Fall 2013 Quarterly

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Quarterly DELTA CHI

FA L L 2 0 1 3

Dr. Jimmie J. Underwood

ALUMNUS SPOTLIGHT Page 8

2012-13

AWARDS &

RECOGNITON Page 16


In The Bond XXX Inside The Quarterly Volume 110 Number 3 Fall 2013

In The Bond 2 “A”s’ Academy Challenge 3 Rob Harrell 4 Dr. Jimmie J. Underwood 8 Phil Yang 10 Annual Donor Recognition 1 1 1890 Society 14 Coast To Coast 15 Awards & Recognition 16 Risk Management 24 Chapter Situations 25 Educational Initiatives 26 Keeping In Touch 27 Our Brothers Who Serve 27 Farewell & Parting 27 Delta Chi Quarterly

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Four Words... For every Delta Chi, it is our favorite time of year: the return to campus for our undergraduate brothers, brisk fall air, and Founders’ Day! Let me be the first to wish everyone, “Happy Founders’ Day!” As we reflect of the 123rd anniversary of the founding of our Fraternity, let us remember the Preamble as well as the eleven Basic Expectations of Delta Chi. In a recent conversation with Ray Galbreth, Missouri ’69, we were talking about the meaning of the Preamble. He made an interesting observation: “The four most important words in the Preamble are ‘promote’, ‘develop’, ‘advance’ and ‘assist.’ They are the verbs in each clause, and it is our actions that make Delta Chi!” I had never before thought about the Preamble this way, and I think Ray’s thinking is absolutely correct. PROMOTE friendship – It is our responsibility to contribute to the growth and prosperity of friendships both inside and outside of the Fraternity. It is important to find the potential for friendship with all individuals we meet. When we participate in philanthropic and community events, we are able to PROMOTE friendship within our communities and campuses as well. The other aspect of promoting friendship involves conflict. We need to be mindful and work to limit conflict, whether it is inside or outside of the house. When conflict does occur, be sure to act. Promote resolution in a calm, courteous and professional way so that friendship may ultimately prevail. DEVELOP character – We, as brothers, should encourage

each other to expand our experiences and allow each other to grow - each in our own way. Through different opinions, experiences, and over time, we all become who we are. Our character is what makes us individuals, and we should be encouraging each other in a positive way to DEVELOP into who we are, especially during our undergraduate years. More importantly, we should also continue to develop throughout our lifetime. We do not, however, need to encourage stereotypical or bad behavior, as this does not assist us in becoming better men. ADVANCE justice – Do the right thing. It is that simple. Don’t stand by quietly and do nothing while an associate member is being hazed or you see a brother getting ready to make a poor decision. You have a responsibility to step in and help. Justice is not for the few, or for Delta Chi brothers only. Rather, it is for everyone. Imagine how far the reputation of the fraternity community could ADVANCE if all fraternity men stepped in when hazing, sexual abuse, or other inappropriate behaviors were about to occur. Be a leader. Lead by example. Remember your oath, and remember your values. ASSIST in the acquisition of a sound education – Are we truly doing all we can to assist our members in the pursuit of an education? We are each other’s keeper and should be encouraging study hours, going to class, and academic success. We must start this during the associate member program and carry it through to graduation. Be sure everyone knows where the tutoring center is on campus. Let’s encourage a struggling brother to go to his professors’ office hours. Go with him, if need be. Have your Faculty Advisor come and speak to the associate member class on the importance of academic success, and ask all of the brothers to attend as well. If we ASSIST and watch over each other, we are more likely to graduate on time, and we stand a better chance of obtaining a good job to start our careers. These basic core values and principles are part of what makes us unique and better men - not just better fraternity men, but better men throughout our lives. It is my honor as your 52nd “AA” to wish you a happy Founders’ Day, and I hope you will remember these four important words - PROMOTE, DEVELOP, ADVANCE AND ASSIST - today, and in the future. The Preamble is, and these words are, not just for our student members.

This paper is FSC certified at the mill and is 10% post-consumer waste. Forestry Stewardship Council is a nonprofit organization based in Bonn, Germany that sets global standards for responsible forestry.

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DELTA CHI QUARTERLY

Miles Washburn “AA” Massachusetts ’87 52nd “AA” Life Loyal Member


“A”s’ Academy Challenge XXX

Brother Steve Michels, Marquette ’87, commits to a

Three-Year “A”s’ Academy Challenge Please support this campaign today! Last year, Brother Steve Michels, Marquette ’87, challenged Delta Chis to support the “A”s’ Academy, resulting in over $50,000 in increased funding to the Fraternity’s premier leadership development program. This year Brother Michels is issuing a new challenge grant. Understanding the importance of insuring the future of the “A”s’ Academy, and believing whole heartily that others will “step up to the plate,” Brother Michels will donate up to $210,000 over the next three years. The Challenge’s three-year goal is $420,000. This enables full educational program funding of the “A”s’ Academy for the next three years. It also provides you with an opportunity to make a financial gift that has twice the impact! Your contribution today will help build a bright future for all chapters and colonies by assisting the Foundation in meeting this all-important challenge.

Now in its ninth year, the “A”s’ Academy has impacted over 1,000 of Delta Chi’s key leaders. The Academy provides programming in leadership, ethics, and management skills, and the curriculum empowers our chapter and colony “A”s to improve Delta Chi on all of our campuses. Brother Michels is counting on the Foundation’s loyal donors to take the lead in meeting his challenge. Please complete the form below and send it in with your donation. Give generously so we can tap into the generosity of Brother Michels and take full advantage of his potential $210,000 donation.

Support the “A”s’ Academy with your tax-deductible gift today at www.dcef.com!

Delta Chi would like to thank all of its donors for the Foundation’s previous “A”s’ Academy Challenge! Richard F. Curtin, Abracadabra ’60 Steven G. LaVoie, Abracadabra ’82 Arthur B. McIntyre, Abracadabra ’51 Mark V. Raynard, Abracadabra ’79 Larry S. Tessler, Abracadabra ’60 Charles E. Carlin, Alabama ’57 Frederick H. Connell, Alabama ’65 Gregory D. Cotton, Alabama ’77 Stantley Williams, Alabama ’60 D. Glenn Baird, Arizona ’75 Paul Dean Horn, Arizona ’64 Bruce R. Seligman, Arizona ’65 Jason Michael Walker, Arizona State ’00 Miles E. Barnett, Auburn ’56 Michael L. Carroll, Auburn ’71 Alan F. Drinkard, Auburn ’71 R. Douglas Meckes, Auburn ’71 Cary F. Poole, Auburn ’80 Richard Bryan Webb, Auburn ’65 Carlo Bracci, Sr., Augusta Alumnus Richard N. McKaig, Ball State ’66 Kevin M. Emery, California Univ-PA ’99 Robert B. Bennett, Central Michigan ’90 Jason N. Butler, Central Missouri ’99 Steven W. Cornwall, Central Missouri ’86 Charles D. Rutt, Central Missouri ’79 Christopher J. Diak, Clemson ’94 John R. Adamec, Coastal Carolina ’06 Ronald T. Topping, Connecticut ’58 Michael Velgouse, Connecticut ’62 John R. Byers, Cornell ’54 Conrad F. Meis, Creighton ’93 David R. Dent, DePauw ’63 George T. Dodd, DePauw ’59 Richard W. Moore, DePauw ’58 Gregory D. Taylor, DePauw ’86 Jason D. Frampton, Duquesne ’05 Douglas A. Chananie, East Carolina ’07 Robert L. Pranger, Eastern Illinois ’86 Kenneth J. Winter, Eastern Illinois ’75 Edward Fusco, Embry-Riddle ’73 Roman D. Hluszczyk, Embry-Riddle ’99 James P. Hunter, Embry-Riddle ’75 Kirk S. Price, Embry-Riddle ’71 Nathaniel K. Smith, Embry-Riddle ’01 Waldemar D. Tiedemann, Embry-Riddle ’77

Eric J. Broadie, Florida ’99 J. Donald Turk, Florida ’68 Ronald G. Stowers, Florida State ’81 Joseph J. DeFazio, Fredonia ’92 James T. Garrett, Fullerton ’68 Michael Kevin Morrissey, Fullerton ’82 Wayne M. Spicer, Fullerton ’70 David A. Sed, Gannon ’74 Thomas E. Edmunds, Georgia ’78 Travis Victor Greene, Georgia Southern ’10 Michael K. Boudreau, Georgia Tech ’93 S. Weslee Knapp, Georgia Tech ’98 Eric W. Southard, Georgia Tech ’07 Scott A. Goodwin, Gorham State ’88 Thomas L. Carroll, Hayward ’98 Mark R. Halfon, Hayward ’91 Stephen C. Johansen, Hobart ’64 Alvin I. Yamashiro, Hobart ’66 Fred L. Jessup, Idaho ’05 Jeffrey A. Bond, Illinois ’97 Lynn Richard Dueser, Illinois ’63 Matthew S. Ehrhart, Illinois ’83 Douglas J. Harper, Illinois ’69 Henry R. Hosman, Illinois ’59 Kevin J. Kell, Illinois ’73 William J. Koves, Illinois ’66 Richard S. Marsho, Illinois ’62 Howard A. Partch, Illinois ’63 Daniel W. Snyder, Illinois ’50 Joseph M. Toolis, Illinois ’05 Donald J. Ward, Illinois ’73 John Miller Galvin, Indiana ’54 Gregory E. Lindsay, Indiana ’70 Gregory W. Fletcher, Iowa ’78 Thomas W. Halupnik, Iowa ’70 Joseph M. Kolar, Iowa ’85 Mark A. Law, Iowa ’97 Tom A. Rockwell, Iowa ’81 Robin D. Shoop, Iowa ’60 Zane B. Smith, Iowa ’66 Richard H. Buchanan, Iowa State ’58 George R. Hooper, Iowa State ’85 Scott A. Schaefer, Iowa State ’85 Benjamin C. Wold, Iowa State ’66 James F. Storey, Jacksonville State ’63 R. Jeffrey Fear, Johnstown ’76

Alan H. Brightman, Kansas ’67 Edward F. McCallum, Kansas ’56 Richard E. Nelson, Kansas ’71 Jimmie J. Underwood, Kansas ’51 L. Elliot Shubert, Kansas City ’66 Aaron A. Otto, Kansas State ’98 Mitchell A. Gruber, Kent State ’89 Ralph O. Wilson, Kentucky ’51 Paul J. Phillips, Kettering-A ’03 Paul J. Prutzman, Lehigh ’66 Alex Umanetz, Lehigh ’53 Scott W. Wojciechowski, Lehigh ’10 Darrell E. Morgan, Livingston ’92 Christopher Lewis Willis, Livingston ’14 Kenneth L. Cooper, Long Beach ’08 Edward A. Loseman, Long Beach ’72 David R. Rojas, Long Beach ’71 Richard J. Scott, Long Beach ’70 Stephen D. Henson, Louisiana Tech Faculty Kevin H. Simmons, Louisiana Tech ’87 Keith B. Snook, Louisiana Tech ’96 Brian P. LoCicero, Marquette ’88 Robert J. Novelli, Marquette ’95 Joel F. Plotkin, Maryland ’89 Miles C. Washburn, Massachusetts ’87 Jon P. Bachelder, Miami ’64 Vernon F. Beyer, Miami ’59 John V. Marstrell, Miami ’42 Douglas O. McLemore, Miami ’69 David G. Falconer, Michigan ’62 Harold M. Gibbons, Michigan ’50 Henry F. Winchester, Michigan ’51 Barry Charles Wood, Michigan ’61 Michael H. Agnello, Michigan State ’81 Lawrence Awwad, Michigan State ’91 James Alan Bannan, Michigan State ’66 George I. Chesley, Michigan State ’64 John R. Jaeger, Michigan State ’84 Richard H. Zimmerman, Michigan State ’56 Kenneth C. Crandall, Minnesota ’71 Stephen M. Desens, Minnesota ’70 David M. Tuomala, Minnesota ’90 Stephen E. Behr, Mississippi State ’73 Michael T. Corlew, Mississippi State ’73 Charles J. Foretich, Mississippi State ’86 John W. Hatmaker, Mississippi State ’79

Robert K. Hubbard, Mississippi State ’88 Bobby Joe Johnson, Mississippi State ’63 Ernest A. Poppers, Missouri ’67 James P. Sheahan, Missouri ’79 Scott B. Stotlemeyer, Missouri ’90 Thomas E. Thornton, Missouri ’52 Herbert Wayne Norton, Montevallo ’82 Ronald J. Martin, New Haven ’87 Michael E. Regan, New Haven ’83 Jonathan D. Moore, North Carolina State ’90 Frank A. Ascoli, Northeastern ’72 Kevin J. Kostoff, Northern Colorado ’90 Steven L. Adams, Northern Iowa ’81 Scott T. Klinefelter, Northern Iowa ’76 Jay B. Meacham, Northwest Missouri ’87 Father Anthony Vinson, Northwest Missouri ’98 Maj. Lowren A. Bock, Ohio State ’55 Russell E. Geiger, Ohio State ’47 Monte L. Johnson, Ohio State ’69 John R. Miller, Ohio State ’50 Hal L. Hefner, Oklahoma ’49 Patrick F. Weber, Oklahoma ’87 Robert G. Cass, Oklahoma State ’84 Leslie J. Davidson, Oklahoma State ’66 Ross A. Gregson, Oklahoma State ’76 Steven L. Henslee, Oklahoma State ’75 Jon D. Wertz, Oklahoma State ’76 Jeremiah J. Bishop, Oregon State ’99 Mark E. Landstrom, Oregon State ’83 John T. Wintler, Oregon State ’44 Michael Claire Horn, Oshkosh ’68 Maurice J. Keesey, Parsons ’68 Robert L. McBride, Parsons ’68 Donald A. Carlson, Penn State ’49 ruce N. Kriebel, Penn State ’67 William E. Reimer, Penn State ’45 Michael D. Rimer, Penn State ’86 Robert P. Simon, Penn State ’41 Charles N. Teyssier, Penn State ’55 John R. Whitaker, Penn State ’48 Alexander M. Hamling, Pittsburgh Alumnus John C. Hedderich, Purdue ’60 Robert D. Hendershot, Purdue ’72 James T. Reilly, Purdue ’76 Jeremy E. Steelberg, Purdue ’83 Stephen J. Walker, Purdue ’63

Arthur K. Warlow, Purdue ’71 Patrick M. Bell, Rutgers ’08 John C. Garvey, S.M.U. ’63 William John Mork, S.M.U. ’65 Paul A. Cox, Sacramento ’87 Christopher J. Douville, Sacramento ’86 Daniel Ryan Janowski, Southeast Missouri ’09 August J. Koebbe, Southeast Missouri ’78 John H. Schulte, Southeast Missouri ’80 Tod A. Anton, Southern California ’51 Allen P. Iftiger, Southern California ’90 Robert L. Knox, Southern California ’62 James N. Lamhofer, Southern California ’50 Donald E. LaPlante, Southern California John Samore, Southern California ’94 Dan Michael Fox, Southern Illinois ’69 Michael Joseph Johnson, Southern Illinois ’10 John William Battles, Stephen F. Austin ’08 James F. Crawford, Syracuse ’69 Adlai A. Hurt, Syracuse ’04 Roger E. Abernathy, Texas ’50 Robert E. Anderson, Texas ’68 Christopher S. Kopech, Texas ’05 John P. White, Texas Tech Faculty Chris Woodruff-Jackson, Texas Tech ’94 Shane R. Demitruk, Tri-State ’99 Robert K. Edds, Tri-State ’72 Michael J. Gitzendanner, Tri-State ’99 Stephen D. Pelletier, Tri-State ’02 Donald L. Stripling, Tri-State ’70 Phil Busick, Truman State ’10 John W. Daniel, Truman State ’86 Mick Dean, Truman State ’08 Michael E. Leech, Truman State Alumnus Frank S. Dean, Washington ’58 Bruce H. Hoeger, Washington ’72 Robert P. LaBouy, Washington ’66 Eric Edward Thoreson, Washington ’65 James A. Anderson, Washington State Alumnus Dennis Ertzbischoff, Wayne State ’72 Richard F. Suhrheinrich, Wayne State ’58 Michael E. Roos, West Virginia Tech ’96 Ronald Wayne Phillips, II, Western Carolina ’94 John J. Sampanes, Western Michigan ’64 Anthony R. D’Ambrosio, Youngstown ’70

FALL 2013

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Cover Story

ROB HARRELL

DePauw ’91

In 2002, Jeff Main, DePauw ’89, introduced Quarterly readers to a brother from his chapter who had a knack for making people laugh. Then, Rob Harrell, DePauw ’91, had just received his “big break” - one many artists could only dream of. Harrell’s comic strip, Big Top, had been picked up by Universal Press and would go on to be read each morning by hundreds of thousands of people in nearly 50 cities across the globe. Big Top, a daily strip, chronicled the antics of a unique combination of circus characters from 2002 until 2007. During those years, Harrell worked with the very same company that managed Doonesbury, Garfield, and Foxtrot. “I think that Big Top had almost a cult following. I got lots of correspondence with lots of people who loved it,” Harrell shared. “And I was so happy doing that strip. I loved the characters; they became like family to me.” However, life threw Harrell a giant curve ball in 2005 when he learned that he had cancer above his right eye. Traditional radiation would have left Harrell blind and unable to draw anymore. Luckily, Harrell found an experimental treatment which preserved the sight in at least one eye. While having the surgery and during recovery, Harrell was blessed with a truly unique honor. “One of the coolest things that happened was when fifteen cartoonists filled in for me,” recalled Harrell. “They each did Big Top in their own style. Everyone

from Bill Hinds, who does Tank McNamara, to Jim Davis, creator of Garfield, each did a day. Cartoonists are the nicest people I’ve met over the years.” With this turn of events, Harrell needed to ultimately end Big Top in 2007 in order to focus on his recovery and finances. Today, one can enter the Big Top world either with a free membership at gocomics.com or on Amazon.com (Kindle and traditional copies of Big Top are available for purchase). While Harrell settled into a more traditional line of work after his recovery from cancer, he never stopped drawing or writing. Soon, he found himself back in the saddle with the opportunity to write and draw Adam@Home, another Universal Press comic strip that today appears in over 140 newspapers across the globe. This drive and passion ultimately led to Harrell getting his next big break - Monster on the Hill, and the story is best told by Harrell himself (reprinted & abridged with permission from Harrell’s guest blog post on forbiddenplanet.co.uk). A few years ago, I was approached to do a sevenpage piece for an anthology. The anthology was to raise money for cancer research, and as I’d been through my own cancer woes, I jumped at the chance. I was also just curious if it was something I could do. The idea of stretching out and telling a story that didn’t require a punchline every fourth panel sounded great. It also came at a time

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DELTA CHI QUARTERLY

when I was struggling a bit. I was losing the sight in my right eye from the earlier cancer treatments. I had ended [Big Top] due to some health and financial issues, and I’d taken a day job that was less than creatively fulfilling. In a word, I was depressed. So, I ended up doing a story called ‘Melancholia’, about a depressed monster and the doctor that helped him rediscover his mojo. For the character designs, I raided the stacks of sketches I had been doing during down time at my job. I’d been drawing a lot of monsters and birds, for some reason. Maybe because monsters are just fun to draw. The drawings were mostly done in ballpoint pen on the back of agendas for the meetings I was covering. When the anthology fell through, Melancholia sat for a while in a drawer before I was convinced to show it to Top Shelf Productions. Top Shelf had always been my favorite publisher, with its clear focus on great stories. Chris Staros liked what I had, asked if I had ideas for expanding the story and world, and we were off to the races. The idea of a world where every town has its own monster on the hill followed suit, and Melancholia became Monster on the Hill. I really had no idea what I was getting into. After the writing was done and I was ready to start the artwork, I told my wife Amber that she might not see me a lot for the next six months… I finished the art just over two years later. A comic strip is a 50-yard dash. A graphic novel is a marathon.

This was the first sketch of what became Rayburn, who is the main character in “Monster on the Hill”. You can see that he was drawn right over the copy from the agenda. His look evolved a bit over time, but I felt a kinship with him from the start.


Cover Story

monster on the hill In a fantastical 1860s England, every quiet little township is terrorized by a ferocious monster -- much to the townsfolk’s delight! Each town’s unique monster is a source of local pride, not to mention tourism. Each town, that is... except for one. Unfortunately for the people of Stoker-on-Avon, their monster isn’t quite as impressive. In fact, he’s a little down in the dumps. Can the morose Rayburn get a monstrous makeover and become a proper horror? It’s up to the eccentric Dr. Charles Wilkie and plucky street urchin Timothy to get him up to snuff, before a greater threat turns the whole town to kindling. Monsters of all ages are sure to enjoy this tale about life’s challenges, the power of friendship, and creative redemption, packed with epic battles and plenty of wild beasts!

Here’s the first sketch of Tentaculor. In the book, I wanted him to be both intimidating and a bit goofy. So I played up the ‘tuft’ on his head and what are essentially big buck teeth. Buck fangs? I’m not sure why they put that blank page warning on the back of agendas, but they always do.

tentaculor FALL 2013

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Cover Story

FROM IDEA TO STORY

Illustrating “Monster on the Hill”

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I sketched the story out as I wrote it in thumbnails. They were incredibly rough so that I could write quickly. Those roughs were for my eyes only. But here’s one! I would then do a slightly tighter version of the pages before showing them to my editor. I work digitally. I use a Cintiq, and I can’t say enough good things about it. I mentioned losing sight in the right eye. Well, along with that I lost my depth perception, which has made it more difficult to draw with a brush pen the way I was used to. Control-Z is my friend, because if I hit the surface before I think I’m going to, I can undo, undo, undo. (FYI – Cancer free for seven years!)

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I generally scanned my cleaned up roughs and used them to work up an even tighter sketch digitally. Being able to move elements and copy around was invaluable, and my hat is truly off to those who do it the old-fashioned way. Then I’d go in and ink and color on different layers. I know just enough Photoshop to get by, so I don’t have any weird tips. If there is an old-fashioned way to color in Photoshop, that’s what I did.

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DELTA CHI QUARTERLY

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Cover Story When the Quarterly caught up with Rob Harrell, he was just returning from Comic-Con in San Diego, the largest convention for comic books, science fiction/fantasy, and related pop culture art, after a week of promoting his newest graphic novel, Monster on the Hill, and a nationally syndicated comic strip, Adam@Home. How was Comic-Con?

Tell us a bit about your style of including anachronisms in Monster on the Hill.

It was crazy. The crowds were insane. I was at the Top Shelf booth for most of the weekend signing and selling Monster on the Hill books. I also signed autographs at the Go Comics booth for Adam@Home.

I’m just trying to make myself laugh with most of what I write. I get a kick out of having characters [in the 1800s] in a situation where you think they can’t get out of until they pull out their cell phones or something. In Monster on the Hill, there are references to Hot Pockets and a certain blanket with sleeves. Some people think I might have done that unintentionally, but I just find it very funny to put things like that in the story.

How has the reception for Monster on the Hill been thus far? It’s been received very well. Graphic novels are getting more recognition now, and they’re one of the true growth areas in publishing. I’m just so honored by the good reviews so far.

Video games, movies, and internet videos famously feature “Easter eggs” with bonus or hidden content. When you were illustrating Monster on the Hill, did you sneak anything in there?

In your own words, what is Monster on the Hill about? I wanted it to be a fun story, but I also wanted the story to be about overcoming obstacles and depression. The Murk, who is the bad character in the book, was that murky, dark stuff inside all of us. I saw Rayburn as someone who is depressed. So, the story deals with depression in a literal and figurative way. Sometimes I get a bit of a blank look because people think, “I just thought it was a fun story about monsters.” Of course, for Delta Chis there’s a correlation to losing your way and visiting friends you knew years ago to remind you who you really are. After Big Top and my health problems, I did struggle with depression. I did this story as part of my way to work through some of that stuff. I wanted to write something as sort of my journey in the hopes that it would help somebody else, too.

Yes, I did a few things like that. My wife’s name shows up in the background. If you look closely, you’ll find a tip of the hat to Delta Chi hidden in the book. I had fun with the details.

Have you ever gotten writers’ block or been unable to think creatively? How do you work around that? Yeah, I do. Occasionally, I’ll have a day where I just don’t feel like the drawing is working right. But that’s a lot more rare than days where I just feel like I can’t get the writing done. I try to work ahead on writing, especially when I’m feeling it. When you’re working from home, stuff stacks up on your plate, and it just gets hard to be creative. Sometimes you just have to purge all that stuff get the faucet fixed and replace the light bulbs - in order to take care of business.

Do you always work from home or do you find creativity in working in other locations? Thankfully, Austin has a bunch of really cool coffee shops. So a lot of times I’ll write at one of those. There’s just something about the white noise of people being around that distracts the critic part of my brain and makes it easier.

murk

There’s a proverb that goes: “Behind every great man, there’s a great woman.” How does your wife factor into your creative process? My wife is really valuable as a person to run things by. Though, she actually likes to stay a little bit distant from my work until things get into place. I think she doesn’t want to scare me away with a critique or something like that. Once I gain momentum, she’ll get involved with a project and give feedback.

Your career necessitates having many skills. You must be a talented writer, a stand-out illustrator, and passionate about pitching your work in order to secure projects. Which skill or aspect of your career do you find most fulfilling? I think the most fun for me is the writing part of it. When I thought about being a cartoonist, I had always focused on the art. After Big Top ended, I realized I missed the writing so much. So, while writing is probably the most challenging aspect, it’s also the most satisfying to sit down and do.

From your perspective, what are the trends in the publishing industry? Middle grade books for reluctant readers are becoming very popular, such as Diary of a Wimpy Kid. They can’t keep these books on the shelves. Kids read one book and want to read the rest in the series. And parents respond with, “Wow! If my kid wants to read, let’s get him something to read.” These style of books are perfect for comic strip artists because we know how to write stories and also do the artwork. This will actually be my next big project: the first of a three book series of this style. I’m just now finishing my first book - Life of Zarf - and it’s like my dream job - I just love writing it. It will be released Fall 2014 from Dial/Penguin Books.

Do you find inspiration for any of your projects from your Delta Chi experiences? I’m always thinking, in the back of my mind, ‘Who am I trying to make laugh?’, and I look back on Delta Chi and the guys in the Chapter often. When I write, I think to myself, ‘Will this make Travis laugh?’

Looking back at your time at DePauw, what memories do you hold dear? Those were the four best years of my life. I had so much fun. I don’t think there’s any other way to make friendships like I did [in Delta Chi]. I still stay in touch with guys from college and the guys I was in the house with.

This was my first pass at drawing the Murk. By this point, I had a rough idea of the story, so his look was a bit more dictated by what I needed from him as a villain. FALL 2013

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Alumnus Spotlight

DR. JIMMIE J. UNDERWOOD A Lifetime of Service Finding a place to live was the top priority for Jimmie J. Underwood upon arriving in Lawrence in the fall of 1949 to begin his freshman year at Kansas University. Within a few days, Underwood found that place to live. Along with a roof over his head, he also discovered a bond that would last a lifetime. Over the course of his life, Underwood would see the Delta Chi Fraternity grow and develop in to the quality Fraternity known to brothers around the world today. Dr. Jimmie J. Underwood, simply known as “Doc” from his career as a dentist, joined Delta Chi in the fall of 1949. A native of Anthony, Kansas, Doc began his college years without a place to live. When Doc and his father arrived in Lawrence, they were told that no housing was available. After finally securing a room through the Kansas housing office, they learned fraternity pledging was ready to begin. Doc signed up for rush his first night on campus.

“Twenty of us were initiated at one time, in order of our semester grade averages,” Doc said. “Because the chapter had been closed during the war, and had just reopened, we did not have pledge books, songbooks, BRIEFs, or other premise materials – we just winged it.” Decades later, “winging” that initiation would come full circle during Convention. In the four years Doc spent as a member of the Kansas Chapter, he said there was only one person to visit his chapter from Delta Chi Headquarters, and it was a man that would have a profound effect on his life. That man was Marsh White, Penn State ’29, a faculty member on the Kansas campus establishing a chapter for an honorary physics fraternity.

I walked up the hill to the student union, and started the visits to all the fraternities I had listed. I was overjoyed to pledge Delta Chi.

The next morning, Doc found the Delta Chi house, but learned they could not talk to him because he was registered for rush.

Doc said White was impressive and that he had no idea who he was except that he was an older brother from another chapter. Years later, White could still recall how the two first met at Kansas. The only constant contact the chapter had with headquarters while Doc was an undergraduate was receiving the “O.K.” from O.K. Patton, Iowa ’12, regarding financial records. Following graduation from Kansas, Doc went on to four years of dental school and two years served in the United States Air Force in Germany. He then opened his general dental practice in Lawrence. Doc was assigned the job as the Kansas Chapter “BB”, a position he would hold for 15 years. In 1960 he attended his first Convention, in Indianapolis.

That night, Doc received the information he needed, and the following day began a three-day rush period.

At the Indianapolis convention Doc would again cross paths with White, who was to become his mentor and friend.

“I walked up the hill to the Student Union, and started the visits to all the fraternities I had listed,” Doc said. “I was overjoyed to pledge Delta Chi.”

“[White was] the most outstanding Delta Chi who I’ve ever met,” Doc said.

Doc remembers the fraternity house being close to the University, on top of a hill. “I moved in immediately, and didn’t leave it for four years,” Doc said. “I still hate to walk anywhere, especially uphill.” After those four years, Doc continued to live in the bond, dedicating countless hours to Delta Chi. However, keeping close ties with the Fraternity wasn’t something he thought he’d always do.

Doc also had the opportunity to meet Lew Armstrong, Washington ’39, at the 1960 Convention. Armstrong was to be elected “AA” that year and was determined during his time as International President to make sure every chapter and brother was going through Ritual correctly. “He told me that when he was traveling for the Fraternity, one of the shocks was the wide differences in the way the chapters put on the initiation ritual,” Doc said.

In the late 1940s, most fraternities were just beginning to reopen following temporary closures due to World War II.

Doc said Armstrong asked him to bring enough undergraduates to the next Convention in 1962 to demonstrate the Ritual correctly. Doc agreed, and subsequently realized that his own chapter members may actually have needed some assistance with the Ritual themselves.

Doc said his most memorable experience as an undergraduate was his initiation, and it was an initiation that was different from most.

“I had never seen a Ritual other than the one we did at Kansas,” Doc said. “Since I knew the Chapter had lost all of the Ritual material when

“I didn’t have any idea then, but it just grew on me, I guess,” Doc said.

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Kansas ’51

DELTA CHI QUARTERLY


Alumnus Spotlight the Chapter was closed during the war, I made it imperative that [Armstrong] visit our next regional conference,” Doc said. Conveniently that next chapter conference was being held at Kansas. Armstrong attended the conference, becoming the first serving “AA” to visit the chapter since its chartering in 1923. Doc shared that the 1960 Convention also signaled a change in the governance of Delta Chi. At the time, there was a group, known as the “XX,” made up of all the “BB”s from the different chapters that only met during Convention. Delta Chi was beginning a transition from a Board of Directors supported by the “XX” to the Executive Committee of three, supported by eight Regents and an Executive Secretary. Doc said it was recommended to him that William Boyd Prugh, Kansas ’14, be asked to fill the position of Regent. With the position being newly created and with no real description of the job duties, Doc told Prugh it was be similar to being a “BB” to about seven chapters who made up the region at the time. Prugh accepted the position.

significant changes approved within the Fraternity. One of those changes came at the 1954 Convention in Biloxi, Mississippi, when the “white clause” for initiation was eliminated. At the 1970 Convention in Dallas, Doc found White and George Obear, DePauw ’30, having a very early breakfast in the hotel bar. The two men invited Doc to join them. “We became regulars from then on,” Doc said. “We were never disturbed because it was about six in the morning when we had that breakfast.” The two were trying to figure out how to honor Victor T. Johnson, Purdue ’32, who had served as Director, Assistant Treasurer, and President of the Delta Chi Educational Foundation. “Finally, George rolled out a form for the new order to be called the Order of the White Carnation,” Doc said. Doc can still recall when White and Obear presented the idea of the Order of the White Carnation to several brothers and then to the 1975 Convention. Delta Chi had always been short on positions to honor members

in his business and he liked to call on chapters when he was in town,” Doc said. “That’s how the position of Vice Regent evolved.” Gray went on serve as “CC” in 1975, and he was elected “AA” in 1975. “He lived and loved Delta Chi and was probably instrumental in the founding of more chapters than any recent alumnus,” Doc said. “He probably had more to do with the hiring of Raymond Galbreth, Missouri ’69, as the Fraternity’s fourth full-time, paid Executive Director in 1979 than many know.” Doc was later asked by White and Obear to be a part of the Educational Foundation. “They always had the officers of the foundation meet during Convention, and I attended [a foundation meeting], and was elected to the board,” Doc said. “The next year, I was elected President.” It was as the President of the Education Foundation that Doc was able to continue his relationships with Obear and White.

“This Convention was an eye-opener for me,” Doc said. Doc said at that time the position of the “BB” was not being emphasized by the Fraternity very much, resulting in there being very few “BB”s and even fewer at Convention. At the 1962 Convention, Doc was asked to call a meeting of the “XX” and ended up being elected the President of the “XX.”

“Brother[s] White and Obear were both my idea of an ideal Delta Chi,” Doc said. “They were, along with Johnson, truly outstanding gentlemen and brothers.”

“Later that day, before the Convention, [the Executive Committee] adopted the new governance of the Fraternity called the Board of Regents, and they dissolved the ‘XX,’” Doc said.

In 1985, Doc resigned from his position as the “BB” of the Kansas Chapter. After 15 years in the position, he stepped aside, as his son was attending Kansas and would begin his time in Delta Chi.

“I was half-a-day president of the ‘XX,’ the last one,” Doc said. “And it was probably a good thing.”

Doc said he wouldn’t change a thing about his experiences with Delta Chi.

Following the elimination of the “XX,” the Regent system was adopted, the same one still used by the Fraternity today. The 1962 Convention also gave Doc one of his first insights to the financial situation of the Fraternity. This was the first Convention organized by Harold Buchanan, Wisconsin ’35, who was hired in 1961 as the Fraternity’s first full-time, paid Executive Secretary. Buchanan filled Doc in on the financial decisions made by some fraternity leaders. “[The] old-timers had tried to run things on the cheap, with all volunteer help in order to lower the cost to the undergraduates,” Doc said. When Patton was elected “CC” in 1923, he took all the Fraternity records to Iowa City, Iowa, where he was a law professor. The records were ultimately stored in an upstairs room of a building he owned in downtown Iowa City. “Each ‘D’ had to fill out a monthly report and send it to headquarters, where accounting students, hired by Patton, went over them,” Doc said. “[Patton] would then make sure the solvency and the operation of the chapter was okay.” Throughout his time, Doc was also able to see other

who didn’t hold prestigious titles within the Fraternity’s leadership. Doc was thrilled that the first brother to be honored was Johnson. “Vic was a little guy from Purdue, he always hung around at Conventions, and was a nice, quiet little fellow, and he was honored by this Order of the White Carnation,” Doc said. “[It] was designed to honor him, because he had never run for anything, and didn’t yet have a chance to honor him in any other way.” Also at the 1970 Convention, Doc unknowingly began the groundwork for the position known today as Vice Regent. It was at this Convention he first met J. Nick Gray, Missouri ’56. Gray asked Doc if he could volunteer for any job to be done. Doc had just been appointed to complete a term as Regent. In order to do the job adequately, Doc believed that he would need some help. Doc asked the Board of Regents to allow him to have a Vice Regent. “Gray traveled over most of the territory of the region

“I was happy to be involved and happy to have been given opportunities to serve,” Doc said. During his decades thus far under the roof of Delta Chi, Doc has served as “BB,” Regent, Vice-Regent, and President of the Educational Foundation. He is a “BB” Emeritus and a member of the Order of the White Carnation. Doc’s trip to Pittsburgh in 2012 marked his 25th Convention, the highest current attendance of any living member. Marc Stempka constructed this Alumnus Spotlight from interviews previously recorded with Underwood several years ago. Stempka joined Delta Chi during the spring 2007 semester and served as “C” for two years. He joined the Publications Committee at the 2012 Convention in Pittsburgh. He resides in Ebensburg, Pennsylvania and serves as the Assignment Editor for WJAC-TV in Johnstown, Pennsylvania.

Written by: Marc Stempka “C”, California University of PA ’07 Publications Committee

FALL 2013

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Phil Yang

New Founder Profile: Phil Yang When the Founders were creating Delta Chi in upstate New York, they did so with the belief that “great advantages are to be derived from a brotherhood of college and university men.” A century later, Phil Yang, Abracadabra ’80, is proof of the Founders’ vision played out over the course of a lifetime. Yang has been generous with both his time, even while living in Asia, and his financial resources. He became the Fraternity’s fifth New Founder less than twenty years after graduating from the University of California, Berkeley, a distinction given to brothers with donations totaling at least $100,000. “As I have not been able to give more time, being on another continent, I have chosen to provide a measure of financial support to the Education Foundation. This is far less noble than those who have given hours upon hours so my decision was probably more driven by guilt than anything else. Also, I wanted to follow the footstep of Gene Johnson, Oklahoma State ’58, a great friend of Region II, of my chapter, as he lived in near-by Stockton, and of mine.” Yang said. “Trite as it may sound, I have received much from my Delta Chi experience, it only seems fitting to say thanks in this way. I am humbled by those who balance family and career demands as well as that of the Fraternity.”

In looking at his life in Delta Chi, Yang views his journey in three stages, analogous with banking. In the first stage – making deposits – time invested as chapter officer and alumni advisor are like deposits. The second stage – interest accrual – brotherhood continues to expand and deepen. The third stage – annuity payments – friendships forged over the past 35 years are continuously being enjoyed. “In retirement now, I am reconnecting with those from my chapter over ten years of membership and alumni involvement to 1990, the year I moved to Asia,” Phil said. The short period as alumni advisor

DELTA CHI QUARTERLY

The lengthy association also gave Yang the opportunity to extend beyond his own chapter, attending regional conferences and international conventions, which he has notched more than a dozen. Through job assignments away from Berkeley, he fondly recalls those in the Minnesota Chapter, the short-lived San Francisco Colony and the Connecticut Chapter. “As those groups welcomed me, I want to tip my hat to brothers from others chapters who spent time advising my own chapter, namely Paul Picciani, Connecticut ’89 and Rod Batongbacal, Hayward ’00. I am glad they also found advisory work fulfilling, though sometimes frustrating.”

Phil Yang

Many might wonder the origin of Abracadabra, as it is the first one off the list of chapters and only one not bearing a college name. During the early 1960s the Abracadabra Fraternity local, whose alumni included Robert Gordon Sproul of Berkeley’s famed Sproul Plaza and Sproul Hall, merged with the California Chapter of Delta Chi; hence, two proud traditions became one.

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was particularly rewarding as Phil remembers that they had excellent undergraduate members in the 1980’s. In a recent trip to California, Phil reconnected with Walt Brown, Cal Walters, Chris Hornbeck, Herb Venegas, and renewed email contact with Rob Main, Bob, Nevin, Steve Westberg, Matt Wertheim, and Dave Roberts. “Of course, I am in touch with many in my era, the ‘founding fathers’ of 1978, not to mention others through Facebook and LinkedIn.”

Recalling a rich and rewarding Delta Chi experience, Yang’s only regret was not having had the Leadership Consultant experience. “Ray Galbreth asked me to apply in 1980 but I opted to go directly to graduate school, knowing that if I had too much fun, flunking grad school afterwards was a real possibility. The Leadership Consultant role would have provided many life-enriching experiences and character building opportunities.”

Yang further commented, “Corporations place a premium on leadership development and reward those who later serve as mentors to young managers. The fraternity model, by design or not, has an inbuilt mechanism to do just that. The inclination to be an advisor may come at any stage. In some ways, it is like a religious experience, some have it and others do not. But, if it feels right, just ‘answer the calling’. For many, once the work and life balance is achieved and career is near auto-pilot, taking your skill set to the undergraduates is a win-win. I personally believe brothers in their mid 30s and beyond are most able to lend a helping hand. While many have involved themselves much earlier, I would just caution against burn out, so pace yourself and let your Delta Chi experience Written by: Aaron Otto “DD”, Kansas State ’98 be a sustained one!” Publications Committee


Delta Chi Thanks Its Donors

2012-13

Please join the loyal members of Delta Chi below who have stood up to be counted during the past year with gifts to either our Foundation or our Fraternity.

DELTA CHI LOYAL DONORS $15,000-24,999

Patrick J. Alderdice, Ball State ’92 Kirk S. Price, Embry-Riddle ’71 John S. Ziegler, Jr., Louisiana Tech ’01 Joel F. Plotkin, Maryland ’89

Jamie L. Mahne, Mississippi State ’96 Raymond D. Galbreth, Sr., Missouri ’69 Andrew R. Haggerty, New Mexico State ’03 Monte L. Johnson, Ohio State ’69 John M. Shelby, Sacramento ’86 Brad Cole, Southern Illinois ’93 Howard S. Baulch, S.M.U. ’76 Francis R. Bradley, Texas ’89 Christopher S. Kopech, Texas ’05 Bobby L. Dewrell, Troy State ’95 G. R. Steven Sparling, Western Michigan ’88

$5,000-9,999

$500-999

Lee P. Berlin, Cornell ’58 David K. Weber, Cornell ’68 Steven R. Michels, Marquette ’87 Patrick F. Weber, Oklahoma ’87

$10,000-14,999

Michael L. Carroll, Auburn ’71 James M. Marascio, Bryant ’93 John L. Mica, Florida ’67 Charles J. Foretich, Mississippi State ’86 Robert D. Hendershot, Purdue ’72 Rod Arnold, Texas A&M ’88

$2,500-4,999 Kenneth J. Sousa, Bryant Faculty John G. Tunila, Connecticut ’81 Edward Fusco, Embry-Riddle ’73 J. Donald Turk, Florida ’68 Miles C. Washburn, Massachusetts ’87 Andrew L. Dooley, Mississippi State ’98 John W. Hatmaker, Mississippi State ’79 Michael J. Moriarty, Oshkosh ’71 Donald E. LaPlante, Southern California

$1,000-2,499 Frederick H. Connell, Alabama ’65 Joseph E. Moye, Appalachian State ’98 Jonathan K. Sattler, Appalachian State ’87 Stephen W. Smith, Arizona ’66 Chad M. Wolett, Arizona State ’94 Eric L. Kerstetter, Auburn ’00 Richard W. Maizel, Cornell ’68 Roy R. Payne, Jr., Cornell ’52 David C. Cloutier, Embry-Riddle ’92 John K. Corson, Embry-Riddle ’91 Patrick J. Phelan, Embry-Riddle ’72 John G. Schanner, Embry-Riddle ’95 Michael V. Geary, Florida ’90 Ronald G. Stowers, Florida State ’81 Brian D. Blankenship, Georgia Tech ’98 Lyle E. Sprinkle, Georgia Tech ’96 David J. Entzminger, Idaho ’76 Jeffrey W. Long, Illinois ’74 Zane B. Smith, Iowa ’66 Boyd Wayne Boehlje, Iowa State ’61 L. Elliot Shubert, Kansas City ’66 Aaron A. Otto, Kansas State ’98 Neil E. Tucker, Kansas State ’73 W. Dean Wilkerson, Louisiana Tech ’92 Brian P. LoCicero, Marquette ’88 William A. Dittmore, Michigan State ’65 Gregory F. Hauser, Michigan State ’75 Mitchell M. Asmar, Jr., Mississippi State ’73 Deryl R. Baker, Jr., Mississippi State ’01 David S. Carpenter, Mississippi State ’92 Phillip J. Carroll, Mississippi State ’00 Roger C. Clapp Jr, Mississippi State ’89 William L. Henley, Mississippi State ’92 Robert W. Manuel, Mississippi State ’98 Michael E. O’Brien, Jr., Mississippi State ’02 William R. Snapp, Mississippi State ’98

Paul W. Reisz, Abracadabra ’82 Reed Davis, Appalachian State ’02 Edward A. Soens, Arizona ’58 Charles O. Geerhart, Cornell ’81 Kenneth R. Reeder, Denison ’74 Douglas A. Chananie, East Carolina ’07 Roman D. Hluszczyk, Embry-Riddle ’99 Waldemar D. Tiedemann, Embry-Riddle ’77 Daniel A. Mica, Florida Alumnus Armand Mouw, Florida ’49 Keith R. Shriver, Florida ’79 William A. Williams, Gannon ’83 Michael K. Boudreau, Georgia Tech ’93 Stephen W. Wicks, Georgia Tech ’01 Thomas L. Carroll, Hayward ’98 Brad Grambo, Idaho ’85 Raymond F. Borelli, Illinois ’58 Richard S. Marsho, Illinois ’62 Edward F. McCallum, Kansas ’56 Stephen T. Stazel, Kansas ’63 Jimmie J. Underwood, Kansas ’51 Bruce A. Adams, LSU ’07 Stephen D. Henson, Louisiana Tech Faculty James A. Bannan, Michigan State ’66 William C. Paye, Michigan State ’80 John M Hairston, Mississippi State ’87 Matthew D. Kreider, Mississippi State ’00 Andrew M. Lancaster, Mississippi State ’97 Ryan E. VanBuren, Mississippi State ’96 Earl F. Westmoreland, Mississippi State ’73 Travis J. Covey, New Mexico State ’03 Scott T. Klinefelter, Northern Iowa ’76 Jeffrey L. Welles, Ohio State ’75 Paul E. Braun, Oklahoma ’59 Steven L. Henslee, Oklahoma State ’75 Anthony C. Moreno, Oklahoma State ’88 Alan P. Niemann, Oklahoma State ’82 Mark A. Fifer, South Florida ’09 John H. Schulte, Southeast Missouri ’80 Allen P. Iftiger, Southern California ’90 Ratheen C. Damle, Texas ’01 Jarret T. Kwiatek, Texas ’00 Scott S. Gibson, Washington ’82 Kevin A. Vought, Western Michigan ’96

$250-499 Andrew Serpa, Abracadabra ’13 Jeffrey B. Clemons, Alabama ’05 Stantley Williams, Alabama ’60 Gregory Y. Otten, American ’96 Charlie Hong, Arizona ’95 Sterling W. Stopkey, Arizona State ’13 Jason M. Walker, Arizona State ’00 R. Douglas Meckes, Auburn ’71 Marcus G. Monk, Auburn ’65 Derek S. Roh, Auburn ’94

Richard N. McKaig, Ball State ’66 Corey M. Stemm, Bowling Green ’12 Michael S. Casinelli, Bryant ’13 Kevin M. Emery, California Univ-PA ’99 Eric R. Woolfitt, Cal Poly ’03 Ritchie S. Phan, Case Western Reserve ’13 Christian A. Wargo, Case Western Reserve ’13 Joseph R. Betro, II, Central Michigan ’13 Ben A. Zelazny, Chico ’92 Nathan D. Steinberg, Colorado State ’05 Mark Fitzgerald, Connecticut ’79 James M. Garvey, Connecticut ’84 Dennis J. Maroney, Connecticut ’89 Kabir S. Sikand, Davis ’13 David M. Warner, Duquesne ’05 Jordan W. Cork, East Carolina ’06 Daniel Loftus, Eastern Illinois ’90 Jacob Swanson, Eastern Illinois ’13 Matthew T. Barnes, Embry-Riddle ’95 Doyle E. Cooper, Embry-Riddle ’95 Brian R. Harless, Embry-Riddle ’98 Jeffrey S. Hornyak, Embry-Riddle ’90 Bill Tallman, Embry-Riddle ’95 Eric J. Broadie, Florida ’99 Andrew F. Giacini, Florida ’15 Jesse E. Goodrich, Florida ’13 Frederick W. Leonhardt, Florida ’71 Robert W. Thrailkill, Florida ’74 Chris Riley, Florida State ’10 Ethan S. Rives, Florida State ’12 Michael K. Morrissey, Fullerton ’82 Rittik Guha, George Mason ’13 Zachary S. Elliott, Georgia Tech ’99 Michael E. Graff, Georgia Tech ’01 Eric W. Southard, Georgia Tech ’07 David M. Stopp, Georgia Tech ’01 Sean W. Conrad, Gorham State ’97 Steven T. Weir, Gorham State ’75 Todd J. Bryan, Hayward ’02 Jeffrey M. Rakestraw, Huntsville ’92 Christopher M. Kilroy, Huntsville ’99 Ronald D. Clayton, Illinois ’54 Roy A Cowell, Illinois ’79 Craig B. Crawford, Illinois ’97 Daniel W. Di Santo, Illinois ’04 Kevin J. Kell, Illinois ’73 Christopher W. Leibman, Illinois ’96 Joseph M. Toolis, Illinois ’05 Robert A. Wilson, Illinois ’58 John D. Dorner, Illinois State ’91 Marquez L. Brown, Iowa ’01 Mark D. Stephany, Iowa ’02 David F. Hale, Jacksonville State ’70 James F. Storey, Jacksonville State ’63 Robert F. Klein, Johnstown ’74 Kevin J. Beardsley, Kettering-B ’01 Nathaniel J. Dumm, Lehigh ’13 William A. Glaser, Lehigh Alumnus Donald E. Hill, Lehigh ’63 Kenneth L. Shepard, Long Beach ’77 Kevin Haslauer, Louisiana Tech ’13 Kevin H. Simmons, Louisiana Tech ’87 Quinn E. Eddins, Marquette ’94 Brandon L. Krugman, Marquette ’03 Philip Schweiger, Massachusetts ’13 Douglas O. McLemore, Miami ’69 Gavin M. Ryan, Miami ’82 Tim Curran, Michigan ’13 David G. Falconer, Michigan ’62

Jeffrey A. Schoenherr, Michigan ’91 Thomas S. Horowitz, Michigan State ’87 Daniel G. Pilling, Michigan State ’84 Craighton T. Boates, Minnesota ’96 Timothy Bohl, Minnesota ’12 David M. Tuomala, Minnesota ’90 Casey W. Berner, Missouri ’13 Justin Bays, Missouri State ’12 Scott H. Leigh, Missouri State ’90 Stanley W. Fletchall, Missouri Western ’76 Theodore A. Pilas, Montclair ’96 James H. Foley, New Haven ’13 Ronald J. Martin, New Haven ’87 Father Anthony Vinson, Northwest Missouri ’98 Paul W. Bohlman, Ohio State ’70 Albert H. Leyerle, Ohio State ’54 Fred C. Stalder, Oklahoma ’42 William R Bland, Oklahoma State ’79 Robert G. Cass, Oklahoma State ’84 W. Jerry Perkins, Oklahoma State ’68 Michael C. Horn, Oshkosh ’68 Maurice J. Keesey, Parsons ’68 Kenneth L. Medina, Penn State ’87 John F. Spangler, Penn State ’58 John C. Hedderich, Purdue ’60 Joshua D. Chapman, Radford ’13 David C. Cote, Riverside ’13 Paul A. Cox, Sacramento ’87 Christopher J. Douville, Sacramento ’86 Hans Acquistapace, Spring Hill ’13 Mark E. Brink Jr., Spring Hill ’13 Daniel P. Roberts, South Dakota State ’12 Anthony P. Sutton, South Dakota State ’12 August J. Koebbe, Southeast Missouri ’78 Peter Gegick, Syracuse ’12 Robert E. Anderson, Texas ’68 John P. White, Texas Tech Faculty Robert K. Edds, Tri-State ’72 Derrick S. Gray, Tri-State ’13 Brandon C. Nothnagel, Tri-State ’12 Marcus R. Mann, Troy State ’05 Joseph C. Pickett, Troy State ’66 Mick Dean, Truman State ’08 Bobby Cockerille, Virginia Commonwealth ’13 Brian McCann, Virginia Commonwealth ’13 Robert P. LaBouy, Washington ’66 Michael E. Majestic, Washington State ’90 Hiroshi Itoh, Wayne State ’61 Richard K. LaGore, Western Michigan ’64 William F. Yull, Whitewater ’82

$100-249 Steven G. LaVoie, Abracadabra ’82 Arthur B. McIntyre, Abracadabra ’51 Larry S. Tessler, Abracadabra ’60 Luther C. Joyner III, Appalachian State ’11 D. Glenn Baird, Arizona ’75 Paul Dean Horn, Arizona ’64 Douglas Payne Todd, Arizona State ’51 Miles E. Barnett, Auburn ’56 E. Bryant Crutchfield, Auburn ’59 Dennis E. Stephens, Auburn ’62 Richard B. Webb, Auburn ’65 K. Dale Wingo, Auburn ’59 Dennis A. Ault, Ball State ’72 Robert K. Poyer, Ball State ’73 Berardino J. DiBernardi, California Univ-PA ’76 Gary W. Caulkins, Cal Poly ’68 Robert B. Bennett, Central Michigan ’90

FALL 2013

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Delta Chi Thanks Its Donors Jason N. Butler, Central Missouri ’99 Brian E. Capps, Central Missouri ’78 Steven W. Cornwall, Central Missouri ’86 Raymond K. Grindel, Central Missouri ’01 Rodney A. Prall, Central Missouri ’84 Charles D. Rutt, Central Missouri ’79 Mark P. Herberger, Chico ’95 John M. Mauro, Chico ’94 Christopher J. Diak, Clemson ’94 David M. Steinberg, Clemson ’92 John R. Adamec, Coastal Carolina ’06 Jeffrey I. Lewis, Connecticut ’83 John R. Byers, Cornell ’54 William V. Eaton, Cornell Alumnus Donald T. Farley, Cornell ’55 Donald F. Kruse, Cornell ’52 Eugene J. Leone, Cornell ’79 William M. Thompson, Cornell ’91 Michael J. Cripe, DePauw ’63 David R. Dent, DePauw ’63 Donald H. Driemeier, DePauw ’60 T. Lyle Harlor, DePauw ’48 Richard A. Lutes, DePauw ’72 Edward G. Schussler, DePauw ’65 Andrew P. Wachter, Duquesne ’00 Gary M. Dean, Eastern Illinois ’74 Kenneth J. Winter, Eastern Illinois ’75 Anthony M. Adessa, Embry-Riddle ’83 Matthew T. Dorney, Embry-Riddle ’97 James P. Hunter, Embry-Riddle ’75 Ivan L. Lind, Embry-Riddle ’73 Dennis L. Miendersma, Embry-Riddle ’72 Edward Pascavage, Embry-Riddle ’96 Michael G. Saez, Embry-Riddle ’96 Nathaniel K. Smith, Embry-Riddle ’01 Paul G. White, Embry-Riddle ’78 Richard B. DeGraff, Florida ’71 William F. Merlin, Florida ’80 Christopher P. Marois, Florida ’88 William Alan Pinto, Florida ’69 Charles A. Mancuso, Florida State ’84 Brian J. Oettinger, Frostburg ’98 James T. Garrett, Fullerton ’68 Thomas E. Edmunds, Georgia ’78 William L. Thomas, Georgia Southern ’87 Russell K. Williams, Georgia Southern ’05 S. Weslee Knapp, Georgia Tech ’98 Scott A. Goodwin, Gorham State ’88 Stephen C. Johansen, Hobart ’64 Michael S. Burney, Idaho ’70 Fred L. Jessup, Idaho ’05 David M. Moore, Idaho ’68 John F. Tate, Idaho ’64 Douglas R. Berg, Illinois ’83 Jeffrey A. Bond, Illinois ’97 Kenneth A. Buel, Illinois ’57 Lynn Richard Dueser, Illinois ’63 Matthew S. Ehrhart, Illinois ’83 Peter J Froehlich, Illinois ’80 Frank C. Hinds, Illinois Faculty Henry R. Hosman, Illinois ’59 John A. Lindemann, Illinois ’50 Mark J. Luginbill, Illinois ’74 Raymond W. Luken, Illinois ’50 J. Bradley Sargent, Illinois ’83 Daniel W. Snyder, Illinois ’50 Stephen E Thiems, Illinois ’65 Frank K. Voris, Illinois ’61 J. Jeffrey Broderick, Illinois State ’81 William E. King, Illinois State ’82 Steven F. Levin, Illinois State ’85 Dennis E Wiese, Illinois State ’94 Dennis K. Cuffel, Indiana ’86 John Miller Galvin, Indiana ’54 Gregory E. Lindsay, Indiana ’70 Matthew H. Paine, Indiana ’97 L. Eugene Tanner, Indiana ’55 Kenneth A. Bergman, Iowa ’51 Thomas W. Halupnik, Iowa ’70

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DELTA CHI QUARTERLY

Andrew J Hargitt, Iowa ’83 Joseph M. Kolar, Iowa ’85 Mark A. Law, Iowa ’97 Tom A. Rockwell, Iowa ’81 Robin D. Shoop, Iowa ’60 Nathan T. Bibus, Iowa State ’97 Richard H. Buchanan, Iowa State ’58 C. Larry Carmichael, Iowa State ’58 Robert J. Cochran, Iowa State ’63 Gregory W. Fletcher, Iowa ’78 George L. Hopkins, Iowa State ’61 Marc Alan Nichols, Iowa State ’68 Scott A. Schaefer, Iowa State ’85 Sidney L. Soldwish, Iowa State ’65 Jan P. Shoemaker, Iowa State ’67 Benjamin C. Wold, Iowa State ’66 Alan H. Brightman, Kansas ’67 Richard E. Nelson, Kansas ’71 Don A. Seufert, Kansas ’74 Keith R. Cryderman, Kansas State ’63 Matthew Doland Clark, Kennesaw ’12 Steven P. Bossart, Kent State ’90 John P. Larger, Kent State ’04 Ralph O. Wilson, Kentucky ’51 Paul J. Phillips, Kettering-A ’03 Dustin G. Wiess, Kettering-A ’06 Rene C. Owczarski, Kettering-B ’02 J. Dixon Earley, Lehigh ’63 Paul J. Prutzman, Lehigh ’66 Alex Umanetz, Lehigh ’53 Alvaro J. Castillo, Long Beach ’97 Edward A. Loseman, Long Beach ’72 Grant T. Herrin, LSU ’07 Charles A. Cheatham, Louisiana Tech ’88 Keith B. Snook, Louisiana Tech ’96 C. Edward Beavers, Louisville ’85 Thomas M. Farrelly, Marquette ’87 Thomas E. Nelson, Marquette Alumnus Daniel J. McTague, Massachusetts Alumnus Jon P. Bachelder, Miami ’64 Ronald F. Hacker, Miami ’63 John V. Marstrell, Miami ’42 Norman K. Womer, Miami ’66 H. Keith Hellems, Michigan ’62 John W. Holmes, Michigan ’65 Chris D. Jensen, Michigan ’95 Herbert E. Koenig, Michigan ’63 James G. McComb, Michigan ’61 Kenneth J. Moll, Michigan ’98 Henry F. Winchester, Michigan ’51 Stephen C. Cagle, Michigan State ’82 Joseph J. Chai, Michigan State ’82 Charles A. Champ, Michigan State ’54 George I. Chesley, Michigan State ’64 Howard O. Emorey, Michigan State ’51 James V. Ferrara, Michigan State ’81 Timothy J. Hansel, Michigan State ’80 R. Peers Henes, Michigan State ’79 James W. Holman, Michigan State ’82 John R. Jaeger, Michigan State ’84 Stuart P. Jeffares, Michigan State ’84 Paul E. Lindow, Michigan State ’84 Andrew N. MacDonald, Michigan State ’80 Alan D. Marasco, Michigan State ’82 Thomas A. McLelland, Michigan State ’79 John P. Milliken, Michigan State ’83 Thomas O. Monroe, Michigan State ’47 James R. Novitsky, Michigan State ’80 Perry A. Pappas, Michigan State ’83 Terry R. Rombalski, Michigan State ’82 Michael K. Sheehy, Michigan State ’82 Thomas A. Sprenger, Michigan State ’83 Claesen D. Wyckoff, Michigan State ’69 Stephen M. Desens, Minnesota ’70 David T. Warford, Minnesota ’65 Stephen E. Behr, Mississippi State ’73 Michael T. Corlew, Mississippi State ’73 Gerald D. Denton, Mississippi State ’86 Bobby Joe Johnson, Mississippi State ’63

Ernest A. Poppers, Missouri ’67 James P. Sheahan, Missouri ’79 Alec R. Lee, Missouri State ’05 Herbert W. Norton, Montevallo ’82 Michael E. Regan, New Haven ’83 Thomas F. Viola, New Haven ’82 Jason E. Sisk, New Mexico State ’03 Jonathan D. Moore, North Carolina State ’90 Drew M. Reavis, North Carolina State ’95 Steven R. Ackerson, Northern Iowa ’76 Steven L. Adams, Northern Iowa ’81 David S. Conklin, Northwest Missouri ’88 William E. Mattinson, Ohio State ’54 John R. Miller, Ohio State ’50 William K. Peairs, Ohio State ’72 Michael D. Vickrey, Oklahoma ’88 Leslie J. Davidson, Oklahoma State ’66 Connie N. Fisher, Oklahoma State ’55 Michael C. Johnston, Oklahoma State ’78 William C. Miller, Oklahoma State ’77 E. Michael Stanford, Oklahoma State ’70 Jon D. Wertz, Oklahoma State ’76 William C. Kallander, Old Dominion ’96 Donald E. Enright, Oregon State ’65 Mark E. Landstrom, Oregon State ’83 John T. Wintler, Oregon State ’44 Peter Shaw Johnson, Oshkosh ’74 Daniel M. Karnuta, Penn State ’85 William E. Reimer, Penn State ’45 Michael D. Rimer, Penn State ’86 Charles N. Teyssier, Penn State ’55 Samuel A. Thornton, Penn State ’66 John R. Whitaker, Penn State ’48 William P. Hedderich, Purdue ’57 Richard J. Studer, Purdue ’56 Stephen J. Walker, Purdue ’63 Arthur K. Warlow, Purdue ’71 James Palmer Welch, Purdue ’51 Joseph A. Friedman, Rollins ’49 Ralph L. Pernice, Rollins ’52 Michael L. Mitchell, Sacramento ’95 Joel H. Bryden, San Diego ’79 Mark Alexander Arroyo, South Florida ’09 Tod A. Anton, Southern California ’51 David D. Awrey, Southern California ’78 Richard A. Eimers, Southern California ’66 Harry Parl Holman, Southern California ’57 Terence P. Kahn, Southern California ’65 B. Robert Malouf, Southern California ’71 Dan Michael Fox, Southern Illinois ’69 Charles P. Rahe, Southern Illinois ’65 Phillip A. Ruppel, Southern Illinois ’65 Carl Richard Benson, S.M.U. ’60 John C. Garvey, S.M.U. ’63 William John Mork, S.M.U. ’65 Lloyd W. Aubry, Stanford ’48 John William Battles, Stephen F. Austin ’08 Jeremy B. Coullard, Syracuse ’69 James F. Crawford, Syracuse ’69 Roger E. Abernathy, Texas ’50 Jonathan D. Wilson, Texas State ’05 Chris Woodruff-Jackson, Texas Tech ’94 Michael J. Gitzendanner, Tri-State ’99 Richard R. Kruger, Tri-State Faculty Eric J. Nixon, Tri-State ’13 Trent J. Unterbrink, Tri-State ’98 Phil Busick, Truman State ’10 Larry K. Nothnagel, Truman State ’79 Wayne H. Potter, Truman State ’91 Ronald L. Adolphi, Washington ’68 Albert B. Becker, Washington ’64 Donn Anton Bodine, Washington ’55 Frank S. Dean, Washington ’58 Bruce H. Hoeger, Washington ’72 James A. Anderson, Washington State Alumnus Richard F. Suhrheinrich, Wayne State ’58 Kevin B. Pitchford, West Virginia Tech ’86 Michael E. Roos, West Virginia Tech ’96 Ronald Wayne Phillips, II, Western Carolina ’94

John J. Sampanes, Western Michigan ’64 Steven M. Yager, Western Michigan ’03 Andrew W. Johnson, Whitewater ’14 Piero Fioravanti, Whitewater ’92 Paul C Hoeffer, Wisconsin ’90 Anthony R. D’Ambrosio, Youngstown ’70

$50-99 Richard F. Curtin, Abracadabra ’60 Lawrence R. Poundstone, Abracadabra ’34 Mark V. Raynard, Abracadabra ’79 Charles E. Carlin, Alabama ’57 John H. McPherson, Jr., Appalachian State ’91 Allan Eisenwinter, Arizona ’59 Bruce R. Seligman, Arizona ’65 Donald E. Womack, Arizona ’50 Albert J. Catroppa, Arizona State ’55 Alan F. Drinkard, Auburn ’71 Timothy E. Fitzsimmons, Auburn ’80 Cary F. Poole, Auburn ’80 David C. Schulz, Auburn ’60 Joel R. Smith, Auburn ’53 Charles M. East, Augusta ’01 Andrew T. Kelley, California Univ-PA ’95 Marcin A. Citak, Case Western Reserve ’11 John C. Rivers, Clemson Alumnus Ronald Paul Bugbee, Connecticut ’66 Albert A Coppola, Connecticut ’55 Jon L. Norris, Connecticut ’63 Ronald T. Topping, Connecticut ’58 Gregory Henry Baum, Cornell ’69 Frederick J. Klemeyer, Cornell ’67 Richard C. Oppelt, Cornell ’75 Karl G. Anderson, DePauw ’51 David M. Dickens, DePauw ’87 George T. Dodd, DePauw ’59 Richard W. Moore, DePauw ’58 Jerry D. Pontius, DePauw ’56 Jason D. Frampton, Duquesne ’05 Robert D. Telep, Embry-Riddle ’97 Russell H. Driscoll, Florida ’57 Daniel Thompson, Florida ’10 Joseph J. DeFazio, Fredonia ’92 Michael Lee Greedy, Fullerton ’67 David A. Sed, Gannon ’74 Travis Victor Greene, Georgia Southern ’10 Sean F. Kilfoil, Gorham State ’87 Gary Jon Deys, Hobart ’66 Brian D. Godsy, Huntsville ’81 James E. Friestad, Illinois ’78 Glenn J. Guth, Illinois ’73 Donald J. Ward, Illinois ’73 Eugene D. Juba, Lehigh ’54 Richard C. Reilly, Lehigh ’67 Smith D. Boyd, Livingston ’74 Darrell E. Morgan, Livingston ’92 Robert U. Martin, Long Beach ’69 Richard A. Olsson, Long Beach ’75 David R. Rojas, Long Beach ’71 Glenn A. Weiss, LSU ’84 Malcolm W. Robertson, Louisville ’92 William P. Bunyan, Kansas ’61 John Ray Perry, Kansas City ’57 Craig A. Wignall, Kansas City ’73 Michael Cusack, Massachusetts ’74 Capt. Ronald F. Ball, Miami ’59 Vernon F. Beyer, Miami ’59 Wayne H Ruihley, Miami ’50 D. Dick De Line, Michigan ’50 Harold M. Gibbons, Michigan ’50 Donald W. Shaffer, Michigan ’53 Barry Charles Wood, Michigan ’61 Michael H. Agnello, Michigan State ’81 Ronald C. Baughman, Michigan State ’67 William J. Blaha, Michigan State ’81 Marvin E. Howell, Michigan State ’51 Myron E. Ranney, Michigan State ’56 Joseph E. Roe, Michigan State ’85 Rudolph H. Stuppnig, Michigan State ’55


Delta Chi Thanks Its Donors Richard H. Zimmerman, Michigan State ’56 Barry A. Umbs, Milwaukee ’70 Kenneth C. Crandall, Minnesota ’71 Clark H. Cummins, Minnesota ’56 Joseph L. Bevirt, Missouri ’53 Kenneth E. Dover, Missouri ’80 Armin A. Kuhlman, Missouri ’67 Scott B. Stotlemeyer, Missouri ’90 Thomas E. Thornton, Missouri ’52 Jeffrey B. Field, New Mexico State ’00 Frank A. Ascoli, Northeastern ’72 Jay B. Meacham, Northwest Missouri ’87 Navy F. Banvard, Ohio State ’80 Brian E. Code, Ohio State ’80 Maj. Lowren A. Bock, Ohio State ’55 Russell E. Geiger, Ohio State ’47 Hal L. Hefner, Oklahoma ’49 Ross A. Gregson, Oklahoma State ’76 Eric M Anderson, Old Dominion ’98 Jeremiah J. Bishop, Oregon State ’99 Dale J. Neuman, Oregon State ’66 Dean C. Werst, Oregon State ’62 Thomas M. Holden, Osgoode Hall ’50 Robert L. McBride, Parsons ’68 George C. Kelchner, Penn State ’64 Bruce N. Kriebel, Penn State ’67 Michael A. Stollmeyer, Penn State ’59 James T. Reilly, Purdue ’76 Patrick M. Bell, Rutgers ’08 James L Gollaher, San Diego ’91 Larry D. Smith, San Diego ’75 Robert L. Knox, Southern California ’62 John Samore, Southern California ’94 Charles F. Dykhouse, Southern Illinois ’57 Adlai A. Hurt, Syracuse ’04 P. Russell Day, Texas ’50 Frank L. Spittle, Texas Western ’65 Shane R. Demitruk, Tri-State ’99 Charles P. Durante, Tri-State ’73 Donald L. Stripling, Tri-State ’70 Bertram F. Kelly, Troy State ’89 Matthew Morehead, Troy State ’16 John W. Daniel, Truman State ’86 Michael E. Leech, Truman State Alumnus W. Towne Collins, Washington ’60 Eric Edward Thoreson, Washington ’65 Henry T. Nazdrowicz, Youngstown ’73

LIFE TO DATE New Founders $100,000+ James D. Dodson, Oklahoma ’58 Robert D. Hendershot, Purdue ’72 Steven R. Michels, Marquette ’87 Roy R. Payne, Jr., Cornell ’52 Miles C. Washburn, Massachusetts ’87 David K. Weber, Cornell ’68 Patrick F. Weber, Oklahoma ’87 Phil Yang, Abracadabra ’80

Knight Errant $75,000+ Michael L. Carroll, Auburn ’71

Martlet Club $50,000+ Lee P. Berlin, Cornell ’58 Timothy A Crown, Kansas ’86 Gregory A. Heckman, Illinois ’84 Jon Mellen, Idaho ’60

Hand and Key Club $35,000+ John Lars Elfervig, Louisiana Tech Alumnus John L. Mica, Florida ’67 Marcus G. Monk, Auburn ’65 John S. Ziegler, Jr., Louisiana Tech ’01

Order of The Scimitar $25,000+ Paul W. Bohlman, Ohio State ’70 Raymond F. Borelli, Illinois ’58 Edward Fusco, Embry-Riddle ’73 Gregory F. Hauser, Michigan State ’75 Forrest E. Hoglund, Kansas ’56 Kirk S. Price, Embry-Riddle ’71 Donald K Thorp, Illinois ’85 John G. Tunila, Connecticut ’81 W. Dean Wilkerson, Louisiana Tech ’92 Steven S. Wymer, Illinois ’85

Leges Club $15,000+ Patrick J. Alderdice, Ball State ’92 Rod Arnold, Texas A&M ’88 Francis R. Bradley, Texas ’89 Donald T. Farley, Cornell ’55 Raymond D. Galbreth, Sr., Missouri ’69 Monte L. Johnson, Ohio State ’69 Donald E. LaPlante, Southern California Charles A. Mancuso, Florida State ’84 James M. Marascio, Bryant ’93 Michael J. Moriarty, Oshkosh ’71 Michael J. Moskos, DePauw ’85 Aaron A. Otto, Kansas State ’98 Barry J. Peters, Western Michigan ’89 Patrick J. Phelan, Embry-Riddle ’72 Joel F. Plotkin, Maryland ’89 Jonathan K. Sattler, Appalachian State ’87 Marc A. Solondz, Indiana ’87 Kenneth J. Sousa, Bryant Faculty G. R. Steven Sparling, Western Michigan ’88 Norman E. Strasma, DePauw ’55 Robert A. Wilson, Illinois ’58 Chad M. Wolett, Arizona State ’94 Michael V. Woolbright, Long Beach ’86

Order of The Shield $10,000+ James J Ascher, Kansas ’52 Brian D. Blankenship, Georgia Tech ’98 Lawrence Clarkson, DePauw ’60 Bobby L. Dewrell, Troy State ’95 David J. Entzminger, Idaho ’76 Dale E. Espich, DePauw ’51 Ralph J. Fabozzi, Embry-Riddle ’73 Charles J. Foretich, Mississippi State ’86 Larry W Gies, Illinois ’88 Steven L. Henslee, Oklahoma State ’75 Jeffrey T Jochims, Illinois ’89 Richard K. LaGore, Western Michigan ’64 Leland A. Lahr, DePauw ’52 Brian P. LoCicero, Marquette ’88 Alan P. Niemann, Oklahoma State ’82 Paul L. Picciani, Connecticut ’89 Keith B. Snook, Louisiana Tech ’96 Thomas M. Stovall, Mississippi State ’67 L. Eugene Tanner, Indiana ’55 Eugene Thompson, Idaho ’46 Waldemar D. Tiedemann, Embry-Riddle ’77 Jimmie J. Underwood, Kansas ’51 Frank K. Voris, Illinois ’61

Tie of Brotherhood $7,500+ Howard S. Baulch, S.M.U. ’76 Alan T Bermensolo, Idaho ’76 Boyd Wayne Boehlje, Iowa State ’61 Ratheen C. Damle, Texas 2001 Geoffrey L. Farmer, Ohio State ’71 John W. Hatmaker, Mississippi State ’79 Scott T. Klinefelter, Northern Iowa ’76 Jeffrey W. Long, Illinois ’74 Edward F. McCallum, Kansas ’56 John Lewis Melvin, Ohio State ’55 Joseph C. Neirinck, Ball State ’63 Edward J. Park, Georgia Tech ’97

Robert G Riddett, Lehigh ’74 Phillip A. Ruppel, Southern Illinois ’65 John F. Tate, Idaho ’64 Stuart M. Zolot, Penn State ’75

Sir Edwards Coke Club $5,000+ Mark A. Abolt, Illinois ’81 James S. Alex Jr., Oregon State ’74 J.T. Arenberg, Illinois ’47 Deryl R. Baker, Jr., Mississippi State 2001 James Alan Bannan, Michigan State ’66 Kevin J. Beardsley, Kettering-B 2001 Jonathan E. Beinke, Georgia Tech ’94 Peter M. Bix, Embry-Riddle ’80 Smith D. Boyd, Livingston ’74 John C Brogan, Illinois ’36 Van A Campbell, Idaho ’78 Richard G. Chenoweth, Illinois ’58 Scott G. Christensen, Illinois ’84 David C. Cloutier, Embry-Riddle ’92 Brad Cole, Southern Illinois ’93 Carlton Conrad, Miami ’64 Brian M Crawford, Georgia Tech ’92 John D. Dorner, Illinois State ’91 David W. Drews, Georgia Tech Alumnus James M Duggan, Illinois ’91 John A. Edenfield, Georgia Tech 2006 Richard H Geiger, Illinois ’78 John M. Gioffredi, Iowa State ’78 Thomas W Glasgow, Michigan State ’68 Carl H Goltermann, Illinois ’50 James G. Graham, Illinois ’81 Frank L. Graves, Texas ’55 Jeffrey W. Hainline, Illinois ’77 G. Martin Hall, Georgia Tech ’93 Stephen D. Henson, Louisiana Tech Faculty Thomas E Hogan, Illinois ’81 George L. Hopkins, Iowa State ’61 Richard F. Kauders, Cornell ’69 Peter P. Korch, Johnstown ’84 David S Levine, Illinois ’84 Kenneth M Lies, Illinois ’81 Richard W. Maizel, Cornell ’68 Michael E. Majestic, Washington State ’90 Raymond A. Mathews, Illinois ’76 Roger K. McAlister, DePauw ’75 Timothy J. McCarty, Illinois ’89 Harold A. Missimer, Penn State ’66 Thomas O. Monroe, Michigan State ’47 Joseph F. Murphy, Northern Illinois ’99 William L Odell, Illinois ’80 W. Jerry Perkins, Oklahoma State ’68 Donald W Petit, Stanford ’36 Mark W. Putney, Iowa ’51 Timothy S Riedling, Louisville ’89 John B Schmidt, Illinois ’82 Mark P. Schramka, Northwestern Alumnus Mahmood U. Sheikh, Idaho 2001 L. Elliot Shubert, Kansas City ’66 Bryce A. Sides, Illinois ’56 Lyle E. Sprinkle, Georgia Tech ’96 Bill Tallman, Embry-Riddle ’95 Thaddeus A. Tatum, S.M.U. ’68 Jesse A. Uhlorn, Idaho 2002 Gerald Unks, Illinois ’58 Steve D Westfall, Idaho ’75 Paul P. Whitman, Mississippi State ’97 Jeffrey L. Woods, Missouri ’89 Luther M Young, Auburn ’69 Michael Zung, Texas ’92

FROM THE PAST New Founders $100,000+ Fredrick B. Hammert, Oklahoma ’60 Gene A Johnson, Oklahoma State ’58

Joseph F. Lacchia, Michigan State ’25 E. Duane Meyer, Hobart ’58 George W. Obear, DePauw ’30 Clayton T Roberts, Florida ’31 Bernhard C Shaffer, Penn State ’25

Martlet Club $50,000+ Philip H. Flick, Illinois ’53 Donald G. Isett, Kansas ’28 LaVon P. Linn, Nebraska ’38 Francis L Zwickey, Michigan State ’24

Hand and Key Club $35,000+ Joe Gerdes, Miami ’38 Victor T. Johnson, Purdue ’32 Marsh W White, Penn State Faculty

Order of The Scimitar $25,000+ Carl A Benson, Purdue ’32

Leges Club $15,000+ Fred R Brooks, Abracadabra ’40 Earl Hazen Drew, Illinois ’29

Order of The Shield $10,000+ Clyde H Andrews, Illinois ’30 Philip L Barbour, Cornell ’20 Carl R. Brehmer, Arizona State ’60 Chauncey W W Cook, Texas ’30 Douglas S Holsclaw, Arizona ’25 Henry M Jackson, Washington ’34 Lyle A. Lynn, Iowa ’34 Charles L Zergiebel, Purdue ’53

Tie of Brotherhood $7,500+ Arthur G. Elliott, Michigan State ’38 Christopher W. Johnson, Kentucky ’77 Francis L. Plumly, Penn State ’46 Michael Jack Pucin, Illinois ’31

Sir Edward Coke Club $5,000+ Albin C Ahlberg, Chicago-Kent ’20 Harry G Allgauer, Purdue ’52 John T Arens, Penn State ’37 Thomas H. Chisholm, S.M.U. ’47 Oliver L Christman, Penn State ’20 Ivan W Davis, Illinois ’25 Charles C DeLong, Illinois ’26 Travis W. Freeman, Illinois ’47 Peter A. Fromm, Sacramento ’69 Solon B. Gilmore, Kansas ’46 Frank Granat, Washington ’51 O Charles Honig, Texas ’40 Luther William Hoy, Penn State ’38 Gordon L. Jones, Southern California ’51 Robert E Kaiser, Ohio State ’51 Alvin B Kessler, LSU ’50 Charles Marshall, Illinois ’51 Max Edward Mohler, Indiana ’60 James D. Page, Alabama ’53 Milton J Rose, Illinois ’29 Ralph W Smith, S.M.U. ’32 Kenneth M Snyder, Illinois ’30 W. Dean Sweet, Ohio State ’49 Charles B Valder, Augusta ’82

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Delta Chi Educational Foundation

1890 SOCIETY

Named after one of the most cherished dates in Delta Chi’s history, the 1890 Society is designed to instill lifelong support among our student members. Students are able to join the 1890 Society through an annual donation, and alumni are able to support our undergraduates by becoming sponsors with a larger one-time donation. Donations from society members help Delta Chi continually improve its “A”s’ Academy, Regional Leadership Conferences, scholarships and other educational initiatives and programs. For information about this exciting new program, please visitdcef.com/1890-society.

s†u∂en† MEMBERS

Cody Kermanian, Abracadabra ’15 Daniel Henne, Adelphi ’16 Peter Hraniotis, Adelphi ’16 Nathan Huffman, Adelphi ’16 Andrew Jacobs, Adelphi ’13 Nick Lucci, Adelphi ’13 Kenny Murray, Adelphi ’15 Joshuha Connauton, Alberta ’13 Greg Caplin, American ’13 Dustin Benadretti, Arizona ’15 Gino Ferrario, Arizona ’15 Nicholas Pereira, Arizona ’15 Sean Thompson, Arizona State ’15 Michael Hobensack, Auburn ’15 Tryell Baker, Augusta ’15 Lin Ming Chen, Augusta ’15 Reid Forzley, Augusta ’13 Jeffrey Haas, Augusta ’13 Grayson LaHatte, Augusta ’16 Morgan Lawson, Augusta ’15 Daniel Rice, Augusta ’14 Derek Krzysiak, Behrend ’14 Jason Comroe, Binghamton ’15 Evan Dietsch, Bowling Green ’12 Cody Kern, Bowling Green ’15 Reid Blouin, Bryant ’16 Shane O’Brien, Bryant ’16 Andrew Passias, Bryant ’14 Sam Stone, Bryant ’16 Brian Wajda, Bryant ’16 Greg London, California Univ-PA ’15 David Miller, California Univ-PA ’15 Nicholas Rosinsky, California Univ-PA ’14 Ali Azeem, Case Western Reserve ’14 David Blankfeld, Case Western Reserve ’16 Chauncey Costello, Case Western Reserve ’16 William Driscoll, Case Western Reserve ’16 Zachary Galliger, Case Western Reserve ’14 Jevon Montague, Case Western Reserve ’15 Richie Phan, Case Western Reserve ’13 John Phillips, Case Western Reserve ’17 Stephen Redford, Case Western Reserve ’14 Jacob Schwartz, Case Western Reserve ’16 Danny Smith, Case Western Reserve ’16 Sean Sukys, Case Western Reserve ’13 Nicholas Swingle, Case Western Reserve ’14 Kevin Thompson, Case Western Reserve ’16 Connor Toomey, Case Western Reserve ’15 Aaditya Vishwanath, Case Western Reserve ’13

Christian Wargo, Case Western Reserve ’13 Paul Clark, Central Missouri ’14 Ben Svatos, Central Missouri ’13 Dalton Culler, Charlotte ’16 Paul Reitz, Cincinnati ’17 Jacob Cortez, Corpus Christi ’14 Manny Cortez, Corpus Christi Austin Evans, Corpus Christi ’16 Victor Galvez, Corpus Christi ’13 Derek Gisriel, Corpus Christi ’13 Norberto Gonzalez, Corpus Christi ’13 Josh Moreno, Corpus Christi ’15 Alejandro Nolasquez, Corpus Christi ’13 Jose Rosalez, Corpus Christi ’16 Jeffery Ruiz, Corpus Christi ’ Scott Audette, Cortland ’14 Michael Beale, Cortland ’14 Timothy Melendez, Cortland ’14 Eric Barnes, Denison ’14 Nicholas Almanza, Eastern Illinois ’15 Ryan Averill, Embry-Riddle ’14 Nathan Chateau, Embry-Riddle ’16 Joseph Steble, Embry-Riddle ’16 Andrew Giacini, Florida ’15 Matt Hall, Florida ’13 Matt Weaver, Florida State ’13 Carmelito Deleon, Fredonia ’14 Lake Smith, George Mason ’13 Aron Randall, Georgia Southern ’13 Michael Gilkenson, Georgia Tech ’13 Robert Knox, Hayward ’16 Josh Miller, Hofstra ’14 Mike Morrison, Hofstra ’14 Freddie Alvarado, Illinois State ’15 Michael Bovino, Illinois State ’14 Greg Adkins, Iowa State ’16 Blake Burns, Iowa State ’16 Dominic Keeling, Iowa State ’15 Evan Medvec, Iowa State ’16 Jeff Perdue, Iowa State ’16 John Lieser, Iowa State ’14 Daniel Kator, James Madison ’13 Deep Desai, Kansas State ’16 Aaron Frith, Kansas State ’15 Rhett Jones, Kansas State ’13 Spencer Kaufman, Kansas State ’12 Scott Whittle, Kansas State ’13 Mathis Allen, Kettering-A ’13 Alexander Ardigo, Kettering-A ’15

Kevin Emery, California Univ-PA ’99 John Tunila, Connecticut ’81 Doug Chananie, East Carolina ’07 Ed Fusco, Embry-Riddle ’73 Rusty Williams Jr., Georgia Southern ’05 Todd Bryan, Hayward ’02

Christopher Kilroy, Huntsville ’99 Jeffrey Broderick, Illinois State ’81 Dennis Wiese, Illinois State ’94 Aaron Otto, Kansas State ’98 Matthew Clark, Kennesaw ’12 John Larger, Kent State ’04

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DELTA CHI QUARTERLY

Joel Carne, Kettering-A ’15 Hunter Casbeer, Kettering-A ’17 Don Ebben, Kettering-A ’13 Greg Jablonski, Kettering-A ’13 Tim Starr, Kettering-A ’16 Alan Turner, Kettering-A ’16 Andrew Paul, Kettering-A ’16 Joe May, Kettering-B ’14 Ariel Glassberg, Lehigh ’15 Alex Smith, Lehigh ’14 Ryder Brown, Long Beach ’14 David Davenport, Long Beach ’14 Birane Ndiaye, Long Beach ’15 Anthony Vargas, Long Beach ’16 John Basile, Louisiana Tech ’16 Matthew Kelly, Louisiana Tech ’14 Christopher Richardson, Louisiana Tech ’14 Connor Maloney, Louisiana Tech ’15 Brandon Alexander, Marshall ’14 Michael Grunwald, Massachusetts ’15 Curtis Hill, Michigan ’16 Chris Maj, Michigan ’16 Eric Tamm, Michigan ’15 Brent Vece, Michigan ’15 Michael Nixon, Michigan State ’14 Chris Fulton, Missouri ’15 Jim Grundy, Missouri ’13 Becket Duncan, Missouri State ’13 Nicholas Adams, New Haven ’13 Paul Cassidy, New Haven ’15 Andrew Collins, New Haven ’14 Anthony Dos Santos, New Haven ’13 Daniel Hostomsky, New Haven ’14 Raymond Ng, New Haven ’13 Christopher Spillane, New Haven ’15 Steven Extract, Northern Arizona ’12 Bryan Jew, Northern Arizona ’14 Mason Green, Northern Colorado ’14 Ritchie Balauag, Northern Illinois ’13 Alex Bronder, Northwestern ’15 Trevor Johnson, Northwest Missouri ’14 Kyle King, Northwest Missouri ’15 Tony Rustad, Oklahoma ’14 Justice Achonu, Pittsburgh ’15 Sean McCarthy, Pittsburgh ’16 Nathan Kozlowski, Radford ’15 Daniel Crocker, Rhode Island ’16 Joshua Cali, Southeast Missouri ’16 Andrew Collins, Southeast Missouri ’15

Austin Cordell, Southeast Missouri ’16 Andrew Davi, Southeast Missouri ’16 Marc Erlanger, Southeast Missouri ’15 Zachary Greten, Southeast Missouri ’13 Eric Rocchio, Southeast Missouri ’15 Alex Bitton, South Dakota State ’15 Nate Cacy, South Dakota State ’16 Thijs Hammink, South Dakota State ’13 Andrew Royer, South Dakota State ’15 Ben Ruggeberg, South Dakota State ’14 Anthony Sutton, South Dakota State ’12 Chance Wachholtz, South Dakota State ’16 David Aguilar, Southern California ’14 Bradford Smith, Southern California ’16 Christopher Borges, Southern Illinois ’13 Kashish Chhabra, Southern Illinois ’14 Sean Conway, Southern Illinois ’15 Arthur Demeros, Southern Illinois ’13 Edgar Dominguez, Southern Illinois ’13 Tim Donley, Southern Illinois ’15 Thomas Gibbons, Southern Illinois ’13 Cody Goenterman, Southern Illinois ’16 Erik Graves, Southern Illinois ’14 Seth Harrington, Southern Illinois ’14 Dejon Hill, Southern Illinois ’16 Cooper Kerins, Southern Illinois ’14 Robert Ladner, Southern Illinois ’16 David Lotsof, Southern Illinois ’16 Patrick Lugowski, Southern Illinois ’15 Kyle Matus, Southern Illinois ’16 Dakota McGinnis, Southern Illinois ’13 Brendan Mier, Southern Illinois ’16 Roger Moore, Southern Illinois ’13 Nic Ochs, Southern Illinois ’13 Michael Proscia, Southern Illinois ’16 Marty Ramos, Southern Illinois ’14 Johnny Resendiz, Southern Illinois ’15 Jakub Rusek, Southern Illinois ’14 David Schau, Southern Illinois ’14 Aaron Tungol, Southern Illinois ’16 Ben Varga, Southern Illinois ’16 Luke Whitaker, Southern Illinois ’15 Cody Wilson, Southern Illinois ’15 Dolton Yunker, Southern Illinois ’15 Zane Bora, Stephen F. Austin ’16 Matthew Rohloff, Stephen F. Austin ’16 Zachary Chase, Syracuse ’14 Nathan Dye, Syracuse ’14 Andrew Erickson, Syracuse ’15

alumni SPONSORS Daniel Sanchez, Lake Forest ’11 Grant Herrin, LSU ’07 Stephen Henson, Louisiana Tech Faculty Keith Snook, Louisiana Tech ’96 Daniel McTague, Massachusetts Alumnus Miles Washburn, Massachusetts ’87

Scan the QR Code to learn more

Chris Jensen, Michigan ’95 Greg Hauser, Michigan State ’75 Tom Horowitz, Michigan State ’87 Alec Lee, Missouri State ’05 Travis Covey, New Mexico State ’03 Andrew Haggerty, New Mexico State ’03

Tyler Grable, Syracuse ’15 Josh Henneman, Syracuse ’14 Stephen Mitchell, Syracuse ’14 Ben Shapiro, Syracuse ’14 Nolan Beal, Tarleton ’16 Lance Harris, Tarleton ’16 Andy Hatcher, Tarleton ’16 Collin Parsons, Tarleton ’15 Christian Perez, Tarleton ’13 Juan Ramos, Tarleton ’14 Cody Wittman, Texas ’15 Matt Anderson, Texas Tech ’15 Jeremy Jones, Texas Tech ’15 Jhed Manalo, Texas Tech ’15 Chris Montoya, Texas Tech ’16 Joseph Thompson, Texas Tech ’15 Jacob Villota, Texas Tech ’15 Chase Yull, Texas Tech ’15 Eric Nixon, Tri-State ’13 James Taylor, Tri-State ’13 Jared Lott, Troy State ’14 Matthew Morehead, Troy State ’16 Andrew Baer, Truman State ’14 Matthew Heering, Truman State ’15 Chris Pavlack, Truman State ’14 Ryan Carney, USP ’17 Chip Bowen, Valdosta ’14 Austin Cobb, Valdosta ’14 Kyle Harris, Valdosta ’14 Bryan Portillo, Virginia Commonwealth ’14 Patrick Rouin, Virginia Commonwealth ’16 Ivan Moya, Washburn ’14 Connor England, Washburn ’16 Daniel Fleming, Washburn ’16 Joshua Maples, Washburn ’10 Ryan Masilionis, Washburn ’13 Kyle Robinson, Washburn ’14 Mack Sloan, Washburn ’15 Andrew Walker, Washburn ’15 Justin Tattersall, West Chester ’14 Andrew Johnson, Whitewater ’14 Eric Olson, Whitewater ’14 Paul Flowe, Wilmington ’14 Tyler Frank, Wilmington ’15 Winston Howard, Wilmington ’14 Ian McDermott, Wilmington ’14 Maxwell Moody, Wilmington ’14 Graham Taylor, Wilmington ’15 Dane Young, Wilmington ’13

Jason Sisk, New Mexico State ’03 Zac Cole, Northern Illinois ’03 Scott Klinefelter, Northern Iowa ’76 Rusty Yull, Whitewater ’82


Coast to Coast

2014 International Chapter Meeting Conference Call:

COAST TO COAST

Delta Chi will host a live, interactive chapter meeting on January 29, 2014 at 8:00 PM (EST). If you join us on this exclusive call, you will have the opportunity to ask questions live and hear Fraternity and Foundation leadership provide updates on the Fraternity’s affairs. Look for more details about signing up for the call on www.deltachi.org in the near future.

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6 Capital Area Alumni Host ‘Day At The Races’

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The Capital Area Alumni Chapter joined Jim LeVan, Johnstown ’80, for the 92nd running of the Middleburg Spring Races on Saturday, April 20, 2013. This was Brother LeVan’s 14th consecutive year attending the Races, held in Virginia’s beautiful Hunt Country. Joining him and his wife, Mary Beth, were Brothers Marc Steimer, Johnstown ’78, and wife Aimee; Dan Verner, Johnstown ’81, and wife Jane; Pat Bowling, Johnstown ’81; Brian Tressler, Johnstown ’81; and Vinnie DiCamillo, Duquesne ’95. The group assembled at our reserved, rail side picnic area and enjoyed good food, cheer, and conversation as the galloping thoroughbreds thundered past us only a few feet away! Our reserved area put us close enough to smell the sweat as jockeys drove their mounts to the finish line, which added a sense of excitement to our great afternoon together. Kudos to Marc and Aimee Steimer from driving the farthest to attend! They drove in from Cincinnati, OH. It was a sunny day - great for reuniting with old friends, making new ones, tailgating and betting on the horses. Mark your calendars: fall races will be held Saturday, October 5th, and next spring’s race will be on April 19, 2014. (Reported by “A” Vinnie DiCamillo, Duquesne ’95)

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Awards & Recognition ce nt n me nan s tio ge ver ion uca Go ana lat M ent & e Ed er hip l R s g m r a g w r i i n e e i n o ola mn olv anc mb np vis usi Ad Alu Fin Ho Inv Ma Me Sch

2012-13

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XXXX

$XXXX XX

XX%

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X.XX

AWARDS & RECOGNITION

Total initiates % of bills paid $ raised for The since founding in 2012-13 V Foundation 2012-2013

How can we improve the experience of being a member of Delta Chi? What would it take for our chapter to truly be outstanding? Where should we look to begin?

performance, Delta Chi is promoting a common language for fraternity operations, which we call our ‘core competencies.’ If you examine ‘fraternity’ as a whole, it is apparent that there are eight core areas of fraternity operations that are essential to the success of any chapter/colony.

fraternal action that achieve an intended outcome. This model will allow our organization to better assist our chapters through analyzing data to connect both holistic programming and specific resources to our members’ needs.

When one examines the many functions within a fraternity chapter, one quickly learns that, often, many parts of ‘fraternity’ are interconnected. For instance, when one seeks to improve recruitment results, one quickly realizes that retention plays a key role in the overall effectiveness of recruitment. That is, if one only focuses on recruitment, the Chapter will not realize full potential due to a lack of equal attention to issues concerning member retention. To gain a clear understanding of chapter

Core Competencies The core competency model promotes the eight core functions of a successful chapter within which all aspects of chapter operations fall. By design, the core competency model illustrates that fraternal issues are often interconnected. Because being “successful” doesn’t just mean mastering one event or function of fraternity, this model views “success” as the collective efforts of

The ADVISING & GOVERNANCE core competency promotes setting a solid foundation of procedures to ensure organizational sustainability. Governance serves as the framework for an effective, efficient values-based organization, while proper advising enables consistency and incremental growth.

The ALUMNI RELATIONS core competency promotes the development of a life-long member experience, which is enhanced through meaningful communication with alumni members and regular events and gatherings.

he FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT core competency promotes sound T financial practices and policies within a chapter/colony and its membership. Through the implementation of financial best practices, members can develop sound financial habits for life. Strong financial management, while crucial to success, fades into the background as it enables other programming areas to truly shine.

The HOUSING core competency promotes maintaining an attractive and competitive living environment. Proper maintenance, attention to safety and cleanliness, and the function of the House Corporation are all instrumental to the success of a chapter’s housing initiatives. The INVOLVEMENT core competency promotes relevance through activities on campus and in the community. Great involvement is composed of a variety of activities and programs, including campus organizations, philanthropic contributions, community service initiatives, intramural participation, and more. The MANPOWER core competency promotes strength through a balance of recruitment and retention of members. A greater manpower gives a chapter more resources to achieve its goals.

The MEMBER EDUCATION core competency promotes total member education. Member education initiatives include aspects of the new member program, leadership programming, and other programs throughout a member’s undergraduate experience. The SCHOLARSHIP core competency promotes the “acquisition of a sound education.” Scholarship success is built on events and programming, sound membership standards, and goals.

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DELTA CHI QUARTERLY

Excellence Distinction

2012-13 2011-12 2012-13 avg. 2012-13 initiates initiates membership peak GPA

Achievement Distinction

We will promote the core competencies as a way for our chapters and colonies to build consistent, purposeful action leading to an improved fraternity experience over time. Our Chapter/Colony visitation reports have been updated to reflect this new approach. Colonies will now petition for chartering by showing their work in each of the eight areas. Our Awards & Recognition program also utilizes these core competencies to promote and recognize success.

President’s Cup RED DIVISION BUFF DIVISION Georgia Tech Tri-State Pittsburgh Bryant

Award of Excellence RED DIVISION BUFF DIVISION Georgia Tech Bryant Pittsburgh Duquesne South Dakota State Tri-State West Chester

President’s Most Improved RED DIVISION Auburn

BUFF DIVISION South Florida

RAYMOND D. GALBRETH

Certificate of Achievement

RED DIVISION Auburn Kansas

BUFF DIVISION South Florida

Delta Chi’s Composite Awards are divided into “Red” and “Buff” categories. The “Red Division” contains those chapters and colonies with 15 or more fraternities on their campuses or whose Greek systems have over 30 percent of the undergraduate student body. The remaining chapters and colonies make up the “Buff Division.”


Awards & Recognition Abracadabra Chartered 1910 1109

96

$0

35

Adelphi Chartered 2012 23

100

99

$0

23

97

25

147

$110

6

100

$5113

13

$0

18

Arizona Chartered 1925 2067

99

113

$0

55

100

$0

48

97

$0

48

100

$2769

4

99

$0

10

99

$1800

6

100

$0

12

97

$315

7

105

2

16

10

13

9

16

9

7

$0

26

$0

6

49

N/A

2.96

2.81

$2253

11

Central Michigan Chartered 1988 462

91

$1498

21

Central Missouri Chartered 1971 914

99

$1400

25

30

2.8

2.67

195

99

1775

97

120

98

129

98

259

97

509

98

326

98

255

100

N/A

93

97

28

$0

2

1063

100

12

15

3.00

$0

12

$4693

31

3.02

17

N/A

12

13

3.49

12

9

2.48

7

14

2.77

14

$0

$0

$0

17

2.45

10

10

2.98

3.04

18

2.61

2.65

238

99

$966

15

3.07

672

100

$390

2.91

17

1901

99

550

99

$115

44

$0

397

100

875

92

2.61

14

$650

16

15

N/A

11

28

24

678

169

$0

79

103

358

98

850

92

85

100

394

98

2065

119

684

98

1647

60

1610

99

1119

100

683

123

2.94

270

115

5

517

95

$0

10

1771

100

46 25

2.90

36

3.43

11

1.82

13

3.06

18 $0

11

13

N/A

29 $940

11

21

3.03

18 $550

11

10

N/A

28 $0

12

12

2.55

68 $0

30

$140

35

3.02

78 35

31

2.82

62 $17825 32

20

N/A

50 $0

36

18

2.69

38 $0

46

$500

5

$750

**

2.75

30 19

2.82

49 25

27

2.93

21 $400

14

Kansas Chartered 1923 2.34

2.57

33

Johnstown Chartered 1972 N/A

11

11

James Madison Chartered 2001

42 $0

$75

Jacksonville State Chartered 1968

32

Fullerton Chartered 1967 2.87

27

98

Iowa State Chartered 1923

23 7

Fredonia Chartered 1991 2.78

2.61

84

Florida State Chartered 1961 3.12

24

543

3.25

77

Iowa Chartered 1912

27

Florida Chartered 1926 2.91

12

11

Indiana Chartered 1925

17

Embry-Riddle Chartered 1972

$800

Illinois State Chartered 1973

Eastern Washington Chartered 1984 3.16

99

Illinois Chartered 1923

16 11

393

Huntsville Chartered 1977

19 11

14

Hofstra Chartered 2008

27 7

$0

Hobart Chartered 1948

37 $0

99

Hayward Chartered 1990

23 $0

87

8

23

Hamilton Chartered 2011

24 $0

6

Gorham State Chartered 1969

27 $1625

$600

Georgia Tech Chartered 1991

29 12

100

Georgia Southern Chartered 1972

42 36

459

19

George Mason Chartered 2009

64

Eastern Illinois Chartered 1967 2.87

3.30

60 $0

East Stroudsburg Chartered 2010

28 14

99

East Carolina Chartered 1992

36 19

501

Duquesne Chartered 1994

42

97

1

Denison Chartered 1969

Case Western Reserve Chartered 2012 58

$0

Davis Chartered 1993

18 10

98

Cortland Chartered 2007

107

California Univ.-PA Chartered 1974 364

3.03

25

Cal Poly Chartered 1970 641

20

94

14

16

Corpus Christi Chartered 2010

38

29

Bryant Chartered 1990 307

3.33

23

Bowling Green Chartered 2002 193

10

18

Cornell Chartered 1890

17

Binghamton Chartered 2006 120

N/A

18

Behrend Chartered 1990 282

7

$0

Coastal Carolina Chartered 2005

44

Augusta Chartered 1983 285

2.92

58

Auburn Chartered 1951 1186

34

99

Clemson Chartered 1990

55

Arizona State Chartered 1949 786

N/A

28

Appalachian State Chartered 1986 579

**

18

Gannon Chartered 1971

13

Cincinnati Chartered 2013

18

American Chartered 1992 455

3.38

71 $0

Alberta Chartered 1997 205

18

22

Alabama Chartered 1927 1429

Charlotte Chartered 2013

49

4

2.83

57 $100

28

23

FALL 2013

2.94

17


Awards & Recognition XXX Kansas State Chartered 1992 645

98

$2219

9

Kennesaw Chartered 2010 105

10

98

$0

1

102

3

102

$400

7

$1100

19

99

$0

11

100

$0

4

99

100

$0

4

100

$0

25

107

$2797

22

100

$303

14

100

$0

24

99

$0

10

108

$3499

26

111

$0

20

99

$3625

13

99

21

18

100

28

15

16

15

11

21

9

11

$1368

12

46

21

N/A

30

DELTA CHI QUARTERLY

17

50

28

561

100

$144

7

280

385

81

769

$0

99

5

3

9

13

$0

489

540

$3693

121

99

2.88

1167

7

27

$0

$1406

100

422

98

13

18

$0

18

$4679

1456

99

24

811

99

994

65

$0

30

1824

100

$0

9

$0

272

98

3

1773

100

$40

35

277

100

$0

46

186

70

N/A

15

30

22

50

2.75

27

$0

14

2.35

15

$0

200

97

$0

357

96

$8785

627

98

$1085

21

2.83

36 17

22

16

2.12

43 14

N/A

46 29

25

1396

97

$2905

40

1131

100

$0

4

29

N/A

48 28

2.91

28

178

3.49

388

99

$0

12

98

$0

9

360

100

$500

13

937

117

$0

22

651

132

45

$0

31

506

99

$700

14

869

99

$1465

12

660

96

$0

5

$0

45

97

786

131

9

2.59

12

N/A

25

2.85

14

2.85

32

2.61

28

N/A

28

2.74

14

2.99

19 $0

7

Valdosta Chartered 1968 N/A

22

37 7

USP Chartered 2011 N/A

3.27

30

Truman State Chartered 1978 2.81

7

50

Troy State Chartered 1966 3.34

2.43

54

Tri-State Chartered 1969 3.27

26

19

Texas Tech Chartered 1983 2.67

21

32

Texas Chartered 1907 N/A

N/A

24

Tarleton Chartered 1988 2.73

11

13

Syracuse Chartered 1899

38 16

80

Stephen F. Austin Chartered 2002

37 $0

16

Spring Hill Chartered 2013

89 $820

Rhode Island Chartered 2005 3.13

14

$0

Southern Illinois Chartered 1955

60

Radford Chartered 1997 2.90

2.94

102

Purdue Chartered 1927 3.24

20

100

37

34

Pittsburgh Chartered 2005 2.99

17

728

2.64

Southern California Chartered 1910

28

Penn State Chartered 1929 2.53

2.58

33

Oregon State Chartered 1931 3.04

23

256

53

30

Southeast Missouri Chartered 1977

48

Oklahoma Chartered 1927 N/A

N/A

26 21

2

South Florida Chartered 2000

36

43

Ohio State Chartered 1902 N/A

N/A

17

7

$1368

South Dakota State Chartered 2004

38

27

Northwestern Chartered 1893 2.95

2.85

17 10

99

Sacramento Chartered 1971

32 $694

99

159

3.06

13

59

64

33

Rutgers Chartered 1999

30 25

Northwest Missouri Chartered 1971

58 $0

$4212

Northern Illinois Chartered 1989

82

Minnesota Chartered 1892 1126

2.93

51 $1161

Michigan State Chartered 1935 2000

10

97

Northern Colorado Chartered 1984

42

Michigan Chartered 1892 1165

3.14

22

Miami Chartered 1932 1596

37

690

N/A

61

Northern Arizona Chartered 1959

62

Massachusetts Chartered 1969 532

2.95

30

Maryland Chartered 1990 483

18

**

North Alabama Chartered 2010

27

Marshall Chartered 2009 146

2.42

26

Marquette Chartered 1977 436

4

1

New Haven Chartered 1981

43

Mankato Chartered 1992 209

N/A

45

Louisiana Tech Chartered 1987 391

4

$0

Montclair Chartered 1990

19

Long Beach Chartered 1968 696

N/A

33

Livingston Chartered 1967 529

12

91

Missouri State Chartered 1986

21

Lehigh Chartered 1952 717

N/A

27

Lake Forest Chartered 1950 457

28

668

Riverside Chartered 2013

20

Missouri Chartered 1951

14

L.S.U. Chartered 1941 657

3.17

21

$2598

Kettering-B Chartered 1998 134

14

36

Kettering-A Chartered 1998 146

Mississippi State Chartered 1964

33

2

N/A

21 $0

18

11

2.6


Awards & Recognition Virginia Commonwealth Chartered 1991

West Chester Chartered 1996

71

376

97

$990

19

Washburn Chartered 2008 73

97

102

$0

6

33

5

31

$0

10

9

N/A

97

$0

21

160

82

$0

21

17

345

112

$0

0

4

96

$0

14

7

85

N/A

11

99

$100

92

454

2.53

104

23

N/A

53 33

21

9

32

N/A

25 $0

Windsor Chartered 1971

20

1081

$932

Wilmington Chartered 2011

Western Michigan Chartered 1955 (Closed) 3.00

123

2.53

6

3.29

101

33

William & Mary Chartered 2005

40 18

660

3.14

West Virginia Tech Chartered 1983 (Closed)

22 20

260

West Georgia Chartered 2005

50

$1075

Washington State Chartered 1943 743

2.92

15

Washington Chartered 1908 2077

27

Whitewater Chartered 1970

37

2.93

25 $0

17

21

N/A

Outstanding Chapter Program

This award recognizes the exceptional programming created and implemented by our undergraduate chapters, colonies and alumni chapters. A “program” can be any singular or series of events planned by the chapter/colony.

Missouri Chapter Associate Member Program

Northwestern Chapter “Delta Chi Movers” Philanthropy

Scan the QR Code to download the Chapter’s Associate Member Program.

Scan the QR Code to see the Chapter’s Video Commercial.

“E” Key Award This is the oldest award given by the Fraternity and recognizes chapter/colony “E”s each year for their exceptional performance of all communicative duties. Nominees were evaluated based on their Quarterly submissions, including “Campus Scene” narratives, Farewell/Parting material, Keeping in Touch material, and contact information updates with the International Headquarters. Both timeliness and quality of content are weighed in consideration for this award.

Christian Wargo, Case Western Reserve ’13 Gregory Smith, Embry-Riddle ’15 John Rausch, Florida ’13 Matt Smith, Kansas ’15 Matthew Mitchell, Lehigh ’13 Joe Molisani, Pittsburgh ’15 Spencer Gladis, South Dakota State ’15 Brad Ellis, South Florida ’14

Marge Lee Outstanding “C” Award This award recognizes chapter/colony “C”s who exhibit exceptional performance in all their required and recommended duties. A nominee must have held office for at least one full semester/quarter (by the close of this school year) and be in good standing with the Chapter/Colony.

Brandon Brown, Cal Poly ’13 Andrew Ritosa, Case Western Reserve ’15 Alexander Santini, Embry-Riddle ’15 Alexander Buerck, Minnesota ’16 Blake Dailey, Purdue ’14 Austin Cordell, Southeast Missouri ’16 Ryan Gabet, Tri-State ’14

Tri-State Chapter “Delta Chi Dash” and other philanthropic programming

Scan the QR Code to read more about the “Delta Chi Dash.”

Humanitarian Award This award is presented to a Delta Chi member (undergraduate or alumnus) who, through his actions, exemplifies the ideals of Delta Chi and promotes the welfare of another person or persons.

JACOB POTEAT, Florida State ’13 During his three years at Florida State Scan the QR University, Jake has completed over 400 Code to watch a video about service hours through his participation with the 2013 Florida State’s Dance Marathon. Dance Dance Marathon Marathon is the Southeast’s largest, studentrun philanthropy. Monies raised go to benefit the Children’s Miracle Network. After working in other capacities over the last two years, Jake was chosen to serve as Executive Director of FSU’s 2013 Dance Marathon. The event raised a total of $701,493 in donations this year, a 20 percent increase over last year. Jake has demonstrated a selfless attitude and compassionate desire to help others through his endeavors.

VICTOR HOANG, Pittsburgh ’16 Hoang serves as the Coordinator for Pitt’s Asian Leadership Program. During his involvement with the organization, he led a charity project for the Dreams for Kids Foundation. Hoang coordinated a fundraising effort and organized an awareness effort on campus with a video he shot and speech by the President of the D.C. Chapter of Dreams for Kids. His work has led to the potential of expanding Dreams for Kids to Pittsburgh.

Scan the QR Code to see Hoang’s video

FALL 2013

19


XXX & Recognition Awards Distinguished Delta Chi Award

This award recognizes significant achievement in an alumnus’ profession or outstanding civic service while upholding the values and ideals of the Fraternity. This award may be awarded posthumously.

KIRK FOGG Fullerton ’81

VIC REYNOLDS Georgia Southern ’79

Actor, Producer, Writer

Cobb County (GA) District Attorney Scan the QR Code to see Fogg’s Biography.

TONY PERKINS Truman State ’83

High School Athletics Coach

Scan the QR Code to visit Reynolds’ home page.

Scan the QR Code to read an article about Perkins’ work.

Fogg (third), alongside fellow Nickelodeon show hosts including Marc Summers (far right)

Outstanding Chapter Communication Chicago Cup Rio Grande Area Alumni Chapter

Outstanding Chapter Communication

Rio Grande Area Alumni Chapter, for “The Martlet” Newsletter.

Outstanding Recruitment and Retention

Rio Grande Area Alumni Chapter, for raising their membership by 25% over the past year.

Outstanding Programming Events

Twin Cities Area Alumni Chapter, for their “Sir Edward Coke Open” golf tournament raising money for the Chapter’s scholarship fund.

Outstanding Website

Rio Grande Area Alumni Chapter

Outstanding Alumni Chapter Member Award

Matthew Johnson, Minnesota ’01, Twin Cities Area Alumni Chapter, for working tirelessly to lobby members to support the Twin Cities’ Scholarship Foundation and for reaching their fundraising goal of $5,000 this past year.

Outstanding Chapter Advisor This award recognizes an advisor to a chapter or colony for a specific, exceptional act of service during the previous academic year. This award will recognize individuals for their ability to strategically impact an undergraduate chapter or colony. A Faculty Advisor, “BB”, live-in advisor, ABT or House Corporation member may receive this award, regardless of their Greek affiliation.

Randy Ross, Bryant Alumnus; ABT President, Bryant Chapter Dr. John Denny, Florida ’92; Faculty Advisor, Florida Chapter Taylor Owens, Georgia Tech ’08; “BB”, Georgia Tech Chapter William Meredith, Kansas State Alumnus; Faculty Advisor, Kansas State Chapter David Ferolito, Lehigh ’94; “BB”, Lehigh Chapter Dan Caplan, Northwestern ’07; “BB”, Northwestern Chapter Dr. Timothy Corcoran, Lehigh ’92; “BB”, Pittsburgh Chapter Ryan Bushey, South Florida ’07; “BB”, South Florida Chapter Craig Wiley, Tri-State ’08; ABT President, Tri-State Chapter Peter Galloway, Alpha Chi Rho; Faculty Advisor, West Chester Chapter

20

DELTA CHI QUARTERLY

Valor Award

This award recognizes special acts of heroism on the part of any member of Delta Chi who puts his own life in peril. To qualify for this award, an individual must have rendered heroic service, well documented, above and beyond simply membership in the Armed Services of his country, where his actions place his own life in peril or potential peril while attempting to save the life of another. Both undergraduate and alumni are eligible for the Valor Award.

BRIAN MCINTOSH, Iowa State ’04 Right after Brian was initiated at the Iowa State colony in 2005 he was deployed to Iraq with the USMC. While in Iraq a truck that he was in was hit from enemy artillery. Brother McIntosh pulled the driver out as the truck exploded receiving wounds from shrapnel. He was awarded the Purple Heart.

MATTHEW AGUILAR, Sacramento ’88 At approximately 6:20 pm on 07/01/1994, Officer Aguilar was completing a traffic stop when he was alerted by another motorist of a possible intoxicated driver passing his location. Officer Aguilar quickly responded and overtook the suspected intoxicated motorist. Before an enforcement stop could be initiated, the errant driver drifted off the right side of the roadway and traveled down a very steep eighty-foot embankment. Officer Aguilar stopped on the shoulder, looked over the edge, and observed smoke pouring from the vehicle. After quickly evaluating the scene, Officer Aguilar selected a safe approach route and began to make his way to the vehicle. Upon arrival, Officer Aguilar noted that the driver was still inside and not moving. Flames were visible in the engine compartment and were quickly moving into the passenger area. Fearing for the unconscious driver’s safety, Officer Aguilar entered the vehicle and began pulling him from the wreckage. Aided by a bystander, Officer Aguilar was successful in removing the gas-soaked driver from the vehicle moments before it became fully engulfed in flames. The fire spread quickly, igniting the surrounding grass and brush. Sensing that they were still in danger, Officer Aguilar led the group up the steep hill to safety. The fire continued to burn approximately five acres before it was contained by fire personnel.


Awards & Recognition Meritorious Service Award This award is given to an alumnus who makes significant contributions to Delta Chi as a “BB”, ABT member, House Corporation member, general Fraternity committee member, Regent, Vice-Regent, or staff member.

Reed Davis, Appalachian State ’02 for service to the Appalachian State Chapter as ABT President

Brian E. Capps, Central Missouri ’78 for service to the Central Missouri Chapter

George Rambow III, Indiana ’97, for service to the Indiana Chapter.

Michael A. Gnagi, Central Missouri ’79 for s ervice to the Central Missouri Chapter

Bryan Wagner, Kansas State ’99, for service to the Kansas State Colony ABT.

Jerry L. Haney, Central Missouri ’77 for service to the Central Missouri Chapter

Michael Dean, Truman State ’08, for service to the Publications Committee.

Geoff Allen, Gorham State ’79, for service to the Gorham State Chapter.

Stephen Henson, Louisiana Tech Faculty, for service to the Publications Committee.

In an effort to recognize brothers’ service that hasn’t been previously recognized, Delta Chi’s Board of Regents is pleased to award the following brothers with Meritorious Service Awards:

Darren Talbert, Kent State ’91 for service to the Kent State Chapter ABT

Douglas Tapp, Oklahoma State ’82 for service to the Oklahoma State Chapter as “BB”

Edward Vrtis, Lake Forest ’07 for service to the Lake Forest Chapter as ABT President

Brian Borchardt, Oshkosh ’95 for service to the Oshkosh Chapter as “BB”

Stephen Copper, Abracadabra ’82 for service to the Abracadabra Chapter as House Corporation President

Troy Skinner, Huntsville ’99 for service to the Huntsville Chapter as Faculty Advisor

Gregory Pike, Abracadabra ’82 for service to the Abracadabra Chapter ABT

Michael Arrillaga, Idaho ’96 for service to the International Headquarters as a Director

Richard Sparks, Arizona State ’88 for service to the Arizona State Chapter ABT

Steven Urrutia, Long Beach ’94 for service to the Cal Poly Chapter ABT

Brandon Bruins, Idaho ’96 for service to the Idaho Chapter ABT

Timothy Parker, Louisiana Tech ’89 for service to the Louisiana Tech Chapter as House Corporation President

John Vescova, Arizona State ’97 for service to the Arizona State Chapter ABT William Barnes, Auburn ’80 for service to Region VIII as Regent Gary Monk, Auburn ’65 for service to the Housing Committee Charles Evans, Augusta ’88 for service to the Augusta Chapter as “BB” Willie Saunders, Augusta ’91 for service to the Augusta Chapter ABT David Stoehr, Behrend ’97 for service to the Behrend Chapter ABT David Caillier, Cal Poly ’03 for service to Region II as a Vice Regent Stanley Pinkham, Central Missouri ’78 for service to the Investment Advisory Committee David Surber, Colorado ’83 for service to the International Headquarters as a Leadership Consultant and Director Mark Fitzgerald, Connecticut ’79 for service to the Connecticut Chapter ABT Craig Tumas, Duquesne ’01 for service to the Duquesne Chapter ABT

Thomas Sheffield, Idaho ’94 for service to the International Headquarters as a Leadership Consultant and Director Raymond Mathews, Illinois ’76 for service to the Illinois Chapter Brian Medina, Illinois ’07 for service to the Illinois Chapter as “BB” Dennis Brtva, Illinois State ’81 for service to the Illinois State Chapter as House Corporation President Jock Cameron, Illinois State ’83 for service to the Illinois State Chapter as Financial Advisor

Blake Morris, Lehigh ’85 for service to the Lehigh Chapter ABT

Michael Moriarty, Oshkosh ’71 for service to the Marquette Chapter House Corporation David Plank, Oshkosh ’75 for service to the Oshkosh Chapter ABT and House Corporation John Shelby, Sacramento ’86 for service to the Housing Committee

Keith Snook, Louisiana Tech ’96 for service to the Louisiana Tech Chapter ABT

J. Tom Kidd, Southern Illinois Alumnus for service to the Southern Illinois Chapter

Thomas Farrelly, Marquette ’87 for service to the Ritual Committee

Sean Yallaly, Southern Illinois ’04 for service to the Southern Illinois Chapter as House Corporation President

Brian LoCicero, Marquette ’88 for service to the Marquette Chapter ABT Steven Michels, Marquette ’87 for service to the Marquette Chapter as House Corporation President

Robert Reilly, Texas A&M ’88 for service to the Texas A&M Chapter as House Corporation President

James Deberry, Missouri ’57 for service to the Investment Advisory Committee

Wade Shelton, Texas State ’97 for service to the Texas State Chapter as “BB”

Raymond Galbreth, Missouri ’69 for service to the International Headquarters as Executive Director

Joseph Pickett, Troy State ’66 for service to the Huntsville Chapter as “BB”

George Rambow, Indiana ’97 ’ for service to the Indiana Chapter ABT

Paul Michalski, Missouri ’88 for service to the Missouri Chapter as House Corporation President

David Clithero, Truman State ’82 for service to the Truman State Chapter as “BB”

Jonathan Larson, Iowa ’02 for service to the George Mason and William & Mary Chapters

Mark Sexton, Missouri ’93 for service to the Missouri Chapter as “BB”

Larry Nothnagel, Truman State ’79 for service to the Law Committee

Steven Mortimore, Iowa ’67 for service to the Iowa Chapter as House Corporation President

Scott Leigh, Missouri State ’90 for service to the International Headquarters as a Leadership Consultant

Warren Etcheson, Indiana ’42 for service to the International Headquarters as Executive Director Matthew Kremke, Indiana ’91 for service to the Indiana Chapter ABT

Robert Fear, Johnstown ’76 for service to the Johnstown Chapter as “BB”

Mark Sluss, Missouri State ’87 for service to Region IV as a Vice Regent

Samuel Overton, Eastern Illinois ’80 for service to the Eastern Illinois Chapter ABT

Peter Korch, Johnstown ’84 for service to the Johnstown Chapter as Faculty Advisor

William Tallman, Embry-Riddle ’95 for service to the Ritual Committee

Leroy Mendenhall, Kansas ’68 for service to the Huntsville Chapter

Richard Vermut, Florida ’92 for service to the Florida Chapter as House Corporation President

Jimmie Underwood, Kansas ’51 for service to the Delta Chi Educational Foundation as President

Robert Hutchinson, Florida State ’94 for service to the Augusta Chapter

Charles Wright, Kansas ’41 for service to Delta Chi

Stephen Bianchi, Northeastern ’79 for service to the Rhode Island Chapter ABT

Brian Bender, Hobart ’94 for service to the Hobart Chapter as “BB”

Elliot Shubert, Kansas City ’66 for service to Region IV as a Vice Regent

Dan Tavrytzky, Northern Arizona ’88 for service to the Northern Arizona Chapter ABT

Brian Collins, Montevallo ’85 for service to the Montevallo Chapter ABT Ronald Martin, New Haven ’87 for service to the New Haven Chapter ABT

James Sharrock, Truman State ’84 for service to the Missouri Chapter as “BB” James Anderson, Washington State Alumnus, for service to Region I as a Vice Regent David Holm, Washington State ’04 for service to the Washington State Chapter ABT Thomas Nihoul, Washington State ’69 for service to the Washington State Chapter Michael Moeller, Whitewater ’90 for service to the Whitewater Chapter as House Corporation President David E. Robbins, Whitewater ’89 for service to the Whitewater Chapter as ABT President

FALL 2013

21


Awards & Recognition

2013 CHAPTER LUMINARIES Appalachian State David Belk Gordon ’14

F

Georgia Tech Michael Paul Gilkenson ’13

Chapter: “A”, “E”, Scholarship Chairman, Golf Tournament Chairman, Greek Week Chairman, Homecoming Chairman, IFC President, Student Government Treasurer Organizations: Habitat for Humanity, Youth Basketball Coach, Risk Management & Insurance Society, Finance Student Association Major: Finance & Banking, Risk Management & Insurance Minor: Leadership Development

Chapter: “A”, Brotherhood Chairman, Big Brother Chairman Organizations: Omicron Delta Kappa - President, Faculty Relations Chair Major: Industrial and Systems Engineering Recognition: Dean’s List - eight semesters, Jack C. Webb Scholarship, HOPE Scholarship

Gorham State Brennan Parker ’13

Auburn Paul Stokes ’14

Chapter: “A”, “E”, AMC, Public Relations Chairman Organizations: All-Greek Council, Engineering Student Committee Major: Engineering Minor: Electrical and System Operations

Chapter: “C”, Intramural Chairman Organizations: American Institute of Architecture Students Major: Architecture V

Kansas State Zachary Stroth ’15

Case Western Reserve Ritchie Siandy Phan ’13

V

Chapter: “A”, “B”, AMC, Scholarship Chairman Organizations: Biomedical Engineering Society - Treasurer, Greek Week Steering Committee, Senior Week Committee Major: Biomedical Engineering Recognition: President’s Scholarship, Case Alumni Association Junior & Senior Scholarship, Gamma Sigma Alpha

V

Michigan State Brendan Patrick Hanley ’13 Chapter: “A”, “E”, Social Chairman Major: Economics

Embry-Riddle Gregory E. Smith ’15 Chapter: “B”, Scholarship Committee Organizations: TEDx Planning Group Major: Aerospace Engineering

V

Minnesota Nolan D. Anderson ’13

F

Florida Jesse E. Goodrich ’13 Chapter: “E”, Vice Treasurer, Earthball Philanthropy Director, Judicial Committee, RLC Planning Committee Organizations: Health Science Student Organization - Finance Chair, Dance Marathon - Operations Captain Major: Health Science Recognition: Honors - College of Public Health & Health Professions

V

Chapter: “A”, “C”, Commnity Service Chairman, Scholarship Chairman Organizations: Golden Key Honor Society, Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society, Alpha Phi Theta Honor Society, Tennis Club - Founder & Vice President Major: Philosophy, Economics Recognition: Student Marshal, Economics Department Outstanding Junior & Senior Award, Lanford Presidential Prize, Arthur R. Maytum Scholarship

Photographs with an “F” in the lower-right corner were graciously provided by Fraternal Composite Services. Photographs with a “V” in the lower-right corner were graciously provided by Vantine Imaging.

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Chapter: “A”, “F”, Health Advocate Organizations: Rothenberger Institute, College of Education & Human Development Undergraduate Student Board Major: Kinesiology Recognition: President Scholarship - 2009-2013, Dean’s List 3 semesters, Cum-Laude

Missouri Skylar Morris ’14

Fredonia Edward Shephard Iii ’13

F

Chapter: “C”, Philanthropy Chairman, Recruitment Committee Organizations: College of Human Ecology - Senator; K-State PROUD; Challenge Day Initiative - Creator, President; Hall Governing Board Floor President; BSU Christian Challenge Major: Family Studies and Human Services Minor: American Ethnic Studies, Leadership Studies

F

Chapter: Exec-at-Large, Recruitment Chairman, Athletics Chairman Organizations: IFC - Vice President of Membership Development, New Student Programs - Summer Welcome Leader, GAMMA Steering Committee, Outreach Student Recruitment - Co-Chair, Major: Industrial Engineering Recognition: Dean’s High Honor Roll – eight semesters, Engineering Dean’s List – Eight Semesters, Omicron Delta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi Engineering Honors Fraternity, Tap Day Honoree

New Haven Cameron Wade Varnado ’13 Chapter: “F”, Fundraising Chairman Organizations: Martial Arts Club - Founder, President; Rotaract Club; ROTC - Company Commander; Wrestling Club Major: Forensic Science Recognition: Honors Program, Dean’s List


Awards & Recognition Pittsburgh Jilan Kurlansky ’13

F

Chapter: AMC, Junior AMC, OCC Chairman, Recruitment Chairman, Philanthropy Chairman Organizations: Pitt Pathfinders Major: Communications, History, Philosophy of Science Recognition: Magna Cum Laude

South Florida Joshua M. Dubois ’13 Chapter: “D”, AMC, Fundraising Chairman, Leadership Development Day Facilitator Major: Business Management, Finance

Southeast Missouri Benjamin James Merriman ’13 Chapter: “E”, Recruitment Chairman Organizations: Resident Assistant (3 years) Major: Elementary Education Minor: Autism Education Varsity Athletics: Volleyball, Drum Major

Texas Tech Jeremy Jones ’15 Chapter: “C”, Recruitment Chairman, Philanthropy Chairman, Community Service Chairman, Fundraising Chairman Organizations: Raiderthon - Special Events Coordinator, Special Olympics, Academic Coach, Club Tennis Major: Business Management Minor: Exercise and Sport Sciences

Tri-State Tyler J. Boscoe ’13

F

UIFI Scholarships Each year, the Educational Foundation provides up to nine scholarships to Delta Chi’s emerging leaders in order for them to attend the NIC’s flagship leadership program. The Undergraduate Interfraternity Institute (UIFI) is a five-day institute held during the summer that brings together fraternity men and sorority women from across North America to create opportunities to explore, define, and enhance one’s leadership skills, personal awareness, commitment to one’s fraternity or sorority, and grow to expect values-based action from one’s self and those one leads. Recipients of this scholarship received the full cost of registration and up to $140 in travel costs.

F

V

Delta Chi Educational Foundation Awards & Scholarships

Michael Wiedle, Bowling Green ’16 Daniel Wallace, Central Missouri ’15 Timothy Melendez, Cortland ’14 Luke Trotz, Johnstown ’14 Erik Hansen, Miami ’16 William Nash, North Alabama ’14 Miguel Labrador, South Florida ’16 Jeremy Jones, Texas Tech ’15 Dustin Arvola, Tri-State ’15

Borelli Award The Borelli Award, established in 1982 by Raymond F. Borelli, Illinois ’58, Past “AA” and “AA” Emeritus, and Mark R. Borelli, Illinois ’81 in honor of the memory of Pamela Anne Borelli, beloved daughter and sister, and Mrs. Patricia Ann Borelli, beloved wife and mother. The Borelli award recognizes some of Delta Chi’s most exceptional student members for their outstanding academic, chapter, and campus achievements. The criteria for the award nominees can be viewed at www.dcef.com.

Chapter: “A”, AMC, Scholarship Chairman, Public Relations Chairman Organizations: Student Senate - Vice President, Order of Omega Recruitment Chair, American Society of Chemical Engineers, Skull and Bones, American Chemistry Society, Tau Beta Pi, Phi Eta Sigma, Omega Chi Epsilon Major: Chemical Engineering Minor: Bioprocess Engineering

Borelli Award, with Distinction

Truman State Taylor Joshua Mason ’13

Christopher Berry, Louisiana Tech ’14; “E”, IFC Vice President Kevin Bockerstett, Spring Hill ’13; Beta Beta Beta President, Science Olympiad Event Supervisor Don Ebben, Kettering-A ’13; “A”, Order of Omega President, IFC Treasurer Nicholas Rangel, Louisiana Tech ’13; “B”, Union Board Vice President, Orientation Assistant Director

Chapter: “A”, “C”, House Manager, Philanthropy Chairman, Greek Public Relations Chairman Organizations: Student Government, College Democrats, University Conduct Board, OCCS Intern Major: Justice Systems Minor: Political Science Recognition: Provost’s List - eight semesters, Cum Laude

West Chester Anthony Lafratte ’15 Chapter: Associate Member Class “D” Organizations: Honors College, Beta Alpha Psi, Student Government, Circle K International Major: Accounting, Finance Recognition: Dean’s List - four semesters, Madeleine Wing Adler Emerging Leader Award, Honors Student Association Each Delta Chi Chapter and Colony may nominate one Chapter Luminary each year. A Chapter Luminary is typically a brother who best exemplifies the values of Delta Chi through his actions and achievements within the Chapter/Colony, on campus, and in the community. A Chapter Luminary is typically a junior or senior member, though any student member may receive the distinction. Chapters and colonies may hold their own nomination and selection process and report their Chapter Luminary selection in their Chapter Meeting Report (CMR) and in the Awards & Recognition Applications each spring.

Tyler Boscoe, Tri-State ’13; “A”, Student Government Vice President Becket Duncan, Missouri State ’13; “A”, “C”, “E”, IFC President Bill Sterrett, Illinois ’14; “A”, IFC President

Borelli Award

Washburn Scholarship The Washburn Scholarship, named after Miles Washburn, Massachusetts ’87, is awarded annually to brothers who best exemplify what it means to be a Delta Chi. Community involvement, work responsibilities, chapter involvement, academic performance, and current financial situation are all considered in the evaluation process. Recipients must be active, dues-paying members in good standing with Delta Chi in order to qualify for this scholarship.

Joseph Kenny USP ’15

Andrew Reich Florida ’15

FALL 2013

23


Risk Management Policy

FIPG, INC.

Reaffirmed ’13

RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY

The Risk Management Policy of FIPG, Inc. includes the provisions that follow and shall apply to all Fraternity entities and all levels of Fraternity membership.

Alcohol and Drugs

Hazing

1. The possession, sale, use or consumption of ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, while on chapter premises, or during a fraternity event, in any situation sponsored or endorsed by the chapter, or at any event an observer would associate with the fraternity, must be in compliance with any and all applicable laws of the state, province, county, city and institution of higher education, and must comply with either the BYOB or Third Party Vendor Guidelines.

No chapter, colony, student or alumnus shall conduct nor condone hazing activities. Permission or approval by a person being hazed is not a defense. Hazing activities are defined as: “Any action taken or situation created, intentionally, whether on or off fraternity premises, to produce mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule. Such activities may include but are not limited to the following: use of alcohol; paddling in any form; creation of excessive fatigue; physical and psychological shocks; quests, treasure hunts, scavenger hunts, road trips or any other such activities carried on outside or inside of the confines of the chapter house; wearing of public apparel which is conspicuous and not normally in good taste; engaging in public stunts and buffoonery; morally degrading or humiliating games and activities; and any other activities which are not consistent with academic achievement, fraternal law, ritual or policy or the regulations and policies of the educational institution or applicable state law.”

2. No alcoholic beverages may be purchased through or with chapter funds nor may the purchase of same for members or guests be undertaken or coordinated by any member in the name of, or on behalf of, the chapter. The purchase or use of a bulk quantity or common source(s) of alcoholic beverage, for example, kegs or cases, is prohibited. 3. OPEN PARTIES, meaning those with unrestricted access by non-members of the fraternity, without specific invitation, where alcohol is present, are prohibited. 4. No members, collectively or individually, shall purchase for, serve to, or sell alcoholic beverages to any minor (i.e., those under legal “drinking age”). 5. The possession, sale or use of any ILLEGAL DRUGS or CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES while on the chapter premises or during a fraternity event or at any event that an observer would associate with the fraternity is strictly prohibited. 6. No chapter may co-sponsor an event with an alcohol distributor or tavern (tavern defined as an establishment generating more than half of annual gross sales from alcohol) at which alcohol is given away, sold or otherwise provided to those present. This includes any event held in, at or on the property of a tavern as defined above for purposes of fundraising. However, a chapter may rent or use a room or area in a tavern as defined above for a closed event held within the provisions of this policy, including the use of a third party vendor and guest list. An event at which alcohol is present may be conducted or co-sponsored with a charitable organization if the event is held within the provisions of this policy. 7. No chapter may co-sponsor, co-finance or attend or participate in a function at which alcohol is purchased by any of the host chapters, groups or organizations. 8. All recruitment or rush activities associated with any chapter will be nonalcoholic. No recruitment or rush activities associated with any chapter may be held at or in conjunction with a tavern or alcohol distributor as defined in this policy. 9. No member or pledge, associate/new member or novice, shall permit, tolerate, encourage or participate in “drinking games.” The definition of drinking games includes but is not limited to the consumption of shots of alcohol, liquor or alcoholic beverages, the practice of consuming shots equating to one’s age, “beer pong”, “century club”, “dares” or any other activity involving the consumption of alcohol which involves duress or encouragement related to the consumption of alcohol. 10. No alcohol shall be present at any pledge/associate member/new member/ novice program, activity or ritual of the chapter. This includes but is not limited to activities associated with “bid night,” “big brother-little brother” events or activities, / ”big sister-little sister” events or activities, “family” events or activities and initiation. 24

DELTA CHI QUARTERLY

Sexual Abuse and Harassment The fraternity will not tolerate or condone any form of sexist or sexually abusive behavior on the part of its members, whether physical, mental or emotional. This is to include any actions, activities or events, whether on chapter premises or off-site location which are demeaning to women or men, including but not limited to verbal harassment, sexual assault by individuals or members acting together. The employment or use of strippers, exotic dancers or similar, whether professional or amateur, at a fraternity event as defined in this policy is prohibited.

Fire, Health and Safety 1. All chapter houses should meet all local fire and health codes and standards. 2. All chapters should post by common phones and in other locations, emergency numbers for fire, police and ambulance and should have posted evacuation routes on the back of the door of each sleeping room. 3. All chapters should comply with engineering recommendations as reported by the insurance company or municipal authorities. 4. The possession and/or use of firearms or explosive or incendiary devices of any kind within the confines and premises of the chapter house is prohibited. 5. Candles should not be used in chapter houses or individual rooms except under controlled circumstances such as initiation.

Education Each fraternity shall annually instruct its students and alumni/alumnae in the Risk Management Policy of FIPG, Inc. Additionally, all students and key volunteers shall annually receive a copy of the Risk Management Policy and a copy of the policy shall be available on the fraternity website.

Third Party Vendor Criteria The Vendor Must: 1. Be properly licensed by the appropriate local and state authority. This may involve both a liquor license and a temporary license to sell on the premises where the function is to be held.


Chapter Situations Third Party Vendor Criteria (continued)

Corrective Action Levels

2. Be properly insured with a minimum of $1,000,000 of general liability insurance, evidenced by a properly completed certificate of insurance prepared by the insurance provided.

What follows is a list of chapters that are on Corrective Action for violation of the Risk Management Policy as of October 28, 2012. That is not to say the chapters on the following list are “bad” chapters. Likewise, it is unrealistic to assume Chapters on Corrective that chapters that are Action for Violation of the not on this list are Risk Management Policy complying with every policy. The bottom As of November 6, 2013 line of this issue is Chapter Level Violation that members of the Abracadabra I Alcohol Fraternity are engaging Arizona IV Alcohol/Hazing in dangerous activities Binghamton III Hazing and taking unnecessary Clemson III Hazing risks with their future Coastal Carolina V Hazing and the future of Delta Cortland II Alcohol Chi because they Georgia Southern II Hazing believe this will help Hayward I Hazing fill voids where their Indiana IV Alcohol/Hazing needs are not being Kennesaw III Hazing met. Whatever the case, LSU II Hazing the solution remains Northwest Missouri III Alcohol the same. Each and Penn State III Hazing every chapter needs the Purdue I Alcohol involvement of mature Whitewater I Alcohol alumni who can help the Fraternity’s student members discover that there are alternatives that can meet both their long and short-term needs. Finally, each and every member of Delta Chi needs to periodically reflect on Delta Chi’s values as contained in our Preamble: Promote Friendship, Develop Character, Advance Justice, and Assist in the Acquisition of a Sound Education.

3. The certificate of insurance must also show evidence that the vendor has, as a part of his/her insurance coverage, “off premises liquor liability coverage and non-owned and hired auto coverage.” 4. Named insureds included on the certificate of insurance must as a minimum include the local chapter hiring the vendor as well as the international fraternity that the local chapter is affiliated with. 5. Agree in writing to cash sales only, collected by the vendor during the function. 6. Assume in writing all the responsibilities that any other purveyor of alcoholic beverages would assume in the normal course of business, including but not limited to:

a. Checking identification cards upon entry;

b. Not serving minors;

c. Not serving individuals that appear to be intoxicated;

d. Maintaining absolute control of ALL alcoholic containers present;

e. Collecting all remaining alcohol at the end of a function (no excess alcohol – opened or unopened – is to be given, sold or furnished to the chapter);

f. Removing all alcohol from the premises.

Policy Guidelines According to FIPG: 1. Closed parties (meaning those events with alcohol present) should have a guest list prepared at least 24 hours in advance. A ratio of two guests per member (or fire code capacity, whichever is smaller) is suggested. 2. “Non-alcoholic” keg beer is not permitted because it can contain up to .05 percent alcohol. Therefore, serving it would be a violation of our policy.

According to the Delta Chi Risk Management Manual:
 1. At chapter social events, signs should be posted that indicate the chapter complies with and enforces the laws and policies with respect to alcohol, illegal drugs, and controlled substances. 2. All persons present should not be allowed access to alcohol if they are intoxicated, regardless of age. 3. Alcohol should only be used as an adjunct to the event rather than its focus. 4. The use of alcohol on the premises should be stopped at least one hour before the end of the function. 5. Plenty of non-salty foods and non-alcoholic alternative beverages should be provided. 6. Adequate professional security should be provided to deal with uninvited guests and monitor any other potential problems. 7. Trained party monitors should be present to respond to situations. A ratio of one party monitor for every 20 attendees is suggested. Party monitors should agree to the following:

a. Not to consume alcohol, and remain sober for the duration of the event;

b. Make sure the party starts and ends on time and that the bar opens and closes on time;

c. Wear distinctive clothing to identify themselves at all times.

8. Buses, taxis, phone numbers, etc. should be provided for any event to promote the safe return of members and guests. 9. “Hard” liquor (alcohol rated by proof rather than percentage) should be prohibited from all parties. For “bring your own” parties, a six pack of beer (or the alcoholic equivalent), or less, per person is allowed. 10. Glass bottles of any sort should not be allowed. Restrict consumption of any beverages to cans and plastic cups.

Level 1 – Level 1 Corrective Action shall include, but is not limited to, ordering that the Chapter cease and desist from the conduct in the future and be in accordance with the requirements of Delta Chi Law and the Risk Management Policy of the Fraternity. The Chapter shall be required to submit to the Executive Director a written statement that all prohibited conduct has been stopped. The statement shall be signed by the “A”, “BB” and such other members of the Chapter, as specified in the report, who were involved with or had supervision over the conduct in the violation. Level 2 – Level 2 Corrective Action shall include, but is not limited to, all provisions of Level 1, plus the Chapter shall submit a written plan of procedures and/or activities that comply with the Fraternity’s Risk Management Policy covering the activities in the violation. The plan shall be updated at least twice per year for the period of corrective action. Level 3 – Level 3 Corrective Action shall include, but is not limited to, all provisions of Levels 1 and 2, plus supervision of the activities of the Chapter that were involved in the violation by a person or persons acceptable to the Executive Director. Level 4 – Level 4 Corrective Action shall include, but is not limited to, all provisions of Levels 1, 2 and 3 plus the charter of the Chapter shall be suspended for the period of time of the corrective action. Chapters under Level 4 Corrective Action shall either be placed in conservatorship, as provided in Delta Chi Law, or shall operate under the direct supervision of the Executive Director. Level 5 – Level 5 Corrective Action shall require the suspension of the charter and the cessation of operation of the Chapter as it then exists. Re-establishment of the Chapter shall be subject to the terms and conditions of the Board of Regents after a minimum one-year period.

FALL 2013

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Educational Initiatives

UniLOA Report

SHOWS DELTA CHI STUDENTS IMPROVE IN CITIZENSHIP

ITEM 5: I spend time researching candidates before I vote. For example, I will read some independent sources about more than one presidential candidate before making up my mind.

ITEM 12: I am serious about voting. For example, I actively access the media to learn about and to address questions about a candidate’s platform, beliefs, and values.

ITEM 19: I am informed of current events. For example, I regularly read, listen, or watch various media to remain current in my knowledge of local, regional, national, and international events.

ITEM 26: I vote. For example, I am registered and vote in campus, local, state, and national elections.

ITEM 33: I know about current issues within the community. For example, I know what the hot political and social issues are in my town.

ITEM 40: I contribute financially to causes I believe in. For example, I make financial donations to charities, organizations, and causes.

ITEM 47: I can identify good political leaders. For example, I am able to report to others the values, voting records, platform and political philosophy held by political leaders and understand how these compliment or contrast to those of the community.

ITEM 54: I engage in the political process through voicing viewpoints. For example, I write letters to the editor, engage in debate with others, or contact political leaders to voice my opinion.

ITEM 61: I empower those around me. For example, I actively seek the opinions of others and assess them in contrast to my own and am able to withhold judgment of the other person.

Since 2010, Delta Chi has been tracking the impact it has on its student members through participation in the University Learning Outcomes Assessment (UniLOA) project. UniLOA tracks the development of student members, in aggregate and by chapter, in seven key areas: critical thinking, self-awareness, communication, diversity, citizenship, leadership, and relationships. Participants score themselves in response to statements designed to gauge their breadth and depth within each learning outcome. Since UniLOA is also administered by many universities and Greek organizations, Delta Chi is able to see how its student membership compares to other Greeks and other non-Greek college students in these seven learning outcomes. Early on, Delta Chi Staff recognized an opportunity for improvement within the citizenship learning outcome. It was particularly concerning that, leading up to a major election year, Delta Chi students scored particularly lower than average on statements such

as “I vote” and “I know about current issues within the community.” In his final “In The Bond” message in the Quarterly, 51st “AA” R.C. Damle, Texas ’01, drove home a deep connection to many. He wrote, “Delta Chi itself can trace its origins to the result of an election and the desire to make a difference. Citizenship is not limited to federal, state, or county issues; it extends to our obligations as a part of any society.” Through a focus from Delta Chi’s leadership, the work of Leadership Consultants during chapter visits, and programming at Regional Leadership Conferences, it was not surprising to see that Delta Chi’s scores in several of the citizenship responses improved, either in average score or in position relative to other Greeks and non-Greeks (see chart). Delta Chi looks forward to seeing more data-based evidence that the fraternal experience really does help its members grow far beyond other organizations and college experiences.

“CITIZENSHIP” RESULTS 80 70 60 50 40 30 20

ITEM 68: I am active in organizations related to

10

my professional and personal interests without overextending my commitments. For example, I belong to professional and hobby clubs and groups.

0

5

12

2011-12 Delta Chi

19

26

33

2011-12 Greek Avg.

40

47

2010-11 Delta Chi

54

61

68

2010-11 Greek Avg.

Wanted: An Honest Conversation About Alcohol Consumption This fall, Delta Chi is embarking on a new educational initiative unlike any other in the past. Dr. Alan Marlatt Dr. Jason Kilmer Structured to be an open discussion, interactive forum, the Alcohol Skills Training Program (ASTP) is a non-judgmental, non-confrontational program for those who choose to drink and also those who don’t. As abstinence-only education in other topics generally fails to widely influence behavior change, ASTP seeks to approach risk management on a deeper, more personal level. By reducing the risks associated with drinking through open, honest conversations and a focus on safety, Delta Chi strongly feels its members and its chapters will benefit greatly. The curriculum and content for ASTP was originally developed by Dr. Alan Marlatt and Dr. Jason Kilmer at the University of Washington. Numerous other fraternal 26

DELTA CHI QUARTERLY

organizations have already seen positive results from utilizing ASTP with their student members. Leadership Consultants will first unveil this new program during chapter visits this fall. Then, attendees at Delta Chi’s nine Regional Leadership Conferences, held each spring, will have an opportunity to participate in the program. Delta Chi is also currently looking for volunteers to assist in facilitating an ASTP program as requested by our chapters. Volunteers can be just about anyone with a passion for facilitation - ABT members, faculty, community members, and general alumni. Volunteers will commit one weekend every three years for training and four to six weekends each year facilitating the program on campuses nearby. If you’re interested in learning more about the program or you’d like to express interest in becoming a volunteer, please contact Kevin Madden, Director of Risk Management, at 319-341-3134 or kevinm@deltachihq.org.


Keeping In Touch Abracadabra Born to Brother and Mrs. Brett Goodman ’04, a son, William Jae, on August 10, 2013. Alabama Brother Brandon Pledger ’11 married to Erika Brewington on April 6, 2013.

Born to Brother and Mrs. Alonzo Janes ’01, a son, Dominic Anthony, on May 29, 2013.

Hayward Born to Brother and Mrs. Nate Failing ’01, a son, Pierce William, on May 31, 2013.

Ohio State Brother Thomas Watson ’06 married to Kate Gotalaere on June 8, 2013.

Born to Brother and Mrs. Ian Brannon ’02, a son, Isaac Oliver, on March 20, 2013.

Iowa Born to Brother and Mrs. William Cone ’02, a daughter, Eleanor, on May 28, 2013.

Southern Illinois Born to Brother and Mrs. Lukas Chudyba ’05, a son, Matthew Joseph, on February 19, 2013.

Brother Brian Robards ’05 married to Brandi Fritz on August 17, 2013.

Appalachian State Brett Hoge ’99 has been promoted to Senior Managing Director at BB&T Scott & Stringfellow, in Winston Salem, NC.

Born to Brother and Mrs. Joseph Olesh ’05, a son, Lucas Joseph, on June 3, 2013.

Arizona Born to Brother and Mrs. Charlie Hong ’95, a daughter, Caryn Taylor, on May 25, 2013.

Colorado State Brother Timothy Ulrich ’04 married to Meghan Bowers on July 20, 2013.

Bryant Born to Brother and Mrs. G. Frank Teas ’91, a daughter, Ainsley Elizabeth, on June 21, 2013. Cal Poly Brother J. Anthony Madonna ’96 married to Annee Deering on July 6, 2013. Born to Brother and Mrs. Needham Windham ’99, a son, Leo Curtiss, on July 28, 2013.

Brother Nicholas Fedotoff ’07 married to Lauren Kissinger on July 27, 2013.

Connecticut Born to Brother and Mrs. Brian Brown ’03, a son, Lincoln Allen, on June 15, 2013. Duquesne Andrew Wachter ’00 named a “2013 Fast Tracker” by the Pittsburgh Business Times. Embry-Riddle Born to Brother and Mrs. Joshua Shane Hess ’97, a son, Liam Sean, on June 3, 2013.

Kansas State Born to Brother and Mrs. Brandon Konda ’99, a son, Tristian, on June 13, 2013. Long Beach Brother Ken Cooper ’08 married to Jill Frantz on April 6, 2013. Minnesota Brother Joshua Redshaw ’06 married to Jes Albro on March 1, 2013. New Haven Born to Brother and Mrs. Michael Lewis ’00, a son, Gavin Anthony, on July 20, 2013. Brother Charles Ilioff ’04 married to Tiffany Cote on July 20, 2013. New Mexico State Born to Brother and Mrs. Daniel Holman ’05, a daughter, Abbygale Lynn, on June 7, 2013.

Western Carolina Born to Brother and Mrs. James Mount ’92, a daughter, Emerson Leighton, on July 4, 2013. Born to Brother and Mrs. Thomas Wright ’95, a daughter, Grace, on May 31, 2013. Born to Brother and Mrs. David Cameron ’98, a daughter, Maci Jane, on June 21, 2013. Born to Brother and Mrs. Terry Bartlett ’01, a daughter, Madison, on July 22, 2013. Brother Blake Rogers ’08 married to Stefanie Manning on July 21, 2013. Born to Brother and Mrs. Sean Caulfrield ’07, a son, Ari Cennen, on April 28, 2013.

Our Brothers Who Serve: We Salute You! We salute our brothers who serve their country. For brothers who have served in an active combat zone, Delta Chi has a lapel pin to recognize their bravery. To inquire about our “Men at War” lapel pin, or share photos, news, and updates about brothers serving in the military, please email quarterly@deltachihq.org.

Alabama Brandon Pledger ’11 served in the United State Marine Corps and was deployed to Iraq for seven months in 2007 before pledging Delta Chi in Spring of 2008.

Florida Donald Decker ’85 served on the USS Michigan 1989 − 1991, the USS Boston 1991 − 1993, and the USS Augusta 1996 − 2000. He continued his work for the Navy working at the Naval Submarine School from 1993 – 1996, the Naval Submarine Support Facility 2000 − 2002, the Submarine Surveillance Equipment Program 2002 − 2008, and the USCG Research and Development Center 2009 – present.

Pittsburgh Mark Bailey ’06 currently stationed at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRID) in Fort Detrick, MD. He is also the Officer in Charge (OIC) for the Division of Aerobiological Sciences.

Farewell & Parting These men have lived amongst us for a time, and we have been honored to call them brothers. Now they are gone and we bid them a fond farewell at this parting. Alabama Robert Owen ’50, May 12, 2013 F. Fagan Thompson ’60, January 9, 2012 Leroy Scott Atkins ’61, March 19, 2013 Donald Busby ’61, July 9, 2013 Arizona John Wiles ’48, March 18, 2013 Stephen Harrison ’78, July 26, 2013

Central Missouri Paul Strombeck ’70, May 28, 2013

Iowa State Glenn Saha ’40, July 10, 2012

Oshkosh Thomas Smith Alumnus, July 2, 2013

Clarion Kenneth Spinks ’89, July 9, 2013

Kentucky Dellon Fulton ’50, May 15, 2013

DePauw Robert Holzgrafe ’46, March 2, 2013 Stanley Mutti ’56, July 10, 2013

New Haven Wayne Barrow ’93, July 22, 2013

Southern California John Sutton ’48, June 13, 2013 Richard Sansom ’49, March 26, 2012

Florida State Lanue Ryan ’67, June 24, 2013

Northern Illinois Paul Ladd ’79, June 24, 2013

FALL 2013

27


__ Home

__ Work

Name_________________________________________________ Address_______________________________________________ City__________________________________________________ State _______________________ Zip________________________ E-mail________________________________________________ Moving? Send your mailing label with new address to: The Delta Chi Fraternity, International Headquarters PO Box 1817, Iowa City, IA 52244-1817 Phone (319) 337-4811 Fax (319) 337-5529

CHAPTERS: 125 Abracadabra www.calgreeks.com/author/ucbdx Adelphi facebook.comAdelphiUniversityDeltaChi Alabama www.deltachiua.org Alberta www.deltachi.ca “Delta Chi Alberta” American www.audeltachi.com “Delta Chi American” Appalachian State facebook.com/appalachianstate.deltachi Arizona www.deltachiarizona.com “Arizona Delta Chi Alumni” Arizona State “The Delta Chi Fraternity at ASU” Auburn www.audchi.com facebook.com/groups/AUDeltaChiAlumni Augusta www.dxaugusta.com “Delta Chi Augusta Georgia Alumni Chapter” Behrend behrend.orgsync.com/org/deltachi25022 “Delta Chi the Behrend Chapter” Binghamton deltachibinghamton.weebly.com Bowling Green www.bgdeltachi.com facebook.com/deltachi.bgsu Bryant www.bryantdeltachi.org “Delta Chi Bryant” Cal Poly www.cpdeltachi.com “Cal Poly Delta Chi Alumni” California Univ-PA 317 Green St., California, PA 15419 Case Western Reserve facebook.com/DeltaChiCWRU Central Michigan “Delta Chi Fraternity Central Michigan University” Central Missouri www.ucmdeltachi.com Charlotte facebook.com/DeltaChiCharlotte Cincinnati www.ucdchi.com “The Delta Chi Fraternity Cincinnati Colony” Clemson www.deltachiclemson.com “Clemson Delta Chi E” Coastal Carolina www.ccudeltachi.com “Delta Chi Coastal Carolina Chapter” Cornell www.cudx.org Corpus Christi www.dchitamucc.org facebook.com/dchitamucc Cortland deltachicortland.blogspot.com “Delta Chi Cortland Fan Page”

POSTMASTER - If undeliverable send notice on Form 3579 to The Delta Chi Fraternity International Headquarters P.O. Box 1817 Iowa City, IA 52244-1817

New Address (Please Print)

Davis www.deltachidavis.com Denison www.denisondeltachi.com Duquesne www.duqdx.com facebook.com/duqdx East Carolina “East Carolina University Delta Chi Alumni” East Stroudsburg facebook.com/deltachi.esu Eastern Illinois facebook.com/EIUDeltaChi Eastern Washington www.deltachiewu.com “EWU DChi Alumni” Embry-Riddle www.eraudeltachi.com “ERAU Delta Chi” Florida www.ufdeltachi.com “Florida DX Alumni” Florida State facebook.com/DXFSU Fredonia www.fredoniadeltachi.com “Delta Chi-Fredonia Chapter” Fullerton www.deltachicsuf.com “Delta Chi Csuf” Gannon www.gudeltachi.com facebook.com/deltachi.gannonchapter George Mason gmudeltachi.chapterspot.com “Delta Chi GMU” Georgia Southern www.gsudeltachi.org facebook.com/gsudeltachi Georgia Tech www.gtdeltachi.com facebook.com/GTDeltaChi Gorham State www.gscdeltachi.com Hamilton “Delta Chi- Hamilton Chapter” Hayward www.deltachihayward.com facebook.com/delta.chihayward Hobart people.hws.edu/deltachi Hofstra www.dxhu.org “Delta Chi Fraternity, Hofstra Chapter” Huntsville facebook.com/DeltaChiHSV Illinois www.illinoisdeltachi.com facebook.com/IllinoisDeltaChi Illinois State ilstu.deltachi.org “Illinois State University Delta Chi Fraternity” Indiana www.indianadeltachi.com Iowa deltachiiowa.chaptercms.com Iowa State facebook.comIowaStateUniversityDeltaChi

Jacksonville State facebook.com/jsudeltachi James Madison www.jmudeltachi.com facebook.com/JMUDX Johnstown www.upjdeltachi.com/Welcome.html Kansas www.kansasdeltachi.com “Delta Chi The University of Kansas” Kansas State www.ksudeltachi.com facebook.com/DXKSU Kennesaw www.kennesawdeltachi.com facebook.com/KSUDeltaChi Kettering-A asection.ketteringdeltachi.org facebook.com/KUDXA Kettering-B www.ketteringdeltachi.org facebook.com/groups/ketteringdeltachi Lake Forest www.lfcdeltachi.org facebook.com/DeltaChiLFC Lehigh www.lehighdeltachi.com facebook.com/LUDChi Livingston uwadeltachi.weebly.com facebook.com/uwa.deltachi Long Beach “Delta Chi Long Beach Alumni Association” Louisiana Tech latech.deltachi.org facebook.com/DeltaChi.LATech LSU sites.theginsystem.com/deltachilsu facebook.com/LSUDeltaChi Mankato www.deltachimankato.mfbiz.com “Delta Chi Mankato Chapter” Marquette www.marquettedeltachi.com facebook.com/MUDeltaChi Marshall “Delta Chi Marshall Chapter” Maryland “Delta Chi Maryland Alumni” Massachusetts www.umassdeltachi.com “UMass Delta Chi Alumni” Miami www.deltachimiami.com Michigan www.umdeltachi.com Michigan State msu.deltachi.org “Delta Chi Michigan State University” Minnesota www.mndeltachi.com facebook.com/umndeltachi Mississippi State “Mississippi State Delta Chi” Missouri mizzou.deltachi.edu “Delta Chi Missouri Chapter Alumni” Missouri State www.mostatedeltachi.org “Missouri State Delta Chi”

Montclair www.deltachi-montclair-alumni.org facebook.com/groups/deltachimontclair New Haven www.unhdeltachi.com “Delta Chi New Haven Chapter” North Alabama “Delta Chi Fraternity North Alabama” Northern Arizona nau.deltachi.org Northern Colorado ncdeltachi.webs.com “Delta Chi at Northern Colorado” Northern Illinois “Northern Illinois Delta Chi Fraternity” Northwest Missouri www.nwdchi.com facebook.com/groups/nwdchi Northwestern www.nudeltachi.org facebook.com/DeltaChiNU Ohio State www.osudeltachi.com facebook.com/OSUDeltaChi Oklahoma www.okudeltachi.com “Oklahoma Delta Chi” Oregon State www.osudeltachi.org “Delta Chi The Oregon State Chapter” Penn State www.greeks.psu.edu/ifc/dx facebook.com/DeltaChiPSU Pittsburgh www.pittdeltachi.com facebook.com/pittdeltachi Purdue www.deltachipurdue.com “Delta Chi at Purdue” Radford rudeltachi.blogspot.com facebook.com/DXofRU Rhode Island “Delta Chi - The University of Rhode Island Chapter” Riverside www.deltachiucr.org facebook.com/DeltaChiUCR Rutgers www.rutgersdeltachi.com “Rutgers Delta Chi” Sacramento facebook.com/csusdc South Dakota State www.sddeltachi.com “SD State Delta Chi Alumni” South Florida www.usfdx.com facebook.com/sofla.deltachi Southeast Missouri sites.theginsystem.com/deltachisemo “Delta Chi - Southeast Missouri Chapter” Southern California www.uscdeltachi.org facebook.com/USCDeltaChi Southern Illinois siuc.deltachi.org “SIU Delta Chi Chapter”

Spring Hill “The Delta Chi Fraternity Spring Hill College” Stephen F. Austin “Delta Chi at Stephen F. Austin State University” Syracuse “Delta Chi Syracuse” Tarleton “Delta Chi @ Tarleton State” Texas www.texasdeltachi.org “Texas Delta Chi Alumni” Texas Tech “Delta Chi Texas Tech University” Tri-State trine.deltachi.org “Delta Chi at Trine University” Troy State www.troydeltachi.org “Delta Chi Fraternity Troy Chapter” Truman State www.tsudeltachi.com “Truman State Delta Chi” USP facebook.com/USPDeltaChi Valdosta “Delta Chi Alumni Valdosta State” Virginia Commonwealth www.deltachivcu.com facebook.com/deltachivcu Washburn sites.theginsystem.com/deltachiwashburn facebook.com/DeltaChiWashburn Washington www.uwdeltachi.com facebook.com/DeltaChiUW Washington State facebook.com/deltachiwsu West Chester ah778422.wix.com/wcudeltachi facebook.com/wcudeltachi West Georgia facebook.com/DeltaChiUWG Western Michigan “Delta Chi WMU Alumni” Whitewater sites.google.com/site/uwwdeltachi “Delta Chi Alumni Whitewater Chapter” William & Mary wmpeople.wm.edu/site/page/deltachi01 Wilmington student.uncw.edu/org/deltachi “Delta Chi UNCW Chapter” Windsor www.deltachiwindsor.com facebook.com/deltachiwindsor

COLONIES: 2 Oshkosh facebook.com/DeltaChiOshkosh Wisconsin facebook.com/DXMadison

ALUMNI CHAPTERS: 28 ARIZONA VALLEY: “A” Todd Nyberg-Mastrorilli, Radford ’97, actawardsmail@yahoo.com AUGUSTA AREA: “A” Eric Michenfelder, Augusta ’08, emichenf@aug.edu AUSTIN: “A” Jeff Jones, Texas ’02, Jeffrey-jones@dell.com BOSTON AREA: “A” Darrell TcTague, bostondeltachi@gmail.com CAPE FEAR AREA: “A” Doug Chananie, East Carolina ’07, dchananie@gmail.com CAPITAL AREA: “A” Vincent DiCamillo, Duquesne ’95, vgicamillo@yahoo.com CENTRAL FLORIDA: “A” Dean DiPaolo, Florida ’91, deandx@yahoo.com COLUMBUS: “A” Paul Bohlman, Ohio State ’70, pbohlman@aol.com CONNECTICUT AREA: “A” Mark Auletta Connecticut ’89 auletta@comcast.net DALLAS/FORT WORTH: “A” Michael Baird, Texas A&M ’04, Michael.baird@nmfn.com

GREATER WISCONSIN AREA: “A” Alan Udell, Wisconsin ’91, audell22@aol.com ILLINOIS: “A” Ray Mathews, Illinois ’76, mathcomm@comcast.net KANSAS CITY AREA: “A” Fred Buckley Central Missouri ’00, fredcbuckley@gmail.com LOS ANGELES: “A” Michael Woolbright Long Beach ’86 mike@expresstees.com MIAMI AREA: “A” Joaquin Bello, Florida International ’95, bello_joaquin@hotmail.com MYRTLE BEACH: “A” Michael Smith, Coastal Carolina ’11, masmith@g.coastal.edu NEW ORLEANS: “A” Brandon Sullivan, LSU ’07, brandonlsullivan@gmail.com NEW YORK: “A” Alex Chan, Massachusetts ’92, deltachinyc@aol.com NORTHEAST OHIO AREA: “A” Steve Bossart, Kent State ’90, sbossart@aol.com

RIO GRANDE AREA: “A” Andrew Haggerty, New Mexico State ’03, andrewHaggertydchi@yahoo.com SACRAMENTO AREA: “A” John Shelby, Sacramento ’86, jshelby@surewestnet SEATTLE: “A” Patrick Shields, Washington ’99, Patrick.shields@yahoo.com SOUTH FLORIDA: “A” Michael Agnello, Michigan State ’81, mike@agnellofinancial.com TAMPA BAY AREA: “A” Michael Shelton, Florida ’98, mmshelton1@gmail.com TENNESSEE VALLEY: “A” James Johnson, Huntsville ’04, dchitva@gmail.com THREE RIVERS: “A” Tom Horowitz, Michigan State ’87, tomh@plantscape.com TROY AREA: “A” Mark Kelly, Troy State ’76, info@troydeltachialumni.com TWIN CITIES AREA: “A” Matthew Johnson, Minnesota ’01, matt@tjreg.com