Issuu on Google+

ARCHIVES Tales of Yore and Historical Thoughts From Historian, Loren Mall p.8

From Amps to Amplification p.16 ALUMNI

THE WIDE FRATERNAL WORLD OF How one brother is driving the future of sports marketing at FOX FALL 2016 | VOL. 109, ISSUE 2 | DELTASIG.ORG

FOUNDATION Eighth Annual McKee Scholarship Program Recognizes 64 Brothers p.32


CARNATION THE

Volume 109, Issue 2

EDITOR Adam Lowe EXECUTIVE EDITOR Micah Christensen CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kenneth Kelty, Western Carolina University ’15 Nik Koulogeorge, Stetson University ’08 Loren Mall, Kansas State University, ’58 Evan Poole, University of Pittsburgh, ’14 ART DIRECTOR Shelle Design Incorporated

impacting their communities. Each story of

Address publication materials and correspondence with national office to: Delta Sigma Phi 2960 N. Meridian Street P.O. Box 88507 Indianapolis, IN 46208 317.634.1899 FAX: 317.634.1410 E-mail: communications@deltasig.org Web: www.deltasig.org THE CARNATION OF DELTA SIGMA PHI (USPS 091-020), official publication of Delta Sigma Phi, 2960 N. Meridian Street, P.O. Box 88507, Indianapolis, IN 46208, is published semiannually. Publication postage paid at Indianapolis, IN and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to THE CARNATION OF DELTA SIGMA PHI, 2960 N. Meridian Street, P.O. Box 88507, Indianapolis, IN 46208. Subscription price to non-members is $8 per year. Single copies $3. Copyright 2015 by the Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity; 2960 N. Meridian Street, P.O. Box 88507, Indianapolis, IN 46208. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, mechanical, electronic, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the copyright owner. THE CARNATION® and Delta Sigma Phi® are registered trademarks of Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity, Inc.

a brother is a personal tale of their lives, and reading them is much like catching up with them in person.

In this issue, we have several such

stories, like Iota Mu’s incredible road to receiving their charter earlier this year. Or Brother Frank Urban who spent years

 rothers, Parents & Friends B of Delta Sigma Phi,

21

crafting his own invention, then started his own business to sell it. We highlight Brother Bill Battin, whose work in the field of sports we’re almost all already familiar with. Each

of us, all together again after

and every story is a snapshot of a brother’s

many years apart for some of us. 21

life. These stories accompany the continu-

men who, once united, had taken different

ing look into the profound moments in our

life paths away from their former home. But,

Fraternity’s history.

21 brothers who when together rekindled

the flames of brotherhood from many years

brothers from across the country. Remind

ago. My brothers from the Alpha Alpha

yourself of the incredible men who you’re

chapter at the University of Illinois reunited

bonded together with in our common Ritual.

for a weekend of celebration and remem-

And once you’ve done that, call up a chapter

brance in mid-September.

brother and tell them about your life, and

hear about theirs as well.

I love these moments. Times in which I

Take a moment and catch up with

get to see brothers who I haven’t spoken with

in far too long. In these moments, I remem-

in college. Let’s keep celebrating and remem-

ber why fraternity is such a valuable thing. It

bering now with our fellow brothers. Enjoy

is the glue that binds together men from all

this issue of The Carnation.

Your time with the Fraternity didn’t end

walks of life in ways we could never expect. /DeltaSigmaPhiHQ

It has given me some of the best friends I

@DeltaSigmaPhiHQ

could have asked for.

@DeltaSigmaPhi

YITBOS,

Unfortunately, I can’t travel to different

parts of the country as often as I’d like. That’s

Mission: The Carnation is a lifestyle magazine meant to entertain, educate and inspire the members of Delta Sigma Phi to become better men and lead better lives, while also educating and entertaining other readers who may not be members.

exactly why I get excited for each new issue

Tom Cycyota

of The Carnation. In each magazine are sto-

University of Illinois ’77

ries of friends and brothers and how they are

Grand Council National President

THE CARNATION

2

FALL 2016


CONTENTS 4 Pause for Applause 6 Delta Sigs in the Military

ARCHIVES

/8

Historical Perspectives with Loren Mall 14 Alumni Profiles Kenneth Kelty “I am Kenneth” Frank Urban “Amps to Amplification”

ALUMNI

/ 18

“A Scout's Honor” Jeff Cook

FEATURE / The Wide Fraternal World of Sports with Brother Bill Battin, University of La Verne ’92

EVENTS

/ 19

“From Alpha to Omega: A Leadership Institute Retrospective” 22 Fraternity Growth 25 Chapter Report Card and Pyramid Program Awards 28 Charterings & Recharterings 32 McKee Scholarship Winners 38 Foundation Annual Report

The Wide Fraternal World of Sports

8

46 Upholding Our Standards IN THIS ISSUE 47 Bond Eternal

15

Tales of Yore and Historical Thoughts From Historian, Loren Mall p.8

ARCHIVES

On the cover: Brother Bill Battin in his office at FOX Sports/FS1 in New York City.

THE WIDE FRATERNAL WORLD OF How one brother is driving the future of sports marketing at FOX FALL 2016 | VOL. 109, ISSUE 2 | DELTASIG.ORG

THE CARNATION

3

DELTASIG.ORG

The Magical Mathematical Fraternity Man p.16 ALUMNI

FOUNDATION Eighth Annual McKee Scholarship Program Recognizes 64 Brothers p.32


PAUSE FOR APPLAUSE

ALUMNI MIKE WANDZELL (California State-Fresno ’05) Deputy Regional Commissioner, Pacific Region Mike won the “Outstanding Achievement in Newcast-Medium Market” Emmy for his work as Producer for the Fox 26 Midday News. JIM RATH (Wisconsin ’71) Regional Commissioner, Great Lakes Region Jim was recently inducted into the Green Bay Officials Association Hall of Fame honoring decades of work as a referee. FRANK BASILE (Tulane ’71) Basile was recognized by the Phoenix Theatre in Indianapolis for his lifetime commitment of leadership and philanthropy to the arts and nonprofit sector.

DELTA SIG LIBRARY CHRIS PUCKETT ’13, released a follow

PATRICK STEPHENS (Wisconsin ’71) Former Grand Councilman Stephens was just given the highest alumni recognition, the Maurice O.Graff Distinguished Alumni Award, at University of Wisconsin–La Crosse.

up EP to his 2015 Spring album. This album is a continuation of a project that will result in a complete album.

“I am a music major at East Carolina

University studying Jazz and Classical styles on the double bass. The EP that I am working on is a 4 part series of an album that I am writing called “Seasons”. I have already released Summer and Fall, and am currently working on Winter and Spring. There will be 12 songs total, each song in a different

with my drummer Niraj Singh, and my

key cycling through the circle of 5ths.

bassist/producer Matt Batson, both of

Writing the material has been tricky,

which I graduated high school with.

especially to fit the theme of the album.

The remaining two albums will

The most essential part of writing this

be released hopefully in 2017.”

music is to let it come naturally, and not to force the theme onto the music,

You can find the album on his Sound-

which would make it sound forced.

cloud page at soundcloud.com/

This album is currently in the works

notchrispocket.

THE CARNATION

4

FALL 2016

ROB LIKENS (Kentucky ’12) Likens recently graduated from the NBA’s Associate Program at their head office in Manhattan and was offered a position within their Global Partnerships branch.

Do you have an item to submit for Pause for Applause or the Delta Sig Library? Please email us at communications@deltasig.org.


THE CARNATION

5

DELTASIG.ORG


DELTA SIGS IN THE MILITARY

For years, this publication tracked our brothers who either volunteered or were drafted into military service. As a National Fraternity, we take tremendous pride in the work our brothers do for the world and would like to extend a special thanks to those who fought for their country. In each issue we will continue to highlight brothers who have served. Tell us your story or provide the name of a brother or brothers who have served by emailing us at communications@deltasig.org.

Communications Group. I concluded my Air Force career with 23 years of service, retiring in the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Why did you join? I was in college at the University of Idaho during the latter part of the Vietnam War and I wanted to serve in the military. I liked the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corp (AFROTC) training program so I enrolled. Upon graduation, I received my commission as a 2nd Lieutenant.

MICHAEL G. ROWLES J LT. COL., USAF (RETIRED) GAMMA IOTA CHAPTER '65 Tell us about your military responsibilities and your roles. I encountered a variety of responsibilities during my career as an Air Force officer. My specialty area was field-level telecommunications. This included base telephone, radio, and computer systems plus supporting the instrument landing systems for the airfield. In the early years I was responsible for providing communications security (COMSEC) documents to the pilots so they could properly identify themselves when flying their missions. Later my responsibilities changed to staff level work. This included preparing presentations (briefings) for General officers regarding the application of Air Force policies & procedures. Finally my responsibilities changed to a specific leadership role. I served as commander of Detachment 6, 1998 Communications Group, commander of the 2019th Communications Squadron, and then the Deputy Commander of the 33rd

Why do you believe it is important to serve? Although the technologies have progressed dramatically since then, the basic mission of defending our country remains unchanged. We have an all-volunteer military here in the U.S. And the responsibility of serving our country passes from generation to generation. From more of a personal standpoint, service in the military gives you a chance to grow in learning about hard work, accepting responsibility, and developing life skills. There is also an excellent opportunity to pursue college programs while on active duty, and after getting out of the service. What did you like most about your past positions? I liked most the opportunity to be a positive influence in the lives of the people within my unit and the base where I was assigned. I liked learning the different technologies as they progressed through the years (although they were nothing like we have today). As a unit Commander, one of my most enjoyable tasks was writing letters of recommendation for members of my unit who were getting out of the service and wanted to pursue college and/or getting a job.

THE CARNATION

6

FALL 2016

What has been the biggest lesson you have learned because of your service? Actions speak louder than words. Personal integrity is everything. I learned the hard way that despite the best of intentions when I said one thing and did another, people lost their confidence in me. It took some time, but I was able to restore the confidence. It’s a lesson I retained for the rest of my Air Force career. How did your membership in Delta Sigma Phi relate to your role in the Air Force? The leadership experiences and personal reliability that I learned as a member of the Gamma Iota chapter of Delta Sigma Phi were critical. They were foundations that started me off on the right foot as a young Air Force officer. I was blessed with the opportunity to serve as Chapter President. This gave me valuable experience to draw upon during my Air Force assignments. Most significant was that at Gamma Iota there was a strong Esprit de Corps, bonding, and team outlook. I discovered these same ingredients were part of my smaller, base-level units. It is a special quality within an organization. After the military Along the lines note above, if you are a former/active member of the military and if you are interested in joining with former/active military members to continue the comradeship plus serve your community in a meaningful way, I invite you to become a member of the American Legion. It’s been my distinct privilege to be a part of the Post 650 Military Honors team. The American Legion is the largest veteran’s organization in our country. Its roots date back to WWII and it continues to promote and protect the interests of veterans. Your local American Legion post can be a home where you will be able to meet new friends, talk military, and develop a common bond of shared experiences.


MICHAEL DAVID SMITH J COMMANDER, US NAVY (RETIRED) BETA KAPPA CHAPTER '82 Tell us about your current military responsibilities and your role. I am currently not on active duty as I retired from the US Navy after twenty-two years of service on November 01, 2015. Prior to retirement I served in the Medical Service Corps as a specialist in Planning, Operations and Medical Intelligence retiring at the rank of Commander.

wearing the countries uniform. The price to maintain this freedom has not lessoned over time either from previous generations or currently for those serving. Being born in 1959 I watched fellow Americans serving in Harm’s Way fighting in the jungles of Vietnam, our countries mission during the Cold War, maintaining the peace in Korea, in the deserts of the Middle East and in small countries throughout the world with some paying the ultimate price to ensure I lived in a free country. During my lifetime I saw the number of Americans serving in the military continually dropping. I may be one person but I knew I could do my part and stand by those serving and do everything I could to serve well and with honor. When it is time for me to exit this life and my body is covered by my country's flag and I am provided the honors granted to military service those attending will understand my love for this country and for the flag flying over it.

Why did you join? I am the son of a career US Navy Master Chief Petty Officer and was born in the Naval Hospital Bethesda, Maryland so the Navy was my home. It was a joke in my house that my brother and I were born in khaki swaddling clothes. I firmly believe those who wore the uniform of our nation served to protect the rights provided by our constitution and we all should serve our country either in the armed forces or through some other means. It had always been a dream of mine to serve my country in the Navy so when the opportunity presented itself I gladly raised my hand and volunteered.

What did you like most about your past position? Whether it was from a location in this country, from the deck of various ships, countries overseas, or the deserts of Afghanistan I knew I was a part of something much bigger than me. One has to understand, being a part of the Navy was not about me and what I could receive from the Navy. It was about something President Kennedy said early in my life about what I could do for my country. Serving in the Navy was what I could do for my country. Of course the various positions I had throughout the twenty-two years I served were fulfilling but it was putting the uniform on everyday seeing US Navy on my uniform, seeing our nations flag raised each morning to our national anthem and at 10:00 pm each night hearing the sounds of taps was what I liked the most.

Why do you believe it is important to serve? As a lover of history one can research the founding of our country and see where our freedom was purchased at a very expensive price, the blood of those

What was the biggest lesson you have learned because of your service? No matter the mission I faced, the obstacles in meeting the mission, I learned how to lead those serving under me and relying

THE CARNATION

7

DELTASIG.ORG

on their incredible abilities and talents to always meet the mission. No one is an island unto themselves and if you are not willing and able to lead from the front, never requiring others to do things you yourself are not willing to do you, and always taking care of your crew you will never earn the respect of others and you will not be successful. I was never rewarded or promoted solely on my abilities and actions. I found success being lifted onto the shoulders of the Sailors and Marines serving with me, serving together in one mind and one body for one mission. How did your membership in Delta Sig affect your role in the armed forces? One of the first things I learned when I pledged Beta Kappa Colony was Delta Sig Men are Men of Courage, Men of Action, and Men of Excellence. I learned the fraternity of brotherhood, how the bond of brothers became stronger with each passing day and how Delta Sig is not about one individual and is about a brotherhood that can be relied upon no matter the situation. Delta Sig has always led the world of fraternities in being a brotherhood, not of different races, creeds and colors but being brothers. Being a brother of Delta Sig means I am a part of something bigger than me and our mission is to build better men. I took the core foundation of my brotherhood into adulthood and found the same values of Delta Sig are along the same lines of the Navy Core Values of Honor, Courage and Commitment. Even today with it being thirty-four years since I graduated college the lessons learned while a collegiate Delta Sig are still with me. I have known and found this brotherhood does not lesson with time and it is just as strong as it was way back then. I will always be indebted to Delta Sigma Phi for providing a foundation of brotherhood and core values I have relied upon and used to ensure success whether it be in collegiate studies, a professional career or in everyday life. It is because of Delta Sigma Phi that I am a better man.


HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

The Sphinx Has No Wings As late as 1920, some Delta Sigs wrote paeans to the Sphinx, verses extolling the virtues of the icon. Unlike the first Delta Sigs, they did not have classical training and they were untutored in ancient history. They referred to Delta Sigma Phi’s central symbol as a female figure. They were praising the wrong icon. There are two well-known Sphinxes of the ancient world, and they are fundamentally different. by LOREN MALL, HISTORIAN

T

he original archetype is the Great Sphinx of ancient Egypt, and it is the form adopted by Delta Sigma Phi. The Egyptian Sphinx is a colossal monolith of a reclining lion with the upper body and face of a man wearing the Royal Nemes of Pharaoh. The figure still looms high on the Giza Plateau, facing east across the Nile. A short distance behind it are the Three Great Pyramids.

The Great Sphinx of Egypt is the most enigmatic symbol of the old land. Carved from an outcrop of limestone, it has guarded the Great Pyramids of Giza for more than four and a half thousand years. Some investigators insist it is much older than that. From time immemorial, the colossal Sphinx has stared due east, its eyes focused on eternity. It waits and watches in “still-

THE CARNATION

8

FALL 2016

ness and silence,” Pliny the Elder wrote in the first century, keeping the secrets of ancient Egypt. After more than two centuries of archeological research, no one knows how early the Egyptian Sphinx was sculpted, who carved it from a single block of rock, which pharaoh the face represents, and what the sculpture means. It remains the most recognizable and the most baffling monument of ancient Egypt. Over the ages, the desert sands have weathered the contours of the Great Sphinx. It has been attacked by invading armies that scarred its features. Chunks of the colossus have crumbled. Yet the impenetrable Sphinx continues to fix its stony gaze on the eastern horizon, retaining its inscrutable expression of strength and majesty. With an intense thoughtfulness in its eyes, it broods as its mouth frames the traces of a smile. The largest stone sculpture in the world and the oldest, it endures in stoic quiet, speaking only through the whispers of the sand that age its body. The first Delta Sigs were struck by its endurance in the onslaught of adversity. In 1899, they selected the Great Sphinx of Giza as the foundational symbol of Delta Sigma Phi. The second and younger Sphinx is a legendary figure of Greece. It is a lion with the breasts and face of a woman and the wings of an eagle. She is often shown sitting on her haunches on a mountain road overlooking a slope blemished with gravestones. The Greek Sphinx exists only in mythology, personified by relatively small statues and pictorial representations. Unlike the beneficent prototype, she cast a scourge of drought and famine upon the land. The curse could be lifted only when someone correctly answered a question she posed to the youth of Greece who journeyed the road she guarded. She blocked their passage and demanded they answer


a riddle taught to her by the Muses: what is it that has one voice and yet becomes four-footed and two-footed and three-footed, and travels slower with the more feet it uses? When the young men could not solve her puzzle, she strangled them. The Greek people were terrified. When Oedipus replied to the challenge, he answered, “a human.” An oracle had prophesized the Greek Sphinx would die if someone gave the correct answer, and the response by Oedipus sent the malevolent creature into uncontrollable distress. She cast herself from the mountainside and died. The grateful people made Oedipus their king. In actual coronations in ancient Greece, the king was crowned with a garland of white carnations. They signified nobility and purity of purpose. The answer Oedipus gave made perfect sense. People crawl on all fours in infancy, walk on two feet when mature, and lean on a staff in old age. The Egyptian Sphinx has always provided inspiration for Delta Sigs, and the Fraternity’s 1905 coat of arms was designed to remind members of its significance. In 1921, Robert Ashley, editor of The Carnation magazine and a member of the national board of directors, thought the coat of arms should be changed. Professional illustrators who worked for a fraternity supplier redesigned it according to his ideas. Convention delegates approved his initial model in 1921, and the Fraternity trademarked the artists’ final rendition of the coat of arms in 1925. The 1921 design retains the motivational vision the early Delta Sigs understood, but several revisions by Ashley give it a different appearance. One of the differences is the head of the Sphinx;

The Egyptian Sphinx has always provided inspiration for Delta Sigs, and the Fraternity’s 1905 coat of arms was designed to remind members of its significance. In 1921, Robert Ashley, editor of The Carnation magazine, thought the coat of arms should be changed... the Fraternity trademarked the artists’ final rendition of the coat of arms in 1925.

it is more distinct and refined. Also in a major change, it has wings. Joining them is an orb representing the sun. The wings of the 1921 coat of arms are not derived from the Greek Sphinx. Instead, they are those of the Egyptian falcon. The Egyptians revered the majestic bird because it soared so high it seemed to come close to the sun-god. The people associated it with the sun, and they ascribed sacred powers to the great bird. Sometimes it was depicted as moving the sun across the sky, fulfilling its mission of maintaining the order of the cosmos. The Egyptians often portrayed Horus, the falcon god, in sculptures and tomb paintings as spreading its wings to protect the pharaoh. Ashley applied this pose to the Fraternity’s 1921 Sphinx.

The Great Sphinx of the Giza Plateau does not have wings, and it does not fly. On Delta Sigma Phi’s coat of arms, it is the divine bird’s wings that spread wide before the Sphinx. True to the old mythology, they take a protective pose. Now, as always, the Great Sphinx of Egypt maintains its vigil on the Giza Plateau. In silence, it keeps its meaning hidden in mystery. Hegel, the eminent 19th century philosopher, thought the man-beast represents mankind raising itself above nature. Other thinkers agree it represents the duality of humankind. By its form, the great figure suggests that human intellect is capable of overcoming the unlearned animalism that lies beneath the surface of every person.

The Sphinx in Egypt and represented in the Fraternity’s first coat of arms (top). THE CARNATION

9

DELTASIG.ORG


FEATURE

Bill and Detroit Tiger Miguel Cabrera on set to film the Happy Days promo.

THE CARNATION

10

FALL 2016


The crack of wood against the ball rings out across the whole nation. People hundreds of miles apart all simultaneously slide to the edge of their seats. Hearts race as breathing slows – all eyes watching the white ball fly through space and time. It hits the back bleachers, and the game is won by one run. Excitement abounds for some, while others nurse the pain of defeat. There is nothing quite like the life and energy of live sports. Few people understand this quite as well as Bill Battin, University of La Verne ’92.

//////////////////////////// by MICAH CHRISTENSEN ////////////////////////////

THE CARNATION

11

DELTASIG.ORG


FEATURE

A

s the Senior Vice President of Marketing in charge of On-Air Marketing for FOX Sports and FS1, Bill oversees all promotional efforts for television. This includes billboards, TV commercials, web banners, and more. He oversees the whole team, from producers to writers, editors, and everyone else. He also negotiates deals with any outside contractors or agencies. Bill and his team truly have a passion for their work. The team has currently won six Sports Emmy Awards, the Promax Award for Best Integrated Marketing Campaign, and over 100 Sports Cleos and PromaxBDA awards. This makes the team one of the most decorated in the business of sports marketing. But it is about much more than what games are coming up soon – it is all about the love of the game. THE WORLD CUP OF SPORTS MARKETING Televised sports programming is as old as TV itself. It was a natural evolution to the popular radio shows that brought the sports actions to fans who couldn’t make it to the game. As TV grew in popularity, so did the number of channels, creating competition for the sports broadcasts as well. As dedicated sports broadcasts and channels began appearing, the

need to stand out grew. Sports marketing became an increasingly important aspect of operations. Bill’s Bachelor of Arts in TV Broadcasting made him a perfect fit for the Sports Marketing team at FOX Sports – in which he eventually worked his way up to the top. 2015 was a particularly big year for Bill and his team. The Women’s World Cup called FOX Sports home of the competition. It fell onto Bill and his team to make the event unlike anything before seen on the network. A task made even harder by the lowkey popularity of soccer in the US – particularly women’s soccer. The Women’s World Cup was the most comprehensive campaign ever done by the team. It leveraged every media format imaginable while incorporating several pop culture cross-overs. Some of the ladies of the US World Cup team were "Simpsonized", being turned into life-size Simpsons characters - one of the highest pop culture honors of the 21st century. They also made appearances on “American Idol”. That year’s competition winner had their theme go on to be used as the Women’s World Cup team theme for the tournament. The team took a new approach to their marketing of the Women’s World Cup. Instead of focusing on the sport, they made all of the promotions about the players. It provided a human inter-

2015 WAS A BIG YEAR... The Women’s World Cup called FOX Sports home of the competition. It fell o  nto Bill and his team to make the event unlike anything before seen on the network. A task made even harder by the low-key popularity of soccer in the US – particularly women’s soccer.

THE CARNATION

12

FALL 2016

est to watching and rooting for the team during the tournament. The project lasted over 10 months in total. Promos began filming in January, far before the tournament started in June. During production and filming, the team created marketing content that was used for over six months, resulting in 80+ features. It was a massive undertaking in both size and scale. The team won a Sports Emmy for Set Design for their work on the project. They used an innovative modular set of 6 rooms that they then shuffled the players through. The creative design allowed them to create a lot of content while maximizing on efficiency. While the Women’s World Cup promotional work was incredible, it is not the only award-winning work that Bill and his team have produced. The FOX Sports marketing team is one of the most decorated in the business with dozens of industry awards and numerous Sports Emmys. Bill relies on relationships to create award-winning work. He makes it a point to be as kind and accommodating as possible with his team, outside talent, and vendors. He knows that not only do happy people do better work – they also will want to work with you again. FS1 One of the most memorable projects for Bill during his lengthy career was the launch of the brand new subsidiary channel, FOX Sports 1. While FOX had extensive sports programming on its primary channel, they also have a large catalogue of other beloved shows. To fully expand on the success that FOX Sports achieved, they would need to make an entirely new home. FOX Sports 1 was conceived to compete directly with other sports-only channels. Bill knew that this would not be easy, as the existing channels had years to establish a devoted viewership,


to director for her music videos, lent his talent to the ads as well. "People often thought that it was a Nike commercial!" said Bill. The spot set a defining tone for FS1. Happy Days was all about the fun of anticipation, rivalry, and the game. FS1's focus is just that – giving people access to the fun of sports.

Bill sports his plethora of event credentials.

but they didn’t have the expertise of FOX behind them. Launching a dedicated sports channel was uncharted territory for Bill, so he and his team had to rely on instinct to create everything that went into FS1. “On the night that FS1 launched, everyone was up past 3am to watch as it unfolded,” said Bill. “After nearly a year of work, it is just something that you won’t forget!” FS1 has also seen its own share of incredible ad work. One of the most famous sports ads of recent years is the Sorry for All the Football campaign. The ad series

includes long-suffering wives, girlfriends and pets left behind when their loved ones become consumed with college football. The campaign was even capped by a full page letter of apology to all of the “Football Widows” who would have to face the fall season alone due to their extensive football line-up. The Happy Days ad was another smash success for FS1, landing the marketing team serious acclaim. Bill and his team traveled to stadiums and arenas across the country, getting unprecedented access to the players for the ad. Joseph Kahn, Taylor Swift's go-

THE CARNATION

13

DELTASIG.ORG

FRATERNAL WORLD OF SPORTS Bill was drawn to the Greek world upon entering college, and noticed pretty quickly that Delta Sig was different from all of the other fraternities on campus. “For me, it wasn’t even a question. The guys were just awesome. Good guys, fun guys! I didn’t run into any of the typical frat guy stuff there.” Delta Sig played a large role in opening the doors that led Bill to where he is now. After graduating with a degree in TV Broadcasting, Bill worked as a bank teller just making ends meet, but he knew he wanted more. Through a connection made within the fraternity, Bill scored an internship at FOX. He got the business card through one of his college classes, and held onto it until his senior year. When it came time to begin the job hunt, he dug out the card and called the number. This act helped him score an internship at FOX. Since his internship, Bill has worked doing almost any role imaginable at the network. Bill still meets up with chapter brothers on any occasion that they can make it. The men all bring old pictures, sometimes even their paddles, to their reunions. To them, this is what it is all about: brotherhood.


ALUMNI PROFILE

“I am Kenneth Kelty” I

am Kenneth Kelty. At age three and a half I was diagnosed with autism and was told by a doctor I would never talk. However, I am currently talking and doing a lot of public speaking engagements. In the fall of 2012, I attended the Western Carolina University Participants Program, a two-year inclusion program for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities to come and learn. My first semester at

WCU was really great and I blossomed a lot with the experience from The UP Program and campus. Before I came to WCU, graduation for the UP program was not inclusive. However, one night in November of 2012, the whole student body came together and said if the participants can’t walk then we won’t walk. At the end of the semester, the bill was passed so the participants could walk. In the second semester of my first year, I volunteered through a social

THE CARNATION

14

FALL 2016

skills group to work with school-aged children on social skills. It was there that I met my friend Isaiah who was a senior in the rec therapy program and Delta Sigma Phi brother. During that semester when we would meet for dinner he introduced me to his twin brother Eric and his little brother in the fraternity, Byron. It was during an Entourage meeting I attended that I met the president of the fraternity, Ryan Denver. Entourage is a


Kelty (back row, third from the left) poses for a group shot with his chapter brothers.

job where current students would give tours to perspective students and their families who wished to attend Western Carolina University. During the summer of 2013, Ryan and I were chatting on the internet about Delta Sigma Phi, and I asked if they ever thought about volunteering with The UP Program. I offered to speak to the fraternity in the fall about the opportunity. While I spoke to the fraternity, they were very welcoming and wanted

to know how to get involved. When I started to hang out with them before recruitment week they already accepted me as one of their brothers, and I got to hang out with them. As I underwent recruitment, it was hard for me to qualify because since I did not qualify for the required GPA through the UP Program, but the Delta Sig brothers stood by me. When speaking at conferences or in the classroom, I speak about my involvement with the fraternity. I featured them in my article as well. Near the end of my senior year, I was at my final Person Centered Planning meeting with the UP Faculty. Near the end of the meeting, Jay Raxter, who became a brother the previous semester and someone who I worked with through The UP Program, gave me the letter saying I could become an official Delta Sigma Phi brother. It was on May 2 that I became a alumnus. At graduation, some of my fraternity brothers came to support me – even the ones who were not graduating until later in the day. Plenty of great pictures were taken. My experience as an alumnus has been great. I have connected with brothers from other universities and have received support from them.

THE CARNATION

15

DELTASIG.ORG

I am still doing a lot of public speaking engagements and writing articles and besides speaking to professionals and high school students. Currently, I am also a part-time administrative assistant at The Arc of The Triangle in Wake County, NC. This past April, I completed my LEND Traineeship at the Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities at UNC Chapel Hill. LEND (Leadership Education in Noro-Developmental Disabilities) is an interdisciplinary leadership graduate school elective for students in the allied health care professions who are working towards Masters and Doctorate degrees. The CIDD is one of the pioneers to include self-advocates in their LEND Program there are two others that have both family fellows and self-advocates. I do plan on doing advocacy work for the broader LEND’s in the country to include self-advocates and for inclusive post-secondary education. I am currently right now working on my first book. I plan on talking about my life with autism and inclusion across my life span. If you want to follow my story go to Kenneth Kelty Public Speaker and Author - it’s my public page.


ALUMNI PROFILE

by FRANK URBAN, EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY ’78

I

grew up in a musically inclined family. My father played the saxophone and was a member of a professional band. Due to his influence, one of my brothers played the drums and I played the guitar. We were both in a band for a while in high school, but when we went away to college neither of us joined another band.

THE CARNATION

16

FALL 2016

At college, I knew that I wanted to pursue a career that involved music, but down deep, I didn’t think that I was good enough to make it as a musician. To confirm my belief, I told myself that I didn’t know anyone else who had managed to make it as a musician either. During my first semester at Eastern Illinois University, I went to several rush parties to see which fraternity that I liked. At one of these parties I learned that the Delta Sigs were on the concert committee at EIU. They were the “teamsters” of EIU. They unloaded the trucks, set up the auditorium stage, and then helped position and equalize the band’s sound equipment for every concert at EIU. It was the perfect job for me! One of the benefits of this job was that we got free tickets to these concerts, and excellent seats were always reserved for us. Setting up, adjusting the sound equipment, and hearing the results while attending these concerts that had the most profound effect on me. I didn’t realize it yet, but I had really learned about “live” music and how it was different from any recorded music. Many years later, this experience would lead me back to the musical career I always dreamed of. After a few years of work with my degree in tow, I bought a home with a very large room that I could use to build my own “concert worthy” sound system. I experimented for years with different equipment and studied its effect on the room acoustics. After years of experimenting, I realized there was something wrong with the equipment. It was impossible to make the recordings sound like live music. I resolved to find out why.


I purchased special software that could analyze music in 3D and reveal the content of every instrument and voice. I studied hundreds of recordings, and within a year I had the answer. It was the filter within the speaker or subwoofer that was harming the signal. These filters are used to divide the signal into several pieces so that the high frequencies can be sent to the tweeters, and the low frequencies can be sent to the woofers. The filters had an accidental side effect of distorting the signal. Correcting the issue was another ordeal entirely. I hired two consultants and studied the problem myself, and after months of study, the consultants told me that it was impossible to solve this problem. The problem was inherent in the electronics that are used to filter music. It was physics, and you can’t change the laws of physics. That was it. I tried. I was disappointed, but I had to face reality. I had to let it go. And then, one morning I woke up with an idea. What if I try to alter the signal before it gets distorted? To change it enough so that after it gets smeared, it is now where it should have been in the first place? It seemed like a plausible solution. I decided to study signal processing for a few months to try and find the best avenue to our solution. After my research phase, I requested quotes from two companies for development on what I had found. The first company wanted $45,000 just to get started, and they estimated it would cost over $100,000 to get an acceptable prototype designed. The other company gave an estimate of just under $5000 to handle one instrument and see if they could get it to work – since they were not

“The moral of my story: If people tell you that it’s impossible, don’t believe them! Just believe that it isn’t going to be easy.”

sure if it was possible. The choice was pretty easy to make! A few weeks later, I got sound editing software from the development company for my computer and got to work processing the bass drum. It sounded terrible and artificial. Well, this wasn’t going to work, but they told me

THE CARNATION

17

DELTASIG.ORG

this was the best that they could do. I still believed that it was doable, but I wasn’t going to invest over $100,000 to find out. I was disappointed, but I had to let it go. After a while, I had another idea. What if there is a microchip on the market that does what I needed it to do? I called a few chip manufacturers and explained the problem. The Analog Devices engineering department said that they may have a chip that might work, so I ordered a few of them to test. Less than a year later, I had a working prototype and this device could be built in quantity for less than $30 each! So I applied for a patent, and that was granted in less than two years. Now all I had to do was sell this invention to a large audio company. I didn’t realize it yet, but this was the biggest challenge of all. I sent letters, went to high-end audio shows and consumer electronics shows to meet the people who represented these companies. Everyone seemed interested, but I didn’t get a single offer to buy it. The usual reply I got was that “our company has a team of engineers and they would have developed this device if it was worth developing”. At this point, I felt that I had invested so much time and money into this effort that I needed to set up a company to manufacture it myself. Four years later, that vision is a reality. The company is called US Soundlabs, and this device is sold on Amazon. It is called the Module SW2 Signal Processor for Subwoofers. The moral of my story: If people tell you that it’s impossible, don’t believe them! Just believe that it isn’t going to be easy.


SERVICE SPOTLIGHT

A Scout’s Honor by MICAH CHRISTENSEN

O

n July 27, 2011, it was a day like any other in Gladstone, MO. A woman driving along the road had a green light, but a car turning through the intersection late gunned the engine to try to avoid her. He didn’t. Her car was spent spinning around twice after the collision with severe damage dealt to her sedan. Jeffrey Cook, Epsilon Lambda ’80, was headed to a convenience store when he saw the accident occur. He jumped out of his car and ran to help. He was briefly knocked to the ground by a passing car. He tried to get the woman to stop her car. He banged first on her front passenger window. Then he dashed around to the driver’s window and thrust his arm through the partially open window. He yanked open the door, and with smoke billowing from the car hood and gasoline leaking from a broken fuel line, Cook was now running alongside the car. He hung on to the open door — hopping on his left foot while his right foot pushed towards the brake pedal and doing his best to steer with his right hand. His brash efforts were successful, and the car was brought to a stop. This was the sort of moment that a boy scout prepares for. Jeffrey, a lifelong Boy Scout turned Scoutmaster, simply did as he had been taught and how he taught his scouts to act. His actions that day saved the life of the woman driving the vehicle. The Honor Medal of Heroism is the highest honor a boy scout can hope to achieve, with only 14 issued to adults in the entire history of the scouts. Jeffrey became one of the few who now sport that medal due to his actions on that day.

Jeff and his wife, Jill, during college and in modern day.

This is only a small snapshot into Jeffrey’s long history with the Boy Scouts of America. He has over 29 years of experience in scouting – five as a Scoutmaster, nine as a Cubmaster, and over 20 years with various councils and committees. Jeffrey’s sons, Joshua and Jordan, are both Eagle scouts. Jeffrey joined Delta Sigma Phi at Northwest Missouri State University, where he would later meet his wife, Jill. Jeff founded Scouts Helping Scouts in 1992 – a group within the Boy Scouts of America dedicated to providing relief and support efforts to fellow scouts in need. The first catastrophe the new group responded to was Hurricane Andrew in August, 1992. “In my twenty years as Mid America Council President/Scout Executive, 40 years as a Professional Scouter, and 62 years total dedicated to scouting, Jeff Cook is at the top of my list for exceptional scouters,” said Lloyd E. Roitstein, Scout Executive. “What he accomplished for our Council and community, along with what

THE CARNATION

18

FALL 2016

he has done to support numerous other causes throughout our country, was and is incredibly generous and noble.” Fraternity has always held an important spot in Jeff’s heart right alongside scouting. One of his passions has been to work with national fraternities to organize an Area Alumni Association – above and beyond the Chapter Alumni Association. As a volunteer and past Board Member of what is now the North-American Interfraternity Conference (NIC), Jeffrey helped six other fraternities grow their regional alumni engagement. Steven Spielberg, Michael Jordan, John F. Kennedy, Neil Armstrong, and Martin Luther King, Jr. – men who are lauded as the best of the best in their fields. These men, despite the numerous degrees of separation, all share a common bond – each one was a part of the Boy Scouts of America. This historic group has long been a staple in the culture of the American male. Jeffrey Cook is working tirelessly to bring that level of excellence now to Delta Sigma Phi.


From Alpha to Omega: A Leadership Institute Retrospective O

n July 16, 2016, the 24rd Delta Sigma Phi Leadership Institute came to an end. The Omega class – the undergraduate brothers from all across the country – huddled together in the Delta Sig HQ lobby for closing remarks from Patrick Jessee. He challenged them to remember all that they had experienced, because they are now among the select few in Delta Sig history who got to attend LI. Leading with courage is a core component of Delta Sigma Phi’s mission. The Leadership Institute (LI) is Delta Sigma Phi’s flagship educational program. This five-day institute combines facilitated discussions, team-building activities, high and low ropes courses, and various challenge activities, such as raftbuilding or wilderness rescue. Trained alumni volunteers and professional staff guide each student through the event. Since 1993, this program has allowed undergraduate members to improve their individual, team, organizational and professional leadership skills. Formerly known as the College of Engineered Leadership, more than 1,100 participants have graduated from this program armed with the skills of principled leadership. As we start to look onward to what 2017 will hold for the Alpha Alpha class of LI, we wanted to take a look back at the years of history contained within the program.

A  LPHA Tony Blanton, Transylvania University ’85, shared some of his insight into LI. Tony has attended and volunteered at 16 different Leadership Academies over the years. How many participants did we have in the Alpha Class, vs the Omega Class? The Alpha Class had 30 undergraduate participants who were invited to attend based upon recommendations from the chapter services staff. We also included the chapter services staff as participants in the first class. Including the staff and the alumni volunteers who served as facilitators/speakers, there were 45 total participants.

THE CARNATION

19

DELTASIG.ORG

The Omega Class had 53 undergraduate participants who were selected to attend through an application process. Including the staff and the alumni volunteers who served as facilitators/speakers, there were 68 total participants.

Was the Alpha Class LI held at Camp Tecumseh, or has the location changed over the years? The Alpha Class was held at the Delta Sig chapter facility at Purdue University. The location has changed through the years; locations of which I’m aware include Indiana University, the Benedictine Center in Indy, the University of Maryland, Bradford


LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE

Has LI always been a multi-day affair, or was it originally shorter? LI has always been a multi-day program. The first few years were 4day programs and at some point it was expanded to 5 days.

Woods Leadership Center, Chapel Rock Camp in Prescott, AZ, and Camp Tecumseh. I’m pretty sure we started utilizing Tecumseh in the early 2000s, and with the exception of two years at Bradford Woods and the year at Chapel Rock prior to the Phoenix Convention, we’ve been at Tecumseh exclusively.

What are some of the classes/ activities/events that used to take place but don’t any longer? While the curriculum has been pretty steady over the past 6 years, we tweak the program every year. A list of things we don’t do any longer would be quite long. A couple of things that come to mind: 1. The original curriculum was built around the leadership concepts from The Leadership Challenge. At some point the curriculum changed to center on concepts from Emotional Intelligence. When I was recruited to come back and lead the program in 2003, we went back to the model of The Leadership Challenge. 2. Participants used to complete a survey of around 50 random questions such as “name something that’s green,” “name a NASCAR driver,” and “name a U.S. state that doesn’t have a Delta Sig chapter.” We would compile the results and play a Family Feud type game with the participants on one of the nights of LI.

Do you feel like LI attendees are different now that they were back in the Alpha Class? Not really. With the Alpha Class, we hand-picked the undergraduates

THE CARNATION

20

FALL 2016

who were considered the Fraternity’s ‘best and brightest.’ These days, even though there’s an open application process, we still have the luxury of choosing from among the most successful undergraduate leaders that the Fraternity produces.

As a longtime volunteer for LI, how have your feelings towards the event changed over the years? When we started the program in 1993, it was a pilot. The participant group wasn’t called Alpha Class because we didn’t know if there would be another class the following year. Even after the 1994 program, there wasn’t really a sense of it being something that was going to continue long-term. When I left staff at the end of 1994, I really didn’t give a thought about what was going to happen with the program. When I was recruited to lead the program again in 2003, there was a distinct possibility that LI wasn’t going to happen again unless I agreed. Prior to that, LI had been mostly staff-driven in terms of the lead facilitating. Between 2002 and 2003, there had been some significant HQ staff turnover. The new staff didn’t have anyone with the experience to be the lead facilitator, so there was consideration of not having it at all. I agreed to work with LI again because the new staff needed my help, not really because I was extremely invested in the program. Now, LI has been running for 24 years and I’ve been involved in 16. It has grown to become something I care deeply about, mostly because I’ve had the privilege of seeing the impact that the program has had over the years, not only with the participants, but also with the Fraternity.


my skills as a facilitator into the skills of a participant.

O  MEGA Carter Koen, University of Missouri ’14, just graduated from the Omega class of the Leadership Institute. What was your favorite activity from LI? I would have to say that my favorite activity was probably the wilderness rescue course. While all the activities were great, the course really pushed us as individual leaders to come together and adapt to each other’s styles. While no one got incredibly angry or frustrated, the task as a whole was very taxing both mentally and physically, pushing us to our limits. We left the activity incredibly drained but really fulfilled in the fact that we were able to overcome some great obstacles as a team and not just the physical ones at that.

What was the biggest take-away for you in regards to what you learned? As a leadership development facilitator at the University of Missouri myself, I was finding it incredibly difficult to apply myself to some of the activities and programs without attempting to “take-over” or immediately give the answer to said activity. However, in talking with the various mentors and program leaders, I was better able to identify how to transfer

How have you applied what you learned at LI? One of the biggest applications that I have taken outside of LI would be the principle of Enabling Others to Act. One of my biggest strengths yet also my biggest weakness is developing others and allowing them to identify their roles in organizations and in leadership. However, I constantly would simply give people the answer without letting them self-identify the solution. While it may take them a bit longer, allowing an individual to self-identify their role or solution is far more fulfilling than simply telling them the answer. I have started to apply this in various aspects, from the Beta Beta chapter, academics, and various involvement on campus. With this I’ve started to notice that I am forming better relationships with indi-

viduals and learning more about how people perceive the world from their perspective.

Have you kept in touch with anyone you met for the first time at LI? Most definitely! I have a list of people, especially those closer to Mizzou that I try to keep in touch with. While it may be a simple conversation of ‘Hey, how are things going?’ it’s nice to know that you have 50+ people that are willing to keep up with you and will have your back in times of trouble. Even though we have brothers all across the nation, it’s great to know that my Omega brothers are always there come hell or high-water.

In 3 words, how would you describe the Omega class of LI? Dependable, Impactful, Fulfilling

“When we started the program in 1993, it was a pilot. Even after the 1994 program, there wasn’t really a sense of it being something that was going to continue long-term. ...Now, LI has been running for 24 years and I’ve been involved in 16. It has grown to become something I care deeply about, mostly because I’ve had the privilege of seeing the impact that the program has had over the years, not only with the participants, but also with the Fraternity.”

THE CARNATION

21

DELTASIG.ORG


FRATERNITY GROWTH

Fraternity Growth Through The Years & Into The Future How a new generation of students will reshape the way fraternities, including Delta Sig, expand to or return to college campuses.

I

by NIK KOULOGEORGE, STETSON UNIVERSITY '08 f you attend a Delta Sigma Phi Convention (the next takes place in Baltimore in July 2017) you may get a rare opportunity to learn about the history of Delta Sigma Phi from Past National President and present Historian, Loren Mall.

One story related to our founding was the manner in which Delta Sigma Phi grew from the City College of New York to other schools, the first being Columbia University and the second being at New York University. It was at the latter that Meyer Boskey, a founding member from C.C.N.Y., recruited Charles Tonsor, a personal friend, to establish the Gamma Chapter at NYU. In the last issue of the Carnation, we discussed how fraternities originally grew into national or regional organizations by absorbing local chapters. This assisted Delta Sig through the majority of its growth in its early years. There were thousands of local fraternities and sororities, and each would petition a national organization to join as a part of its network. The Alpha Theta Chapter at the University of Michigan was originally the Knickerbocker Club, first established in 1888. The Alpha Chi Chapter was known as Phi Kappa Delta prior to 1925, established as the first fraternity in the state of Florida in 1898.

As the times changed, so too did the manner in which fraternities grew and re-established chapters on college campuses. By the 80’s and 90’s, national organizations sent professional staff to college campuses as the number of local fraternities diminished and continued growth became a focus for building a truly nationwide network. Between 2000 and 2010, many organizations established the model currently employed by Delta Sig in partnership with Phired Up Productions: Dynamic Recruitment. Dynamic recruitment served us well, Delta Sig had some of its most successful re-developments or new chapter developments between 2009 (when we became the first organization to partner with Phired Up) and 2015. Many chapters opened within that time frame had been closed for more than a decade, and now vibrantly contribute to their campus and community as Better Men. Times; however, are changing again, and the manner in which we determine where to establish chapters as well as the way in which college students communicate has changed, and continues to change. Students are less likely to pick up the phone to speak with someone they don’t know, a still-effective, but diminishing practice. Students don’t need to meet our members or staff to learn about the Fraternity, they can simply search years of news articles on Google, search “Delta Sigma Phi” and find dozens of

THE CARNATION

22

FALL 2016

videos on Youtube, or simply search #YITBOS on Twitter or Instagram to interact with and witness the day-today life of fraternity men. Millennials, those born throughout the latter half of the 80’s the 90’s and some in the early 2000’s, are considered “joiners,” people looking for endless clubs and perks to brighten their resume. We have been serving the interests of Millennials for years, and just in time, as a new generation enters college this year. Generation Z is generally considered to consist of those born into a post 9/11/01, information-tech era. They are just now entering college, and they have spent their entire life building friends over the internet. Some consider their best friends to be those they met over the internet and have never met physically. Generation Z students are growing up with smartphones, an advanced internet, and 3D Printers. They are growing up in an era where the biggest new companies don’t sell products, but services one can simply opt-in to via their smartphone. If a college student today wants to learn to tie a tie or determine whether their car is broken, they’ll pull out their cell phone, and watch a video on YouTube. Rather than ask a stranger where he or she purchased a watch, modern college students will simply describe the watch in a Google search and flick through photos until they find the right one, or can even search just by taking a picture of the watch.


They are also privacy-conscious, due to the whole “post 9/11” part, and having witnessed a bad recession in their formidable years, very focused on expending only energy that will advance them toward a stable future. Research reported in Business Insider1 and other media outlets suggest that the next generation of college students are very entrepreneurial, which is great for re-establishing a chapter or establishing a new one. The next generation is also very driven, which is great in the fact that we want our members to build better lives for themselves and others. They are; however, not naturally interested in “joining.” That simply means there needs to be an obvious value and benefit to an organization for Generation Z-ers to consider spending their time with it2. You know those students who juggle being President or Vice President of six clubs at one time? There will be far fewer of them over the next decade or two. The good news is that we have an exciting proposition for the next generation of college students: A chance to join into a brotherhood of men who seek to make one another better. It’s an even better proposition if they have the opportunity to entrepreneurially establish or re-establish the chapter they become a part of. What does that mean for the way our fraternity grows? In the coming years, we’ll take bold steps just like we did in 2009 to change the way fraternities expand. We will work to cultivate interest groups, connect with and market to students online, and utilize referrals from members and friends of Delta Sig across the United States to find students interested in establishing a chapter of Delta Sigma Phi.

Consider the prospect of a member referring a friend online who attends another university. Our staff reaches out to that friend, and then conducts an online marketing campaign to gather additional interest. In these cases, we may have 5-15 interested students ready to join without ever stepping foot on a campus. Our Fraternity Growth team has already done this to an extent. By gaining access to email lists from the colleges and universities at which we are establishing or re-establishing a chapter, we have been able to reach out to students before stepping foot on campus. Technology like Chapter Builder, developed by a Delta Sig and now a product of TechniPhi, serve our chapters, and our growth team, as a fully functional relationship management tool. Instead of typing notes into an excel sheet regarding a conversation we had with a student, we can send text messages and emails directly to students through the app, and it automatically tracks it. All of this means that we will be able to reach out to a larger, wider variety of students more quickly and effectively than ever before, but also that we’ll be able to utilize information about which schools members transfer to or have friends at when we make our case to a college or university to establish or re-establish a chapter (read the Spring 2016 issue of the Carnation for more on that process). It’s not just growth that will be affected. The way in which we support student members, chapters, Alumni Corporation Boards, advisory boards and local associations will continue to be quicker, more efficient and more affordable. A glimpse of that can be seen with Delta Sig’s Mentor Platform, which can connect any student from anywhere in the country with an alumnus interested

in mentoring a Delta Sig. Between the mentorship platform and LinkedIn (an online social network with a professional focus), members have more of an opportunity than ever to meet alumni from their chapter or within their profession. This next generation of college students will expect a robust online experience as a part of their membership, whether it be in how they access their membership benefits, learn which members live nearby or how they learn and grow through the Fraternity. This next generation of college students will also know exactly where to find whatever they would like to know about our Fraternity, the chapters of this Fraternity and its membership at large. That means it’s all the more important that we apply the lessons learned through our Fraternity’s ritual to our every day life. Over the next decade, the membership experience of Delta Sig will be enhanced by what we can provide online and through modern technology. We can stream any speech or event across the globe in real-time without spending a penny. Videos, viewable on any member’s phone, laptop, or perhaps even a watch, may become our primary mode of communication. That will excite many, but there is also cause for concern. It is just as easy for good news and a well-designed promotional video to go viral and be viewed by millions as it is for an email, video, or snap (from Snapchat) that paints our membership in a negative light. All of these are equally accessible on the internet, the primary method in which college students learn about things they wish to purchase or become a part of. The call for each of us to stick to our personal and Fraternity values is just as important as ever, and perhaps even more so now that most of what we say or do can be read or seen with one click.

1. Schlossberg, Mallory (2016, February). Teen Generation Z is being called 'Millenials on Steroids,' and that could be terrifying for retailers. Business Insider. 2. Jenkins, Ryan (2015, June). 15 Aspects That Highlight How Generation Z is Different from Millenials. Business 2 Community.

THE CARNATION

23

DELTASIG.ORG


CHAPTER REPORT CARD

Pyramid Program Annual Summary & Report Card

E

ach fall issue of the Carnation, we look back at the year prior and report what we have learned through the Fraternity’s annual accreditation process: The Pyramid Program. At the 2015 Convention in New Orleans, we announced updates to our accreditation program to make it both a better indicator of which chapter operations need to be prioritized and a window into the interests of our members. The Pyramid is split into four sections, and organized much like a hierarchy of needs, like the once-famous food pyramid. At the base are two sections, Membership and Fraternal Standards, comprised of five components each. These sections contain the basic functions of a chapter, and are the “Accreditation” mentioned in the Fraternity Manual and other governing documents of Delta Sigma Phi. The middle section, Vision & Impact, consists of 6 components which track the Fraternity-wide strategic initiatives, including engagement of chapter alumni, volunteering in the local community, involvement in other campus organizations, service to the American Red Cross, officer transition plans

THE CARNATION

and attendance at Fraternity programs such as the Regional Leadership Academies or Presidents’ Academy. The top section is unique to Delta Sigma Phi’s annual assessment and where things get exciting. Elevation consists of 7 components of which chapters choose four to complete. The Elevation section allows us to learn about the interests of members of each chapter, and gives each chapter a chance to excel at and be known for a focus on career development or a health and wellness program.

24

FALL 2016


RED CROSS/PHILANTHROPY/SERVICE

$47,680

dollars raised ($222,152 donated to philanthropic causes overall)

79,810

hours volunteered (based on 56 chapter’s submissions)

23.13

average service hours per member

1986

pints of blood collected (saving up to 5,958 lives according to the Red Cross)

MEMBERSHIP

6,300

ELEVATION (BY CHAPTER) See how chapters of Delta Sigma Phi sought to enhance their membership experience in the 2015-2016 academic year:

Total membership (at the end of the spring term)

21

Local Philanthropy/Service Partners

20

57

Parent Clubs

average chapter size (+1 from 2015)

17

Career Developments

3.06

16

average chapter GPA

Personal Development Programs

11

Health & Wellness Programs

2779

3

Members reported to be involved or hold leadership positions in other organizations

These components are all based on observations of activities our chapters already performed and recommendations of chapters to include them in our annual assessment. Although there are currently seven components to choose from, we will continue to grow the Elevation section as we learn more about other types of events and programs of the chapters of Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity.

THE RESULTS As we have in years passed, we are including a visual display of how our undergraduate chapters benefitted their members and the world in the 2015-2016 academic year. With the addition of the Elevation section, we’ve also been able to compile some interesting information regarding which of the components are most popular among the chapters of Delta Sigma Phi.

Inter-Council Engagements

2

Campus Forums

Resources and more information regarding the Pyramid Program can be found at www.deltasig.org/chapters/ pyramid-program. Additionally, the Chapter Support team will host several webinars throughout the academic year to review and discuss the accreditation process, as some changes have been made to clarify expectations and simplify some of the components. As we continue to refine our annual assessment, we hope that Delta Sig’s will benefit from an accreditation process focused on a stable foundation and the interests of our members. If you have questions or suggestions, please contact Director of Fraternity Growth & Services, Nik Koulogeorge at Koulogeorge@Deltasig.org.

The statistics above are based on documented submissions provided by a majority of Delta Sigma Phi chapters. It is likely that most of the statistics on this page are lower than the actual figures, in the case that several chapters did not report their performance for the 2015-2016 academic year. The Chapter Support Team recom mends the Secretary of each chapter manage (or manage a chair position) the collection of documentation related to the Pyramid Program throughout the year.

THE CARNATION

25

DELTASIG.ORG


CHAPTER REPORT CARD

CHAPTER SCHOOL

SPRING ’16 GPA

DOLLARS RAISED

BLOOD PINTS COLLECTED

AVG. HOURS PER MAN

MEMBER GROWTH

Alpha Alpha

Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

-

$600.00

27

15.56

9.68%

Alpha Chi

Stetson University

3.1

$561.84

-

-

23.88%

Alpha Delta

Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

3.11

$0.00

-

18.58

10.00%

Alpha Epsilon

Duke University

-

$0.00

-

-

11.39%

Alpha Eta

Hioh Northern University

2.8

$1,500.00

-

-

-9.43%

Alpha Gamma

Georgia Institute of Technology

3.26

$500.00

-

12.15

-6.06%

Alpha Iota

Ohio State University

3.42

$12,942.35

142

25.84

30.30%

Alpha Lambda

Millikin University

2.93

$1,442.00

-

56.61

-26.98%

Alpha Mu

University of Virginia

-

$1,230.00

-

-

2.94%

Alpha Nu

Oglethorpe University

-

$365.00

0

12.25

60.00%

Alpha Pi

Michigan State University

3.06

$21,750.00

-

20.1

5.56%

Alpha Sigma

University of Maryland, College Park

-

$1,200.00

93

18.93

29.58%

Alpha Tau

Albion College

3.29

$0.00

-

14.96

-3.57%

Alpha Theta

University of Michigan

3.289

$0.00

-

11.63

25.35%

Alpha Upsilon

Kansas State University

3.286

$8,000.00

-

54.91

16.13%

Beta

Columbia University

-

$284.00

-

-

3.95%

Beta Alpha

Iowa State University

2.84

$0.00

-

9.37

23.64%

Beta Beta

University of Missouri

3.081

$0.00

-

-

17.88%

Beta Gamma

University of California, Los Angeles

-

$0.00

-

-

-13.33%

Beta Iota

Wittenberg University

2.846

$0.00

-

5.86

0.00%

Beta Kappa

University of Alabama

-

$11,585.00

-

-

1.02%

Beta Mu

Transylvania University

3.31

$2,900.00

-

53.7

0.00%

Beta Nu

California State University, Fresno

-

$0.00

-

-

16.28%

Beta Pi

Michigan Tech University

2.45

$0.00

-

68.95

-4.76%

Beta Psi

Arizona State University

3.07

$0.00

-

-

-4.14%

Bradley

Bradley University

-

$0.00

-

21.36

5.88%

Delta Delta

Purdue University

-

$0.00

-

-

-3.81%

Delta Epsilon

Missouri Univ. of Science and Tech.

3.298

$3,417.69

17

39.64

-7.69%

Delta Lambda

Utah State University

3.06

$0.00

-

-

-5.71%

Delta Mu

Loyola Marymount University

Delta Omega

Cleveland State University

Delta Omicron

Western Carolina University

Epsilon

Penn State University

Epsilon Beta

University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh

-

$0.00

-

30.28

-1.30%

2.97

$0.00

-

15.51

34.62%

-

$0.00

838

-

9.38%

-

$70,000.00

-

-

2.54%

-

$0.00

-

33.71

-5.88%

Epsilon Delta

University of Wisconsin-Platteville

-

$0.00

-

-

-25.00%

Epsilon Iota

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

-

$0.00

-

-

22.73%

Epsilon Kappa

Loyola University Chicago

-

$1,039.00

73

13.13

1.28%

Epsilon Lambda

Northwest Missouri State University

-

$0.00

-

-

-13.79%

Epsilon Phi

East Carolina University

Epsilon Pi

Woodbury University

2.924

$0.00

-

-

29.41%

-

$0.00

-

-

12.20%

Epsilon Rho

California Polytechnic State University

-

$0.00

60

14.31

-5.56%

Epsilon Tau

Grand Valley State University

-

$0.00

-

6.85

-18.18%

3.14

$520.00

25

22.46

-4.65%

-

$0.00

-

20.58

9.09%

2.33

$0.00

-

44.29

14.29% -12.50%

Eta

University of Texas at Austin

Eta Alpha

Milwaukee School of Engineering

Eta Beta

Cal. State University, San Bernardino

Eta Chi

New Mexico State University

-

$0.00

-

-

Eta Eta

Rochester Institute of Technology

-

$0.00

-

15.57

New

Eta Kappa

University of Michigan-Dearborn

-

$0.00

-

-

-10.26%

Eta Omega

Johnson & Wales University

-

$0.00

-

-

34.29%

Eta Omicron

University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire

-

$0.00

-

-

21.95% -6.67%

Eta Psi

Gallaudet University

-

$0.00

34

-

Eta Rho

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

-

$0.00

-

New

Eta Upsilon

Indiana State University

-

$0.00

-

-

FIU

Florida International University

-

$0.00

-

-

60.87% New

Gamma Chi

Drexel University

3.13

$0.00

-

26.81

-20.48%

Gamma Epsilon

San Jose State University

-

$0.00

-

-

16.94%

Gamma Iota

University of Idaho

-

$0.00

-

21

-12.50%

THE CARNATION

26

FALL 2016


CHAPTER SCHOOL

SPRING ’16 GPA

DOLLARS RAISED

BLOOD PINTS COLLECTED

AVG. HOURS PER MAN

MEMBER GROWTH

Gamma Rho

Gannon University

3.301

$360.00

63

33.06

48.65%

Gamma Tau

Eastern Michigan University

2.75

$0.00

-

-

18.60%

Gamma Upsilon

South Dakota School of Mines and Tech.

2.78

$0.00

-

17.33

40.38%

Gamma Xi

University of Northern Texas

-

$0.00

-

12.9

11.11% -50.00%

Gamma Zeta

Rutgers University

-

$0.00

-

-

GWU

George Washington University

-

$0.00

-

20.55

New

Iota Alpha

Georgia College and State University

-

$0.00

-

-

-4.49%

Iota Beta

State Univ.of New York at Binghamton

-

$0.00

24

23.3

43.75%

Iota Delta

James Madison University

2.854

$8,762.63

141

25.08

14.77%

Iota Epsilon

University of Central Florida

3.04

$3,000.00

-

20.9

30.43%

Iota Eta

IUPUI

-

$400.00

151

35.88

12.73%

Iota Gamma

Indiana University South Bend

-

$0.00

-

-

-53.33%

Iota Iota

Case Western Reserve University

-

$0.00

-

-

16.18%

Iota Kappa

University of Utah

3.25

$334.00

16

25.34

-6.25%

Iota Lambda

Appalachian State University

3.197

$2,922.00

-

19.89

7.84%

Iota Mu

Kennesaw State University

-

$2,620.00

-

19.71

34.48%

Iota Psi

Indiana University

Iota Theta

Boise State University

Iota Zeta Kappa

-

$1,700.00

-

10.17

-12.33%

3.253

$1,327.81

-

22.15

-2.94%

Miami University

3.0

$0.00

-

-

8.57%

Auburn University

-

$0.00

-

-

-18.06%

Kappa Delta

Virginia Tech

3.19

$0.00

-

-

19.78%

Omega

University of Pittsburgh

-

$1,973.00

-

21.76

19.67%

Rho

North Carolina State University

-

$0.00

-

18.53

4.76%

Sigma

Thiel College

2.87-2.95

$0.00

150

-

-25.81%

SUNY Plattsburgh

State Univ. of New York at Plattsburgh

Tau

Hillsdale College

Theta Chi

University of Gerogia

Theta Epsilon

Wingate University

3.24

$0.00

-

-

35.71%

-

$0.00

-

-

20.83%

3.41

$40,000.00

-

10.75

0.80%

-

$0.00

-

-

55.56%

Theta Gamma

Stony Brook University

-

$0.00

-

-

-50.00%

Theta Kappa

State University of New York at Oswego

-

$600.00

0

18.58

-2.94%

Theta Lambda

Dickinson College

-

$1,500.00

-

8.51

-2.00%

Theta Mu

University of Kentucky

3.288

$3,300.00

-

21.93

-20.92% 17.65%

Theta Omega

Georgia Southern University

Theta Psi

Shorter University

Theta Rho

University of Oregon

-

$0.00

-

-

3.14

$1,250.00

101

26.93

10.81%

-

$0.00

-

-

18.68%

Theta Sigma

La Salle University

-

$0.00

-

-

-4.65%

Theta Theta

University of Hartford

-

$0.00

-

-

44.44%

Theta Upsilon

Texas A&M University

-

$0.00

-

15.25

-11.11%

UNC Greensboro

University of North Carolina, Greensboro

-

$0.00

-

-

-38.10% 14.29%

USC Aiken

University of South Carolina, Aiken

-

$0.00

-

-

Hilgard

University of California, Berkeley

3.34

$0.00

-

-

-4.00%

Zeta Chi

University of Alabama, Birmingham

2.88

$0.00

-

17.11

-32.50% 12.50%

Zeta Kappa

University of Northern Colorado

Zeta Lambda

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Zeta Nu

Missouri State University

-

$30.00

-

12.56

3.031

$0.00

0

18.19

9.09%

-

$0.00

-

-

26.09% -22.22%

Zeta Omega

University of North Carolina Wilmington

3.111

$500.00

-

-

Zeta Pi

University of Louisiana at Monroe

-

$0.00

-

21.05

2.63%

Zeta Upsilon

Eureka College

-

$4,235.42

31

47.81

-14.29%

Zeta Xi

St. Cloud State University

2.47

$3,000.00

-

-

15.00%

Zeta Zeta

Texas Tech University

-

$4,500.00

-

25.16

-3.88%

*To learn more about the Pyramid Program and the requirements for each of these components, go to www.deltasig.org/chapters/pyramid-program. The information provided was reported as a part of the Fraternity’s 2015 accreditation assessment. A “-” denotes that the information was either not submitted, unavailable or the chapter did not meet the criteria. For the 2015-2016 academic year, Headquarters Staff will collect as much of this data as possible during our chapter visits to provide an even better snapshot of all chapters’ work throughout the year.

THE CARNATION

27

DELTASIG.ORG


CHARTERINGS

IOTA MU CHAPTER LANDS AT KENNESAW STATE UNIVERSITY by MICAH CHRISTENSEN

O

n April 30, 2016, the 230th charter of Delta Sigma Phi was awarded in the early heat of the Georgian spring. The chapter spent less than a year as a new chapter before they were approved for chartering – a feat rarely seen in any Greek organization. A feat that was accomplished by a group who truly learned what brotherhood means. Iota Mu’s story began in the spring of 2015. National staff arrived on campus in the early days of the semester, and continued recruitment through late March. Moving forward from their initial semester on campus and into the fall, which was their first as a collective

group moving forward, the men had much to accomplish and very little experience to work from. The men credit their success to fostering a strong brotherhood that started in an atypical manner. Allen English ’15, the social chair for the chapter, said he originally didn’t want to be a part of Greek life at all. When the National staff approached him about starting the chapter, he was resistant to their message. It all changed when he realized that he could be a part of making a fraternity that was something he would want to be a part of. He and the rest of the Alpha class all shared that vision – the oppor-

THE CARNATION

28

FALL 2016

tunity to create a chapter with a better culture. A culture that embraced philanthropy, acceptance and excellence. The new chapter was determined to create a new standard for Greek life on the KSU campus. With this vision in mind, the men gained momentum, and moved forward into the spring of 2016 ready for a great semester. By the end of the spring semester, the men had the highest GPA average of any chapter on campus, and won several distinctions from the university – including the Academic Plan of the Year award. The chapter is well-liked on campus and in the community as well. The men are active in campus life and intramural events. During the fall semester, the chapter hosted a social event known as the “Nightmare on Owl Street.” The event was a mixer planned alongside another fraternity and 2 sororities. The groups donated all proceeds to the Kennesaw State University Care Center, a non-prof-


“I’m a big fan of an analogy that I use, wherein our life metaphorically is a stone block, and with each action we take in an attempt to improve ourselves the transition from block to masterpiece takes place,” said Hague. “Every positive action is a strike taken with hammer and chisel in the hopes you can mold yourself into the person you want to become down the line.”

it that helps to rehabilitate homeless students on campus. Their chartering requirements were handily met, outside of some of the upper level metrics that were planned but pending execution at the time the application was delivered. The chartering banquet was on April 30th, 2016. It was planned by Brother Martin Branick along with a small committee of chapter members, and took place at the Le Meridien Hotel in Atlanta, GA. According to Grand Council Member John Knowles, the ceremony was “The best I’ve ever been to.” Nearly 160 guests were in attendance at the event – including alumni, parents and dates. Chapter Vice President Jeremy Ungaro, who gave an overview of the Chapter from the beginning up to chartering, made a very funny remark akin

to “It’s been a long journey full of blood, sweat, and tears—all right, nobody cried, but it has been difficult!” Chapter President Morgan Hague spoke during the event, and discussed the chapter’s plans for the future. He also spoke about what motivated the men as they pressed onwards toward their chartering. “I’m a big fan of an analogy that I use, wherein our life metaphorically is a stone block, and with each action we take in an attempt to improve ourselves the transition from block to masterpiece takes place,” said Hague. “Every positive action is a strike taken with hammer and chisel in the hopes you can mold yourself into the person you want to become down the line.” Several other speakers gave account during the course of the evening, including: Christopher Carter,

THE CARNATION

29

DELTASIG.ORG

the Assistant Director of Greek Life at KSU, Amber Huston, COO of Delta Sigma Phi, and John Knowles, who gave the charter presentation on behalf of the Grand Council. The event concluded with a very passionate singing of “The Emblem” that had emotions running high. It was the perfect epilogue to the evening’s events. “It was probably one of the greatest feelings I’ve ever had,” remarked Allen English. “Having our names on the charter as a Founding Father. All the people from the past year and a half, their names will always be here. I can return in 50 years and our names will still be here.” The chapter has been further motivated by their chartering, and is looking to make an even bigger splash on campus this academic year.


CHARTERINGS

RECHARTERING OMEGA AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH by EVAN POOLE, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH '14

O

n a late day in October of 2014, fiftythree strangers gathered in an upper conference room of the William Pitt Union at the University of Pittsburgh with nervous energy. Before this meeting, the only contact many of the men in the room had with each other was “liking� the photos shared on Facebook of them accepting their bids to an organization they knew next to nothing about. For the majority of us, we had never had any contact with a fraternity save for a few hours on Friday night in North Oakland. We listened to the pep talks of Kenny Traber and Joe Falter as we tried to comprehend what we were getting

ourselves into. What followed was the most exciting, gratifying, and defining year of our collegiate careers. Sixteen months later, we stood in the ballroom of the Double Tree in downtown Pittsburgh, no longer a group of strangers, but a fraternity of brothers united in common cause under the letters Delta, Sigma, and Phi. It seemed fitting that the day on which we were re-chartered coincided with the centennial celebration of the Omega chapter. Originally founded in 1916, the Omega chapter of Delta Sigma Phi was a popular and successful pillar of Greek life at Pitt for over 87 years. Much has

THE CARNATION

30

FALL 2016

changed over a century but the parallels between our Founding Father class and the original Founding Father class cannot be denied. Both comprised of sophomores and juniors, young men possessing the courage to start something new. Both willing to dedicate their actions to build something bigger than themselves. Both poised to leave a legacy of excellence for those after them to follow. Similar to the original founding fathers of Omega chapter, we could not have accomplished this monumental task alone. The support system that was put in place for us by the National Fraternity and the University of Pittsburgh was substantial. Specifically, the Omega chapter owes its re-chartering to a handful of individuals that were invaluable to our success. Brothers Kenny Traber and Joe Falter spent weeks on campus recruiting a diverse set of highly motivated men to form the starting founding father class. Brothers


Patrick Hall and Justin Munz spent countless hours on the phone and in person providing guidance that allowed a collection of strangers to become a brotherhood predicated on deep, personal relationships. Faculty Advisor Kathleen Kyle donated her time and energy working with our Executive Board, cultivating strong leadership skills and affording logistical knowhow that turned a group of rag-tag kids into an organized fraternity of gentlemen; an achievement which won her the 2015-2016 Faculty Advisor of the Year. No matter their role, this support system’s contributions to the Omega chapter cannot be overstated. Like all new fraternities on campus we experienced our fair share of trials and tribulations. We quickly realized that this was something that would not come easy, or to the faint of heart. Some recruited men fell by the wayside for fear of the unknown. Some failed for lack of perseverance, others for want of faith. But those of us with the courage to press on found much more than we ever hoped to have gained: loyalty.

“Specifically,

the Omega chapter owes its rechartering to a handful of individuals that were invaluable to our success... ‘People join people, not organizations.’ The truth of these words to the Omega chapter is beyond disputation.”

We have had three new member classes since the time or our redevelopment. With each new class, a new perspective on how our fraternity will endure emerges. Each brother brings with them the inspiration to elevate this brotherhood into a new age of fraternity. Gone are the days of apathetic chapters, content to be constrained by the four walls of their house. Gone are the days of bystanders

THE CARNATION

31

DELTASIG.ORG

perpetuating the stigma attributed to our institution. The Omega chapter has become a vocal and active part of the Greek community. Raising a substantial amount of contributions for the American Red Cross and local philanthropies. Participating in antisexual assault workshops. And sponsoring our campus’s Mental Health Awareness Week. In addition to our extracurricular activities, we have ranked within the Top 5 GPA among IFC Fraternities on campus. Omega’s impact on the community has been felt, even in our short time. “People join people, not organizations.” The truth of these words to the Omega chapter is beyond disputation. Many of our founding fathers never would have guessed they would join, let alone start, a fraternity in college. But, for as long as people willing to take a chance join people who are motivated to succeed, our organization will continue to thrive at the University of Pittsburgh. In the story of Omega, one chapter has ended and a new one is beginning, and may it be told for another hundred years.


MCKEE SCHOLARSHIPS

This year, 64 Delta Sigs are being recognized for their excellence in the recognition of a scholarship from the Delta Sigma Phi Foundation. The scholarships are made possible through a generous will bequest to the Foundation from Hensel McKee, University of Washington ’30, and his wife Jeanette. Just over $4.3 million was provided to the Foundation. We are excited to continue the tradition of the McKee scholarships, which started in 2009. From leadership, to service and academics, our McKee recipients represent some of the best and brightest Delta Sig undergrads and graduate students.

THE CARNATION

32

FALL 2016


THE BETTER MAN SCHOLARSHIP

$10,000 each for men who are a well-rounded embodiment of Delta Sigma Phi values DANIEL COOPER, Transylvania ’16

SURAJ RAMA, Kentucky ’13

CHAD SCHWEINZGER, Purdue ’05

“As a first generation college student, it is hard for me to find money outside my scholarship to participate in events like study abroad trips. But thanks to you all this scholarship will be used towards my academic career, and is making me a better man. Thank you again for your selfless donations and giving me the opportunity to see the world and experience more than I ever could have without this scholarship.”

“I am continually amazed by the overarching concept of brotherhood and what it means to my chapter and others, and how my new extended family impacts my life in such a positive way. Words are unable to effectively capture my feelings of gratitude for the opportunities of friendship, harmony, and culture, and now scholarship, but thank you so much from the bottom of my heart.

“Thank you from the bottom of my heart. I would treat any money received as an investment in me by Delta Sigma Phi and its contributors. It’s an investment I take very seriously and one I intend to do everything I can to repay. Please know that an opportunity like this is rare and that you are enabling people like me to continue to successfully follow their dreams..”

MEN OF COURAGE SCHOLARSHIPS $2,500 for men who exhibit exceptional leadership

ADAM BENJAMIN, Miami University ’14

TIMOTHY ELLIS, Transylvania University ’14

ELIAS HANNA, Transylvania University ’15

RYAN HANSON, Transylvania University ’13

MATTHEW LAROE, University of Virginia ’14

TIMOTHY LAWDAN, Loyola University Chicago ’07

DUNCAN PARSONS, Duke University ’13

ETHAN PERKINS, University of Georgia ’16

PAUL THOMAS, St. Cloud State University ’07

USMAN VIRK, University of Michigan-Dearborn ’13

THE CARNATION

33

DELTASIG.ORG


MCKEE SCHOLARSHIPS

MEN OF ACTION SCHOLARSHIPS

$2,500 for those who have committed themselves to outstanding service to their communities

MAXIM BELOVOL, Loyola University Chicago ’10

MATTHEW DOTY, University of Oregon ’10

KEVIN GECK, Duke University ’10

CHRIS KAIHLANEN, University of Texas ’10

BRANDON KELLINGHAUS, Indiana University Purdue University - Indianapolis ’10

MATT SPARLING, Indiana University-Bloomington ’10

JACOB SPITZMILLER, University of Missouri ’10

ASHER ZLOTNIK, Columbia University ’10

NO IMAGE PROVIDED

KYLE KUBOVCIK, Cleveland State University ’10

CONNOR MALONEY, Utah State University ’10

MEN OF EXCELLENCE SCHOLARSHIPS $2,500 for men with exceptional academic performance

NO IMAGE PROVIDED

GURVIKRAM BOPARAI, University of Virginia ’10

ZACHARY DONLEY, Kansas State University ’10

SEBASTIAN EDER, University of Texas ’10

MICHAEL FRITZ, University of Kentucky ’10

JOHN HANN, University of Georgia ’10

JOHN HENDERSON, Transylvania University ’10

JORDAN POTTER, University of Kentucky ’10

BRETT ROSS, University of Central Florida ’10

DYLAN STOLZ, Indiana State University ’10

PETER TROMBLY, University of Virginia ’10

THE CARNATION

34

FALL 2016


SPHINX SCHOLARSHIPS $2,500 for graduate students

RAJ ARDESHNA, Rutgers ’10

QUENTIN BECKER, Transylvania University ’10

SHOMIK CHAUDHURI, University of California, Los Angeles ’10

CHARLES DELISLE, Grand Valley State University ’10

BRETT FOUNTAIN, University of Kentucky ’10

DONALD GALLENSTEIN, Transylvania University ’10

ERIC LAPLANT, University of Oregon ’10

ARTHUR MONTEJANO, California State University, Fresno ’10

CLINTON NELSON, Arizona State University ’10

MARTIN SEITZ, State University of New York at Oswego ’10

MARK SHERMAN, The Pennsylvania State University ’10

CHRISTIAN SUERO, Michigan State University ’10

JOSEPH UNDERWOOD, Transylvania University ’10

TYLER VIOLILLO, Miami University ’10

DONGYU WANG, Georgia Institute of Technology ’10

THE CARNATION

35

DELTASIG.ORG


MCKEE SCHOLARSHIPS

NILE SCHOLARSHIPS

$500 for undergraduates exhibiting exceptional leadership and values

NO IMAGE PROVIDED

SAMUEL ANDERSON, University of Utah ’10

THOMAS ANJARD, Kansas State University ’10

MASON BAKER, University of Central Florida ’10

HENRY BOOTH, Duke University ’10

NANHAO CHEN, Transylvania University ’10

NATHANIEL GAYDOSIK, Shorter University ’10

JOHN GRODHAUS, University of Georgia ’10

FINN HOBSON, University of Pittsburgh ’10

RYAN JOHN, Bradley University ’10

MATT KLOSTERMAN, Missouri University of Science & Technology ’10

JUSTIN KUBAL, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign ’10

ALEX LEBHAR, University of Central Florida ’10

BRAXTON PALMER, Arizona State University ’10

GARRETT PAULSON, University of WisconsinLaCrosse ’10

STEPHAN MONTES, Columbia University ’10

JAMES MULLENBACH, Georgia Institute of Technology ’10

THE CARNATION

36

FALL 2016


THE CARNATION

37

DELTASIG.ORG


ANNUAL REPORT

Letter from the President T

hroughout these pages, you’ve had the opportunity to learn about some of our esteemed alumni and promising undergraduate members. As Delta Sigma Phi continues its mission to empower and encourage its members to become Better Men, men of courage, men of action, and men of excellence, the Foundation continues to boldly strive to provide the Fraternity with a robust financial platform that will fund exceptional educational opportunities to undergrad members across the nation. If you’ve ever donated to the Foundation, or considered it, one of the questions you’ve probably asked yourself is “Why should I donate to the Delta Sigma Phi Foundation instead of my alma mater? Or one of the many other char-itable organizations I’m interested in?” I’d like to invite you to take a moment and read what Delta Sigma Phi has meant to your undergraduate brothers:

“Each facet of my Delta Sig experience adds to my development as a better future engineer, businessman, leader, manager, husband and father.” “Being a member of Delta Sigma Phi has made me realize the kind of man I want to be when I grow up and enter the real world: A better man.” “I can’t thank the fraternity enough for the experiences and challenges it has placed before me. Delta Sig has truly helped in my development in becoming a Better Man and I look forward to what the future holds for my brothers and me.”

THE CARNATION

38

FALL 2016

What Delta Sigma Phi is providing for members, the educational opportunities, the experiences – it’s working. Delta Sigma Phi is building better men. The mission of the Foundation is inextricably intertwined with the Fraternity. The support you offer the Foundation is support for young men like these. Young men that can benefit, and are benefitting, from the educational programs offered by the Fraternity. We have some fantastic information to share with you throughout the following pages, but if there is one take-away we want to leave you, it’s this: Every dollar that you donate to the Delta Sigma Phi Foundation is a dollar that is creating real change. Real change that results in Better Men. Men of courage, men of action, and men of excellence. YITBOS, Brad Sullivan, Transylvania University ’99 President, Delta Sigma Phi Foundation


1899 Society PINNACLE SOCIETY Bruce Loewenberg, University of Missouri ’58 Hensel McKee, University of Washington ’30* FOUNDERS’ SOCIETY John Boma, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign ’80 Tom Cycyota, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign ’77 Ted Desch, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign ’49 Dick Handshaw, Alfred University ’68 Loren Mall, Kansas State University ’58 Cornel Raab, Purdue University '66 Tom Roeser, Purdue University ’70 GORDIAN KNOT SOCIETY Ed Clements, San José State University ’49* Tom Decker, University of Missouri ’69

Chris Edmonds, University of Alabama at Birmingham ’88 Chuck Finklea, Barton College ’74 Jon Gundlach, Oglethorpe University ’87 Dave Harvey, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ’88 E. Allen James, North Carolina State University ’65 Erik Johannesen, San Diego State University ’78 Gary Kalian, The University of California, Berkeley ’58 Louie Ripberger, Purdue University ’74 Kevin Schaudt, Eastern Michigan University ’83 William Shepherd, University of Alabama ’34* Tony Smercina, The University of Texas at Austin ’81 William and Donna Wilder* Gil Williamson, San José State University ’58 THE LAMP SOCIETY Rolfe Allen, University of Maryland, College Park ’34* Tom Archer, University of Virginia ’87 Gene Blanchard, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’50 Roger Carroll, University of Virginia ’80 Chris Cronin, University of Detroit Mercey ’84

THE CARNATION

39

DELTASIG.ORG

The 1899 Society was created to recognize those donors who have made annual or lifetime gifts to the Delta Sigma Phi Foundation. Annual memberships begin at $1,000 and lifetime memberships begin at $25,000. SOCIETY........................... GIVING LEVELS Pinnacle Society..............$1,000,000+ Founders’ Society............$500,000-$999,000 Gordian Knot Society.....$250,000-$499,999 Lamp Society....................$100,000-$249,999 Lute Society.....................$25,000-$99,999

Lee Dueringer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’60 Allen Fore, Eureka College, ’86 Charlie Gilbert, Georgia Institute of Technology ’59 Mike Griffin, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ’86 Jon Hockman, The Ohio State University ’87 Mike Hoffman, Arizona State University ’85 Donald Hunt, Iowa State University of Science & Technology ’28* Mark Johnson, San Diego State University ’83


ANNUAL REPORT

Dan Kitrell, St. Cloud State University ’80 Robert Koch, University of WisconsinOshkosh ’67* Ken Kramer, University of Detroit Mercey ’58* Jim Larson, California Polytechnic State University ’72 Grant McCloud, Millikin University ’93 Jerry O’Brien, Purdue University ’59 Brian Patrick, University of North Texas ’68 Cornel Raab, Purdue University ’66 Gus Ramirez, Georgia Institute of Technology ’66 Russ Shaw, The Ohio State University ’59 Bud Tishkowski, Hillsdale College ’57 Moe Trebuchon, Georgia Institute of Technology ’83 Scott Wiley, State University of New York at Oswego ’97 THE LUTE SOCIETY Charles Anderson, Georgia Institute of Technology ’82 Fred Arnold, Michigan State University ’38 Sean Austin, Georgia Institute of Technology ’83 Dave Bahlmann, Hillsdale College ’58 Justin Baldwin, San Jose State University ’64 Steve Banfield, Transylvania University ’87 Bob Banning, University of Missouri ’57 Joe Bertolino, East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania ’94 Beta Beta ACB University of Missouri Beta Beta Alumni Control Board Roy Bliss, Arizona State University ’62 Frank Boyle, Michigan State University ’48 Jim Braeutigam, The University of Texas at Austin ’59 Brian Brooks, University of Missouri ’64 Jeff Burrows, University of Missouri ’76 Barbara Carlton Jim Carpenter, Georgia Institute of Technology ’61 Don Chandler, The University of Texas at Austin ’73 Landon Christy, University of Louisiana at Monroe ’00 Kevin Cole, High Point University ’89 Dave Collins, Western Michigan University ’65 Marshall Cox, The University of California, Los Angeles ’56 Steve Cunningham, University of Missouri ’70 Mark Davis, University of Missouri ’97 Jason DeKeuster, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire ’95 Fred Dellett, Kansas State University ’56 Azeem Dhalla, California State University, San Bernardino ’91 Jack Droste, Missouri University of Science & Technology ’81 Mike Duke, Georgia Institute of Technology ’68 David Eason, Colorado State University ’91 Epsilon ACB The Pennsylvania State University Epsilon Alumni Corporation Board

Howard Etling, University of Missouri ’32 Don Falk, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign ’49 Tim Forrester, Michigan State University ’88 Shawn Fowler, Georgia Institute of Technology ’84 Jim Gay, University of Missouri ’01 Tim Gentry, University of Missouri ’81 Jim Greener, Arizona State University ’62 Neal Griesenauer, Missouri University of Science & Technology ’58 Jim Haleem, Western Illinois University ’66 Morris Heintschel, The University of Texas at Austin ’70 Don Heppermann, University of Missouri ’63 Brad Heutmaker, University of WisconsinOshkosh ’93 Stan Hill, Georgia Institute of Technology ’02 Frank Hoke, University of Missouri ’30 Ken Hollender, Georgia Institute of Technology ’80 Tom Howard, University of Houston ’66 Harry Hufford, The University of California, Los Angeles ’50 John Jenkins, University of Virginia ’84 Patrick Jessee, Purdue University ’01 Barry Kalian, California State University, Sacramento ’85 Don Keltner, University of Southern California ’51 Bob Kennel, North Carolina State University ’57 Scott Kimpel, The University of Texas at Austin ’93 Steve Kleinschmidt, University of Missouri ’77 Jon Krause, California Polytechnic State University ’82 Charles Kubin, The University of Texas at Austin ’52 Walt Kurczewski, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’62 Skip Leutzinger, University of Missouri ’68 Andrew Lovejoy, Georgia Institute of Technology ’92 Larry Lundberg, San Jose State University ’66 Ramsey Mankarious, Michigan State University ’87 Marc Mathews, Transylvania University ’77 Dave McCarthy, The University of California, Los Angeles ’81 John McDonald, Purdue University ’70 James McGinty, Auburn University ’44 Richard McLellan, Michigan State University ’61 Stan McLemore, University of Alabama at Birmingham ’84 Peter Minderman, Georgia Institute of Technology ’76 Roger Mola, Purdue University ’71 Jonathan Monfort, California Polytechnic State University ’82 Orlando Montesino, The University of Texas at Austin ’72 Mike Morris, Eastern Michigan University ’65 James Mumford, Wingate University ’92

THE CARNATION

40

FALL 2016

Bill Murray, The University of Texas at Austin ’51 Chris Northern, The University of Texas at Austin ’77 Randy Peterson, University of North Carolina at Charlotte ’93 Mike Petrik, Eastern Illinois University ’76 John Prange, Millikin University ’58 Ron Reed, Western Illinois University ’68 Mike Renfro, The University of Texas at Austin ’79 Ken Riley, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse ’85 Ed Rodriguez, The University of Texas at Austin ’86 Russell Roebuck, Barton College ’58 Bob Rojka, San Jose State University ’49 Edward Runser, Edinboro University ’72 Bill Sandidge, Georgia Institute of Technology ’76 Tom Seto, Purdue University ’05 Dennis Sheehan, University of Maryland, College Park ’53 Mike Silvaggi, University of Detroit Mercy ’81 Phil Smallwood, Georgia Institute of Technology ’59 Hank Stricker, University of Michigan ’48 Brad Sullivan, Transylvania University ’99 Bill Tilghman, Barton College ’84 John Ting, The University of California, Berkeley ’03 Eric Token, University of Missouri ’83 Jim Unger, University of Missouri ’67 Gene Vance, Transylvania University ’85 Meeks Vaughan, Georgia Institute of Technology ’76 Harry Vogts, University of WisconsinMadison ’29 Eric Wagner, The Ohio State University ’62 Bert Watts, Georgia Institute of Technology ’68 Nathan Wight, Illinois State University ’97 Roger Willis, Purdue University ’68 Michael Wims, University of North Texas ’65 Allan Winter, University of Colorado Boulder ’55 Bill Yates, Grand Valley State University ’97

Listing is as of June 30, 2016. *denotes Bond Eternal


30+ Year Donors 53 YEARS Bill H. Cross, Stetson University ’59 Jerry F. Crump, The University of California, Berkeley ’55 52 YEARS Richard Louis Duroe, Iowa State University of Science & Technology ’50 51 YEARS David Roy Allen, Western Illinois University ’61 Robert Lee Day, The Ohio State University ’61 Bruce Jerome Loewenberg, University of Missouri ’58 50 YEARS Charlie S. Gilbert, Georgia Institute of Technology ’59 Sigfred Sandberg, University of New Mexico ’47 Loren Dale Tregellas, Kansas State University ’55 49 YEARS Gene Eugene Blanchard, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’50 Kermit Q. Greene, The University of California, Los Angeles ’46 Larry Gene Keisling, University of Pittsburgh ’57 48 YEARS Richard Allan Klumpp, Loyola Marymount University ’58 Elmo Foucheaux Vestal, The University of Texas at Austin ’47* Loren Lee Mall, Kansas State University ’58 Richard E. Belcher, Edinboro University ’62 47 YEARS Cliff F. Burk, University of Detroit Mercy ’65 Jim D. Foss, University of Southern California ’53 Ragnar Louis Lindberg, University of Missouri ’57 Larry L. Lundberg, San Jose State University ’66 Phil Ramazzina, Oregon State University ’59 46 YEARS Lee Dueringer, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign ’60 Robert Dale Hahn, University of Maryland, College Park ’62 Allen James, North Carolina State University ’65 Barry Lamm, Barton College ’58 John Dennis Pietras, St. Francis College ’51 Bob Eugene Pitts, University of Arkansas ’48* Chuck W. Schubele, Drexel University ’58 Ed Cameron Timmermann, Thiel College ’48

William Arthur Truex, San Diego State University ’62 45 YEARS Thomas W. Applegate, Lehigh University ’53 Robert Henry Holliday, High Point University ’67 Kenneth Paul Knopp, The University of Texas at Austin ’54* Donnie Edward Snedeker, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’57 Eric Armin Wagner, The Ohio State University ’62 44 YEARS Dick W. Crain, Western Illinois University ’53 Leonard D’Ooge, Michigan State University ’43* Ron Buford Pruitt, The University of Texas at Austin ’60* Nathaniel K. Willis, Cornell University ’32 Michael D. Wims, University of North Texas ’65 Ronald Lee Woofter, Ohio Northern University ’59 43 YEARS Marvin Allison, The University of California, Los Angeles ’57 Maurice Ray Armstrong, Millikin University ’47* Fred V. Dellett, Kansas State University ’56 Ted Edward Desch, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’49 Larry Driever, The Pennsylvania State University ’38* William R. Hodson, Drexel University ’64 John Jennings, University of Louisiana at Lafayette ’57* Charles Alan Jones, The University of California, Berkeley ’61 Ted Alfred Owens, North Carolina State University ’58* Jack Rowley, Waynesburg College ’57 Dale Swenson, University of Kansas ’57 Jesse Allen Weigel, University of Pittsburgh ’53 Carl Reed Wermuth, University of Missouri ’62 Chuck G. Winston, Southern Methodist University ’56 42 YEARS Robert Dana Andrews, Albion College ’58 James R. Bradley, University of WisconsinMadison ’49 Robert H. Churchill, Albion College ’40* Marshall G. Cox, The University of California, Los Angeles ’56 Daniel S. Elliott, Drexel University ’61 Waldo Pierce Emerson, University of Florida ’60 Michael Jean Engle, Saint Louis University ’66 David Holmes, University of North Texas ’66 Bruce Algot Holmgren, Morningside College ’67 Terry Lee Potts, San Jose State University ’67 John William Prange, Millikin University ’58 Carl F. Raiss, University of Michigan ’49* Warren E. Sawyer, Lehigh University ’38* Russ Clyde Shaw, The Ohio State University ’59 Charles R. Walgreen, University of Michigan ’55*

THE CARNATION

41

DELTASIG.ORG

41 YEARS Howard H. Benton, Kansas State University ’60 William Karl Bissey, Ohio Northern University ’72 Dave Ernest Collins, Western Michigan University ’65 Guilford D. Cummings, Univeristy of Tennessee (Cumberland) ’31* Peter H. Dahlquist, Kansas State University ’54 Mike L. Dolan, Millikin University ’48* Terry Wayne Donze, Missouri University of Science & Technology ’68 Bob Louis Elmore, The Pennsylvania State University ’38* Wayne Alan Jacobson, University of WisconsinLa Crosse ’65 Edward Deyo Le Fevre, Millikin University ’54 Jim L. Madsen, Eastern Michigan University ’68 John Raymond Parker, Purdue University ’68 Bruce Volney Penwell, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’48 Warren H. Wagner, University of Maryland, College Park ’41* 40 YEARS Jae Lance Allen, Arizona State University ’64 Brian Shedd Brooks, University of Missouri ’64 Bob Walter Chapman, Michigan State University ’60 David A. Darwin, North Carolina State University ’65 Alex Doig, San Diego State University ’57 Mark Lee Dunker, The University of California, Berkeley ’58 Forrest Lane Jones, Southern Methodist University ’50 Charles C. Kubin, The University of Texas at Austin ’52 Russel J. Knorr, The Pennsylvania State University ’40* Richard C. Roe, Iowa State University of Science & Technology ’50* Gary Lee Zarybnicky, University of Kansas ’60 39 YEARS Carl R. Blanchard, Alfred University ’59 Jack Duane Dostal, Wittenberg University ’60 Bill Lawerence Epperly, Western Illinois University ’64 Jim Miller Evans, California Polytechnic State University ’58 Frank Lashley Frederick, North Carolina State University ’63 Giles A. Light, Transylvania University ’63 Burnie John Oates, University of WisconsinPlatteville ’68 Ray E. Prochnow, University of Southern California ’44* Guy Covada Thigpen, Thiel College ’47* JR Richard Waltrip, Millikin University ’47* 38 YEARS George J. Barchet, Hartwick College ’48* Kenneth Daniel Bieber, Duke University ’67


ANNUAL REPORT

Jim Oliver Braeutigam, The University of Texas at Austin ’59 Ken H. Burtness, The University of California, Los Angeles ’63 Marcus E. Drewa, University of North Texas ’53 Jim Bruce Gustafson, University of Minnesota ’67 Art S. Fetters, Michigan State University ’50* Milton W. Heath, University of Michigan ’49 William Lewis Hoover, The Ohio State University ’64 Dennis Reed Howard, University of Virginia ’71 Harry William Newlon, San Diego State University ’50 Uko Villemi, University of Florida ’57* Roland Christian Wedemeyer, The University of California, Berkeley ’51* 37 YEARS Rolfe Lyman Allen, University of Maryland, College Park ’34* Frank Michel Basile, Tulane University ’58 William A. Brady, Michigan State University ’38 Allan Lee Brandt, University of NebraskaLincoln ’64 Brownie Brown Futrell, Duke University ’75 Gerry A. Hartmann, Iowa State University of Science & Technology ’56 Robert Warren Henny, Michigan State University ’57 Lester Warren Jacobs, The University of California, Berkeley ’62 Darrell Keith Kougher, Edinboro University ’67 Michael R. Laxner, Loyola University Chicago ’71 Robert Lonson Martin, University of Virginia ’65 Larry Dale Matheny, University of Missouri ’67 Richard Douglas McLellan, Michigan State University ’61 Roger Anthony Mola, Purdue University ’71 Orlando Carlos Montesino, The University of Texas at Austin ’72 Don Earl Newhall, San Jose State University ’51 Jack Edward Ott, University of Pittsburgh ’55 David Michael Press, Lehigh University ’69 B.R. Sefton, Millikin University ’52 Chuck Roger Smith, The University of Arizona ’51* Harry Edgar Stroud, The University of California, Los Angeles ’48 Eugene Lee Swearingen, Kansas State University ’58 Lester Andrew Wagner, University of Virginia ’66 Bill Klein Walker, The University of California, Berkeley ’47 John Herbert Weber, Lehigh University ’60 Bruce Arthur Westphal, San Jose State University ’61 Ron Clark Winkler, The University of California, Berkeley ’65 Gary Lee Workman, Millikin University ’61 Win Werner Wuttke, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’65

36 YEARS Ron Leo Bloom, University of Missouri ’64 Craig Alan Cerqua, University of WisconsinPlatteville ’75 Irving Taylor Cutter, The University of Texas at Austin ’60 Robert F. Fellrath, Central Michigan University ’52 Bill Kurt Hartwig, California Polytechnic State University ’61 Gary Kalian, The University of California, Berkeley ’58 Kenneth W. Klindt, Iowa State University of Science & Technology ’56 Phil David Kluge, Hartwick College ’76 Earl J. Kroner, Oregon State University ’51 Dick F. Mead, The University of California, Berkeley ’52* William F. Montigel, The University of California, Los Angeles ’41* John Mitchell Ozier, Auburn University ’69 Wayne Rush, Kansas State University ’59 Michael Scigliano, Iowa State University of Science & Technology ’60 Bill O. Stidham, Eastern Michigan University ’58 Ed Melvin Swanson, Hillsdale College ’57 Andrew H. Thalheim, Tulane University ’43* Pat A. Wilkerson, Kansas State University ’53 35 YEARS Henry John Brucker, Lehigh University ’37* Bruce Stewart Cameron, California Polytechnic State University ’61 Jim S. Carpenter, Georgia Institute of Technology ’61 Don Mason Chandler, The University of Texas at Austin ’73 Lewis Graham, Purdue University ’69 Roger George Gregory, University of Idaho ’58 Tom Jay Hewitt, University of WisconsinOshkosh ’64 Keith Ronald Hooker, Arizona State University ’60 Melvin W. Jackson, Southern Methodist University ’34* Homer Bruce Koliba, Southern Methodist University ’52* Bob John Lagomarsino, University of California, Santa Barbara ’48 Bruce Andrew Marshall, Southern Methodist University ’77 Lawrence E. Miller, Iowa State University of Science & Technology ’38* John Charles Munday, San Jose State University ’55 Jim Nemec, Stetson University ’31* Dennis Paul Niemiec, Michigan State University ’74 Joe C. Offutt, Missouri University of Science & Technology ’73* Doug R. Olson, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology ’57 Burton Lad Rohde, The University of California, Berkeley ’68

THE CARNATION

42

FALL 2016

Warren Wentworth Sauer, San Diego State University ’58 Tom Andrew Sgritta, Purdue University ’65 Kenneth J. Sims, Thiel College ’57 Pat John Stephens, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse ’67 Gary Anthony Teixeira, University of Houston ’72 Ray G. Thomas, Michigan Technological University ’49 Henry M. Wagoner, University of Michigan ’67 Lonnie Boyd Williams, Wake Forest University ’75 Russ Lee Yensen, California Polytechnic State University ’63 34 YEARS Bob Housel Bader, California Polytechnic State University ’59 Bruce Dwight Baker, Missouri University of Science & Technology ’71 Mike Balfour Bixler, The University of California, Berkeley ’63 Robert L. Brander, Central Michigan University ’51 Bob F. Calderwood, Utah State University ’68* Robert Stanley Cansler, East Carolina University ’75 Max Joseph Derbes, Tulane University ’41* Bob Samuel Divine, Georgia Institute of Technology ’48 Glenn B. Eades, Oregon State University ’55 Don B. Falk, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign ’49 Richard Blair Foulk, Thiel College ’46 David Lee Fratta, Indiana University of Pennsylvania ’67 Jack Barto Gordon, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’47* Jim Haleem, Western Illinois University ’66 Frank Maurice Haynes, University of Colorado Boulder ’56 Dave Allen Hotchkiss, Kansas State University ’57 James W. Hyde, Albion College ’32* Randall Ralph Ice, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology ’68 Spencer Eugene Kneubuehl, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater ’70 Stanley C. Kottemann, Tulane University ’47 Alan S. Livingstone, McGill University ’65 David Rolla Mohr, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’68 Robert Charles Nelson, The Ohio State University ’62 John William Pearson, The University of California, Berkeley ’64 Tony John Perfilio, Utah State University ’66 Jim W. Pilz, Michigan State University ’46 Edward B Rasmessen, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’34 Rusty Russell Rice, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’73 Carl Richard Stephens, Northern Arizona University ’54


Howard Tellef Tellepsen, Georgia Institute of Technology ’31* Joe Fredrick Willerth, Purdue University ’67 33 YEARS David Allen Arceneaux, Nicholls State University ’71 Fred Max Arnold, Michigan State University ’38* Henry Cole Boss, Kansas State University ’69 Van Ray Botts, University of California, Santa Barbara ’48 Lee Leroy Buck, Hillsdale College ’40* Thomas Edward Desmond, Univeristy of Tennessee (Cumberland) ’50 Richard R. Dolson, University of Pittsburgh ’75 Lloyd F. Dunn, The University of California, Los Angeles ’39* Bill Eckhout, Oregon State University ’48* Murray C. Edge, University of North Texas ’55 Chuck Charles Finklea, Barton College ’74 John E. Groneck, Saint Louis University ’55 William J. Haire, Eastern Illinois University ’62* Brien George Hallmark, University of Montana ’58 Harry L. Hanscom, University of Washington ’36* Richard Lawrence Knoblauch, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey ’63 Gary Scott Likins, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’59 Joe Michael Luchetski, Duke University ’76 John Robert Macauley, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’42* Marc Alan Mathews, Transylvania University ’77 John Douglas McDonald, Purdue University ’70 Clyde Coleman Medlock, Duke University ’59 Robert William Osgood, Michigan State University ’35* Stanley C. Pearson, The University of California, Los Angeles ’29* Francis X. Shellem, University of Alabama ’40* Michael P. Smelt, Michigan State University ’57 Bill R. Surles, University of North Texas ’66 32 YEARS Jim Hollis Adams, Georgia Institute of Technology ’60 Gordon F. Arneal, University of California, Santa Barbara ’48* Frank Latimer Barkley, Duke University ’57 Marvin W. Causey, University of New Mexico ’47 Richard T. Dietrich, University of Idaho ’65 Bob Lewis Draime, Michigan Technological University ’74 Robert A. Fraundorf, University of California, Santa Barbara ’55 William E. Gibson, Thiel College ’49 Chan Chandler Harris, The University of California, Los Angeles ’31* Mark Barden Haselton, California Polytechnic State University ’61 Hal Wade Ingram, North Carolina State University ’75

Erik Lynn Johannesen, San Diego State University ’78 Allen B. Lee, San Diego State University ’62 David H. Lubetzky, The University of California, Los Angeles ’61 James Carroll McGraw, Auburn University ’50 Richard Joseph Noyes, Michigan Technological University ’57* Benson R. Quan, The University of California, Berkeley ’68 Fred W. Rosenkampff, Western Carolina University ’59 Jack Edward Stammer, California Polytechnic State University ’56* Asa Neiley Stevens, The Pennsylvania State University ’20* Steven Alan Viskup, University of Kansas ’61 Thomas H. Woodruff, Hartwick College ’52* Kenneth John Yerike, University of Nevada-Las Vegas ’70 31 YEARS Chuck T. Aylesbury, University of Southern California ’42* AE Bates, University of Pittsburgh ’28* Michael Stead Biebrich, Purdue University ’65* John Frederick Brehm, Univeristy of Tennessee (Cumberland) ’34* Steve John Buffi, The University of California, Berkeley ’79 Paul Wendell Burch, Kansas State University ’62 Carl F. Burling, Iowa State University of Science & Technology ’31* Joe B. Burrow, University of Tennessee (Cumberland) ’43 James Arlo Cipra, The University of California, Los Angeles ’61 Chris J. Cleary, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology ’81 Eugene Alvin Denman, University of Alabama ’57* Juan Luis Garcia-Tunon, Saint Louis University ’68 Henry Jack Grathwol, University of Maryland, College Park ’43* Marshall Miller Johnson, The University of California, Los Angeles ’47 Robert G. Kenrick, Alma College ’54* Michael Glen Malone, University of Southern California ’61 Roland Harold Pedersen, University of Montana ’57* David L. Petersen, Washington State University ’76 Daniel Paul Poisel, California University at Pennsylvania ’67 Richard Owen Pompian, University of Michigan ’57 Jason C. Reed, The University of California, Berkeley ’62 Jim Arthur Schmalz, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse ’73 Tony A. Smercina, The University of Texas at Austin ’81 Gene Eugene Smith, Georgia Institute of Technology ’63 Bob Harol Thompson, University of Florida ’60

THE CARNATION

43

DELTASIG.ORG

Hook Taylor Van Hook, Western Illinois University ’68 Greg Arthur Wolf, Saint Louis University ’70 Tommy Richard Young, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign ’32* Jim R. Zinck, Western Illinois University ’54 30 YEARS John Charles Bley, Humboldt State University ’60 Frank L. Boyle, Michigan State University ’48 Bruce Edward Brown, University of North Texas ’67 Don Foster Cole, California Polytechnic State University ’76 George Henry Cook, St. John's University ’66 David Ogden Cox, Auburn University ’35 Robert C. Davis, University of New Mexico ’64* Wes Harwood Eaton, Boston University ’40* Howard F. Etling, University of Missouri ’32* Irving G. Ewen, Oregon State University ’56* Andy James Fyke, The University of California, Davis ’83 Martin James Gregg, University of California, Santa Barbara John Edward Heitler, The University of Texas at Austin ’51 Frank A. Hoke, University of Missouri ’30* Don Floyd Hunziker, Kansas State University ’61 Robins H. Jackson, Iowa State University of Science & Technology ’43* Steve George Kleinschmidt, University of Missouri ’77 Ronald A. Lempriere, The University of California, Berkeley ’51* William Mike Liddicoat, California State University, Chico ’66 Ted John Manvell, Thiel College ’67 Mike Michael Martini, The University of California, Los Angeles ’44 Richard Mascuch, Lehigh University ’38* Lawrence E. McLean, Washington State University ’50* Dick Mills, San Jose State University ’57 Mike Guy Morris, Eastern Michigan University ’65 Eugene L. Munin, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign ’79 Kenneth A. Pharoah, Georgia Institute of Technology ’80 William G. Preston, University of Washington ’31* Walter Joseph Radishek, Waynesburg College ’48* Wayne Eugene Redmond, The University of California, Los Angeles ’67 Gerald Gene Retzlaff, Iowa State University of Science & Technology ’62 Ed F. Rodriguez, The University of Texas at Austin ’86 Don P. Saxon, Michigan Technological University ’48 Darrell Allan Schermerhorn, California Polytechnic State University ’55 John Walters, Albion College ’65

*Indicates Bond Eternal


ANNUAL REPORT

THE CARNATION

44

FALL 2016


THE CARNATION

45

DELTASIG.ORG


UPHOLDING OUR STANDARDS

DELTAGRAPHS

Chapter Closures ETA OMEGA CHAPTER – JOHNSON & WALES UNIVERSITY In early July 2016, the Grand Council voted to revoke the charter and close Eta Omega Chapter at Johnson & Wales University. The closure of the chapter, which had a membership of more than 40 undergraduate men, came as a result of the chapter’s repeated violations of university and National Fraternity policies over the course of two years. In April 2015, the chapter was found responsible for university alcohol policy violations and was issued a disciplinary probation and additional sanctions. In Spring 2016, the university investigated and found the chapter responsible for four separate incidents at which the chapter hosted events with alcohol in violation of its university probation from May 2015. Furthermore, the university reported that each of these four events was tied to additional incidents of physical violence or sexual misconduct alleged to have involved members or guests. The chapter was suspended and lost recognition from the university. The Eta Omega Chapter also had numerous issues meeting its financial obligations to the National Fraternity – accumulating over $9,000 in debt at the time of closure. Despite the chapter’s strengths, a combination of poor decision-making, a disregard for the university’s policies and a failure to fully participate in the university’s process ultimately led to the loss of campus recognition. We are truly disheartened that our brothers will lose this undergraduate component of the Fraternity experience. Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity is committed to upholding our standards and fostering meaningful Fraternity experiences for our members.

THE CARNATION

46

FALL 2016

GAMMA CHI The Gamma Chi Chapter at Drexel University recently had its House Rededication Ceremony. The day started with the undergrads meeting at the house around 10am to prepare to greet the guests and give house tours, which started at 10:30am. These ran until roughly 12pm when the brothers and guests went outside for short speeches and the ribbon cutting. The "House Rededication Ceremony" in the ritual book was then performed. Following the ritual, more pictures were taken outside the house before walking to a local restaurant (Wahoo's Tacos) for refreshments.

UPCOMING DATES DAY OF GIVING – December 8, 2016 BRUCE J. LOEWENBERG SUMMIT – January 13-15, 2017 PRESIDENTS’ ACADEMY – January 27-29, 2017 CONVENTION – July 6-9, 2017 LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE – July 21-25, 2017


BOND ETERNAL

Brothers below are listed by chapter, with the following dates being of initiation and then of passing.

BETA BETA James Joseph Connelly, 12/4/60, 7/7/16 Michael C. Lane, 12/13/64, 5/20/16

NU James Ward Fisher, 1/17/60, 10/15/15

BETA GAMMA Edward A. Bostwick, 10/2/49, 6/10/16

HILGARD Vincent H. Greco, 9/25/32, 3/1/06

BETA DELTA Frank W. Lane, 4/13/41, 7/21/16

RHO William B. Barksdale, 4/9/57, 4/23/16 Thomas Neil Buckley, 2/13/67, 5/7/16 James Newton Moore, 5/5/67, 9/6/16

BETA ETA Edgar Burton Kemp, 4/13/52, 5/15/16

PHI Allen R. Fauke, 5/31/57, 9/11/15 Frederic M. Denny, 3/26/25 CHI Donald Eugene Carson, 4/9/49, 5/26/16 Jack Wesley Wright, 5/23/55, 3/20/16 ALPHA ALPHA James Armstrong Babb, 3/1/53, 1/26/14 ALPHA ZETA George Keene Ross, 5/5/67 ALPHA ETA Robert M. Napier, 1/8/50, 3/23/15 Philip Francis Jehle, 4/20/69, 6/22/15 ALPHA LAMBDA William P. Innis, 9/23/56, 11/4/15 ALPHA PI Robert E. Jameson, 3/1/88, 7/27/16 ALPHA UPSILON Charles "Chuck" Averill, 3/25/48, 2/12/16 ALPHA PHI Michael Denny Larrabee, 2/22/53, 4/22/03 BETA ALPHA Frank R. Webb, 10/7/45, 9/10/15 Richard A. Petitt, 4/20/52, 9/12/15

DELTA EPSILON Joseph C. Offutt, 2/24/73, 6/14/16 DELTA ZETA Val Elliot Zumbro, 5/18/65, 6/29/14 DELTA MU Joseph H. Dunnigan, 12/20/58, 5/26/16 DELTA NU Regis James Martin, 3/11/73, 6/1/06

BETA IOTA Franklin E. Rossitto, 4/2/50, 8/11/16 ALPHA IOTA Robert F. Voth, 2/24/57, 4/3/16

DELTA PSI Ralph Paul Conforti, 9/30/74, 12/15/12 Gary Charles Puglia, 9/30/74, 4/24/14 Martin A. Anderson, 3/1/93, 8/6/16 EPSILON EPSILON James Gordon Hughes, 2/3/67, 7/23/16 Kenneth J. Bleck, 11/6/70, 9/15/16 Robert James Yates, 1/1/72, 9/3/16

BETA LAMBDA Louis Doyle Moore, 4/28/74, 10/21/15 BETA UPSILON William Calvit Bankston 11/30/56 6/4/05

EPSILON RHO Donald Ray Foster, 1/18/59, 10/9/15

BETA PHI Richard M. Yokim 11/24/68 9/9/16 GAMMA IOTA Robert Thomas Van Kleeck, 5/21/50, 12/21/95 Robert Morris Hillyer, 3/7/54, 10/26/13 Theodore Osman Creason, 3/17/67, 5/31/16 GAMMA KAPPA Harry Ronald Gianneschi, 5/10/63

EPSILON UPSILON George David Allspach, 9/1/68, 5/24/16 ZETA GAMMA Curtis A. Craigmile, 9/27/81, 12/5/15 ZETA DELTA Steven T. Molen, 12/28/80, 5/9/16 ZETA PSI Robert David Graham, 12/1/89, 5/26/16 ETA ETA Kenneth Raymond Puckett, 11/3/91

GAMMA LAMBDA Vincent West Reagor, 12/16/50, 5/3/16 GAMMA XI Felix Peter Sockwell, 11/1/64, 9/7/16 GAMMA OMICRON Leland Wayne Tillberg, 6/4/68, 5/26/16 GAMMA SIGMA Richard Dale Rusk, 1/4/71, 11/3/14

THETA ZETA Michael Gordon Hjelm, 12/12/92, 11/11/15 ZETA PI David Kyle Elahi, 11/11/06, 7/2/16 IOTA ALPHA Zachary Thomas Hart, 4/4/08, 8/4/16

GAMMA OMEGA Robin Elliott Mitchell, 1/23/77, 5/7/16

THE CARNATION

47

DELTASIG.ORG


CARNATION

NONPROFIT ORG US POSTAGE

THE

PAID

OF DELTA SIGMA PHI 2960 N. Meridian St. P.O. Box 88507 Indianapolis, IN 46208

BOLINGBROOK, IL PERMIT #467

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

SHOULD THIS MAGAZINE BE DELIVERED TO A DIFFERENT ADDRESS? UPDATE THE ADDRESS AT WWW.DELTASIG.ORG OR CALL 317.634.1899

UPDATE YOUR INFORMATION New address? Different email account?

Delta Sigma Phi 2960 N. Meridian Street P.O. Box 88507 Indianapolis, IN 46208

Stay in the loop and help keep our records up-to-date! Please share your contact info by cutting out and mailing this completed page or by emailing communications@deltasig.org.

First Name

Middle Name

Address

Last Name

City

State

Zip Code

Email

Phone ( Cell / Home / Work )

Chapter/School

Initiation Year

The fraternity has made The Carnation available online, through DeltaSig.org. In order to receive the digital copy, please check the box.

I would like to receive an electronic copy of The Carnation. Please remove me from The Carnation mailing list.


Fall 2016 Carnation