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DELTACOLLEGIATE STUDENT RUN SINCE '61

Volume 85 • Issue 8

New barbecue restaurant opens in Buena Vista

How division in politics affects everyone

Three-day weekends could save productivity and lives

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Page 14

December 3, 2019

Electronic Media program prepares for next generation

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2 NEWS

www.deltacollegiate.com

December 3, 2019

Baldwin’s offers delicious change in Buena Vista Kelvin Butler • Reporter sign was also redone, @KelvinButler19 as was the interior. “30 or more of our SAGINAW - The family members would cowboy sign is always come to our now a pig-boy. house when we cooked Baldwin’s something, and Smokehouse Barbeque then that gave us is now open inside the idea of, maybe the former Texan we should open restaurant in Buena up a place of our Vista Township, on own,” Evelyn and 3316 East Holland Rd. Roy shared about Couple Roy and what gave them Evelyn Baldwin, pastors the idea of opening at New Beginnings up the restaurant. Deliverance Ministries in Saginaw, founded the restaurant to fill a void in the community. “We tried to open up a place years ago when an old barber shop closed down, Maddie Fordos • Photographer but they wanted way The sign outside of Baldwin’s Smokehouse more money than what BBQ draws attention with a southern cartoon we offered,” says Roy pig character. Buena Vista. Friday, Nov. 22. Baldwin. “With that, God gave us sign to not start so big, so we waited and “With us opening the then when the old Texan When asked about restaurant, we gave restaurant went down, what it’s like running the community 45 new we lost a staple in the his church compared jobs,” says Roy. “Which community. So we made to this newly opened we gave to people who the decision to make restaurant, Roy said attended our church and a ridiculously low offer there’s really Isn’t any people who wouldn't and if they accepted difference. He says have gotten another job it, it was God’s way of they treat their staff anywhere else. With this saying we’re ready. And just like how they restaurant we wanted to sure enough, they did.” run their church. have something that no “BV was losing a lot of The restaurant serves other place has, so we businesses and money, a variety of barbecuecan bring in money to so we wanted to give the related food items from this community instead community something half a chicken, barbecue of people going out of to be proud of, and nachos with the option the city to spend their then we was like, why it of brisket, chicken or money. With our new couldn’t be us to start it,” shredded pork to even a business, hopefully adds Evelyn Baldwin. delightful plate of catfish we can start giving When asked about fingers. All the recipes BV a new source how they ended up come from their family. of income for this choosing this place to The restaurant strives community’s economy.” create their restaurant, to offer affordable prices Baldwin’s Bob thought the building for a great quality plate Smokehouse Barbecue was an ideal location of food, and a friendly is open Thursday for their business. The cast of workers who through Sunday from facility already contained care about the people 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. chairs, a kitchen and they are serving, trying and can be followed other accessories. The to give a pleasant time. on Facebook. iconic Texan cowboy

A Bachelor’s Degree in Business is Within Reach • Transferring credits is easy • Transfer up to 92 credits for qualified applicants • We offer more than 15 specialty business majors Apply online or visit the Northwood office in the Advising Center on Delta’s campus, Monday through Thursday. Walk-ins are welcome!

Dan Toland

Admissions Representative 989.686.9304 toland@northwood.edu

northwood.edu 800.622.9000

WHERE WILL YOUR

TRUE NORTH LEAD YOU?

Northwood University is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination and equal opportunity for all persons regardless of race, gender, color, religion, creed, national origin or ancestry, age, marital status, disability or veteran status. The University also is committed to compliance with all applicable laws regarding nondiscrimination. Northwood University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission (hlcommission.org), a regional accreditation agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. 2019-1410 11.19


NEWS 3

www.deltacollegiate.com

December 3, 2019

Rebecca Roberts • Photo Editor

(Above) A small fraction of the awards honored to the Electronic Media Broadcasting Program on display in the production control room

Rebecca Roberts • Photo Editor

(Above) The set, crew members and guest experts reset during a break in live-filming “The Follow Up” on QTV. Tuesday, Nov. 26.

(Left) Producer and Director Bob Pryzbylski monitors filming, calls out camera direction, and manages a vision mixer simultaneously during live filming.

Electronic Media program prepares for next generation Michael Piwowarski • Editor-in-Chief @DCMichaelFP

UNIVERSITY CENTER - Thomas Bennett, general manager of broadcasting at Delta College, sits in his office in the courtyard level of A wing, home of the Electronic Media broadcasting facilities. His office is in the last part of the entire main campus that has not been renovated since 1961, when Delta College first opened its doors. “The bathroom down at this end is original 1961,” Bennett says, referring to the restroom facilities on the west end. Now, planning is underway for this to change. The board of trustees approved a motion Nov. 12 to award a contract to TowerPinkster to provide architectural and engineering services for the EMB renovation project, as well as approve a $5.9 million budget. “We have both interns and student employees down here,” says Bennett. “We want to increase the amount of opportunities for them. We think it’s better for them, it gives them experience, practical experience, and it’s better for us. It gives us students that can not only do the job but do it well and we think that we can create a good symbiotic relationship that benefits both sides.” Kim Wells, associate professor and coordinator of the Electronic Media program, says that the reworking of the EM facility is a step being taken toward improving the program, as well as integrating Delta’s new journalism program more. “Moving forward I believe the two programs will only get stronger as we work together to create new and unique

opportunities for our students,” says Wells. Part of the project includes expanding on the facilities, including adding new recording and editing facilities for students to use for both Electronic Media and journalism projects. “The Electronic Media department is really growing out of our current space.” says Wells. “Right now, I am redesigning how our physical space will look - with more storage for media equipment, additional editing bays, and a sound booth for audio recording.”

We have both interns and student employees down here. We want to increase the amount of opportunities for them. - Thomas Bennett general manager of Delta College broasdcasting

The facility for WDCQ-TV, Delta College’s PBS affiliate, was already renovated and upgraded in 2003 in the station’s move from analog to digital. Therefore, the main focus of the project is in the radio facilities for WUCX-FM (Q 90.1), Delta’s NPR station, and the northern side of the EM hallway. However, the equipment is still due for upgrades. Bennet says that cameras, for instance, will be replaced so that Q-TV can broadcast in 4K. Facilities management director Nick Bovid said in a memo to the board of trustees that architectural finishes, mechanical and electrical systems are either at or nearing the end of their useful life. This includes 15+ year old

broadcasting equipment which is still in use. “We are looking to improve our infrastructure to be IP based, digital based, where we are migrating and have been migrating everything from analog to digital, and now to more of an IP base,” says Bennett. “So that’s going to be one of the areas we’re looking at.” In addition, equipment that is used and checked out by EM students - including cameras, microphones and tripods - will be upgraded soon. “As the program coordinator, I update and replace cameras every couple of years,” says Wells. “In January, students will see some new cameras, tripods and microphones available for their use.” As the facilities being renovated have not been significantly updated since 1961, asbestos is among the major challenges that will be faced in construction. “When they actually do the construction, they will have to wall off the area and make sure that when they’re doing it, they have to wear special equipment to remove [the asbestos], and make sure none of it gets out in the area,” Bennett explains. Bennett says that physical construction will not happen for a time though, as the EM project is currently in the planning stages. “The planning stage is going to be about a year long,” says Bennett. “The timeline that I’ve seen has about a year planning, so 2020 is pretty much planning and getting prepared, and then in 2021 is when the construction would happen that year. So we’re about a year away from any physical knocking down of walls.”


4 NEWS

www.deltacollegiate.com

December 3, 2019

How division in politics affects everyone Billy Badour Collegiate Correspondent

while also creating more niche, passionate groups such as antifa and the alt-right.” A student at the University of Michigan, Mason UNIVERSITY CENTER – With politics seemingly Payne, 19, said that “I personally don’t feel anxiety more divisive than ever, we must ask ourselves as when discussing political issues with my family a nation: “What are the consequences of this?” since we all feel similarly, but I can definitely see Today’s political divisiveness has been mounting how it could be uncomfortable for some.” for nearly 50 years. According to pewresearch.org, These students both said that they are concerned political division and animosity has deepened since about the division between parties and believe that the latest presidential election. Members of a political the gap between them is widening. Both of these party are now more likely to view the opposing party students also believe that the latest as “immoral” and “close-minded”. presidential election has significantly On top of this, a majority of Americans widened the division between parties. I don't think now view the two parties as “too “I feel it alienated the parties there's been this extreme”. According to people-press. from each other even further,” says org, 78% of Americans say that the Payne. “With much disapproval, much of a political division between parties is growing. 81% Trump took office and only seemed divide since the Civil of American adults also say that they to care about a small portion of are at least somewhat concerned about War. the American population.” the division of political parties. Included - Andrew Dwan, Hope College attendee Andrew Dwan in the 81% is the 46% of Americans Hope College student stated that he was very concerned who say they are very concerned about over the growing political divide. the political division in the country. “I don’t think there’s been this much of a For the first time since the 1980s, more than political divide since the Civil War,” says Dwan. a third of Americans say that there is a large “I am also worried about the growing divide difference between political parties, with 55% between rural and urban. Rural communities saying that there is a large difference. overwhelmingly vote Republican, while As the holidays are approaching, metropolitan areas are voting Democratic.” so does the tip-toeing around political These three individuals all echoed issues when families are together. similar ideas and thoughts on the negative “I try to avoid talking about political issues effects of a growing political divide. with family as they more often become shouting “The political divides coming from Trump’s election matches that don’t change anyone’s mind,” says have pushed candidates from both sides of the aisle Delta student Gordon Kraft, 19. “Both parties seem to the extreme of their political ideas,” says Dwan. to have developed a ‘us vs. them’ mentality,

Political Division:

Then & Now

To understand modern political divisiveness, we must look back to where it started. Modern political divisiveness came to a head in the 1968 presidential election. That year was eventful in the Civil Rights movement as there were many protests early in the year. This culminated in the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. and subsequent riots afterwards. In early June, Democratic presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy was shot and killed. This led to the election of Republican Richard Nixon vs. Democrat Hubert Humphrey vs. American Independent George Wallace. According to The Washington Post, the two biggest issues of the election were the Vietnam War and racial tensions. Nixon ran under the idea of “traditional values,” while “playing on growing white resentment and anxiety over social disorder and racial integration.” Humphrey ran under the idea of getting out of the Vietnam War and being a “conservative Democrat.” Wallace was a segregationist, who years earlier stood in front of the University of Alabama’s schoolhouse door to block integration on his way to becoming a regional hero, painted the picture of the federal government putting the needs of blacks ahead of those of “hard-working Americans”. Wallace being in the race made Nixon look much more appealing and moderate in comparison. Wallace’s campaign has many parallels to Donald Trump’s presidential campaign such as: working-class anger, racial appeals and comfort with confrontation. Wallace also had a strong hold over the “less educated” and “less affluent,” similar to Trump. Hillary Clinton’s campaign would be most similar to Nixon’s as they were both experienced establishment picks. Both candidates practically campaigned off of being the better alternative in their respective election. Both candidates were also heavily disliked by few, but merely tolerated by most.


NEWS 5

www.deltacollegiate.com

December 3, 2019

E

EN MIL

E THE GR

Light up! Bay City welcomes recreational marijuana

Michael Piwowarski • Editor-in-Chief @DCMichaelFP BAY CITY - As Michigan residents will be able to purchase recreational marijuana starting Sunday, Dec. 1, Bay City has established its ordinance just weeks ahead. On Wednesday, Nov. 13, the state Marijuana Regulatory Agency announced that existing businesses with medical licenses that are also pursuing recreational licenses may set aside up to half their inventory for recreational sales. Medical marijuana is only available to customers who have a state-issued patient or caretaker card. On the other hand, recreational products are sold with a 10% excise tax, which is added to the 6% sales tax. Both must be kept separate on store shelves. The Bay City board of commissioners voted Monday, Nov. 18 on an ordinance which doubles the amount of recreational licenses allowed within the city from 25 to 50, to match with the limit for medical licenses. The motion was passed 7 to 2. As stated in the amendment, the city’s reason for increasing the limit of recreational licenses is to allow already-existing medical dispensaries the opportunity to sell some of their products on the recreational side, should they choose to do so. Green Peak Innovations, the owners of Skymint on Euclid Ave, previously told the Collegiate that they have already applied to the state for a recreational license, as they seek to enter the recreational market. City manager Dana Muscott says that, with the new recreational rules in place, Bay City can now start taking applications for recreational marijuana licenses. Puff Cannabis Company, a medical dispensary located on Marquette Avenue, told the Collegiate that they already have

their recreational license, but are unsure when they will be able to start selling recreational products. There are restrictions in place, which are included in the ordinance. Licenses for marijuana event organizers, designated consumption establishments, excess marijuana growers and supplemental applicants are not being issued at this time. Use of marijuana is also prohibited in public spaces owned and occupied by the city. Dave Pleitner, owner of Golden Harvests in Bay City, came to the meeting for the public hearing on the ordinance to speak against these restrictions. “I own an 80,000 square foot building I’m trying to fully build out,” Pleitner said at the hearing. “By prohibiting the limits of my company to expand, it hinders my ability to create more jobs and create additional tax revenue for the city, and of course my electricity consumption.” Pleitner went on to state that he plans on creating 100-150 jobs once his facility is fully built out. He argues that these restrictions hinder his ability to fully expand and compete with

other companies in the state. He also contends that the restrictions will scare off big companies that want to move in to Bay City.

By prohibiting the limits of my company to expand, it hinders my ability to create more jobs and create additional tax revenue for the city, and of course my electricity consumption. - David Pleitner, owner of Golden Harvests in Bay City

“If someone wants to go buy a 100,000 square foot building, and then they see this ordinance, [...] they may question it, because if they can only build out 20,000 square feet, why would they come buying [a] 100,000 square foot building?” Pleitner argued. Dana Muscott told the Collegiate that she initially brought forward these restrictions, but the city is open to making amendments to the ordinance as necessary. “It’s something that I think is

important to the city, to restrict those type of festivals and events at this point until we find out what the rules out of Lansing are, so that we’re on an even heel with the state on their laws for marijuana use,” says Muscott. However, others felt that the ordinance is a little too generous. Commissioner Rashelle Hilliker was one of the board members who voted no on the ordinance, arguing that Bay City already had too high of a limit for business licenses at 25. “I felt that it had a very generous offer of licenses in the city and I feel like there was too many licenses already,” says Hilliker. In spite of the restrictions, Bay City remains the only one of the tri-cities that has opted in to allowing recreational marijuana. The Saginaw City Council voted in July to ban recreational marijuana for a one-year “sunset provision” in order to develop a better understanding of the state rules. Midland has also opted out. In addition, neither Saginaw nor Midland have any medical dispensaries in operation. There are currently eight listed in Bay City according to potguide.com.


6 COLLEGIATE LIFE

www.deltacollegiate.com

December 3, 2019

What is one thing about Christmas that most people like, but you dislike, and why?

“Honestly, the lights, because sometimes I get distracted while driving.” - Danielle Prueter, 18, Reese

Subscribe to the Delta Collegiate on YouTube and get the special holiday edition of

“I think reindeer are kind of annoying. They are just deer, but Christmasy. I do not think that they are interesting.” - Michael Ceja, 19, Alma

“Christmas music because it is really repetitive and it never changes year after year.” - Jasmine Rios, 18, Midland

Coming Soon Photo Flashback: A New Fireplace! Rebecca Roberts Photo Editor @DC_rrv Speculations on this archived photograph are numerous and endless. I think I like not knowing anything about a photo more than knowing the story behind one, it’s more fun to imagine what brought the subjects together, what they are feeling and what kind of era they were living in.

With colder weather approaching, we might take a cue from the subjects in this print and come up with alternative ways to keep warm. It looks like some students and possibly a professor set up a trash can fireplace. For what reason? I’m not sure. Possibly an assignment or a sociopolitical statement? What do you think? And let us know if you recognize anyone in this photo with more information on when it was taken and why @DeltaCollegiate!


COLLEGIATE LIFE 7

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December 3, 2019

Maddison Godi • Reporter

Manager Samuel Lingenfelter is shown cashing out some regulars orders at Red Eye coffee house. Friday, Nov. 22.

Students need later hours Maddison Godi • Reporter @DCMaddison

SAGINAW— Students are searching for late hours in the Tri-Cities. For local Delta College student Helen Brooks she finds most of her available time in the evening, “I usually do all my homework past 9 p.m. because I do not get out of class till 9 p.m.” Having a busy workday surrounded by classes does not relieve time for students like Helen to find time to study or have time for friends. Throughout the Tri-Cities, there are no college town amenities like late-night libraries or coffee shops. Unless it is a bar or Deja Vu, nothing stays open past 10 p.m for students to meet up and hang out, study or chill. Between Saginaw Valley State University, Northwood, Davenport University and Delta College, there are thousands of students commuting throughout the Tri-Cities. Yet, while walking through Midland, Bay City

and Saginaw in the evening, there is a lack of youth. This is due to local businesses not pulling students out by staying open late. Multiple local coffee shops in Bay City and Midland only keep their doors open until 6 p.m. or 7 p.m. Their weekend hours are even shorter—they open later and close earlier, or are not open at all. The end of the week is a time for students to be out enjoying themselves but these businesses are keeping them indoors. “We stay open mostly to give people a place to hang out,” said Samuel deZeng Lingenfelter, manager of Red Eye coffee house. There is one location from Saginaw that does draw all ages from their homes to socialize. Red Eye coffee house has been around since 1993 and has been the nightlife hub ever since. The cozy atmosphere and staff welcomes people in and catching up with friends keeps them there for hours.

“I’m hanging on to an idea that people still want to hang out and talk face to face,” said Lingenfelter. “I find coffee to be one of the popular products to bring people together.” Students are required to study and produce projects and papers weekly. It is hard to find a place to meet up when local businesses close their doors before 8 p.m. This does not leave time for those working or going to class to enjoy a chill, atmosphere into the night. Red Eye has focused on keeping their doors open till 10 p.m. every night of the week. “I’ll normally hang out at a house or something because my friends and I know there is nothing to do,” said Kelly Lore, Delta student. The people that have been coming to Red Eye for the past 25 years have made it into a family environment. Local graduates come in to catch up and talk about college. Parents bring their kids to try the cookies displayed on the counter. Couples lounge on the couches in the back room. Everyone is welcome. In Oct. 2018, a chain of robberies took place in Saginaw and Red Eye was a target. “This was the first robbery in 20 plus years,” said Lingenfelter, “but since it did happen I think it might deter people.” A year later, based on crowds in attendance, it is obvious people still feel safe within Red Eye’s walls. Children are still walked through the doors and groups of friends are still comfortable seating themselves around tables. “I think when it is dark outside people do not feel as safe,” said Lingenfelter, “this is a misconception. If it was truly dangerous people wouldn’t be down here.” If everyone is kept cooped inside their homes glued to their technology, how are they expected to live a spontaneous life? Many will benefit from the Tri-Cities turning into a late-night hub.

Being alone for the holidays doesn’t have to mean loneliness Haeley Huggard • Reporter @HaeleyHuggard The holidays are coming, but not everyone has someone to celebrate with. For many, the holidays aren’t a time for feeling happy. However, just because you are alone for the holidays doesn’t mean that you should feel sad. There are many ways you can celebrate the holidays without feeling alone. But the most important thing to do first is to change your perspective. Try focusing on all the fun and enriching activities you can do this holiday season. First, you can make a new tradition by finding a fun sport to do inside or outdoors. You can try outdoor sports such as skiing or outdoor biking. But if you want to stay inside, you can always try indoor tennis or swimming. Sports are a fun way to get in shape and create new ways of meeting people with similar interests. Travel is another option for those who are looking for an adventure. If you have some extra cash set aside, try going on a solo trip. Travel is a great way to experience new places and people. As a bonus, you also get to be away from the cold weather if you go south. If you still want to do an activity in the spirit of the holidays, try volunteer work. This is a great way to give back to the community and make others feel good. You can volunteer at a soup kitchen such as the East Side Soup Kitchen in Saginaw. Or you can seek a different variety of volunteering opportunities at United Way of Midland County. If you really want to celebrate the holiday with other people, you can always find a new family to celebrate with. This can be done by going online and adopting a family with the Volunteers of America Michigan program. This program allows you to buy gifts for families in need and then deliver their gifts to them. You can choose families based off your location or by size of family. This is a great way to give the holidays meaning and bring happiness to a family in need. If you’re away from home this holiday season because of work or college, you can always have a Skype session with your family. Even though it's over a phone or computer screen, it's still a way to stay included in all the holiday fun and see all of those missed family members. Christmas doesn’t have to be tough just because you are by yourself. There are many ways to celebrate, whether it’s by treating yourself to a vacation or new hobby or by giving back to the community. There are many ways to bring new meaning to the holidays.


8 FEATURE

www.deltacollegiate.com

December 3, 2019

Delta Road Trip

Elevate your diet and mind

Rebecca Roberts • Photo Editor Vibe Well’s interior has a very clean, modern look. Fenton, MI. Tuesday, Nov. 19. Patrick Sochacki Collegiate Life Editor @SochackiPatrick Additional reporting by Rebecca Roberts Photo Editor FENTON - “It was a calling. This is our lifestyle in a brick-and-mortar space.” Jennifer Ream, and her sister Christine Landaal, are co-owners of the organic cold-pressed juice, smoothies, acai bowls and wellness studio, Vibe Well. “The community has been extremely welcoming,” said Ream in reference to the first 15 months they’ve been operating in Fenton, MI. This is their first location and Ream is very confident that “2020 is about creating a strong foundation for growth. 2021 and beyond will be for expanding.”

Ream and Landaal aren’t sure if expansion includes franchising or if the new locations will be privately-owned. The sisters don’t intend on going to large cities or places that already have access to the type of products and services Vibe Well offers. Ream wants to stay in smaller communities where they can provide a service that isn’t commonplace, something Fenton and other small towns desperately need. The choices provided at Vibe Well vary widely— they include organic coldpressed juice, organic smoothies, organic acai bowls, organic oat bowls, organic superfood coffees and organic hot teas. Each choice has several varieties that are made from fresh and organic fruits and grains.

If you suffer from food allergies then Vibe Well is a destination for you, they are free of almost all allergens including: dairy, gluten, corn, soy, peanuts, fish, crustacean shellfish, wheat and most common tree nuts “My son, Robbie, was definitely the inspiration,” said Landaal. “He had gone into anaphylactic shock and we have been to the ER several times because of his allergies.” Landaal couldn’t stand the thought of other kids, or adults, missing out on foods or restaurants because of the allergies her son suffered from. The idea behind Vibe Well was fresh and unique to Ream and Landaal, just like their menu items are to their customers. “We didn’t know the hows, just that it needed to be done,” said Ream.

Ream was clear — an obstacle to providing those organic ingredients for the many options at Vibe Well is locating suppliers and watching costs. “We work hard to keep costs down,” says Ream. “We’re currently figuring out costs so we don’t charge prices people can’t afford while also getting the freshest and highest quality ingredients to use in our foods.” They encountered other challenges as they were getting started, too. “As women, no one wanted to fund us, there were no references for this type of business and no concept to base ours off of,” Ream explained. A major factor that pushed Ream and Landaal forward in their vision for Vibe Well was internal guidance. “You have to trust in that guidance,” said Ream. This is a theme in the concept of the entire business, trusting that you can help yourself get to where you need to be.

Everyone can get there through personal ambition and the desire to improve. The sisters relied on the trust and faith they had in each other to push forward, even when things got tough. “Don’t be afraid to take risks,” said Ream when asked about advice for college students looking to start businesses. “Failures are just a step, a part of the journey. Don’t judge yourself on failures.” If you’re interested in checking out Vibe Well, and possibly even meeting the owners, make your way down to Fenton. They used to be closed on Sundays, but due to popular demand they are now open seven days a week. The hours range from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday. Vibe Well is located at 495 North Fenway Drive in Fenton, MI. If you’d like information on ingredients or class schedules you can visit their website at vibewell.com.

Rebecca Roberts • Photo Editor Vibe Well’s acai bowls are topped with bananas and berries, as well as superfoods like cacao nibs and bee pollen. Fenton, MI. Tuesday, Nov. 19.


A&E 9

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December 3, 2019

Disney+ monopolizes streaming services Maddison Godi Reporter @DCMaddison Since Disney+ was released, it has gained 10 million subscribers and 3.2 million mobile app downloads. This colossal line up of 600-plus movies and TV shows will only be growing in the new year. At only $6.99 a month, or free with an unlimited data agreement from Verizon, Disney+ has shaken the streamable competition. The first streaming service created was Amazon in 2006, but it did not launch worldwide until 2016. Netflix has been around since 1998 and started off as a DVD rental service and turned to a streaming service in 2007. A year later, Hulu came out and has since live-streamed its way to the top three. Eleven years later, Disney+ is disrupting everything these streaming services have worked toward. Included in Disney+ is the largest collection of Disney movies and shows: Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, National Geographic, the Simpsons and several short films. It is now the

streaming service with the most streamable content available. Another addition that is making Disney+ a bigger competitor is Disney’s Hulu takeover. Even though the full sale will not be completed for another five years, Disney has already taken control. This has allowed them to create a bundle including ESPN+ for $12.99 a month. This collaboration will allow Disney to begin processing all of their Fox, Freeform and Hulu adult content. A separation between kid-friendly comedies on Disney+ to adult drama content on Hulu will make the bundle worthwhile. Who wants to spend more on all different streaming services when they can get it all for only $12.99? Disney+ has learned from the best by including the option to download as many movies and shows as possible from the app. They are also offering the subscription in the 4K and HDR experience at no extra cost. It honestly feels too good to be true. Since the app is still

new, there are several hiccups that will only be fixed within time. For example, the Disney+ homepage shows a number of shows under different genre titles. This is similar to how other streaming services like Netflix and Hulu are set up. The only problem with this feature is that some of the same movies are listed under each genre. This has shocked many subscribers. Since there are over 600 plus movies and shows to choose from,

there is no need to see the same choices repeated. Also, there are still several Disney movies and shows stuck in licensing deals with Netflix. Some of these movies are Finding Dory, Cars 3, Moana, Pete’s Dragon and Coco. Between the end of 2019 and into 2020, each Disney movie is scheduled to leave Netflix at different times as their licensing agreements turn up. This will only add to the 600-plus movies available. Since Disney was created back in 1923,

they have produced a lot of cultural content. This collection of older content is available on Disney+ but with a warning saying “may contain outdated cultural depictions.” Movies included are The Jungle Book, The Aristocats, Fantasia, Swiss Family Robinson and Davy Crockett. Even though the app needs some adjusting and some movies and shows are not available, Disney + is predicted to have 13 million subscribers by the end of 2020.

10 years later and it is still ‘Nothing Personal’ By Celestina Martinez, Collegiate correspondent. Alternative rock/pop group All Time Low re-recorded and re-released their “Nothing Personal” album in honor of their 10 year anniversary. Being a huge fan of this band since high school, I was really excited when they announced in the summer that they were going to re-release this album, along with a tour and a documentary published to YouTube. My teenage heart was filled with joy. Let me just start with a wave

of nostalgia that rushed over me when I listened to the re-released version. A strange feeling of being in high school again came over me. As many singers get older, their voices change. However, lead singer Alex Gaskarth still manages to capture the moment with every note that he hits. From the opening words of “Weightless” to the last note of “Therapy,” it is like listening to the original album for the first time again. Since it is re-recorded, there are some slight changes to the songs, including a laugh at the end of “Stella” and a more

“screamo” approach in the chorus of “Lost in Stereo.” My favorite song from the album is “Therapy.” It reminds me of when they sang it live, at their concert that I was able to attend. The slight pause between the first verse and chorus is where Alex Gaskarth would pause to hear the crowd cheering. It brought back memories that I haven’t thought of since 2017. I would highly recommend this album to anyone who hasn’t gotten the experience of seeing this band live. It’s like being at your own personal concert.

And to music lovers of any kind, this album has emotions and humor, definitely making it worth a listen. Catch it on Spotify and other streaming services.

To have your stories added to the Collegiate email us at DeltaCollegiate@gmail.com


10 A&E

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December 3, 2019

Noteworthy

Reflecting on the music of the 2010s

RJ Murphy • Reporter @rjmurphwords The 2010s were a decade defined by digital media.

Streaming services now dominate the music industry. We’ve seen how these companies have refined their

platforms, how old artists have adapted and how new artists have soared to stardom by engaging with the

internet. Here are the songs that ascended to the top of the year-end U.S. Billboard Hot 100 Charts in the 2010s.


A&E 11

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December 3, 2019

Review

Pokemon is back with a new RPG experience

Colton Carrier Reporter @ColtonCarrierDC With an early announcement showing lackluster graphics and a noticeable cut to the game’s expansive collection of little monsters, Pokemon fans were dead set on “Pokemon Sword and Shield” being the first major disappointment in the series history. However, when it was released, I was pleasantly surprised. What I had in front of me was one of the most fun RPGs I’ve played in recent memory, despite its flaws. Pokemon is not a series of drastic chances, but “Sword and Shield” make some decisive turning points. This duo seeks to make an

Review

Colton Carrier Reporter @ColtonCarrierDC Practically every medium under the sun has jumped to streaming, one way or another. Be it Netflix shaking up the film industry or Spotify shifting how most people find their new favorite tunes, streaming has changed the way most people engage with their favorite media. So it only makes sense that video games would try to hop on that bandwagon. Taking titles such as “cloud gaming” and “games on demand,” services over the years have tried to hold onto this new market. However, cloud gaming has been a pipe dream, limited to

already accessible series doubly so, taking out a few of my long standing gripes with the series and turning this set into the best jumping-in point for Pokemon as a whole. Eliminating the tutorials that filled the series and cutting back on the “random encounters” that normally plague RPGs, the game has become less of a slog to get through, instead becoming a pure distillation of fun, from gameplay, to writing, all the way to creature design. Before release, long-time developer Game Freak announced an unprecedented (at the time) 400 Pokemon being cut from the game.

As a series whose entire existence is based on the tagline “Gotta catch ‘em all,” many long time fans took personal offense to so many favorites being cut, all for the sake of improving animations on the 400plus Pokemon left over. And here lies one of the faults of the game: this improvement in animation went almost entirely toward the new Pokemon Camp feature, letting you hang out and cook for your little monsters. This whole feature adds a lot of character and charm for every Pokemon that’s in the game, but it seems to have come at the cost of the battle animations, which have mostly remained unchanged

from the series’ 3DS outings. Speaking of things that haven’t been changed, don’t expect much variety from the in-game fights. I mean, if it isn’t broke, don’t fix it, right? The Pokemon games have thrived due to their easyto-learn, hard-to-master combat. The only major change lies in the new “Dynamax” mode, where you turn your beloved Pokemon into towering behemoths. In essence, it’s not much different from the Mega Evolutions from Pokemon X and Y with a new coat of paint, but that doesn’t make it any less fun. Let’s face it, if you like Pokemon, you like it. If you don’t like it, “Sword and Shield” may be the best bet to change your mind, but don’t expect a miracle. “Sword and Shield” are by no means the deepest RPGs on the market, but there’s so much heart packed into them that it’s hard not to recommend them.

Is cloud gaming the next frontier for video games? those with the best internet connections and the most up-to-date computers. Cloud gaming has a shaky history, to say the least. It first jumped into the public eye with OnLive, a service that streamed games over a desktop connection. During the service’s five-year run from 2010 to 2015, games were found to have low-quality visuals due to extremely variable stream quality and input lag that made certain games unplayable. Across the board, critics found streaming to be inferior to just owning games, in every regard. Afterwards, Sony bought out the patents to OnLive, using the technology to build their own game streaming service, PlayStation Now. The whole concept of cloud gaming is a bit complex. Basically, instead

of having a high-power computer or game console in your house, you’re remotely accessing a computer built into a server. From here, the game you want to play is streamed to you, about the same way a YouTube video is streamed to you when you watch it. From there, every input you make - like button presses, mouse clicks or analog stick movements - travels over the internet to that remote computer. Ideally, this all happens so fast that there’s no noticeable delay, but that’s where the first issue of cloud gaming arises. Anyone wanting to dive into gaming on demand doesn’t just need a good internet connection, they need a consistent one, ideally uncongested with other devices and physically close to the servers. For most people wanting a

cheaper alternative to video game consoles, that isn’t very accessible. Streaming games also takes up a significant amount of data. To put things in perspective, a modern AAA release will take around 50 gigabytes to download; running most streaming services uses around 10 to 20 gigabytes per hour. With most internet providers using data caps, that’s a lot of data being used up fast. All of this brings us to the blockbuster on the cloud gaming scene, the Google Stadia. Cutting to the chase, the Google Stadia works. But at this time, the entire service appears half-baked, from premise to execution. Claiming to run at 4K on Chromecast devices and 1080p on phones and Chromebooks, first impressions show corners cut left and right,

with the same old graphic issues present, as well as consistent performance issues. On top of this, the service will be missing key features, such as Bluetooth support, a larger game library, Google Assistant support, all promoted during the service’s announcement. Gaming on demand has made strides from a decade prior, but the same issues keep popping up with each new iteration. However, Google has made one of the boldest leaps into cloud gaming in history, covering more regions than any service before it. While I wouldn’t suggest hopping aboard the on-demand train just yet, there’s no questioning that game streaming has become a genuine option for those with the means to give it a shot.


12 A&E

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December 3, 2019

Review

‘Knives Out’ stabs at best movie of the year

Samuel Philpot Associate Editor @Philpoteropolis As 2019 comes to a close, there are a few must see movies left to be released. Though most people are probably looking forward to the next “Star Wars” film, “Knives Out” is a cinematic masterpiece that should not be slept on. Written and directed by Rian Johnson, “Knives Out” is a wonderfully hilarious murder mystery that’ll keep you on the edge of your seat through it all. Opening with a fast paced intro to unveil all the characters and their affiliation to the deceased Thrombey (portrayed by Christopher Plummer), Johnson’s film keeps the table spinning. Throughout the film, you’re presented with these tidbits of information that let you believe anyone could have been the

murderer. Though this seems necessary for the genre, Johnson displays the information in a quick and interesting way. It all helps dive deeper into the depth of each character. Keeping the murder mystery story fresh, Johnson created erratic characters that bring a lot of life and fun to the film in their own ways. For instance, upon telling a lie, the house nurse Marta (portrayed by Ana de Armas) would puke. In order to help figure out right from wrong, Detective Blanc (portrayed by Daniel Craig) utilizes this ailment and has the house nurse assist him. Even if the characters were written poorly, the all-star cast would have easily still made this film loveable. Seeing Chris Evans turn around from good ol’ Captain America to play a douchey country club brat was simply outstanding. Daniel Craig

delivered magnificently on his role and the use of a southern drawl accent was interesting to see. The humor throughout the movie was kept light-hearted and fun. Through the use of quick wit and snarky comments, the suspenseful film had me laughing all the way through it. Writing and characters aside, the cinematography was something else that really helped the film’s story. Through the use of lighting and shadows, the murder mystery theme was kept alive and suspensful as they danced around important facts and faces. The film remained thoroughly enjoyable and hilarious, even during a moment’s talk about politics. It was captured and used in a way that helped advance the characters individually and show how they all seem to be opposites. This film is greatly unpredictable

and unique. Even though this year has been filled with box office breakers and a slew of remakes, “Knives Out” is fresh cinema that we needed in today’s unoriginal Hollywood.

Colton Carrier • Reporter @ColtonCarrierDC Dark Souls

Popping up in 2011 on the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360, the main claim to fame of “Dark Souls” was its brutal difficulty, punctuated with frequent deaths, visceral combat and insurmountable odds. While this is all supported by intricately tuned gameplay, the real kicker in “Dark Souls” is the dark, formidable atmosphere and world. “Dark Souls” is a masterclass in subtle world building, letting the plot be as barebones or deep as the player wants, with every item you run into providing background to the grim world of Lordran.

Journey

As an early experiment of “games as art,” “Journey” lies on one concept: communication. The game starts with the player getting paired up with another player who remains unnamed until the end of the game. During the game, there’s no way to communicate with this person directly, but both players experience everything together. “Journey” takes its duo on a trek through brilliant desert landscapes, where vibrant colors bring life to a dying landscape. At two hours, “Journey” is not a long experience, but it’s one of the most unique ones in gaming.

Gone Home

“Gone Home” is a quintessential slow-burn. Void of conflict, the game focuses entirely on the relationship between the player character and her family who, after several years away, have split apart, leaving the protagonist to piece her life together. The game has little in the way of gameplay, but the story is a unique experience, letting the player figure out a complicated family’s drama through exploration. “Gone Home” is a tour de force of writing in gameplay, and along the way has revolutionized the adventure game market.

Superhot VR

Virtual reality (VR) may have dropped off the map as gaming’s hottest trend, but many great games came out of the VR boom of the late 2010s. Despite this, it’s hard to pinpoint a single one that set itself apart from the pack better than “Superhot VR.” A spin-off of the already-amazing game “Superhot,” this iteration places you in the shoes of the game’s unnamed, faceless protagonist. The story is paper thin, but you’re here for the high octane action, mind games, physicality and crazy stunts.

Nier Automata

Ruminating on the nature of humanity, and the role of robots in a world without humans, “Nier Automata” tells dire tales of morality and mortality. It’s a spiraling depression with a shine of optimism to get you through it. If you can get past the gameplay, the only average part of the experience, you will get some of the best writing in gaming, backed up by the best soundtrack in the medium. Its way of delivering the story can be difficult, but “Nier Automata” is not to be missed at any cost.


SPORTS 13

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December 3, 2019

Colin Kaepernick Top 10 sports gifts has an NFL problem Kelvin Butler • Sports Reporter @KelvinButler19

Kelvin Butler Sports Reporter @KelvinButler19 Colin Kaepernick is a very polarizing figure in sports who sacrificed his future in the NFL by kneeling during the national anthem, in protest over the police brutality among the AfricanAmerican community. This leads to what some people would refer to as being black balled by the NFL. Right now, Kaepernick is in a lose-lose situation pretty much because he’s not good enough to turn a bad team into a good team. And most, if not all, good teams got a quarterback who is (if not better) certainly the same, at least. That’s saying if Kaepernick will just return seemingly at the peak of his prime. He took three years off and the game has changed a lot since. Besides the Chicago Bears, there’s no other good teams that need a quarterback and is in a win now stage. Besides that, every bad team either has a young quarterback trying to develop them, or will just draft a quarterback to try and develop them. Then sign a 32-year old-Kaepernick,

expecting game-changing quarterback play from him. If he’s looking to start, let’s look at all the bad teams that don’t have a young quarterback. The Cincinnati Bengals don’t have a young quarterback, but they’re going to get the no. 1 pick in the draft so that’s where they’ll get their quarterback. The Chargers is the only place that might make sense but they need Phillip Rivers to sell tickets when they move into their new stadium. So all Kaepernick has is some back up opportunities and I don’t know what the media will do, but there will be a bunch of noise about starting Kaepernick just like when Tim Tebow was in the league. So if the team’s owner isn’t afraid of the media circus that might happen, they might be afraid of what their fan bases might think, especially if the team is located in a southern state or a state which has had racial tensions before. Like the Dallas Cowboys or the Carolina Panthers, because you know how social media is, if ten cranky old whites protest outside of Jerry's world (Dallas Cowboys stadium), the whole world will over react instead of just ignoring them as if ten people will make the NFL go bankrupt.

Hey people, if want to give your sports loving human specimen a gift for Christmas, you can always do something sexual or make some homemade biscuits-n-gravy for them. But if y’all is on the fringe of getting a divorce or sticking together for the one kid y’all didn’t plan for, here are the top ten sports gifts for that.

Some cute little things for the women like nail decals, slippers or a Snuggie of their favorite team. $10-200 Go to a fun tailgate like Buffalo Bills or Oakland Raiders; it’ll be an experience. Price may vary.

Super Bowl tickets $2000-4000

Cute little things like team mugs, cookie cutters or a bobblehead. $5-20

College Football playoff championship game $750-1500

Wear his or her favorite player jersey with nothing under it. Hopefully it’s free.

College Football playoff tickets (either game) $750-1000

Pro Bowl tickets $100-200

Playoff game tickets $200-400

A Jersey of his or her favorite player or any outerwear with his favorite team on it. $20-250

The end draws near for another disappointing Lions season Kelvin Butler Sports Reporter @KelvinButler19 The 2019-2020 season for the Detroit Lions had a lot of potential after starting off (2-0-1) in the first three games. But the wheels of momentum slowly started to come off after they almost stopped the hot Kansas City Chiefs, but let them off the hook in a three-point loss.

Then the next week, the drama-filled Minnesota Vikings came to their home and won by 12 points, which should’ve been more if a certain receiver didn’t have a career game. Then the sad realization trickled in for the poor adorable Lions, when they saw that they fell from first in the NFC North to last place after they lost to the quarterback-

less Chicago Bears. Then there’s the fact that they traded away one of their best defensive backs and team captain in Qaundre Diggs for a fifth round pick. This was a terrible trade, because most fifth round picks are never good unless you get extremely lucky. In that case, the Lions basically gave Diggs away for free. Then during a three

game losing streak, their young, gritty and full of potential running back Kerryon Johnson got injured during the middle of the season. So their running game has been dismal ever since he’s been out with injury. Also, since he has been on IR with no timetable, there’s a high chance he will miss the rest of the season. Especially with this

news happening with them having a (3-6-1) record with no chance of making the playoffs. But anyway, Matthew Stafford is out for up to six weeks with a back injury, leaving Jeff Driskel the starting quarterback, and so far he is 0-2 as the starter, so with that the 2019-2020 Detroit Lions season was a wash. Hooray for next year!


14 OPINION

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December 3, 2019

Five days. Eight to 12 hours shifts each day. Then all you’ve got is the weekend to try and relax or finish those around-the-house projects before the work week begins all over again. Overworking is a serious problem among adults; not just in the United States, but in many other countries as well. Japan even has a word for it — karoshi. Whether it’s just trying to live paycheck to paycheck or saving up for retirement, people can’t seem to make it to their end goal without having to put in some serious hours. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2018 full-time workers spent an average of 7.94 hours a day at work, and 2.94 hours worked at home. Part-time workers averaged 8.28 hours at work and 3.11 hours of work at home. Because of the amount of hours people must

Three-day weekends could save productivity and lives Editorial spend at work, their health seems to be the first thing that goes; whether it’s from stress, lack of sleep or being unable to get enough nutrition. From all of this, people who are overworked usually suffer from high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Both of which can lead to major heart problems.

The solution to overworking? A fourday work week. Over the summer, Microsoft Japan tested a four day work week for

their staff. The staff was able to keep a fiveday paycheck over the summer. The result? A 40% increase in productivity for the company. The company plans a winter trial as well. The success of the four-day work week began back when New Zealand company Perpetual Guardian had a successful trial run in March 2018. For

eight weeks, employees would work 30 hours a week but still get paid for 37.5 hours and they were required to do the same amount of work. After the eight-week trial, Perpetual Guardian saw a 20% gain in productivity. Not just that, but team engagement such as: leadership, commitment, stimulation and empowerment all went up by at least 10%. Stress levels among the staff also dropped by 7%. Both of these companies have proven that a four-day work week would benefit both the company and the health of their employees. The four-day work week is something that should be implemented all around. If these are the kind of results we can see among trial runs, then perhaps it is worth giving a shot. Not only for the company, but for the wellbeing of working adults as well.

Why I take risks to serve my country Gregory J. Haven Collegiate correspondent When I was 10 years old, my grandfather was a combat medic during the Korean War and saved lives, from bullet wounds all the way to burn victims. From that day on, I always wanted to make a change in this world to affect other people’s lives. My grandfather taught me to never give up on your dreams and always be the dog to stand up against the wolves of the world to protect the sheep. I always believed in fighting for my country because I’m always a risk taker, I always stood up for people who couldn’t stand up for themselves and I believe that someone needs to do it. Being a risk taker is a high reward, high downfall kind of ordeal and for most of my life, I’ve had a high downfall. But swearing into oath to protect my country was a huge risk because once you take an oath to protect, you can’t quit,

or else you’ll get a dishonorable discharge and you’ll basically be a felon. As a result, I was the first one to join the military out of all my siblings and of course, I chose infantry, learning to shoot and kill. My father and the whole family were against it so much that they had an intervention during thanksgiving, back in 2017. My grandma Deim said, “What the hell is wrong with you? Do you want to die like the ones who went to Afghanistan?” I responded, “I won’t die.” Then I took the risk two months later. The military and I always shared a common goal: standing up for those who couldn’t stand up for themselves. Growing up, I was never a bystander to watch someone bully another person. It boils my blood. I always confronted that person no matter who they were. The history about war caught my eye. For example, in World War ll, we fought Germany and we were the reason that the Allies won. Another one is 9/11: the towers

collapsed, people screamed and didn’t know what to do. When I learned about those horrific events, it motivated me to make a change and keep peace in this world, standing up for the people of the world and killing terrorists. When people tell me, “Oh I can never join the military, I’d punch the drill sergeant in the face,” I laugh because it tells me you wouldn’t be able to handle self control. Someone needs to step up to the plate and defend our country because this nation gives everyone an equal opportunity to go to school and make something of yourself, rich or poor, black or white. Whether it be military or even police officers, we all step up to the plate and take an oath to protect and serve those who won’t. I believe in a lot of things in life, but fighting for my country is one thing that I must put before my own self and for the people who live in this great nation.

Photo Courtesy of Gregory J. Haven, Collegiate Correspondent

To have your stories added to the Collegiate email us at DeltaCollegiate@gmail.com


ACTIVITIES 15

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December 3, 2019

nativity scene

Written by Maddison Godi Illustration by Lindsay Lang

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Upcoming Events Tuesday Dec. 3 29th Annual DECA Holiday Arts And Crafts Show 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. @ main campus hallways

Get your holiday shopping done in between classes‌ right here at Delta! Choose from a wide variety of arts and crafts for sale and support local vendors, as well as the Collegiate DECA club.

Wednesday Dec. 4 Blood drive 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. @ main campus (west main hallway)

Get into the giving spirit this holiday spirit and donate blood! Your contribution will help accident and burn victims, as well as cancer patients, who desperately need it.

Sunday Dec. 8

Wednesday Dec. 11

Allegro Series concert 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. @ main campus (Room G160)

Student Success: Habitudes (Emotional Fuel) 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. @ main campus (Room N007)

Join Brad DeRoche, Delta College music professor, and adjunct instructor Wendy Chu for a classical concert with guitar and piano, featuring selections from Carulli, Albeniz, CastelnuovoTedesco and Marchelie.

Thursday Dec. 12 Full Moon Stroll 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. @ Chippewa Nature Center in Midland

What better way to wrap up finals week than to get some fresh air and enjoy nature? Join interpretive naturalists from the Chippewa Nature Center for a guided walk under the full moon.

Looking for some advice in the heat of finals week? Learn how to make a personal network with the people closest to you, as a way to make you better and more accountable as a person.

Saturday Dec. 14 Winter Holiday Choral Concert 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. @ main campus (Room G160)

Join the combined choirs of Delta College for their annual Christmas concert, featuring a variety of traditional Christmas carols and holiday favorites. Admission is free, but donations are accepted.


MADE TO MOVE Your future, your opportunity, your next move. Find it all here. Ferris offers flexible, convenient classes in the Great Lakes Bay Region and online. Transfer up to 90 Delta College credit hours. Meet with an advisor now to maximize your transfer credit and move Ferris Forward.

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