Free. 523-3200. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. DANNEMORA — Free gym-time for children, former Dannemora Elementary School, 40 Emmons St. 10 a.m.-noon. 561-4999. PLATTSBURGH — Journey Into Reading, Champlain Centre Mall, 60 Smithfield Blvd., 4:30-6:30 p.m. Reading for children up to age 16 with free book provided. Hosted at center court. www.journeyintoreading.org. CHAZY —Chazy Lions Club Meetings, Weathercock Restaurant,9688 State Route 9, 7 p.m. PLATTSBURGH — Senior Zumba, Town Office building on Banker Road, 5-5:45p.m. $5 per night and class size is limited to 40 participants. PLATTSBURGH —Zumba, 6-7p.m. right at the Town of Plattsburgh Office building on Banker Road. $5, limited to 40 participants.

Friday.Jan.20

PLATTSBURGH — Family Swim night, Wellness Center, at PARC,295 New York Road. 7-9 p.m. $2 charge per person for all participants. Children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 562-6860.

Saturday.Jan.21.

TUPPER LAKE— Evolution of the ADK’s, Flammer Theater, the Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, 1 p.m.

Sunday.Jan.22.

TUPPER LAKE—Family Art & Nature: Turtle Time, Flammer Theater, the Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, noon.

Monday.Jan.23.

PLATTSBURGH — Scrabble game, Seniors Citizens Council of Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m.-12 p.m. 5636186, ext. 102. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123.

Tuesday.Jan.24.

KEESEVILLE—Open archery shooting, The Chesterfield Fish and Game Club, 359 Green St. 7-10 P.M. Open to all ages. 643-8754 or 6432651. SARANAC — Saranac Hollow Jammers country music and dancing, Saranac Town Hall, 3662 Route 3, 6-9:30 p.m. 293-7056. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. WILMINGTON—Bible Study & Potluck, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 6 p.m.

Wednesday.Jan.25.

WILMINGTON—Teen Night Group, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86,

Sat, Dec. 31st

7-8 p.m.

Thursday.Jan.26.

WESTPORT — Story hour, Westport Library, 6 Harris Lane, 10 a.m. Free. 962-8219. LAKE PLA CID — Story hour, Lake Placid Public Library, 2471 Main St., 10:15 a.m. Free. 523-3200. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. DANNEMORA — Free gym-time for children, former Dannemora Elementary School, 40 Emmons St. 10 a.m.-noon. 561-4999. PLATTSBURGH — Journey Into Reading, Champlain Centre Mall, 60 Smithfield Blvd., 4:30-6:30 p.m. Reading for children up to age 16 with free book provided. Hosted at center court. www.journeyintoreading.org. PLATTSBURGH —Senior Zumba, Town Office building on Banker Road, 5-5:45p.m. $5 per night and class size is limited to 40 participants. PLATTSBURGH — Zumba, 6-7p.m. right at the Town of Plattsburgh Office building on Banker Road. $5, limited to 40 participants.

Friday.Jan.27.

PLATTSBURGH — Family Swim night, Wellness Center, at PARC,295 New York Road. 7-9 p.m. $2 charge per person for all participants. Children under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. 562-6860.

Saturday.Jan.28.

TUPPER LAKE— Winter Photo Workshop w/ Carl Heilman, the Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, 9 a.m. register at thewildcenter.org.

Sunday.Jan.29.

TUPPER LAKE—Family Art & Nature: Super Animals, the Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, noon. TUPPER LAKE— Super Animals Show, Flamers Theater, The Wild Center, 45 Museum Drive, 1p.m.

Monday.Jan.30.

PLATTSBURGH — Scrabble game, Seniors Citizens Council of Clinton County Senior Center, 5139 N. Catherine St., 9 a.m.-12 p.m. 5636186, ext. 102. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123.

Tuesday.Jan.31.

KEESEVILLE—Open archery shooting, The Chesterfield Fish and Game Club, 359 Green St. 7-10 P.M. Open to all ages. 643-8754 or 6432651. SARANAC — Saranac Hollow Jammers country music and dancing, Saranac Town Hall, 3662 Route 3, 6-9:30 p.m. 293-7056. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. WILMINGTON—Bible Study & Potluck, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 6 p.m.

Wednesday.Feb.1.

REDFORD — Saranac fiddlers performance. Assumption of Mary School. 6:30-9:30 p.m.. $2. 293-7031. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. WILMINGTON—Teen Night Group, Wilmington Church of Nazarene, 5734 NYS Rte 86, 7-8 p.m.

Thursday.Feb.2.

PLATTSBURGH —Senior Zumba, Town Office building on Banker Road, 5-5:45p.m. $5 per night and class size is limited to 40 participants. PLATTSBURGH — Zumba, 6-7p.m. right at the Town of Plattsburgh Office building on Banker Road. $5, limited to 40 participants. LAKE PLA CID — Story hour, Lake Placid Public Library, 2471 Main St., 10:15 a.m. Free. 523-3200. CHAZY —3 Mile Club, Chazy Central Rural School, 609 Old Route 191, 6 p.m. $3. 578-7123. DANNEMORA — Free gym-time for children, former Dannemora Elementary School, 40 Emmons St. 10 a.m.-noon. 561-4999.

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16 - www.the-burgh.com

December 24, 2011

Death notices Esther E. LaMark, 74

burial was celebrated Saturday, Dec. 17, 2011 at 11 a.m. at St. Patrick’s Church, Patent Road, West Peru with Rev. Alan D. Shnob, parish pastor, celebrating. Burial followed in the parish cemetery. Arrangements were in the care of the Hamilton Funeral Home, 294 Mannix Road, Per u. To light an online candle and of fer condolences in t he m emory of Agnes B oyd p lease v isit w ww.hamiltonfuneralhome.com or call 643-9055.

KEESEVILLE — Esther E. LaMark, 74, of AuSable St, died Nov. 30, 2011 at her home. She was born in Wisconsin, July 28, 1937 the daughter of John and Mary (Taushcer) Stephen. Shawn Patrick Giam-Bruno, 50 There were no public calling hours or service. Burial was in the Port PERU—Shawn Patrick Giam-Br uno, 50, of the Reservoir Rd, died Douglas cemetery. Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2011 at this home. Arrangements were in the care of the Hamilton Funeral Home, 124 He was born in Plattsburgh, August 29, 1961, the son of Thomas Clinton Street, Keeseville. To light an online candle and offer condoand Margaret Elizabeth “Betty” Giam-Bruno. lences in the memory of Esther LaMark visit www .hamiltonfuneralServices will be held at a later date. Burial will be in St. Patrick’s home.com or call 834-7667. Cemetery in West Peru. Arrangements were in the care of the Hamilton Funeral Home, 294 Mannix Road, Per u. To light an online candle and of fer condolences Lenora A. Kain, 66 in the memory of Shawn please visit www.hamiltonfuneralhome.com AUSABLE FORKS—Lenora A. Kain, 66, of the Golf Course Rd, died or call 643-9055. Tuesday, December 6, 2011 at the CVPH Medical Center in Plattsbur gh. She was born in Staten Island, July 30, 1945 the daughter of W illiam and Rose (Kullman) Duhs. There were no public calling hours or services. Bertha L. “Bert” Gonyea Fornier, 59 Arrangements were in the care of the Hamilton Funeral Home, 124 SCHUYLER FALLS—Bertha L. “Bert” Gonyea Fornier, 59, of Amber Clinton Street, Keeseville. To light an online candle and offer condoLane, died Thursday , Dec. 15, 201 1 at the CVPH Medical Center in lences in the memory of Lenora Kain visit www .hamiltonfuneralPlattsburgh, with her loving family by her side. home.com or call 834-7667. She was born in Plattsburgh, March 21, 1952 the daughter of Larney and Hazel (Donah) Seymour. Calling hours were held Monday, Dec. 19, 2011 from 6 to 9 p.m. at Agnes B. Boyd, 80 the Hamilton Funeral Home, 294 Mannix Rd. A prayer service folWEST PERU—Agnes B. Boyd, 80 of the Patent Road, W est Peru, died lowed at 9 p.m. at the Hamilton Funeral Home with Rev . William G. Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2011 at the CVPH Medical Center in Plattsburgh Reamer, CVPH Chaplain, of ficiating. Burial will be in the Schuyler with her loving family by her side. Falls Cemetery. She was born in Peasleeville, March 27, 1931 the daughter of Joseph Arrangements were in the care of the Hamilton Funeral Home, 294 and Anna (Bombard) Trombley. Mannix Road, Per u. To light an online candle and of fer condolences Calling hours were held Friday, Dec. 16, 2011 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the in the memory of Bert please visit www.hamiltonfuneralhome.com or Hamilton Funeral Home, 294 Mannix Road, Peru . A Mass of Christian call 643-9055.

Phillip W. Lawrence, 95 WILLSBORO—Phillip W. Lawrence, 95, formerly of the Lakeshor e Road, died Satur day, Dec.17, 201 1 at Meadowbr ook Healthcar e in Plattsburgh. He was born in Willsboro, Aug. 8, 1916, the son of W illis O. and Margaret (Madden) Lawrence. He graduated from Essex High School. A funeral service was held W ednesday, Dec. 21, 201 1 at 1 1 a.m. at the Hamilton Funeral Home, 294 Mannix Road, Per u. Rev . Alan D. Shnob will officiate. Burial followed in the Calvary Cemetery in W illsboro. A reception followed at Johnny’s Family Smokehouse in Willsboro. Arrangements were in the care of the Hamilton Funeral Home, 294 Mannix Road, Per u. To light an online candle and of fer condolences in the memory of Phillip Lawr ence please visit www.hamiltonfuneralhome.com or call 643-9055.

Grace Ann Barnett, 97 PLATTSBURGH—Grace Ann Barnett, 97, formerly of the River Road, Peru died Saturday, Dec. 17, 2011 at the Clinton County Nursing Home in Plattsburgh. She was born in Penn Yan, Oct. 5, 1914 the daughter of Milton and Nina (Goundry) Rapalee. A memorial service will be held Wednesday, Dec. 29, 2011 at 11 a.m. at the Peru Community Church with Dr. Rev. Robert E. Svenson, pastor, of ficiating. Burial will be private and at the convenience of the family in God’s Acre Cemetery. Arrangements are in the car e of the Hamilton Funeral Home, 294 Mannix Road, Per u. To light an online candle and of fer condolences in the memory of Grace Barnett please visit www .hamiltonfuneralhome.com or call 643-9055.

Submit death notices to editor Stephen Bartlett at Stephen@denpubs.com

PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE • PUZZLE PAGE

E-TAILS By Jim Holland

1 6 10 15 19 20 21 22 23

26 27 28 29 30 31 32 35 37 38 41 42 44 48 53 54 55 56 57 59 60 62 63 65

ACROSS Grades X3 and Z4 Pumped (up) Ripe, so to speak Ecuadoran province named for a metal Cream’s Clapton New York restaurateur An orchestra tunes to one Hockey legend makes a particular fashion statement? Adds (up) Beatles title critter One may be chartered Water holder Rhein tributary Two-bagger: Abbr. New England senator’s winter tools? Olympics chant “Well played” Pampering place Hist. majors’ degrees Business abbr. Provençal capers spread Author Thomas blows a tune? Guitar great Paul Concert beginning? According to Connect (with) Car roofs with removable panels Deportment “So-so” reactions Wyoming hrs. Mumbai nurse Author Graham’s lament?

73 Cyberseller’s site 74 Workers’ rights assurance, in ads 75 Bill dispenser 76 Sharp relative 77 Put up 80 Talk show host spanning five decades 83 Mel of many voices 84 Fido’s response 85 In back 88 Writer Oscar’s groupies? 91 Seductive greeting on the docks 94 Caviar, e.g. 95 Like USN volunteers 96 Narc’s org. 97 Most idiotic 100 Works with dough 102 Routines that crack up patriot Thomas? 106 Stand beverage 107 Quarterback Tony 111 One way to think 112 “Say Anything ...” actress Skye 113 Final, maybe 115 Split apart 116 Maintain vital info on actor Rob? 119 Jazz combo 120 Established fact 121 Bit of Realtor slang 122 Coupe alternative 123 Pre-wedding party 124 Hägar’s hound 125 Formerly, once 126 Low Hold ’em pair

1 2 3 4

DOWN Bombay-born conductor Pacific greeting Oarsman Mardi Gras parade group

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 24 25 29 32 33 34 35 36 38 39 40 43 45 46 47 49 50 51 52 58 60 61 63 64 66 67 68 69

Scotch partner Frat social Enterprise helmsman It’s good to keep them about you It may be elem. Part of ASAP Zambia neighbor Take under one’s wing Old Tokyo Bay capital Cartoonist Browne Had one’s revenge Overhead __ 6 Okays “A stitch in time ...,” e.g. Mideast “son of” Texas flag symbol Big bag carrier Ball-balancing performer Cross one’s fingers Prefix with mensch Enthusiastic acceptance, in Acapulco Eastern guru Assume Barre des Écrins range Surmount Fuss Guacamole, for one Ogee shape Aromatic herb Rick’s love Caesar’s being “Contact” acronym Bad thing to catch Hr. affected by delays “Yo!” Rep. with a cut Vegas’s __ Grand Put one’s hands on Cainites, e.g. Listless assent, perhaps S.F. Giants’ league

70 71 72 77 78 79 81 82 83 86 87

Spiral-horned antelope ’30s V.P. John __ Garner __ Sketch “Phooey!” Mentalist Geller Conditions Furry Endor dwellers Yours, in Tours Oil meas. Criticism Nobelist Morrison

89 Cell user’s problem 90 Make lovable 92 Canine also called a Hokkaido 93 Come out of the bullpen 98 Sewing pattern 99 Flat fee payer 101 Stands by an artist 102 Romeo and Juliet, e.g. 103 Warn 104 Ancient Samos’ region

105 107 108 109 110 113 114

Seminary subj. Send (to) for help Rust, say Asia’s __ Peninsula Dark clouds and such Pitcher with a big mouth Baseball’s “Walking Man” Eddie 116 Metric wts. 117 Beethoven’s A? 118 Pacific st.

This Month in History - DECEMBER 24th - Franz Joseph Gruber composed “Silent Night”. (1818) 25th - Jesus Christ is born in a little town in Bethlehem (0) 26th - James Mason invents the coffee percolator. (1865) 27th - Radio City Music Hall in New York City opens. (1932)

SOLUTIONS TO LAST WEEK ’ S PUZZLES !

(Answers Next Week)


December 24, 2011

www.the-burgh.com - 17

73270

FIREWOOD FIREWOOD-MIXED HARDWOOD Firewood-Mixed Hardwood, $240 per full cord delivered. Free delivery within 20 miles of Westport. 518-962-4688.

HOME IMPROVEMENT COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS QUALITY, DURABLE AND AFFORDABLE COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS. Free on-site consultation. Call CB Structures 1-800-9400192 or www.cbstructuresinc.com HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED? HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED? Contact Woodford Bros. Inc. for straightening, leveling and foundation repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN / www.woodfordbros.com

INSURANCE PERMANENT LIFE INSURANCE. PERMANENT LIFE INSURANCE. Qualify to age 95. Fast. Easy. Few Questions. No Exam! 1-800-9383439, x24; 1-516-938-3439, x24

LOGGING LAVALLEE LOGGING LAVALLEE LOGGING is looking to harvest and purchase standing timber, primarily Hemlock & White Pine. Willing to pay New York State stumpage prices pn all species. References available. Matt Lavallee, 518-645-6351 LOG LENGTH FIREWOOD Log Length Firewood 6-7 Full Cord $750 Delivered. 518-2076718

REAL ESTATE ADIRONDACK " BY OWNER" adirondack " by OWNER" www.AdkByOwner.com1000+ photo listing of local real estate for sale, vacation rentals & timeshares. Owners: List with us for only $275 per year. Visit on-line or call 518-891-9919

APARTMENT KEESEVILLE IN Village Bright & Clean, 1 bedroom apartment, 20 min. South of Plattsburgh, 2 mi. to I-87, off street parking, pets OK, $595 + security, includes heat & utilities. 518-834-7647

ELIZABETHTOWN 1 bedroom apt., heat, hot water, stove & refrigerator furnished, HUD approved, no pets ( no exceptions) Non-smoker. Call 518-873-2625 Judy, 518-9624467 Wayne, 518-962-2064 Gordon.

- ROBERTS WESLEYAN COLLEGE ROBERTS WESLEYAN COLLEGE Nurses know...one degree makes a difference - 15 months, 1 night/wk or online. No tests or clinical. www.roberts.edu/nursing

**FREE FORECLOSURE LISTINGS** Over 400,000 properties nationwide. Low down payment. Call now 1-800-7493041

HELP WANTED

KEESEVILLE 3 BR/1.5 BA, Brand new 3 bedroom 1.5 bath, dishwasher, washer/dryer. $740/mon +security, snow removal included. NO smoking, NO pets. References required. Lynn Saltus, 518-834-9606 ext. 36 $740 lsaltus@friendsofthenorthco untry.org KEESEVILLE 0 BR/1 BA, Brand new handicap accessible studio apartment. Full kitchen, $260/month + security, snow removal included. NO pets, NO smoking. Lynn Saltus 518-834 -9606 ext 36 $260 lsaltus@friends ofthenorthcountry.org

HOME NEW RUSSIA Rocky Peak Lodge 3-4 bedrooms, all appliances 1 car garage, steam heat, non smoker, call for details 518-873-6556. HOMES FOR RENT: Essex, NY 4 bdrm Colonel, 5 acres, pool, horse barn $1000/ mo. Westport, NY 5 bdrm Colonel $850/mo. Westport, 89 Bessboro Lane, very large 1 bdrm apt. $450/mo. Willsboro, NY 4 bdrm Ranch $750/mo. 845-742-7201

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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY - REACH AS MANY AS 5 MILLION Reach as many as 5 MILLION POTENTIAL BUYERS in central and western New York with your classified ad for just $350 for a 15word ad. Call 1-877-275-2726 for details or visit fcpny.com

- DO YOU HAVE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES DO YOU HAVE EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES TO PROMOTE? Reach as many as 5 million potential candidates in central and western New York with a 15-word classified ad for just $350! Place your ad online at fcpny.com or call 1877-275-2726 - HELP WANTED! HELP WANTED! Make $1000 weekly mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.nationwide-work.com - MYSTERY SHOPPERS Mystery Shoppers Needed Earn up to $150 per day Undercover Shoppers Needed to Judge Retail & Dining Establishments Experience Not Required Call Now 888-3803513 AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800494-3586 www.CenturaOnline.com DRIVER- BUILD Your Own Hometime! Daily Pay! New Trucks! Local orientation. 31 Service Centers. Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com

A TRULY happy couple with so much love to share hopes to give your precious newborn a lifetime of happiness. Michael and Eileen 1 -877-955-8355 babyformichaeland eileen@gmail.com

LAWSUIT CASH LAWSUIT CASH Auto Accident? Worker Compensation? Get CASH before case settles! Fast Approval. 1-866-709-1100, www.glofin.com

BEDTIME STORIES and big family get togethers are things we can't wait to share with the baby we hope to adopt. We would welcome hearing from you. 1-800-9823678 Trish and Matt.

LAWSUIT MONEY NOW LAWSUIT MONEY NOW for injury/ accident cases. Pay us only if you win. Quick approval. No credit check. No monthly payments. Lawyer operated. 1-877-953-8631 www.excellegalfunding.com

PREGNANT? PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring adoption expert. You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby's One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136296

NEED FAST CASH? Need Fast CASH? Short term loans up to $1500 deposited into your bank account OVERNIGHT! Call for quick approval. 877-290-0052

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? You choose from families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby's One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6292, 24/ 7 Void/Illinois PREGNANT? IF you're considering adoption we would love to bring your baby into our family. Please give us a look www.jonanddale.com jonanddale@earthlink.net 800-698 -7164

ELECTRONICS "CRAZY-CHEAP ELECTRONICS" "CRAZY-CHEAP ELECTRONICS" Never pay retail prices again. Laptops, HD-TVs, Iphone-4S, Save up to 90%. www.DealFunBay.com

HAY FOR SALE 2011 First cut hay for sale. Five foot bales. 25 bales in the hay mow. 25 bales in the yard. Call 518-236-6131 Ask for Don. $35.00/bale HAY FOR SALE Hay for Sale, 4x5 round bales $30 each. 518-962-4452

PHONE ACTRESSES FROM HOME Best Pay-Outs, Busy System Weekends a Must! Land Line/ Good Voice 1-800-403-7772 lipservice.net

FINANCIAL SERVICES

CAREER TRAINING ADOPTIONS

FOR SALE 275 GALLON Fuel Tank all parts included $200; Well Pump Gould, 1 HP, 4 months old, $600.00. 518576-0012 AR-15’S AR-15 16" BULL BARREL, .223 CAL. LIKE NEW $800.00 AR-15 20" STANDARD A2 .223 LIKE NEW $750.00 CALL DAVE AT 518-891-5989 DOWN AND X-COUNTRY SKIS DOWN AND X-COUNTRY SKIS Call Shep 518-578-5500

FARM PRODUCTS

OUT OF High School? 18-24 guys and girls needed. Travel all across America. Paid training, travel and lodging. 877-646-5050

WORK ON JET ENGINES - Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866)453-6204 or visit www.fixjets.com

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**OLD GUITARS WANTED!** **OLD GUITARS WANTED!** Fender, Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, Prairie State, Euphonon, Larson, D'Angelico, Stromberg, Rickenbacker, and Mosrite. Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1930's thru 1970's TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-401-0440 AIRLINES ARE HIRING AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for hands-on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1-877-202-0386. AIRLINES ARE HIRING AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available Call AIM (888) 686-1704 or visit www.fixjets.com ANY LAPTOP REPAIRED ANY LAPTOP REPAIRED JUST $79. Macs, too. REALLY! FREE Fedex shipping! $49 extra for screen or motherboard replacement. CALL Authorized Laptop Repair Specialists. 1-877-283-6285 AT&T AT&T U-Verse for just $29.99/mo! SAVE when you bundle Internet+Phone+TV and get up to $300 BACK! (Select plans). Limited Time Call NOW! 1-866-944-0906 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 800-510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com CASH FOR CARS, Any Make or Model! Free Towing. Sell it TODAY. Instant offer: 1-800-8645784 CASH FOR CARS: CASH FOR CARS: All Cars/Trucks Wanted. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Any Make/Model. Call For Instant Offer: 1-800-864-5960 CASH PAID CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS- up to $17/Box! Most brands. Shipping Prepaid. FAST payment. Ask for Emma 1-888-776-7771 www.cash4diabeticsupplies.com

WOOD BOILER WOOD BOILER Indoor Marathon 70,000 BTU. Heats 2500 sq. ft., 10 yrs. old, cuts your heating bill in half, accepts 24" wood, $2000.00. 518-298-3050 Days 518-2982206 evenings.

DIRECTV DIRECTV $29.99/mo $0 Start Costs! Free HBO CINEMAX SHOWTIME STARZ! FREE HD/ DVR! Free Installation! We're "Local" Installers! 800-355-4203

GENERAL

BIKES FOR TYKES look for them in Items under $100 Super savers ads

FRANK’S AUTO SERVICE Over 35 years of Subaru experience!

29571

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518-425-9957

29573

29572

28884


18 - www.the-burgh.com

DIRECTV DIRECTV - up to $31 off/mo.! 150+ Channels & FREE SHOWTIME for 3 mos - ONLY $29.99/ mo for one year. New customers Call NOW! 866-397-2788 DISH NETWORK. DISH NETWORK. Starting at $19.99/month PLUS 30 Premium Movie Channels. FREE for 3 Months! SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL 1-888-8238160 DIVORCE $450* DIVORCE $450* NO FAULT or Regular Divorce. Covers Children, Property, etc. Only One Signature Required! *Excludes govt. fees. Locally Owned! 1-800-522-6000 Ext. 100. Baylor & Associates, Inc. DO YOU HAVE PRODUCTS DO YOU HAVE PRODUCTS OR SERVICES TO PROMOTE? Reach as many as 4.9 million households and 12 million potential buyers quickly and inexpensively! Only $490 for a 15word ad. Place your ad online at fcpny.com or call 1-877-275-2726 EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800 -510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE. EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINE. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 1-800-4942785. www.CenturaOnline.com EARN COLLEGE ONLINE. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified Call 888 -201-8657 www.CenturaOnline.com

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WORK ON JET ENGINES WORK ON JET ENGINES - Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866) 854-6156.

LAWN & GARDEN BRUSH HOG Model EFM600. Used 1 year, like new. Finish mower. 518-570-8837 $1,000

WANTED DIABETES TEST STRIPS. WANTED DIABETES TEST STRIPS. Any Kind/Brand. Unexpired. Up to $22.00. Shipping Paid. 1-800-266-0702. www.SellDiabeticstrips.com WANTED JAPANESE MOTORCYCLES KAWASAKI 1970-1980 Z1900, KZ900, KZ 1000, H2-750, H1500, S1-250, S2-250, S2-350, S3400 CASH. 1-800-772-1142, 1310-721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

MUSIC AIRA ACOUSTIC GUITAR Aira Acoustic Guitar $99.00. 518643-7097 CLARINET, VIOLIN, FLUTE, TRUMPET, CLARINET, VIOLIN, FLUTE, TRUMPET, Amplifier, Fender Guitar $75 each. Upright Bass, Cello, Saxophone, French Horn, Drums $189 each. Others 4sale 1-516-377-7907

WANTED TO BUY FAST PAYMENT for sealed, unexpired DIABETIC TEST STRIPS-up to $17/Box! Most brands. Shipping Prepaid. Call today & ask for Emma 1-888-776-7771 www.cash4diabeticsupplies.com CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY Car or Truck, Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591 TOP CASH FOR CARS, Any Car/ Truck, Running or Not. Call for INSTANT offer: 1-800-454-6951

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ONE MAN’S TRASH is another man’s treasure. Denpubs classifieds can put you together. 1-800-989-4237

BIKES FOR TYKES look for them in Items under $100 Super savers ads

YEARBOOKS "UP to $15 paid for high school yearbooks1900-1988. yearbookusa@yahoo.com or 972768-1338."

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY WESTPORT: OFFICE SUITES. Fully furnished w/cubicles, desks, computer & phone hook-ups. 720 sq. ft. Lakeviews. Contact Jim Forcier @ 518-962-4420.

FOR SALE 4-GOOSE DECOYS 4-Goose Decoys, Flambeau Magnum Guide series, like new, used once, in org. box. $50 OBO 518354-8654 DESK DESK -dark pine with glass top file drawer, $50 (518) 524-4698

ACCESSORIES 4-FIRESTONE 4-FIRESTONE Windforce Mud & Snow Tires, 215/60R16, like new, $300 OBO. 518-524-1972

SINGLE-FAMILY HOME ***FREE FORECLOSURE Listings*** OVER 400,000 properties nationwide. Low down payment. Call now 800-250-2043.

VACATION PROPERTY DO YOU HAVE VACATION PROPERTY FOR SALE OR RENT? With promotion to nearly 5 million households and over 12 million potential buyers, a statewide classified ad can't be beat! Promote your property for just $490 for a 15-word ad. Place your ad online at fcpny.com or call 1-877-2752726 CHECK us out at www.denpubs.com

DONATE A CAR - SAVE A CHILD'S LIFE! Timothy Hill Children's Ranch: Helping Abused and Neglected Children in NY for Over 30 Years. Please Call 1-800-9364326.

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

DONATE YOUR VEHICLE UNITED BREAST CANCER FOUNDATION. Free Mammogram www.ubcf.info RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY COUPON 1-888-468-5964 DONATE YOUR CAR. FREE TOWING "Cars for Kids." Any Condition. Tax Deductible. Outreach Center 1-800-521-7566 CASH FOR CARS and TRUCKS: Get A Top Dollar INSTANT Offer! Running or Not! 1-888-416-2208 DONATE A CAR - HELP CHILDREN FIGHTING DIABETES. Fast, Free Towing. Call 7 days/week. Nonrunners OK. Tax Deductible. Call Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 1-800-5780408 DONATE YOUR CAR SUPPORT OUR VETERANS & U.S. TROOPS ! #1 MILITARY SUPPORT CHARITY! 100% Volunteer Free same Day Towing. Tax Deductible. Call and Donate Today! 1-800-4710538 DONATE YOUR CAR to CHILDREN'S CANCER FUND of AMERICA and help end CHILDHOOD CANCER. Tax Deductible. Next Day Towing. Receive Vacation Voucher. 7 Days 1-800-469-8593

$

Only

SNOWMOBILES 2 ARTIC CATS 2 ARTIC CATS 2001 550-$3000 REV, GOOD SHAPE 2000 370$2500 1 OWNER, GOOD SHAPE CALL 518-6449752PHOTOS AVAILABLE

SUVS

1995 GMC YUKON 4x4, runs good, needs muffler, loaded, Dark Green, good tires, $3000 OBO, Keeseville, NY 518261-6418

29

2000 F-150 V-8, 8' box w/ fiberglass cap, new tires, brakes & battery, $3600 OBO 518-593-1523 1998 DODGE RAM 1500 EXT CAB Green/Gray 123,000 miles, Good condition. Runs good. $3,500 Call: (518) 946-7735 Email: greggdahlen@yahoo.com

VERMONT:

In the North Country we are strong, hardworking people! We value friends, family and our neighbors! We come together in times of need! We aren’t afraid to lend a helping hand! We stand on common ground! We stand in agreement! We stand UNITED!

Addison Eagle / Green Mountain Outlook

CENTRAL NEW YORK:

ADIRONDACKS SOUTH: Times of Ti,

Eagle Newspapers

Adirondack Journal, News Enterprise

CAPITAL DISTRICT:

ADIRONDACKS NORTH:

Spotlight Newspapers

The Burgh, Valley News, North Countryman

2009 TOYOTA LAND CRUISER White/Black, Excellent condition. Wouldn't your truck for sale look just perfect here? Our new classified system has been built by AdPerfect one of the nation's leading classified software companies. The program has many eye catching features sure to help you sell your vehicle. The online self service package is free so give it a try today! $1,000,000 Email: dan62@charter.net

There’s no greater feeling; than coming together as a community! With 39 partner agencies, our health and human service network provided assistance to 80,000 people in Clinton, Essex and Franklin Counties last year.

MEMORIALS

FREE

Place an ad in Print and Online

THIS YEAR’S CAMPAIGN GOAL: $775,000

O ver 400 M onum ents In Stock !Low Prices, U nbeatable W arranty

Any one item under $99

www.theclassifiedsuperstore.com MAIL TO: THE CLASSIFIED SUPERSTORE P.O. Box 338 Elizabethtown, NY 12932

Plattsburgh Memorials

DEADLINES:

Monday by 4:00 p.m. online and at our office: 14 Hand Ave., Elizabethtown, NY 12932

24 HOURS / 7 DAYS A WEEK SELF-SERVICE AT WWW.THECLASSIFIEDSUPERSTORE.COM Ph: 518-873-6368 Ext 201 or Toll Free: 800-989-4237 or Fax: 518-873-6360

73265

EMAIL TO: adirondacksnorth@theclassifiedsuperstore.com

75252

United Way of the Adirondack Region Inc. 45 Tom Miller Road, Plattsburgh, NY 12901 Ph: (518) 563-0028 • Fax: (518) 563-0270 Web: www.unitedwayadk.org OUR MISSION: To be a leader in community partnership building and to increase the organized capacity of people to care for one another

FOR SALE 2004 Yamaha Rhino UTV w/winch and 6' plow, roof, windshield, many extras. Excellent cond. Asking $6,400 (518) 569-2767 fredthwaits@hotmail.com

1989 CHEVY Pick-up 1500, with snow plow, excellent condition, $3900. 518-834-7743 or 518-8604568

(Approximately 15 words) *Additional lines for only 75¢ each

GUARANTEED TO SELL RUN YOUR PERSONAL AD FOR ONE ITEM IN ONE ZONE UNTIL IT SELLS!

1987 MOTOR-HOME SUN-VISTA 1987 Motor-home Sun-vista, Highrise 34', awning, air conditioning, $7500. 518-834-7743 or 518-560-4568

TRUCKS

FIRST 4 LINES

$15 Ad runs for 3 weeks, one zone, plus $9 for each additional zone, or run all 5 zones for 3 weeks for $50

DONATE VEHICLE: RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY COUPONS. NATIONAL ANIMAL WELFARE FOUNDATION SUPPORT NO KILL SHELTERS HELP HOMELESS PETS FREE TOWING, TAX DEDUCTIBLE, NON-RUNNERS ACCEPTED 1-866 -912-GIVE

CARS

Personal Classified Specials! 3 WEEK SPECIAL

SELL YOUR CAR, TRUCK or SUV TODAY! All 50 states, fast pick-up and payment. Any condition, make or model. Call now 1-877-8188848 www.MyCarforCash.net

2001 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE Black 2 door. New tires, rotors, brakes catalytic converter. $4,500 Call: (518) 946-7550

LAND YOUR BEST CHANCE TO OWN A LAND & CAMP. For Sale: Over 250 properties at bargain prices. Offers considered. 5 Acres w/ Cozy Camp - $19,995! CALL NOW! 1-800-229 -7843 www.LandandCamps.com

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Years, Makes, Models. Free Towing! We're Local! 7 Days/Week. Call Toll Free: 1-888-416-2330

4875 So. Catherine St. Plattsburgh, NY 12901

Ph. (518) 563-7666 1-800-750-4452

54719

GENERAL

December 24, 2011


December 24, 2011

www.the-burgh.com - 19

ATTENTION ALL ADVERTISERS!

EARLY CHRISTMAS & NEW YEAR’S DEADLINES

For Display, Legals and ClassifiedAdvertising

OUR OFFICES WILL BE CLOSED Monday, December 26th & Monday, January 2nd Vermont Zone: The Eagle, Green Mtn. Outlook Friday, December 23rd & December 30th at noon Northern Zone: North Countryman, Valley News & The Burgh Friday, December 23rd & December 30th at 3 p.m. Southern Zone: Times of Ti, Adk. Journal, News Enterprise Friday, December 23rd & December 30th at 3 p.m. NEW MARKET PRESS 16 Creek Rd. Ste. 5A Middlebury, VT 05753

518-873-6368

802-388-6397

Merry Christmas and HappyNew Year!

85223

New2012 Ford Explorer 4WD

DENTON PUBLICATIONS 14 Hand Ave. Elizabethtown, NY 12932

New 2011 Ford Supercrew XLT 4x4

STK #EN162 • V6, 6 Spd., Auto, Air, P/ Windows & Locks, Cruise, SYNC, Sirius

STK #EM523 • 3.5L Ecoboost, 6 Spd. Auto, Pwr. Grp., SYNC System, Chrome Pkg., Sirius

MSRP..................................$32,645 Ford Promo Bonus Cash........-$1,000 Dealer Discount.......................-$550

MSRP......................................$40,560 Ford Retail Customer Cash.......-$2,000 FMCC Customer Bonus Cash*...$1,000 Ford Trade Assist......................-$1,000 Dealer Discount........................-$2,570

$

31,095

$

Offer ends 1/3/12

MSRP..................................$23,990 Ford Retail Customer Cash. . . . . .-$500 Ford Promo Bonus Cash.........$1,000 Ford Retail Bonus Cash............-$500 FMCC Retail Bonus Cash*.......-$500 Dealer Discount.......................-$800

Offer ends 1/3/12

MSRP..................................$35,285 Ford 3.7L Bonus Cash..............-$500 Ford Retail Customer Cash. . .-$2,000 FMCC Bonus Cust. Cash*. . . . .-$1,000 Ford Trade Assist Cash.........-$1,000 Dealer Discount....................-$1,790

$

Offer ends 1/3/12

28,995 OR GET

Ford Focus SE NewSTK2012 #EN210 • Auto, Air, Cruise, CD, Pwr. Windows & Locks

0%* & $1,500 !

Offer ends 1/3/12

New 2011 Ford Edge AWD SEL

MSRP..................................$19,785 Ford Retail Customer Cash......-$500 FMCC Retail Bonus Cash*.......-$500 Dealer Discount.......................-$500

$

0%* & $1,000 !

2011 Ford F150 Supercab XLT 4x4 New STK #EM527 • 3.7 V6, 6 Spd. Auto, Air, Cruise, Pwr. Grp., SYNC System

STK #EN221 • Auto, Air, Cruise, Pwr. Windows/Locks/Mirrors/Seat

20,690

33,990

OR GET

New 2012 Ford Fusion SE

$

20765

STK #EM471 • V6, Auto, Air, Pwr. Windows/Locks/Seat, Sirius, SYNC System, Touch System

18,285

For 36 OR GET 0%* & $500 ! Months*

MSRP..................................$34,595 Ford Retail Bonus Cash.........-$1,500 Ford Promo Bonus Cash........-$1,000 Dealer Discount....................-$1,100 Offer ends 1/3/12

*FMCC approval required. All customers may not qualify.

$

30,995 Offer ends 1/3/12

28392


20 - www.the-burgh.com

December 24, 2011

Congratulations to these four winners of our

Gift Certificate Giveaway Lucinda Desrocher

of Schuyler Falls

Arnie’s

Katie Inheider of Morrisonville Boucherie Viau

Betty Clark of Peru China Buffet

Terrie Fleming of Morrisonville C&C Unisex

85144

28951

www.The-Burgh.com

WE WOULD LIKE TO THANK YOU FOR THE OVERWHELMING RESPONSE

Ask about 0%Financi ng!

Up to 72 mo See dealer

nths.

for details

.

The Staff at Adirondack Chevy would like to wish everyone and their families a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! 2011 Chevy Volt LT

2012Chevy Cruze 1LT

2011 Chevy 1500 WT Ext. Cab 4x4

Leather, OnStar, XM, Loaded

#CQ211, Air, Cruise

#CR1, Loaded, Pwr. Seat, Cruise, OnStar, XM Radio, 6 Spd.

280

$

Tax is included!

449

92MPG! x a $7,500 Tt! Credi

††

per mo.

MSRP.......................$31,045 Adk Chevy Disc...........-1,545 Rebate.........................-5,005 Targeted Rebate........1,500**

YOUR PRICE

2008 Chevy Impala LT

$

15,980 OR

$

264*

/MO.

2009 Pontiac Vibe AWD

AM44A, Fully Loaded, OnStar, XM Radio

2011 Chevy Malibu 2LT

CP240, Leather Heated Seats, OnStar, XM Radio

$

47,980

OR

$

288*

/MO.

2009 Dodge Caliber SXT CP225, Fully Loaded

2001 Nissan Xterra

CQ286A, 4x4, Auto, V6, Fully Loaded

Low Low Miles! Miles!

$

6,950

OR

$

OffPric

$

22,995

FREE LIFETIME NYS INSPECTIONS WITH ANY PURCHASE!

CHECK OUT THESE QUALITY USED VEHICLES! CP228 OnStar, XM Radio, Fully Loaded

$8,050e!

218*

2008 Chevy Equinox AWD Sport

CR50A, Leather Heated Seats, OnStar, XM Radio, Fully Loaded!

$

/MO.

2005 Ford F-350 Crew Cab 4x2 XLT

CQ281A, Lariat Pkg, Leather, Power Brakes, Diesel, Loaded

14,980 OR

$

243 *

/MO.

2011 Dodge Grand Caravan

CP239, “Crew” Pkg, DVD, Leather, Fully Loaded

$ * $ * $ * 256* 14,880 OR 239 20,980 OR 373 21,880 OR 352 GREAT SELECTION GIVE BUZZY, BUCKY OR BRUCE A CALL TODAY FOR OF TRUCKS & SUVS MORE GREAT EVERYDAY SAVINGS! 518-873-6389 $

15,480 OR

$

/MO.

$

/MO.

$

/MO.

$

/MO.

*TAX, TITLE, REG. NOT INCLUDED. ††10,000 MILES PER YEAR/48 MONTH LEASE.

28390

$280/Mo. with only †† Dueat $ Signing!

TB_12-24-2011_Edition  

SIGN-UP TODAY! CALENDAR P15 PUZZLE P16 REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS P18 Confused about financial aid options for college? Need help navigating a...

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