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CORNERSTONE Published by the Fraternity •  Twenty-Third Edition •  2019


First Edition, 1976 Twenty-Third Edition, 2019 Copyright 1976, 1978, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2010, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 The Delta Chi Fraternity, Inc. Iowa City, Iowa


Preamble We, the members of The Delta Chi Fraternity, believing that great advantages are to be derived from a brotherhood of college and university men, appreciating that close association may promote friendship, develop character, advance justice, and assist in the acquisition of a sound education, do ordain and establish this Constitution.


This manual is dedicated to the men who are sharing the great experience which caused Founder Peter S. Johnson to declare, “Delta Chi was my first love; it shall be my last.�


Table of Contents   1. Delta Chi

Basic Expectations of a Delta Chi...................... 1 The Brotherhood of a Lifetime............................ 3

  2. The Greek Tradition

History of the Greek Movement.......................... 7 Presidents of the United States Who Have Been Members of General College Fraternities.................................................. 13 The North-American Interfraternity   Conference.............................................................. 14 Men’s Fraternities...................................................... 16 N.I.C. Decalogue........................................................ 18 The Greek Alphabet and the Fraternity Language................................................ 20

  3. Delta Chi’s Roots

Sir Edward Coke........................................................ 23

  4. History of Delta Chi

The Founding of The Delta Chi Fraternity...... 28 The Name of the Fraternity and the Badge... 33 The Ritual..................................................................... 34 The Emblem................................................................ 35 Expansion.................................................................... 36 Delta Chi Goes Single Membership................... 40 Shall We Become a General Fraternity?.......... 41 1922-Present............................................................... 46

  5. The Delta Chi Bond

The Insignia................................................................. 51 Why “National”?........................................................ 53 Awards and Recognition........................................ 57

  6. The Fraternity Today

General Structure and Governance................... 61 Professional Organization..................................... 63 Housing in Delta Chi................................................ 65 The Delta Chi Educational Foundation............ 66


7. The Chapter Today

What Does It Take To Have a Successful Chapter?................................................ 68 Member Education................................................... 71 Opposed to Hazing.................................................. 72 The Chapter................................................................ 74 Brand Identity............................................................ 74 Officer Responsibilities........................................... 78 The Basics.................................................................... 85 Alumni Board of Trustees...................................... 88 House Corporations................................................. 89 “This isn’t a business, it’s a Fraternity!”............ 90 Fair Share vs. A Piece At A Time........................ 92

  8. The Role of the Alumnus

Alumni Responsibilities.......................................... 94 Stay Involved.............................................................. 95

  9. Order of Business

Parliamentary Procedure....................................... 96

10. The Essence of Good Taste

Introductions.............................................................. 104 Shaking Hands........................................................... 104 Arriving at a Restaurant......................................... 105 Entering and Being Seated................................... 105 Table Manners............................................................ 105 Tipping.......................................................................... 106 Conduct in the House............................................. 107 Phone Courtesy......................................................... 107 Electronic Etiquette................................................. 108 Chapter Hospitality.................................................. 110 Personal Cleanliness................................................ 110 The Basic Dress Wardrobe.................................... 111 How to Tie a Tie......................................................... 113 Walkout Policy........................................................... 114

Appendices

The Nine Regions of Delta Chi............................. 117 Locations of Undergraduate Chapters............ 118 The Delta Chi Fraternity Officers........................ 120 The Delta Chi Fraternity Officers Emeriti........ 124 Order of the White Carnation.............................. 126 The Delta Chi of the Year Award........................ 127


John J. Kuhn Award................................................. 128 New Founders............................................................ 128 Presidents of the Delta Chi Educational Foundation.................................................................. 129 Significant Dates....................................................... 129 Greek-Lettered Groups of All Kinds.................. 131 International General College Fraternities and Sororities............................................................. 132 National Professional Societies........................... 133 National Honor Societies....................................... 135 National Recognition and Service Societies.. 137 The Greeks Have a Word for It............................ 138 Geographic Locations of Men’s Fraternities International Headquarters................................... 143 Previous Convention Sites..................................... 144 Delta Chi Songs......................................................... 145 Personal Record........................................................ 162 Recommended Officer Notebooks................... 163 Danger Signs of Alcohol Poisoning................... 164 FIPG, Inc. Risk Management Policy................... 165


The photograph printed on the inside front cover is of the 1929 Delta Chi Convention where the Fraternity officially abolished “Hell Week.” The inside back cover is the group photograph of Delta Chi’s 61st International Convention, held in Denver, Colorado the Summer of 2018.


Basic Expectations of a Delta Chi   1. I will strive for academic achievement and practice academic integrity.   2. I will respect the dignity and worth of all persons. I will not physically, mentally, psychologically, or sexually abuse or haze any human being.   3. I will protect the health and safety of all human beings.   4. I will respect my property and the property of others; therefore, I will neither abuse nor tolerate the abuse of property.   5. I will meet my financial obligations in a timely manner.   6. I will neither use nor support the use of illegal drugs; I will neither abuse nor support the abuse of alcohol.   7. I will acknowledge that a clean and attractive environment is essential to both physical and mental health; therefore, I will do all in my power to see that the chapter property is safe, properly cleaned and maintained.   8. I will know and understand the ideals expressed in my fraternity Ritual and will incorporate them into my daily life.   9. I will exercise compassion and understanding in dealing with all persons. 10. I will sustain my commitment to and involvement with our fraternity throughout my lifetime. 11. I will challenge all my fraternity members to abide by these fraternity obligations and will confront those who violate them.

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In the usual course of things I should have been forgotten at graduation. This is the keynote of the Fraternity. The Fraternity man never graduates. He receives his diploma and leaves his Alma Mater for the larger affairs of the world, but as long as his Chapter stands, he is as much a part and parcel of it as in his undergraduate days. His success is theirs and their success is his. He belongs to the family for life. . . . Most of us in our undergraduate days do not appreciate the fact that the fraternity is the one tie that will bind us to the college for life. It is only when we come back, when we return as strangers to the old campus from which all our acquaintances have long since gone, that we know that our fraternity is the one thing dear to us that has survived the going of the years. The fellow who leaves should never think that his connection with his fraternity ends with his graduation. It has only begun. He will come across the members all the years of his life. Some can aid him and some he can aid, but the fact that a man is a member of your own society will cause you to “sorter snuggle up to him” wherever you find him. Man is a gregarious animal and cannot help it. There is one thing about it, whatever your fraternity brother’s position may be or what turns the fates may have given him: he is worthy of respect. — Founder Peter Schermerhorn Johnson writing twenty years after the Founding of Delta Chi

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Delta Chi — The Brotherhood of a Lifetime Each year, thousands of young men join fraternities, looking for that mystical “bond of brotherhood” and a sense of belonging that has so much to do with why the role of a Delta Chi is important to us. Today, as a new associate member of The Delta Chi Fraternity, you feel excitement; you see opportunities; you understand the responsibilities and look forward to the challenges of full membership in Delta Chi. That exhilaration will carry over to every facet of your life. Being accepted by and becoming a part of Delta Chi gives you the benefit of a rich heritage and a promising future. The Corner­stone is a reference manual for Delta Chi’s history, its membership, its purpose and goals, its programs, each individual member’s responsibilities and much more. It addresses the role and responsibilities of Delta Chis throughout their lives. Membership in the Fraternity is not limited to the undergraduate years. The opportunity to grow and continue one’s fraternal affiliation is always open. To do so simply requires that each Delta Chi take upon himself a commitment to stand by his oath taken early in his membership. An alumnus who had given nearly 60 years of service to the Fraternity once said to a group of undergraduates, “The excitement about Delta Chi you feel today doesn’t begin to compare to the rewards it can offer through a lifetime. Every day the Fraternity means more to me. It has for sixty years.” Forget for a moment all of the material manifestations of fraternities as you see them. What you are left with is a group of college men who wish, by close association, to accomplish certain desired ends that they cannot accomplish individually. During the Associate Member education program you will have the opportunity to understand and embrace our values, assimilate into your chapter, and start developing the bonds of brotherhood. Each chapter has an Associate Member Counselor (AMC) who is responsible for facilitating an approved Associate Member Education Program.

1 AX “Being a Delta Chi is not an oath you take once. It’s an oath you live every day.” - Miles C. Washburn 52nd “AA” of Delta Chi

The Associate Member Program should be used in conjunction with this manual.

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Associate Member Pin

Official Badge

Alumni Rededication Pin

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In addition to reading this manual, each associate member is expected to select a “big brother” from among the membership of the chapter. The big brother is responsible for taking steps to help guide his little brother through the mem­ b er­ s hip education program. He will follow your development closely as you prepare to accept the responsibilities of full membership. The Cornerstone is intended to be your Delta Chi handbook and to serve as a handy resource today and in the future. It should not be committed to memory and it cannot be used as a text book where testing is a presumed or actual condition of membership and initiation. There are no words to quantify or qualify the significance and impact of the Fraternity on its members. In large part, the richness, reward and challenge of being a Delta Chi is dependent upon each member’s quest to make his place in life. The path to a full and broad personal interpretation of “fraternity” is filled with late night talks, recruitment, officer elec­tions, committee involvement, social functions, alumni relations, exam preparation and service projects. The list includes every function of being a student or concerned alumnus. The tasks are sometimes difficult, and disappointments occur frequently. But strangely enough, those who persevere are those who express the greatest satisfaction. They are the ones who consider the meaning of Brotherhood and may state, “It cannot be defined.” They are the ones who realize that “fraternity” is a collection of intangibles; it cannot be evaluated in mathematical terms or analyzed through objective scientific tests. The consideration of “fraternity” can only be done in comparative terms in light of one’s personal experience. They are the ones who realize the true joy of the pursuit, dedicating themselves to make the most of that day’s adventure. They are Delta Chis. At this point, you need to ask yourself an important question — “If I’m making a commitment to Delta Chi, what can I do for the Fraternity after graduation and throughout my life?” Presently, you are beginning your college life and probably have not given thought to the future beyond college. How­ ever, your commitment today means nothing without your commitment to “tomorrow” in Delta Chi. How do you build the type of commitment necessary to make Delta Chi a lifetime brotherhood? Become “involved” from the beginning. As an associate member, consider serving as an officer of your class.


Delta Chi — The Brotherhood of a Lifetime

Organize activities for your class. Working with your fellow associate members will further your understanding of people and the guidelines of the Fraternity. When you attain full membership, a new vista of opportunities will open for you, such as serving as an officer or committee chairman for your chapter. Try to visit nearby chapters to witness how they work and the type of people who run them. Attend the Regional Leadership Conferences, International Conventions and other programs hosted by the Fraternity. Meeting and interacting with brothers from across North America is rewarding and builds friendships for life. Then, as your graduation draws near, you will appreciate how much Delta Chi has influenced your growth. More opportunities become available. You can serve on a chap­ter’s Alumni Board of Trustees (ABT) or as “BB” of a chapter. Service on a number of committees of the general fraternity is possible. Most prestigious and demanding of all is election to serve as “AA”, “CC”, or “DD” of the General Fraternity. The more you “serve,” the more there is to gain in terms of business, professional and personal relationships, not to mention the personal satisfaction of knowing you have been an influence in the direction of an organization: your fraternity — Delta Chi. Involvement means financial support as well. Many members, undergraduate and alumni alike, give in a myriad of fashions, from wills and bequests to one-time and recurring cash donations to The Fraternity or the Delta Chi Educational Foundation. This financial support is vital to the programs of Delta Chi. With­out the generosity of our membership, Delta Chi could not offer industry-leading leadership programs. Then, there is the legacy of Delta Chi — a male relation in your family (i.e., son, grandson, nephew, father, grandfather, etc.). Imagine the pride of placing the badge of Delta Chi on your relative, sharing with him the same opportunities to learn and grow in an environment conducive to sound education and lifetime brotherhood. That brings us again to your commitment. There is much you can do in Delta Chi. The Fraternity needs your commitment, not only for the immediate future, but also for the long term as well. For Delta Chi to continue to exist and flourish, we need each new member, like yourself, to use the enthusiasm and energy of today, tomorrow and beyond. You and they are the lifeblood of Delta Chi. There is an opportunity for your adult male relative to become a Delta Chi initiate just as you have,

The more you “serve,” the more there is to gain in terms of business, professional and personal relationships.

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provided he is not an initiate of another men’s college social fraternity. The commitments of thousands of brothers before you have created a great heritage. Your commitment and that of hundreds of other associate members today will shape the future of Delta Chi. Make your experience in Delta Chi, the Brotherhood of a Lifetime, a family heritage.

T h e A m e r i c a n c o l l e g e f ra t e r n i t y i s a n American institution and the chapter in the form it ideally exists on the college campus is a miniature of the larger American democracy . . . The fraternity group is formed by mutual selection, based on congeniality and common purpose. Here the young member learns, perhaps for the first time, to submit to the will of the majority and to shape his own conduct by the interests and standards of the others with whom he lives. In assuming his share of work in the group, he develops a sense of responsibility for the well-being of something outside himself. He is merged with the group; must work with and for it; must fight to emerge as a leader who will direct it. He learns the great lesson of subordinating self and selfish desires for the good of others. He thus learns to lend his strength to those who have less, thus fulfilling an educational goal of which there is no higher . . . — Baird’s Manual of American College Fraternities, Bicentennial Edition.

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The Greek Tradition

History of the Greek Movement Unique among the educational institutions of the world, American college fraternities are as old as the nation itself. They arose in response to a need for close personal relationships among students, and they have provided an opportunity for supplemental education beyond the formal curriculum of the college. In the early days, studies centered around Greek and Latin. Electives were unknown, and classics rather than current events dominated discussion. It was a trying time, especially for teen-aged young men, as most were, having been sent to college by parents to acquire discipline as much as book learning. And a harsh discipline it was. Dress and deportment were strictly defined. Travel was difficult. Athletic and social events were few and far between. It was indeed all work and no play, but students, then as now, found a way where there was a need. The need was to be able to relax and recuperate, to enjoy the friendships and fun that make life bearable, to learn those things that can’t be taught in the classroom, to put purpose and perspective into a personal way-of-life, to belong, and to share common experiences in confidence. In Williamsburg, Virginia, in 1750, the way was gathering of College of William and Mary classmates in an upper room of the Raleigh Tavern. Over a bowl of punch, a small group of students talked and laughed and called themselves the Flat Hat Club. These students didn’t know it, but they had organized the first general men’s college fraternity.

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In 1750, the Raleigh Tavern saw the forma­tion of the Flat Hat Club.

Good things are soon copied, but old habits are hard to break. Other groups appeared, but they were social only to a limited extent. They were concerned with faculty approval

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and the need to act more like a literary society — meeting to deflate or critique compositions, staging an oratorical contest, or engaging in a form of early campus politics with rival groups. The climate of the times was reflected in their names: Ciceronian, Calliopian, and Philopeuthion. One group, PDA, ejected a student who was a superior Greek scholar. That rejected student, John Health, took three Greek letters, gathered four friends, and held the first secret meeting of Phi Beta Kappa, the first Greek-letter society or fraternity, on December 5, 1776. It was secret because it had to be. The William and Mary faculty didn’t approve of its students discussing the pressing issues of the day and possibly straying too far from accepted beliefs. So Phi Beta Kappa developed secret signals of challenge and recognition as they met weekly in the Raleigh Tavern’s Apollo Room. The secret grip and mottos and ritual, distinctive badge, code of laws and use of Greek letters all were used by Phi Beta Kappa and later adopted by subsequent fraternities. But the important legacies of Phi Beta Kappa are these: high moral ideas, scholastic advancement, and the friendship of one brother with another. The College Yard at Wil­liam and Mary circa 1740.

Five months after the signing of the Declar­ation of Independence, five students at the College of William and Mary founded Phi Beta Kappa.

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Phi Beta Kappa felt that other campuses should share its good idea and that higher education give proper consideration to prepare a student for his future responsibilities by preparing him socially. In 1780, the Alpha of Connecticut was planted at Yale, in 1781, the Alpha of Massachusetts at Harvard, and more followed. As time went on, Phi Beta Kappa became purely intellectual in its aims, though the original cardinal principles were “literature, morality and friendship.” During the anti-secret society movements of the 1830s, the society voluntarily revealed that its name meant “Philosophy, the Guide (or Helmsman) of Life.” Since that time it has become strictly an honorary organization and today recognizes undergraduate men and women who show superior achievements in academics on more than 270 American campuses.


The Greek Tradition

Meanwhile, four Phi Beta Kappa men at the University of North Carolina in 1812 organized Kappa Alpha, which expanded in informal fashion to more than 20 campuses throughout the South. Unfortunately, it would not survive the Civil War. To the north, on the campus of Union College, Schenectady, New York, the decline of a military marching club left a void in student life in the fall of 1825. So a group of students, including several members of Phi Beta Kappa, organized Kappa Alpha Society (not to be confused with either the 1812 Kappa Alpha or the current Kappa Alpha Order) on November 20, 1825. Remaining conservative throughout its existence with only nine chapters and a total alumni base of fewer than 10,000, Kappa Alpha Society enjoys the distinction of being the first Greek-letter general college fraternity with continuous existence to date. Due to its secrecy, some students and faculty opposed Kappa Alpha Society, but other students admired the concept of the organization and formed Sigma Phi on March 4, 1827, and Delta Phi on November 17, 1827. Kappa Alpha Society, Sigma Phi, and Delta Phi formed the “Union Triad,” and set the pattern for the American fraternity system. Eventually, Union students founded six fraternities, which is why the college is recognized as the “Mother of Fraternities.” Some think the college fraternity is uniquely American; certainly such an expanded and developed system exists nowhere else. Alexis de Tocqueville, a much-traveled Frenchman, wrote Democracy in America following a trip to America in the 1830s. In it he commented: “Americans of all ages, all conditions, and all dispositions constantly form associations. They are the most fraternal people in the world.” He was as prophetic as he was observant. Sigma Phi later founded a second chapter at Hamilton Col­lege in Clinton, New York. Seeking an alternative to two bitterly fighting literary societies, some Hamilton students took inspiration from the local Sigma Phi Chapter and founded another Greek-letter society, Alpha Delta Phi, in 1832. Fraternities were on the move. A year later, Alpha Delta Phi established its second chapter west of the Alleghenies at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. John Reilly Knox had been prominent, as a member of a Miami University literacy society, in a “rather bitter fight” against Alpha Delta Phi. He admired the organization and spirit of the Alpha Delta Phi members, but imagined a society of “good without the ingredient of evil” and in 1839 founded

Phi Beta Kappa became strictly an honorary organization. With 283 active chapters and over 500,000 living mem­bers, it is the largest Greek-lettered so­ciety.

Union is recognized as the “Mother of Frater­nities.”

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Alpha Delta Pi (founded as the Adelphean Soci­ety) is the oldest women’s fraternity.

22 of the present day fraternities were founded prior to 1860.

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Beta Theta Pi, the first fraternity founded in the “West” and the first member of what was to become the “Miami Triad.” Faculties were still highly suspicious of fraternities, so both Alpha Delta Phi and Beta Theta Pi existed in secret, with members not even wearing their badges publicly. Then in 1847, members of both organizations were found to have participated in a student revolt against an unpopular Miami University administration. The so-called “snow rebellion” involved heaping great quantities of snow in the entrances of the College buildings, thus preventing the faculty from entering the classrooms for two days. All the members of Alpha Delta Phi and all but two members of Beta Theta Pi were expelled. Both fraternities went inactive until 1852. In 1848 Phi Delta Theta was founded to fill the void, and, in 1855, six men who split from the Delta Kappa Epsilon Chapter, which had been started in 1852, formed Sigma Chi. The Miami Triad was complete. Sororities had their beginnings at Wesleyan Female College, Macon, Georgia. The Adelphean Society was organized May 15, 1851, and followed a year later by the Philomathean Society. They remained strictly local sororities for more than 50 years before adopting Greek names and expanding as Alpha Delta Pi and Phi Mu, respectively. By 1860 the fraternity system was firmly established, with 22 of the present-day general fraternities having been already founded. The Civil War, pitting brothers against brothers in a familial and fraternal sense, resulted in the closing of many colleges and the temporary interruption in the development of new fraternities. The only fraternity founded during the War was Theta Xi at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, the first professional fraternity (later becoming a general fraternity). It was not uncommon for whole fraternity chapters in the South to enlist as a body to defend the Confederacy. In a few cases, chapters tried to hold together in military units. Afterwards the persistence of bitter sectional feeling worked to keep open the wounds that needed healing. To promote the healing process was a task particularly suited to fraternities. Responding to the urgency of the need was Alpha Tau Omega, the first fraternity founded after the Civil War in 1865; Kappa Alpha Order, 1865; Kappa Sigma Kappa (merging with Theta Xi in 1962) 1867; Pi Kappa Alpha, 1868; Sigma Nu, 1869; and Kappa Sigma, 1869; all in Virginia. The nation and its campuses would not be the same after the Civil War. One significant change was the increased enrollment of women in


The Greek Tradition

colleges. “Aware of the condescending and frequently scornful activities of the male students,” writes one historian, “women wanted nothing more than to prove their capabilities and to achieve an equally important position” on their campuses. Noting the advantages of fraternity group living, I.C. Sorosis (now Pi Beta Phi) was founded April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois as the first national sorority, and Kappa Alpha Theta was founded January 27, 1870, at DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana, as the first women’s Greekletter society. In the early days, most educational institutions existed primarily to prepare young men for the learned professions and the clergy. Emphasis was placed on the classical studies, especially Greek and Latin. When fraternities came along, it was natural for them to draw on those teachings. Literacy exercises were a common part of all chapter meetings, where the presentation of essays and debates was customary. At first, meetings were held in rented rooms but soon the chapters acquired halls that they furnished as clubrooms. Eventually, chapter houses became common. Gradually, more and more men began to enter college. The curriculum expanded. Many colleges became universities. The church affiliations of many schools weakened and, in many cases, was dropped altogether. New institutions and the state-supported institutions grew to fill the need for mass education. Several states in the late 1890s adopted anti-fraternity legislation. As the chapters grew larger, they found it possible and desirable to provide living quarters. Soon the fraternity house became a common sight in college towns. Those organizations which lacked sufficient leadership soon passed out of existence; those that had it expanded at a rapid rate and encouraged the formation of many new fraternities. Into such an environment Delta Chi was born on October 13, 1890. The corner was turned into the 20th Century with the realization of the importance of inter­fraternity endeavors. An intersorority conference (the forerunner of today’s National Panhellenic Conference) met in Chicago in 1902 and the National lnterfraternity Conference (now called the North-American Interfraternity Conference) first convened in New York City in 1909. It didn’t mean things were all “upward and onward” after that. Quite the contrary, it was a roller-coaster ride of bottom-of-the-barrel-depths and exhilarating heights. World

Kappa Alpha Theta was the first women’s Greek-lettered society.

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War I was fought to “make the world safe for democracy.” Raccoon coats, rapid fraternity expansion and crazy behavior characterized the 1920s. The Great Depression caused many fraternities to disappear or merge in the 1930s. World War II found most of the chapters closed — entire chapters were drafted or volunteered — and many of their houses used by the government for military housing. The end of the fraternity system was feared by some and predicted by many. With peace, men flocked to the campuses to resume their studies and to resume fraternity life as well. Matured by the war, they had a serious attitude toward studies, an impatience with juvenile hazing practices, and an openness to consider some social changes (within a decade facing up to and resolving discriminatory inequities). The growth of the huge, impersonal education complex resulted in an increased need for fraternities and their personal contact and relationships within a smaller group. The late 1960s and early 1970s was a period of “Do your own thing.” Students challenged much of what was considered to be traditional. Fraternities, highly visible and identifiable, were considered to be part of the “establishment” and not germane to the era. The Greek system responded, after a period of difficulty, by re-examining itself, reaffirming principles and purposes, and realigning priorities and programs. Students responded by recognizing fraternities as a means for personal development and achievement. It has been said, “It is the good in a social institution that causes it to persist.” The 1980s saw a resurgence of the fraternity movement and was a period of growth. Unfortunately, the 1990s reversed that trend as the movement saw a 7% decline in initiations for seven years in a row. The 2000s were a period of stabilization with a focus on philanthropy work. This trend still holds true today as the fraternity movement is stronger than ever.

“A Mystic Bond of Brotherhood makes all men one.” -Thomas Carlyle 12


The Greek Tradition

Presidents of the United States Who Have Been Members of National General College Fraternities James K. Polk, Kappa Alpha Society

Ulysses S. Grant, Delta Phi Rutherford B. Hayes, Delta Kappa Epsilon James A. Garfield, Delta Upsilon Chester A. Arthur, Psi Upsilon Grover Cleveland, Sigma Chi Benjamin Harrison, Phi Delta Theta and Delta Chi* William McKinley, Sigma Alpha Epsilon Theodore Roosevelt, Alpha Delta Phi & Delta Kappa Epsilon† William Howard Taft, Acacia & Psi Upsilon† Woodrow Wilson, Phi Kappa Psi Calvin Coolidge, Phi Gamma Delta Franklin D. Roosevelt, Alpha Delta Phi Harry S. Truman, Lambda Chi Alpha Dwight D. Eisenhower, Tau Epsilon Phi John F. Kennedy, Phi Kappa Theta Gerald R. Ford, Delta Kappa Epsilon Ronald Reagan, Tau Kappa Epsilon George H. W. Bush, Delta Kappa Epsilon George W. Bush, Delta Kappa Epsilon

To date, 44% of all U.S. Presidents have been fraternity men.

President George Bush acknowledged Delta Chi’s Centennial Convention with a letter that stated: “I am pleased to send my greetings and congratulations to all the brothers of Delta Chi Fraternity as you celebrate your 100th anniversary. For the last century, Delta Chi has helped young men to more fully enjoy their college years by promoting camaraderie, scholarship, and academic excellence. Many lifelong friendships are formed during fraternal experience; friendships that have a shared respect for tradition and that are built upon concern for the well being of others. I commend the members of Delta Chi for

18 U.S. Vice Presidents, including one Delta Chi, were or are fraternity members.

*Until 1906, Delta Chi was a professional law fraternity that allowed dual memberships. †Although no longer possible to belong to more than one general college fraternity, an individual in previous times could hold dual membership under certain circumstances.

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sustaining a long record of success in helping to prepare students for the challenges of the future. Barbara joins me in sending best wishes for a memorable centennial celebration and continued growth in your next 100 years.”

The North-American lnterfraternity Conference North-American Interfraternity Conference

Delta Chi has provided the conference with five chief officers.

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The North-American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) is a confederation of 66 men’s college fraternities with over 6,100 chapters on more than 800 campuses throughout Canada and the United States. The NIC represents over 380,000 collegiate members and four and one half million alumni. Its volunteer leaders and professional staff serve fraternity leaders in university, government, and media relations. The promotion of scholarship, leadership, service, and friendship among fraternity members is the NIC’s purpose. The NIC owes its existence to the Department of Universities and Colleges of the Religious Education Association, which sponsored a meeting in Chicago on February 11, 1909 that was attended by representatives of 17 fraternities. The representatives found the interaction worthwhile, and requested the REA to call another meeting to discuss mutual problems and the idea of a “Panhellenic Union.” On November 27, 1909, at the University Club of New York City, 60 delegates answered the call to meet by W.H.P. Faunce, Delta Upsilon, then president of Brown University and chairman of the REA’s Department of Colleges and Universities. As the discussion proceeded and the sentiments of rivalry gave way, the delegates made the discovery of common interests and goals, which led to a unanimous vote on making the Conference a permanent organization. The NIC wishes to improve the quality as well as sustain the heritage of the fraternity community. This educational mission is conducted in harmony with other organizations and associations sharing common interests. NIC services include a forum for information exchange. The NIC sponsors an Annual Meeting and brings fraternity leaders together for workshops, discussions, and cooperative actions. Over the course of its history, the Conference has had a track record of accomplishments that have benefited the fraternity system in general. Examples include matters of


The Greek Tradition

membership rights, tax rules for our organization and the ability of fraternities to maintain their single-sex status. Delta Chi has been an integral factor in the growth of this interfraternity cooperative effort. Delta Chi has provided the Conference with five chief officers: John J. Kuhn, Cornell 1898 former “AA”, headed the Conference in 1923; Dr. Charles W. Gerstenberg, NYU ’04 served as Chairman in 1930; Russell C. MacFall NYU ’22 was the 1938 Chairman; Lewis S. Armstrong, Washington ’39 “AA” Emeritus, served as the President in 1972*; and Gregory F. Hauser, Michigan State ’75, “AA” Emeritus and member of the Order of the White Carnation, served as President in 1999. Only three other fraternities have ever supplied the NIC with as many chief officers: Beta Theta Pi, Delta Tau Delta, Pi Kappa Alpha, and Sigma Nu, each also contributing five chief officers.

The ability of the fraternity movement to survive and grow, in spite of many negative circumstances, might be explained by the fact that it has two quite different sets of purposes and characteristics. One of these might be characterized as a group of spiritual objectives. These have remained rather constant since the inception of the fraternity idea. Included among these purposes are the promotion of friendship and brotherhood, mutual aid, fellowship, loyalty to a ritual, and idealism. Without such high motives, constantly recalled and implemented, it is probable that fraternities as we know them, might long ago have so changed as to lose their present identity. . . . It is easy to discern also a set of utilitarian purposes have changed in accordance with social trends and the demands of the times. Since each fraternity chapter must go before its supporting public to recruit new members at all too frequent intervals, its utilitarian purposes are kept continuously responsive to what in the mercantile field is called customer demands. The durability of the fraternity system is accounted for by the combination of the stability of its spiritual purposes and the adaptability of its utilitarian characteristics. — Marsh W. White, “AA” Emeritus, April 1953

*In 1961 the title of the chief officer was changed from Chairman to Presi­dent.

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Men’s Fraternities Fraternity

Date and Location of Founding Chapter

Acacia Alpha Chi Rho Alpha Delta Gamma Alpha Delta Phi Alpha Epsilon Pi Alpha Gamma Rho Alpha Gamma Sigma Alpha Kappa Lambda Alpha Phi Alpha Alpha Phi Delta Alpha Sigma Phi Alpha Tau Omega Beta Chi Theta Beta Theta Pi Chi Phi Chi Psi Delta Chi Delta Kappa Epsilon Delta Lambda Phi Delta Phi Delta Psi Delta Sigma Phi Delta Tau Delta Delta Upsilon FarmHouse Iota Phi Theta Kappa Alpha Order Kappa Alpha Psi Kappa Alpha Society Kappa Delta Phi Kappa Delta Rho Kappa Sigma Lambda Chi Alpha Lambda Sigma Upsilon Lambda Theta Phi

1904 — U of Michigan 1895 — Trinity C 1924 — Loyola U 1832 — Hamilton College 1913 — NYU 1904 — Ohio State U 1922 — Ohio State U 1914 — U Cal-Berkeley 1906 — Cornell U 1914 — Syracuse U 1845 — Yale 1865 — Virginia Military Institute 1999 — U.C.L.A. 1839 — Miami U (OH) 1824 — Princeton 1841 — Union C 1890 — Cornell U 1844 — Yale 1987 — Washington, D.C. 1827 — Union C (NY) 1847 — Columbia 1895 — CCNY 1858 — Bethany C 1834 — Williams C (MA) 1905 — U of Missouri 1963 — Morgan State University 1865 — Washington & Lee U 1911 — Indiana U 1825 — Union C (NY) 1900 — U of Bridgeport 1905 — Middlebury C 1869 — U of Virginia 1909 — Boston U 1979 — Rutgers University 1975 — Kean College

16


The Greek Tradition

Fraternity

Date and Location of Founding Chapter

Omega Psi Phi Phi Beta Sigma Phi Delta Theta Phi Gamma Delta Phi Kappa Psi Phi Kappa Sigma Phi Kappa Tau Phi Kappa Theta Phi Lambda Chi Phi Mu Delta Phi Sigma Kappa Phi Sigma Phi Pi Kappa Alpha Pi Kappa Phi Pi Lambda Phi Psi Upsilon Sigma Alpha Epsilon Sigma Alpha Mu Sigma Chi Sigma Lambda Beta Sigma Nu Sigma Phi Epsilon Sigma Pi Sigma Tau Gamma Tau Delta Phi Tau Epsilon Phi Tau Kappa Epsilon Theta Chi Theta Delta Chi Theta Xi Triangle Zeta Beta Tau Zeta Psi

1911 — Howard U 1914 — Howard U 1848 — Miami U (OH) 1848 — Washington & Jefferson 1852 — Washington & Jefferson 1850 — U of Pennsylvania 1906 — Miami U (OH) 1889 — Brown 1925 — Arkansas State Teachers C 1918 — U of Connecticut 1873 — U of Massachusetts 1988 — South Bend, IN 1868 — U of Virginia 1904 — College of Charleston 1895 — Yale 1833 — Union C (NY) 1856 — U of Alabama 1909 — CCNY 1855 — Miami U (OH) 1986 — U of Iowa 1865 — Virginia Military Institute 1901 — U of Richmond 1897 — Vincennes U 1920 — Central Missouri St U 1914 — City College of New York 1910 — Columbia University 1899 — Illinois Wesleyan U 1856 — Norwich U 1847 — Union C (NY) 1864 — Rennsselear Polytechnic Inst 1907 — U of Illinois 1898 — New York, NY 1847 — New York U

17


The N.I.C. Decalogue   1. The college fraternity has as its goal, in harmony with that of the college, to provide training and discipline of the individual who, in seeking an education, desires to make of himself a useful member of society, possessing knowledge, trained skill, and capacity for accomplishment. The college fraternity as a group organization seeks to teach men how to live and work together, striving by precept and example for the personal development of the individual in the training of mind and body. It carries forward the fundamental purposes of education, adding a fraternal influence for correct living and individual development.   2. The college fraternity must regard itself as an integral part of the institution in which it is located. It not only must be amenable to the rules and regulations of the college institution but must also share in all the college responsibilities of the undergraduate. The college fraternity must match the discipline of the college administration and must accept the added responsibility incident to the supervision of group life in the chapter house. Furthermore, the college fraternity, with complete loyalty and allegiance to the college that nurtures it, has the duty of supporting in every possible way the institution of which it is a part.   3. The college fraternity is also a business organization. Successful management requires sound financial practices and good housekeeping methods. There is a dual obligation of prompt collection of monies owed and prompt payment of accounts due. The fraternity man and the chapter group acquire strength and stature as they develop business experience and a true perception of correct business methods. Financial strength and integrity in the fraternity enable it to accomplish its other aims.   4. The college fraternity stands for excellence in scholarship. It seeks as a part of its college to promote diligent application to study by the fraternity member, not only in order that the requirements of the college are met, but also that achievement above the average level may be attained. The college fraternity adds its rewards for intellectual attainment to those given by the college.

18


The Greek Tradition

  5. The college fraternity accepts its role in the moral and spiritual development of the individual. It not only accepts the standards of the college, but also, in addition, endeavors to develop those finer qualities of ethical conduct that add to the inner growth of man.   6. The college fraternity recognizes that culture goes hand in hand with education, and, therefore, seeks to broaden the growth of the fraternity member by encouraging the acquisition of knowledge and training in cultural subjects. It is in this held that the college fraternity augments the formal instruction of the institution in encouraging an appreciation of art, music, literature, dramatics, debate, sports and games, speaking and writing, and national affairs.   7. The college fraternity is the center of much of the social life of the fraternity member. As such, it seeks to develop the social graces, the art of good living, and the development of courtesy and kindness. Good manners, good taste, and good companionship are a part of the training of every fraternity member.   8. The college fraternity recognizes the importance of the physical well being of its members. It seeks to provide healthful and sanitary housing. It encourages healthful practices by the members, discourages physical excesses, and promotes athletic competitions in both fraternity and college life, so that “mens sana in corpore sano” shall be the aim of every fraternity member.   9. The college fraternity assumes civic responsibilities. The chapter house is another training ground for good citizenship. Fraternity members are taught first their civic responsibilities as members of the college community, and are prepared in later life to assume their responsibilities to their communities and to the nation. 10. The college fraternity seeks to develop those qualities of human understanding, companionship, and kindness with a knowledge and training in appraising the basic values of life, which will lead towards a better civilization with peace and understanding among all peoples.

Delta Chi has been a member of the N.I.C. since 1911.

Adopted by the North-American Interfraternity Conference, 1944.

19


The Greek Alphabet and the Fraternity Language

A number of excellent fraternities — such as Farm­House and Triangle — do not use Greek letters for their names.

Don’t say “alum”!

Fraternities draw heavily upon both the Greek and English languages for terminology in their designations for (inter)national organizations, indi­ vidual chapters, offices, publications, and special programs. Because Greek letters are prominently used, the term “Greek” is commonly applied to members of all general college fraternities and sororities. However, a number of excellent fraternities — such as FarmHouse and Triangle — do not use Greek letters for their names and others use Greek letters in their names but are based on non-Grecian principles. Adding to the peculiarity of the fraternity language is the fact that a few Greek letters (particularly Xi and Phi) have several pronunciations. Sometimes both a Greek and an English form are used in the same name because the particular group prefers it that way — “Alpha Phee” for Alpha Phi. Therefore, be alert to the exceptions to the rules. Now mix in a bit of Latin. The name for graduates of colleges and universities, as well as the nonstudent initiated members of fraternities and sororities, has become Americanized to the following: Male Singular - alumnus (ah-lum-nus) Male Plural - alumni. (ah-lum-nye) Female Singular - alumna (ah-lum-nuh) Female Plural - alumnae (ah-lum-nee) Mixed group of men and women - alumni Nicknames? Almost every Greek group has one or more for itself and its members. A member of Delta Chi is a “D-Chi.” Some others to show the variety are: a Phi Delta Theta member is known as a “Phi Delt”; a Beta Theta Pi member is a “Beta”; a Tau Kappa Epsilon member is a “Teke”; a Delta Kappa Epsilon member is a “Deke”; and a Phi Gamma Delta member is a “Fiji.”

20


The Greek Tradition

There are a few other important particulars about the fraternity language. “The house” refers to the chapter’s home (the actual building) while “the chapter” refers to the chapter’s members (the people) as a group. Remember: it is always “fraternity” and never “frat.” Other terms and abbreviations can be found on page 138.

Α Ε Ι Ν Ρ Φ

Β Ζ Κ Ξ Σ Χ

Γ Η Λ Ο Τ Ψ

Alpha/al-fah Beta/bay-tah Gamma/gam-ah

Epsilon/ep-si-lon Zeta/zay-tah

Eta/ay-tah

Iota/eye-o-tah Kappa/cap-ah Lambda/lamb-dah

Nu/new

Xi/zzEye Omicron/om-ah-cron

∆ Θ Μ Π Υ Ω

Remember: it is always “fraternity” and never “frat.”

Delta/del-tah

Theta/thay-tah

Mu/mew

THE GREEK  ALPHABET

Pi/pie

Rho/row Sigma/sig-ma Tau/tawh Upsilon/oop-si-lon

Phi/figh

Chi/kigh Psi/sigh Omega/o-may-gah

21


The Fraternity Language Pronunciation English Used by Form Name Equivalent Fraternities Α Β Γ ∆ Ε Ζ Η Θ Ι Κ Λ Μ Ν Ξ Ο Π Ρ Σ Τ Υ Φ Χ Ψ Ω

22

α Alpha β Beta γ Gamma δ Delta ε Epsilon ζ Zeta η Eta ϑ Theta ι Iota κ Kappa λ Lambda ∝ Mu ν Nu ξ Xi ο Omicron π Pi ρ Rho σ Sigma τ Tau υ Upsilon ϕ Phi χ Chi ψ Psi ω Omega

A B G D E Z E Th I K L M N X O P R S T U Ph Ch Ps O

al-fah bay-tah gam-ah del-tah ep-si-lon zah-tah ay-tah thay-tah eye-o-tah cap-ah lamb-dah mew new zzEye or zee om-ah-cron pie row sig-mah tawh oop-si-lon figh or fee kigh sigh o-may-gah


Delta Chi’s Roots Sir Edward Coke

If there is one man in history who personified the principles upon which Delta Chi was to be built, that man would be SIR EDWARD COKE (pronounced “Cook”). Born February 1, 1552, in Mileham, Norfolk, England, he died September 3, 1634, eighty-two years later. His long lifetime encompassed the reigns of Edward VI, Mary Tudor, Elizabeth I, James I, and almost half the reign of Charles I. This period of history was crucial to the development of the basic individual rights that we cherish so much today. Coke received his university education at Trinity College, Cambridge, from which he proceeded as Master of Arts to Clifford Inn, attached to the Inner Temple, one of four “schools of the law.” On April 20, 1578, Coke was “called to the bar” after having served an apprenticeship of seven years (eight years was the duration of the normal apprenticeship). In 1579 Coke was one of six counsels for defendant Henry Shelley in a suit that is famous for establishing certain precedents in the inheritance of land. It is said that the question “What is the Rule in Shelley’s Case?” has been a mark of bar examinations for three centuries and two nations.* Shelley’s case would also suffice for Coke’s reputation to endure through the ages. During his life, Coke held many positions of high judicial importance: first entered Parliament in 1589, elected Speaker of the House of Commons in 1592, appointed Solicitor General, Reader of the Inner Temple & Recorder of London in 1592, Attorney-General in 1593, Chief Justice of the Common Pleas in 1606, and finally, in 1613 Chief Justice of the King’s Bench (known as the “Lord Chief Justice of England”). In 1620, Coke entered Parliament for his second time. During that fourteenyear tenure Coke was to again have a monumental impact upon the Anglo-America legal tradition.

3

*“If in a conveyance or will a freehold estate is given to a person and in the same conveyance or will a remainder is limited to the heirs or to the heirs of the body of that person, that person takes both the freehold estate and the remainder.” (Moynihan, Introduction to the Law of Real Property, 1962, Page 138)

23


Quod Rex non debet esse sub homine, sed sub deo et Lege. (The King himself should be under no man, but under God and the Law). ­­— Sir Edward Coke Sir Edward Coke

As Solicitor-General and Attorney-General he acted the usual part of the Crown’s lawyer, conducting several notable “trials of state” including those of the Earls of Essex and Southampton, of Sir Walter Raleigh, and of the perpetrators of the “gunpowder plot,” a plot to destroy Parliament when the King was in session with the House Of Lords. In 1606, Sir Edward (James had knighted him in 1603) was appointed Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. With this appointment Coke, a ferocious attorney, turned to the service of the State and the Law and became one of the most distinguished and respected of English judges. Under the customs of the time, a man could not be appointed a judge until he had been created Serjeant-at-Law. Serjeantry, derived from the medieval Latin word “serientia,” means service and was characteristic of an obligation to perform a personal service relating to solemn occasions of state. Hosting a traditional serjeants’ feast, Coke distributed rings to

24


Delta Chi’s Roots

those present with the motto, Lex est tutissima cassis — the Law is the safest shield. Later Coke was to write “the Law is the surest sanctuary that a man can take, and the strongest fortress to protect the weakest of all; Lex est tutissima cassis.” Being Chief Justice of the Common Pleas enabled Coke to act as arbitrator between the King and the people. It was from this bench that Coke began in earnest his defense of the rights of the people from a monarch obsessed with the theory of “Divine Right” of royal authority. In 1610, there came before Coke a case involving a dispute between Dr. Thomas Bonham and the Royal College of Physicians. The details of the case are unimportant, but Coke seized upon the opportunity to declare the supremacy of the Common Law above that of both the Parliament and the King:

Et domus sua cuique est tutissimum refugium (A man’s home is his castle) —Sir Edward Coke

In many cases the Common Law will control Acts of Parliament and some times adjudge them to be utterly void; for when an Act of Parliament is against common right and reason, or repugnant, or impossible to be performed, the Common Law will control it and adjudge such Act to be void.

American legal tradition does not begin in 1620 or with the founding of the nation in 1776. It begins at a common source with English Law. Sir Edward Coke never crossed the stormy Atlantic but a partial set of his Reports did make the historic 1620 crossing of the Mayflower; well into the nineteenth century Coke on Littleton was a book every lawyer knew. In 1765, more than one hundred fifty years after Coke’s decision, the Massachusetts Assembly, protesting a Stamp Act passed by Parliament, declared it invalid “against Magna Carta and the Natural Rights of Englishmen, and therefore, according to the Lord Coke, null and void.” Patrick Henry also cited Coke as authority for nullification in his speech before the Virginia House of Burgesses. Perhaps it is in Coke’s decision in Bonham’s Case, and in Lex est tutissima cassis, the Law is the safest shield, that the first seeds for the creation of a Supreme Court — a court that would pass on legislation and interpret it — first started. It is clear that writings such as Bonham’s Case would not meet with the approval of a King who believed in his divine authority to rule. In 1613, King James “promoted” Coke to Chief Justice of the King’s Bench, where he could sit in judgment of only criminal cases. If James thought he would eliminate the thorn of Coke from his side he was mistaken. Coke showed no disposition to surrender his opinions and principles. His 25


Coke showed no disposition to surrender his opinions and principles.

zeal in tracking down evidence in scandals came very close to involving the Royal household, and in 1616 Coke was removed from the Bench and from the King’s Privy Council, to which he had been named in 1614. In spite of his inconvenient principles, Coke was recalled to the Privy Council in 1617 where, for three years, he was actively involved in prosecuting corruption in office and was kept active on the other state affairs. In 1620, he again entered Parliament. His service on a Committee of Parliament that investigated Sir Francis Bacon and Coke’s speeches in Parliament on the abuses of the Government once more angered the King. When in 1622 James read of Coke’s leadership in the Commons’ debate on the Liberties of Parliament, he ordered Coke’s arrest and detention in the Tower of London. Coke spent nine months in the Tower, during which time he was examined four times, his papers seized, and he was forced to defend himself in five different suits. In the end nothing was proved against Coke. In the Parliament of 1628, during the reign of Charles I, Coke continued to distinguish his career by his defense of the Common Law over royal power, the right of the Commons to proceed openly against anyone, however exalted, and, most importantly, continued to fight against the imprisonment of men by the Crown without cause. Coke proposed and wrote the historic “Petition of Rights”: “An Act for the better securing of every free man touching property of his goods and liberty of his person. . . . “Be it now enacted that no free man shall be committed by the command of the King or the Privy Council but the cause ought to be expressed and the same being returned upon a habeas corpus, he shall be delivered or bailed. . . . Be it now enacted that no tax, tallage, or loan shall be levied by the King or any minister without Act of Parliament and that none be compelled to receive any soldier into his house against his will. . . .

By withholding a vote on the amount of five revenue subsidies which King Charles needed to replenish an empty Royal treasury, the House of Commons forced the King to accept Coke’s Petition— such a man was Sir Edward Coke, the spiritual Founder of Delta Chi.

26


Delta Chi’s Roots

27


4

28

History of Delta Chi

The Founding of The Delta Chi Fraternity To comprehend the founding of The Delta Chi Fraternity at Cornell in 1890, it helps to first look at the backdrop of the day. The Cornell Law School was actually founded just three short years prior in 1887. Law school in the nineteenth century was very different from what we now generally see. It was universally an undergraduate curriculum, and was generally only one or two years. Most of the actual training came during an apprenticeship or clerkship. Some law students transferred into the law school after one or two years in the undergraduate college, but most came to law school directly from high school, a clerkship or an apprenticeship. Also, many if not most law schools did not even require a high school diploma for admission! The transition to the three-year, post-graduate curriculum was gradual and began about the time Delta Chi came into existence. Thus, the difficulty of its identity was virtually predestined by timing. In 1899, Cornell began requiring a high school diploma for admission to its law school, and Harvard became the first law school to lengthen its law program to three years. As of 1901, Georgetown still did not require a high school diploma for law school admission. The University of Minnesota instituted a requirement of one year of college for its law school in 1909, and Cornell did the same in 1911. Cornell’s requirement became two years of college in 1917. In the same decade, some law schools began requiring a college degree for admission, but the requirement did not apply to undergraduates transferring from within the same university. As a result, Delta Chi, which began as an undergraduate, law fraternity was faced with either remaining an undergraduate fraternity or remaining a law fraternity and evolving into a graduate fraternity. Considering that Delta Chi was apparently a social fraternity from the start, its decision to become a single membership fraternity early in our history was natural, since it was an undergraduate fraternity. But, the same decision made it virtually impossible in the future to remain a social fraternity and a law fraternity even before the law schools became strictly graduate schools since, as the law schools began requiring some time in college before admission to law school,


History of Delta Chi

many men would arrive at law school already a member of a social fraternity and thus ineligible for recruitment by Delta Chi. So, Delta Chi evolved into a general, social fraternity. The only other options were to either become a professional law fraternity, as did Phi Delta Phi or an honorary law fraternity, such as Order of the Coif. The latter course, interestingly enough, would have meant paralleling the evolution of Phi Beta Kappa roughly a century before. The other option of becoming a social, pre-law fraternity much as Delta Sigma Pi is for business or Triangle is for engineering students, lacked the cohesiveness of a defined curriculum and an easily identified group from which to recruit. Since at least 1929, Delta Chi has recognized the following eleven men as the Founders of The Delta Chi Fraternity: Albert Sullard Barnes Myron McKee Crandall John Milton Gorham Peter Schermerhorn Johnson Edward Richard O’Malley Owen Lincoln Potter

Alphonse Derwin Stillman Thomas A. J. Sullivan Monroe Marsh Sweetland Thomas David Watkins Frederick Moore Whitney

This list has not always been the accepted one. Even those on the list had differing opinions. To better understand the confusion, let us go back to the school year of 1889-90 and “set the stage” for the inception of the second law fraternity at Cornell. With only 104 students enrolled in the law school, the year began with conversations of starting a new law fraternity but, as schoolwork increased, the idea was put off until the spring semester. Two incidents have been credited with providing the impetus for renewed interest in the founding of what was to become Delta Chi. One was the election of a Phi Delta Phi as the Law School Editor of the Cornell Daily Sun (the student newspaper) and the second was the election of the law school junior class president. In the case of the class presidency, Alphonse Derwin Stillman had done some campaigning for a student named Irving G. Hubbs and was unaware of any effort being made on anyone else’s behalf. When the voting results were in, Charles Frenkel, a Phi Delta Phi, was declared the winner. That caused Stillman to start “asking around.” It appears that what he found was a law school that was dominated by one small, closely-knit group — Phi Delta Phi.

Alphonse Derwin Stillman

29


Monroe Marsh Sweetland

Myron McKee Crandall

In the hearts and minds of every Delta Chi, October 13, 1890 is a date to be remembered.

30

The question of who first conceived the idea of a new fraternity will probably never be answered. According to Frederick Moore Whitney, there were probably two or three groups working on the idea that spring. Monroe Marsh Sweetland (who was also a member of Delta Tau Delta from Cornell) claimed the idea was his alone; Myron McKee Crandall claimed the fraternity was started in his and Frank Edward Thomas’ apartment at 126 E. Seneca Street; Stillman remembered being approached by “one of the boys” after the class election but couldn’t remember who. In any case, there were meetings held in Crandall’s apartment as well as in Sweetland’s law office on Wilgus Street. It is not clear how these two groups came together, or even in which month, though there seem to have been some individuals who had attended both groups. Crandall did remember approaching Sweetland about the concept of the new fraternity, how excited he was, and how he had joined right in. Sweetland said he always had considered the founding of Delta Chi to date back to when he had unfolded the whole idea to Crandall. While the class officer elections and the Law School Editorship incidents may have provided the initial incentives for organization, it soon became clear that those involved were looking for much more. Realizing a common desire for fellowship and intellectual association, they sought to enrich their college experiences by creating among themselves a common bond, a bond that would materially assist each in the acquisition of a sound education, a bond that would provide each enduring value. As with any important commitment, there had to be time for contemplation and planning. Over the summer, many of the details of the organization were worked out by Crandall, who had stayed in Ithaca until after school opened. There was additional work accomplished by Sweetland, John Milton Gorham, and Stillman. In regard to the adoption of the constitution, Albert Sullard Barnes wrote the following in his 1907 Quarterly article: As I recall it, after refreshing my recollection from the original minutes now in my possession, on the evening of October 13, 1890, six students in the Law School, Brothers John M. Gorham, Thomas J. Sullivan, F. K. Stephens. A. D. Stillman and the writer, together with Myron Crandall and O. L. Potter, graduate students, and Monroe Sweetland, a former Student in the Law School, met in a brother’s room and adopted the constitution and by-laws, and organized the Delta Chi Fraternity.


History of Delta Chi

The minutes from that meeting state “Charter granted to Cornell Chapter,” indicating from the beginning the intent to start a national fraternity. From the spring semester of 1890 until October 13, 1890, there existed, in effect, a fraternity that had no chapters. In the fall of 1890, the names of Fred Kingsbury Stephens, Martin Joseph Flannery and Frank Edward Thomas appeared on the agreement to share the cost of purchasing a sample badge for the fraternity, and the signatures of both Flannery and Stephens appeared on the sssociate member “. . . to form a Greek letter fraternity. . . .” Since both Flannery and Stephens dropped out of the organization early, they have not been included as Founders. Thomas A. J. Sullivan

While it is only supposition, it is believed that the Founders chose to name their chapter (and, therefore, all chapters to follow) after the school in which they had so much pride, in hopes that some of the prestige of the school would then “rub off on” their fraternity. The naming of chapters varies from fraternity to fraternity with school names, Greek alphabet, Greek alphabet within state, and Greek alphabet and numbers being some of the most common. 31


Frank Edward Thomas

32

The inclusion of Thomas’ name as a Founder has been hotly debated since the beginning. Carl Peterson, Union ’22, who had researched the founding of Delta Chi during the 20’s and was largely responsible for the recognition of Crandall as a Founder, maintained that Thomas was equally deserving. This was confirmed in conversations with Barnes, Crandall and Thomas but met with opposition from some of the remaining Founders. The prime reason for denying his recognition seems to be the fact that he did not return to Ithaca in the fall of 1890, even though he was actively involved in the inception of the fraternity during the 1889-90 school year when it, at least on an informal basis, actually came into existence. The possible role he played in the birth of Delta Chi is recounted in Peterson’s article, “New Version of Our Founding” in the September 1930 Quarterly. The authenticity of this role was strongly supported by Crandall. It is interesting to note that Crandall also did not return to school in the fall of 1890, although he did hold a clerkship in Ithaca until early in the fall semester when he left for Utica, New York, and Sweetland, having obtained his Masters of Law degree the previous spring, was practicing law in Ithaca. Despite this, Crandall was listed as an active charter member of the Cornell Chapter on October 13, 1890. It was at his insistence, with presumably the support of the majority of the members present, that Thomas was listed as an honorary member. Sweetland was listed as an honorary charter member. Several of the Founders were working on their Masters of Law degrees when the Fraternity was being organized.


History of Delta Chi

Until the publishing of the 1929 Directory, the list of our Founders did not include the name of Crandall. The inclusion of his name at that time was largely due to the historical work of Peterson even though as early as August 14, 1924 Whitney had recommended Crandall’s name for such recognition. In the same letter, Whitney recommended that Peter Schermerhorn Johnson not be recognized as a Founder since he wasn’t initiated until December 1890 or March 1891 Johnson was, however, responsible for a large portion of the secrets of the Fraternity, writing “Fovens Mater,” and drawing the first emblem for Delta Chi. It is interesting to note that, in 1910, Whitney sent to the Cornell Chapter a composite of the nine men who he then believed to be the Founders of Delta Chi with an enlarged picture of Sweetland in its center. He later had that composite removed when he determined that he had left out one or two men.

George Hoxie

The Name of the Fraternity and the Badge The choosing of the name for the new fraternity is difficult to credit to any one person. In a letter dated November 7, 1919, Crandall claimed to remember having a conference with Sweetland during the summer of 1890 concerning the naming of the fraternity. He also stated that Barnes may have “had something to do about it.” In the same letter he recounted enlisting George Hoxie, a student in the University, but not a law student, to help make a drawing of the Delta Chi badge that same summer. Hoxie’s involvement was confirmed by Whitney and Thomas. Sweetland claimed he, and he alone, picked the name of “Delta Chi” and that he liked the way the two words sounded together. Sweetland further said that he submitted the design and drawing for the first badge which was made by Heggie, an Ithaca jeweler. We do know that “Delta Tau Omega” was considered, and that they may have considered “Omega Chi.” There seems to be no doubt that Barnes obtained the first badge (which he lost at a class reunion 25 years later) and that the second badge was made for Whitney but purchased by Sweetland. In an article published in Volume 5 Number 1 of the Quar­ terly, Barnes stated that he had in his possession at that time, 1907, “. . . no less than seventeen designs . . .” for the badge.

Shown here is a replica of the original badge worn by the Founders.This has been replicated for Centennial Badge.

33


Barnes also claimed to be the chairman of a committee on designing the badge. The badge that Barnes owned had gold letters and a diamond in the center. This badge was frequently borrowed by the other members for special occasions and while having their pictures taken. The first departure from this, according to Johnson, came when Brother Richard Lonergan, Cornell ’92 had his made retaining the diamond in the center but had the Delta mounted in black enamel. An early description of the badge stated that the Delta was jeweled or enameled to suit the owner with a diamond usually surmounting the center. The Chi was jeweled with one garnet on each arm.

Albert Sullard Barnes

The structure of Delta Chi’s initiation ritual has re­mained virtually un­changed since 1890.

Albert T. Wilkinson

34

The Ritual The main work of composing the Ritual was done by Stillman; either during the summer or early fall of 1890. Supposedly the Ritual was read at a meeting when it was still incomplete and was submitted shortly thereafter at a meeting on October 20, 1890, where it was adopted. Since a Committee on the Ritual composed of Stillman, Barnes, and Stephens was appointed on October 13, 1890, it seems probable that it was originally read at that meeting, and that Stillman was given some help in completing the Ritual. In Stillman’s own words. “I looked upon that Ritual as temporary and that (it) would serve until some genius could devise something entirely original. The ritual contained many phrases that were not original and which, as I (Stillman) remember, I did not take the trouble to mark as quotations. The principal ideas are almost as old as civilization, and it was my idea that an entirely new ritual would be prepared.” The original Ritual was written on both sides of some sheets of old style legal cap, and was signed by each new initiate. A rehearsal was held on November 14, 1890. At that meeting, Gorham, Stillman, and Sullivan presented the grip and passwords for adoption. On November 26, 1890, Albert T. Wilkinson (who later introduced Kimball to the Fraternity), Frank Bowman, and George Wilcox were initiated in short form. It was not until December 3, 1890, when Frederick Bagley was initiated, that the full initiation was used.


History of Delta Chi

The Emblem The emblem of the Fraternity changed greatly in the early years. The following design, submitted by Johnson, was adopted prior to the NYU installation. Stillman was probably responsible for the battle ax and scimitar that were included in an early design. The earliest known emblem of the Fraternity is now worn at official functions on a special medallion by past and present international officers as well as members of the Order of the White Carnation. The owl, interlocking Delta and Chi, and the oil lamp, which appeared on some of the early charters, may have been the work of the committee on charters that was formed in the spring of 1891.

The hand of humanity reaching for the key of knowledge.

Here, exactly as Founder Johnson typed it in a 1907 letter to Founder Barnes, is the poem he stated that he had written during the 1890–91 school year: In the City of Grenada, In that quaint old Moorish town, Where Alhambras noble palace, From the lofty height looks down: O’er the portal to the courtyard, Where each passer by may see: Graved by subtile Moorish sculpter, Are the mystic hand and key.

On that symbol rests a legend, Brought from far Araby’s sands, By the Saracenic warriors, When they conquered Gothic lands : And the meaning of that emblem, As has oft been told to me: Is that wisdom’s rarest treasures, Fill the hand that grasps the key.

35


We have placed that ancient emblem on the banner that we love, Golden key of golden promise, with the open hand above: Aid our Maters strength, my brother, that our own fraternity: In the coming years yet distant, have the hand that grasps the key.

It wasn’t until the Easter vacation of 1899 that Fraser Brown and Roy V. Rhodes decided to design a coat of arms for the young fraternity. The design they developed involved the “marriage” or union of two “families”: that of Sir Edward Coke, one of the towering figures in the establishment of law as the instrument of justice; and that of the knight-errant, the feudal predecessor of law in enforcing justice, as symbolized by his weapons. In regard to the alterations made on their original design, Roy V. Rhodes had this to say:

An early version of the coat of arms

The coat of arms involves the “marriage” or union of two “families”: that of Sir Edward Coke and that of the knight-errant.

“Some slight changes were made a few years later by whom I do not know. I had nothing to do with it and I don’t think Fraser Brown had either. One of these changes was the addition of a lot of what appear to be rivets around the edges of the shield and which do not, in my opinion, improve the appearance. Another change was the placing of the martlets in profile instead of from a front view in flight. I believe we adopted the front view because that is the way they are shown on the arms of Sir Edward. For practical reasons we omitted the usual helmet and united the crest and helmet in one great insignia of the fraternity — the Greek letters, Delta and Chi, with the torso between the shield and the crest instead of in its usual position above the helmet.”

Expansion On October 13, 1890, “Founders Crandall, Potter, and Sweetland were placed on the Supreme Council and authorized to proceed with expansion plans.” At that same meeting, Barnes was appointed to work “Buffalo Law School” for possible expansion due to his association with a student there. The lack of enrollment at the school and the fact that the Phi Delta Phi Chapter there was doing poorly, delayed expansion to that school until later. Building Delta Chi into a true national fraternity began during the spring of 1891. On April 14, 1891, John Francis Tucker, of New York University, went to Ithaca and earned the confidence and regard of the

36


History of Delta Chi

Cornell Chapter. He was initiated into Delta Chi that night and was sent back to prepare his associates for induction. Although Stillman remembers Tucker (who was a member of Delta Upsilon) coming to find out about Delta Chi, Wilkinson tells the story with more confidence: “At first the chapter and the Fraternity were the same thing, and there were no separate officers. But in the spring of 1891, in the month of May, I think, we received a visit from John Francis Tucker of New York. We put up a big bluff, and treated him with great formality and instructed him to return to the place whence he came, and make formal application in writing for a charter from our ancient and honorable body. As soon as he departed, there was a hurry call for a meeting to organize a body to which he could apply and it was then that the first general officers of the fraternity, as distinct from the chapter, were elected. I cannot remember for the life of me who they were, except that I was Treasurer.”

Wilkinson’s contention that the general fraternity wasn’t formed until later seems, at least in part, to be verified by the minutes of the April 15, and May 23, 1891, meetings. At the April 15, 1891, meeting, the constitution and Ritual were adopted as read, the committee on charters was appointed, and the men traditionally considered the first set of officers (President Owen Lincoln Potter, Vice President John Milton Gorham, Secretary George A. Nall, and Treasurer Albert T. Wilkinson) were elected. It is interesting to note, in light of Wilkinson’s statement about “a hurry call for a meeting to organize a body to which he (Tucker) could apply” is the fact that this April 15 meeting occurred the night after Tucker’s initiation. At the May 23 meeting, the motto, grip, challenge, and the colors were adopted by the Fraternity. One solution to this is the possibility that Delta Chi was originally founded as a national fraternity, but with the pressures of schoolwork and the chapter at Cornell to keep them busy, the Founders allowed the national organization to take a back seat. When Tucker appeared the next spring, the national organization had to be reorganized in order to accommodate the applicant from N.Y.U. As it turned out, Tucker played a significant role in the development of the Fraternity. In a letter to Johnson dated February 22, 1892, he states: “As to Dickinson Law School, I have been at work at that school since last August and I think I now have six more sssociate members . . . I have worked up a chapter of 25 men at the Albany

Artwork used on early charters

The men traditionally considered the first set of officers of the general fraternity: President, Owen Lincoln Potter Vice President, John Milton Gorham Secretary, George A. Nall Treasurer, Albert T. Wilkinson

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Law School and another 12 men at the University of Minnesota.”

John Francis Tucker N.Y.U. 1896

On February 13, 1897, Delta Chi became an international fraternity.

The debt that Delta Chi owes Tucker would appear to be larger than previously recognized. In 1892 four more chapters were established, three of which exist today (the fourth — Albany Law School — had its charter transferred in 1901 to Union College. Twelve chapters were founded within the first decade and on February 13, 1897, Delta Chi became an international fraternity with the installation of the Osgoode Hall Chapter in Toronto, Canada. Delta Chi’s first convention was held in 1894 at the Michigan Chapter. By the turn of the century, Delta Chi had grown to ten chapters. The initial years of the new century saw conservative growth. The 1902 Convention* authorized the Delta Chi Quarterly. The convention had misgivings — everybody wanted it, some thought it was an unwarranted risk, no one had the slightest idea how to go about it. Harold White, Chicago-Kent ’01 became the first editor and Edward Nettles, Chicago-Kent ’00 was the first business manager. In an article in the May 1929 Quarterly White had this to say: “No doubt in our innocence, we felt the honor compensated for all the work. That’s the marvel of being young and enthusiastic. There was no plan, no adequate appropriation for necessary expenses, no business or editorial policy. . . . there was not even a list of alumni members. We had to start from a point below zero and from the beginning the jobs of editor and business manager so interwove and overlapped that it was difficult to say who did what. . . . When it came to all the endless worries and sleepless nights that accompany the launching of a frail bark in unknown waters by two inexperienced mariners it was a joint enterprise and the punishment was inflicted equally.”

April 1903 saw the first issue of the Delta Chi Quarterly published for a fraternity of fourteen chapters and fewer than 3,000 alumni.

*It was at this convention that the white carnation was selected as the Fraternity’ s flower.

38


History of Delta Chi

1902 Chicago, Illinois Convention

39


Delta Chi Goes Single Membership

Floyd Carlisle Cornell 1903

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At the time Delta Chi was first conceived, men coming to college could begin law studies immediately upon entry to the University. In fact, some schools did not even require a high school diploma as a prerequisite for entry. Many of the law schools, Harvard being the first in 1899, began requiring two years of liberal arts training before eligibility for law. Founded as a professional law fraternity, Delta Chi was initiating members of Delta Tau Delta, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Alpha Tau Omega and the other general fraternities. As time passed, several chapters that had voluntarily refrained from initiating members of other fraternities began pushing for a change in the constitution to prevent dual memberships. Delta Chi stood out as a law fraternity, not an honorary or club, but yet something special. As the Fraternity expanded, a divergent policy grew, contoured by the different chapters. The metropolitan law school chapters wanted to continue the practice of initiating members from the general fraternities. The campus chapters that had voluntarily refrained from such practice, though it was then still allowable, were agitating for a change in the constitution to prevent future initiation of such men. For some years, the single standard men had been slightly in the majority but were not numerically strong enough to change the constitution. The limelight focused on the issue as early as 1903 and was personified by the man elected as “CC” that year. Floyd Carlisle, Cornell ’03 was awarded that office while still an undergraduate. The election is indicative of the impression this man made on a group. He was, ultimately, class president in both his sophomore and senior years at Cornell. Deter­mined to resolve the question in favor of the single membership standard, he championed a change in the Fraternity’s form of government. Up to that point, with only five executive officers to be elected by the convention, the older, more experienced and attractive personalities of the graduate double fraternity men, who were usually the alumni delegates from the metropolitan law chapters, held the stage and the attention of the delegates during the two or three days of convention acquaintance. As a result, they almost always succeeded in being elected. Carlisle planned to break up this habit. By proposing the election of a fifteen man “XX”


History of Delta Chi

(which then elected its own officers: “AA”, “CC” and “DD”), the eighteen chapters of the day would concentrate on trying to get one of their own elected to the governing board. By combining their votes against a candidate favoring dual membership, the single membership chapters were able to elect an overwhelmingly predominate single standard “XX.” This principal question of dual membership was debated for about five years. The arguments of “a man can be both a good Mason and a good Elk” and “No man can serve two masters” were heard time and time again. Finally, after unseating four “dual membership” chapters on alleged violations, the 1909 Cornell Convention adopted an amendment to the constitution prohibiting dual membership. The “guilty” chapters were then reseated. The issue and ultimate decision cost the Fraternity the New York Law (1905), West Virginia (1908), Northwestern (1909) and Washington University (in St. Louis) (1909) Chapters. All were dual membership chapters. But the tide of change had only begun to engulf Delta Chi. During the next dozen years, another undertow would build to turn the fraternal ship. The tug may have even been felt by those men in ’09 — the tug to become a general fraternity.

The tide of change had only begun to engulf Delta Chi.

Shall We Become a General Fraternity? The years after the 1909 decision were years of great change and unrest. The United States became involved in World War I with a majority of the members of the active chapters dropping their college courses and enlisting in the armed forces. Chapter houses became almost deserted and a convention in August 1917 became unthinkable. At the end of the war, the college men returned to the universities to complete their courses. The chapter finances were generally in

41


After World War I, many chapters stretched the recruiting restrictions by initiating men whohad no intention of studying law.

bad condition as were the houses. Attempting to rebuild, many chapters stretched the recruiting restrictions by initiating men who had no intention of studying law. Although the debate over whether Delta Chi should be a law or a general fraternity had received some press as early as 1916, notice was served in the May 1919 issue of the Quarterly in the editorial “Shall We Go On a General Fraternity?” that a torchbearer had taken up the cause of Delta Chi becoming a general fraternity. The editor, Roger Steffan, Ohio State ’13, claimed a majority of the chapters were “no longer even predominantly legal in their membership.” As editor of the fraternity magazine, Roger Steffan, was certainly a major force behind the general membership movement. A Phi Beta Kappa student, Steffan assumed the editor­ship of the Quarterly in 1916. In the May 1929 issue of the Quarterly, he recalled his May 1919 editorial effort: “I remember the night well. The magazine was practically ready to print and I was completing the editorials. Suddenly it struck me like a dazzling light: ‘Why Delta Chi’s a humbug. We’re posing before the world as a law fraternity and we haven’t been a law fraternity for seven or eight years. True, a few chapters remain true to the law tradition but most of them are general.’ And thereupon I decided to lift my piping voice in behalf of making Delta Chi an honest woman. . . .”

In short order, the fraternity’s magazine became filled with comments from all interested, each expressing their exact and often colorful opinions on the subject. The “general” supporters felt that Delta Chi had long ceased to be strictly a law fraternity. The first step toward this was the 1909 decision to bar members of other fraternities. In order to compete successfully, given the requirements now needed for entry to law schools, there had to be a wider field from

42


History of Delta Chi

which to choose members. So the Fraternity began allowing the initiation of men who “intended” to study law. A number of these men eventually failed to study law thus giving Delta Chi more of a general character. Several chapters then claimed that it was becoming increasingly difficult to identify exactly which freshmen men were eligible for recruitment (those who intended to study law) soon enough to effectively compete with the general fraternities. Besides being hard to identify, the number of eligible men was further being reduced by the increasing requirements for law school, admission as well as the increasing interest in the new and popular Colleges of Business Administration. As with any battle, there are men who seem to stand out on both sides. On the side of remaining a law fraternity was John J. Kuhn, “AA”, Cornell ’98. He and others felt that Steffan’s reports of chapters being already general in character were erroneous and that any move toward making Delta Chi a general fraternity would destroy the alumni strength that currently existed. The law advocates pointed out that the legal qualifications save the chapters an added feature in recruitment — the Fraternity had a definite purpose, and this attracted the type of freshman who did things in college and made the “all around man.” Appearing in Quarterly articles by the law advocates were such statements as: “. . . Delta Chi cannot hope to compete as strongly in the old fraternity world as a general fraternity. She would be lost in the shuffle.” With the issues clearly stated, the Fraternity held its first convention in four years. For the larger part of four days, delegates to the 1919 Minneapolis Convention grappled with the problem. Discussion began after Steffan introduced a motion to repeal restrictions in the constitution, limiting membership to law students or pre-law students. A. Frank John, Dickinson ’00, who had attended every convention since 1898, declared the debate to be the finest ever heard at any convention. After nearly six hours of debate, a vote was taken on the resolution favoring Delta Chi becoming a straight-out general fraternity. The result was 35 votes against the resolution and 26 for it; thus the resolution was lost. In order to get a test of strength on the other side of the matter, whether Delta Chi should retain its law membership and instruct the “XX” to enforce this in the chapters, a resolution to that effect was voted upon and likewise defeated.

John J. Kuhn Cornell 1898

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Roger Steffan Ohio State 1913

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With both sides of the matter going to defeat, Billie Bride, Georgetown ‘04, urged the convention to accept a compromise position. Several compromise proposals ultimately met with defeat, with the pro-law men feeling that “going general” changed the character of the Fraternity and the general advocates claiming that staying a law fraternity offered no real relief for the conditions faced by a number of chapters. The only amendment agreed upon in Minneapolis made brothers and sons of Delta Chis, regardless of course of study, eligible for membership. This was agreed on without opposition from either side. The Fraternity left Minneapolis without resolving the membership question. As expected, the discussion of becoming a general fraternity continued. Chapters reported recruiting problems, Steffan’s editorial comments appeared in each Quarterly issue, and John J. Kuhn told the chapters to believe in their product and sell it. In an effort to enforce the constitutional requirements of the Fraternity, John J. Kuhn moved to suspend the Ohio State Chapter for openly admitting to initiating men who never intended to study law. A majority of the “XX” voted against the suspension. The “XX” was tireless in working to solve the membership question. Two separate attempts to change the constitution by mail balloting proved unsuccessful. By the summer of 1920 the general advocates were pushing for a special convention to once and for all solve the membership issue. The generalists pointed to the great expansion that was going on in the fraternity world and leaving Delta Chi without a single new chapter since the chartering of Kentucky in 1913. However, slow communication prevented a special convention from becoming a reality. The “CC”, Billie Bride, stood squarely between the prolaw advocates and the generalists. He was certain that a compromise could be reached. Bride wrote: “We have a serious issue before us and it will settle itself if we don’t tear our hair and lose our tempers. We are all Delta Chi whatever may be our views on the question of our becoming a general fraternity. With a little give and take, the right side will win.” To assure everyone the generalists were firm on their commitment. Roger Steffan made his views on a compromise solution clear in this editorial comment:


History of Delta Chi

“The time when a compromise was possible between the general fraternity and the law group in Delta Chi passed at the Minneapolis Convention. Since then the general fraternity sentiment has increased so rapidly that to attempt a settlement on any basis short of that would be folly. At best, any of the compromises proposed were merely red-eyed, wobbly kneed, weak-mouthed proposals that accomplished nothing. Practically all of the general chapters for years have been initiating engineer and arts and commerce men beyond the limits proposed in the compromises. A compromise would not help the crying need for expansion. Delta Chi cannot add ONE SINGLE CHAPTER to its roll till it becomes a general fraternity. A fifty-fifty, willy-nilly, sort of fraternity would no more be able to get new chapters than a law fraternity. It must be general or nothing — or rather, general or death.“

In 1921, no closer to a solution, the Fraternity representatives met once again hoping to solve the controversy. Only two proposals were submitted with the pro-law advocates deciding to support a more liberal compromise instead of the straight law stand. The second proposal submitted for vote was the straight general amendment. After lengthy debate of both positions, voting began. After six ballots the general amendment had obtained 47 of the 531⁄4 votes necessary for adoption. The phrase “General 47, Compromise 25” was heard until 2:00 a.m. Thursday morning, looking as if no end was in sight. Balloting began again Friday morning with both sides trying feverishly to sway votes or to bring arguments to bear that would change the result. The generalists secured as many as 51 votes before the tide turned against their effort. Somewhere around midnight on the forty-second ballot, the compromise vote actually exceeded the general vote. For the second straight night, no solution seemed in sight. Finally, Billie Bride proposed “that a committee of five, consisting of two from the general side, two from the compromise side, and the Stanford delegate, be appointed to prepare a proposition solving the membership question to report at 9:30 a.m. Saturday.” The motion carried and the committee met from 2 until 5:30 Saturday morning struggling to find common ground. Again, with neither side willing to accept compromise, the neutral, Harry Wadsworth, Stanford ’20, wrote out the amendment that was to carry the Convention. Wadsworth presented the following amendment with the two general representatives on the committee voting in favor:

William W. Bride Georgetown 1904

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Delta Chi is called a “so­cial fraternity” because it helps prepare its members for life in society.

“Male white students in any university or college having a chapter of the Delta Chi Fraternity, who are pursuing studies in, law, liberal arts, journalism, commerce, or finance, by whatever name such courses may be known, who have paid the “XX” per capita tax, Delta Chi Quarterly tax and one dollar for the Fraternity shingle, are eligible for membership in the Delta Chi Fraternity; provided such persons are not candidates for any degree in any subject other than those above named; and provided further that a chapter having 25 per cent of its active members in law or bona-fide pre-legal coursed, may initiate students into the fraternity who are not eligible as above, to the extent that such members shall not, at any time exceed 25 per cent of the entire membership of the chapter.”*

Voting was once again resumed. After 52 ballots, the representative of the Buffalo alumni changed his vote giving the Wadsworth amendment victory. In the months following the convention, it became evident many chapters were finding it impossible to live up to the provisions of the constitution. It was also clear that administering membership eligibility requirements would be extremely difficult. Finally, at their April 29 and 30, 1922, meeting in Chicago the “XX” adopted and submitted to the Chapters for ratification, a constitutional change that would allow any white male student registered at a college or university where there was a chapter of Delta Chi to be eligible for membership. Citing conditions in the chapters and in the expansion work, “AA” Henry V. McGurren, Chicago-Kent ‘10, said: “I am convinced that it not only is desirable at this time to adopt the general fraternity amendment without delay, but that it is absolutely necessary for the unity and welfare of Delta Chi.” And so it stood, Delta Chi had become completely “general.”

1922-Present In 1923, the old “XX” was abolished and replaced with an Executive Committee of seven. This board, comprised of the “AA”, “CC”, “DD”, “EE”, and three members-at-large, was the governing body of the Fraternity between conventions. A new “XX” was created as an advisory body to the Executive Committee; its membership consisted of the “BB” elected by each chapter. *The “white” limitation was removed at the 1954 Convention.

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History of Delta Chi

There were other internal improvements during the period between the world wars. The position of Executive Secretary* was created in 1923 and provision made for a permanent central office that was finally established in 1929. The position of Director of Scholarship came into being in 1925 to lead the drive for general scholastic excellence. In 1927, one fulltime Field Secretary was placed in direct contact with the chapters and, in 1935, a second one was added to the staff. By 1930, Delta Chi had grown to 36 chapters and, in 1934, the Headquarters staff began editing the Quarterly. During this era, Delta Chi made two noteworthy contributions to the Greek letter fraternity world. The first of these was the Tutorial Advisor Plan — members of the faculty (preferably not members of the Fraternity) living in the house where they acted as tutors, advisors, and counselors. In yet another way Delta Chi took the lead among Greek letter organizations: at the 1929 Estes Park Convention, Delta Chi unanimously voted to abolish “Hell Week.” The position of “EE” was also abolished at the 1929 convention and, at the 1935 Convention, the Executive Board was increased to nine. Without realizing the full significance of what it was starting, the Pennsylvania State Chapter in 1937 invited six chapters in neighboring states to meet with them. Dean C. M. Thompson, who was then the “AA”, saw the great potential of such gatherings and promptly asked the Indiana Chapter to be host for the first Midwest Regional Conference. After that, the regional conference plan blossomed, but with World War II and the temporary suspension of many chapter operations, much about the mechanics of the regional conference was forgotten. But the need, desire, and concept were not forgotten. After the war, Delta Chi saw its conference program expand and become more purposeful. Today, the Regional Leadership Conferences play an important role in the affairs of the Fraternity. The conferences are the vehicle for the election of each regent for a two-year term. More importantly, each conference is designed to accomplish specific purposes, including: the development of new approaches to the solution of fraternity problems; fostering a better understanding of the operation of the various programs of the general fraternity and the International Headquarters; promoting good will in university-fraternity relations; and bringing together large numbers of Delta Chis for information, inspiration, and plain good fun.

In 1934, the Head­quarters staff took over the editing of the Quarterly.

*In 1970 the title of Executive Secretary was changed to Executive Director.

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In 1954, the Delta Chi Educational Foundation was established.

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After the Great Depression and on the verge of the United States’ entering World War II, the Fraternity celebrated its 50th Anniversary with 35 chapters. Once again our young men went off to war and many of the chapter houses were taken over by the military as was done during the first war. It was the alumni dues program, started in 1935, that provided the main source of revenue to the Fraternity while the chapters were not in operation. The war ended and the chapters resumed normal operations. By 1950, Delta Chi had 39 chapters. 1951 saw the retirement of O. K. Patton, Iowa ‘12 from the position of Executive Secretary which, while he was a Professor of Law at Iowa, he had held on a part-time basis since 1929 on an official basis. Prior to that time he had effectively operated the central office since his election as “CC.” Prior to 1929, the membership records of the Fraternity would follow the election of the “CC” and the financial records would follow the election of the “DD”. When O. K. Patton was elected “CC” in 1923, he put the records in one room of a downtown Iowa City building and hired one part-time secretary. After the “general” membership question was resolved. Delta Chi grew from 21 to 36 chapters in 1929 and the records and related activity had expanded to four rooms and four secretaries. Effectively after the fact, Delta Chi established its International Headquarters in Iowa City where it has remained. In 1954, the Delta Chi Educational Foundation was established to further the goals of the Fraternity as stated in the constitution. More information on the Foundation is contained elsewhere in the Cornerstone. A further change was made in the Executive Board in 1958 when the size was increased to include the “AA”, “CC”, “DD” the immediate past “AA,” and Regional Representatives. More important than the increased size was the method to be employed in selecting its members. As before, the “AA” “CC”, and “DD” were chosen by the convention. Included in the change was the adoption of a plan whereby regions were established and a Board member selected from each region. Prior to the adoption of this plan, every member of the Board could possibly have come from the same community or geographical area. The new plan made this impossible; the entire Board benefits from the geographical diversity.


History of Delta Chi

At the 1960 Convention, a “Building Loan Fund” was created. The original level of assessment proved too low and, in 1962, the Delta Chi Housing Fund was established to assume the function of the “Building Loan Fund.” Today, the Housing Fund has loans outstanding to chapters and colonies across the country. Also at the 1962 Convention, the Regional Representatives were re-designated as Regents and the Executive Board was renamed the Board of Regents. At the 1975 Chicago Convention, the Order of the White Carnation was created to honor alumni who give outstanding service to the Fraternity in a meritorious but inconspicuous way. The first inductee into the Order was Victor T. Johnson, Purdue ’32. All of these changes were mere aids in making the machinery of the Fraternity work more smoothly. Delta Chi maintains a prominent position in promoting four worthwhile features of fraternity life: development of the individual, cooperation with the college administration, sound finances, and excellent scholarship. Delta Chi today continues its role as a catalyst to promote friendship, develop character, advance justice and assist in the acquisition of a sound education. As an associate member, as an undergraduate brother, as an alumnus, it is your obligation to see that Delta Chi continues to meet the needs of its current members for individual development; it is up to you to see that change is made when change is necessary, but it is just as important that the Fraternity stands firm when change is not necessary. When you meet that obligation you are fulfilling the commitment made so long ago by the Founders of The Delta Chi Fraternity. More information on Delta Chi’s history can be found in Hands Across the Centuries: A History of Delta Chi, 1890-2012. This can be ordered at www.deltachi.org.

A wealth of history about Delta Chi is available and on display at the Delta Chi Inter­national Head­quarters.

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50


The Delta Chi Bond The Insignia

As with most fraternities, the coat of arms depicts the principles for which Delta Chi stands. The precise meaning is explained as part of the initiation ritual. A coat of arms is a family emblem with a tradition arising out of the sixteenth century military aristocracy. The history of those times revolves around the feudal system, whereby the lord of the manor supported knights who acted as champions of right. Those knights wore armor as protection in combat, and hence lost much of their personal identity. To restore that lost identity they decorated their shields; those decorations evolved into the coats of arms of their feudal lords. The coat of arms of Delta Chi consists of three parts. The first is the “crest” (in Delta Chi’s case this is the Fraternity’s badge) and tie of the Fraternity. Below that is the shield. The shield involves the “marriage” or union of two “families”; that of Sir Edward Coke; and that of the knight-errant, the feudal predecessor of law in enforcing justice. The shield is divided into four parts. In the first and fourth quadrants are three black martlets on a gold background. Martlets are peculiar, heraldic birds which are shown without feet. They are colored black, denoting that they are secret with meaning to be revealed only to the initiate. Reflecting Delta Chi’s heritage, the martlets are taken from the family coat of arms of Sir Edward Coke, our spiritual Founder, who is responsible for the establishment of law as the instrument of justice. The martlets fly to the left as does the winged horse Pegasus, the symbol for the Inner Temple where Sir Edward Coke studied the Law. In the second and third quadrants we find the battle ax and scimitar crossed on a field of red.* They symbolize the weapons of the knighterrant, the feudal predecessor of law in enforcing justice. Below the shield is a scroll with the Latin word “Leges,” the open motto of the Fraternity.

5

*Prior to colored printing, color codes were used. Dotted background representing a field of gold and vertical lines denoting a red background are just two examples. It is incorrect to refer to the whole coat-of-arms as a “crest” as the crest is only the top part of a coat of arms.

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The badge of the Fraternity consists of the Greek letters “Delta” and “Chi” arranged in a monogram with the “Delta” superimposed upon the “Chi.” It is in the form of a pin and often is worn in connection with a chain, or guard, to which are attached one or more letters in a monogram representing the member’s chapter. The member’s badge comes in two sizes. The larger of the two is worn by the “A.” The badge may be plain or contain jeweled stones such as pearls. The badge, always worn over the heart, may only be worn by members of the Fraternity or by the sister, fiancée, wife, mother or daughter of a member, or the housemother of an undergraduate chapter. Often a smaller size badge is purchased for that purpose. The associate member pin of the Fraternity is shaped in the form of a “delta” with a gold “chi” across the lower twothirds of the “delta.“ Of the four parts thus formed, the top is white, the lower center is black, and the lower left and right are red. The meanings of the parts and colors of the associate member pin are revealed during the formal Associate Member Ceremony. The associate member pin is worn on the coat lapel (left side). When not wearing a coat, the pin is worn over the heart. The flower of the Fraternity is the white carnation. It should be displayed on Founders’ Day and on certain festive occasions throughout the year. The colors of the Fraternity are red and buff. The official flag of the Fraternity is a double-pointed triangular pennant with a red background and a buff border; upon which are raised the Greek letters “Delta Chi.” The Inter­na­tional Headquarters also has a four-foot by six-foot rectangular banner available.

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The Delta Chi Bond

Why “National”? A simple question with a complex answer. There seems to be only three alternatives: “national” fraternities, local fraternities, or no fraternities at all. Societies, clubs, and other social organizations have been around for a long time. The Greek-lettered college fraternity traces itself back to the founding of Phi Beta Kappa in 1776. Phi Beta Kappa was founded in response to a special set of needs. Over two hundred and thirty years later there are approximately 6,136 chapters of men’s social fraternities, ignoring all the women’s social groups, the service fraternities, the professional fraternities and the honoraries, in the United States and Canada. Why so many? If they did not already exist what would ­happen? Most people believe they would rapidly evolve. They may or may not use Greek letters but, basically, they would look and act much like they do now. Why? Because there is a need for a sense of belonging that must be fulfilled. There is a need for achieving goals that can only be accomplished by the team effort of a group. There is a need for the personal growth that can only occur while working and living with others. But, most of all, there is a need for belonging to something that transcends the individual. What about the “national,” or what are better referred to as the “general” fraternities? Most people also believe that if they did not exist, they would evolve along with the local chapters. Again, why? Because there is a need for a sense of belonging that must be fulfilled. There is a need that what we do today has an impact beyond today, beyond what we can see. But, more than this, there is a need for being a part of something special, something that transcends the local chapter, which even transcends the local campus. A belief, a faith if you will, that is shared with thousands upon thousands of others. Something that stirs the emotions and the heart. There must be something to it because, out of those 6,136 chapters previously mentioned, approximately 400 are locals and 5,736 belong to a general fraternity! In pragmatic terms, there must be strength in numbers. While far from guaranteed, success is more likely with a general fraternity. Of the over 120 campuses where Delta Chi is operating, only eleven have locals. At those 110 plus campuses where there are no locals, would Delta Chi be the same, or even alive, if it were the only local and had to compete in recruitment against the prestige of belonging to a general fraternity? How many of those locals

There are over 6,100 chapters of men’s general fraternities.

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No single chapter has the right to unilaterally change the Law of Delta Chi.

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will be operating five years from now? If one of them dies, who will bring it back? When a member of a local moves across the country, how many members of the same fraternity will he meet? Can he work with a nearby undergraduate chapter of his own fraternity? Let’s assume that the need for “fraternity” is accepted and that the ratio of affiliated to local chapters speaks sufficiently to the value of belonging to a general fraternity. That returns us to the relationship between an individual chapter and its fraternity. In particular, to Delta Chi and its individual chapters. One way to view that relationship is that of a franchise operation like McDonald’s. If you want to open a McDonald’s, you have to buy a franchise and pay them a fee every month. In return they tell you how you have to operate. After all, they have to protect their name. If you want to change the ingredients of the Big Mac, they won’t let you. If you insist on doing it your way, you can, as Joe’s Burgers! When you consider the expertise they have built up over the years, it makes sense to follow the program. The same relationship exists between Delta Chi and its chapters. Delta Chi, through its various assessments, charges for the right to use its name. In the process, the chapters must live up to certain standards. Customarily, the vast majority of those standards were established by the chapters themselves at convention or by mail ballot. To provide the necessary services and uphold the standards, the chapters have elected individuals to run the international organization. They have empowered those individuals to employ a Headquarters staff to facilitate the wishes of the chapters as a whole. It is a democratic process. No single chapter has the right to unilaterally change the Laws of Delta Chl. If a chapter wishes to operate differently and still be a part of Delta Chi, it should ask the chapters as a whole to change the standards. To do otherwise is anarchy. If a member of an individual chapter acted unilaterally and in direct violation of its local by-laws, the chapter would not react favorably. “Fine, but what’s in it for me?” First, it’s impossible to place a dollar value on anything that’s intangible. What’s the dollar value of an international brotherhood? Or the dollar value of the greatly increased probability that your chapter will be around in ten years, or for that matter may exist today because of Delta Chi? When, at the chapter level, we are recruiting an individual whom we wish to have join our chapter, we often have to explain why he has to pay more to join Delta Chi than to live in the residence hall or an apartment. Sometimes we make the mistake of pointing only to such


The Delta Chi Bond

things as the parties, the house, or other tangibles he can see, hear, or touch. If that’s all we show him, then we are selling ourselves short. The intangibles; the sense of community, the brotherhood, the personal growth, the laughter, the tears are so hard to communicate in any meaningful way. Yet that is “fraternity,” that is “Delta Chi.” The same holds true at the general fraternity level as well. If the day-to-day benefits of belonging to a Delta Chi Chapter, even its very existence, are taken for granted, the main value of Delta Chi has been discounted. Without the general fraternity, “Delta Chi” would eventually cease to exist, perhaps more quickly than any of us realize. Does that mean that Delta Chi should not do anything tangible? No. Does it mean that what Delta Chi is doing is enough? No. We need to be doing more. Much more. But Delta Chi is doing what it can with the resources at hand. And each year, as the Fraternity grows, those resources and, thus what can be accomplished, increase. “What are some of the tangibles?” The ones that come quickly to mind include the Delta Chi Quarterly, the Cornerstone, the resources section of deltachi.org, the Ritual, our coat-of-arms, our badge, our associate member pin and ceremony, the shingle, visits from Leadership Consultants, the Convention, the Regional Leadership Conferences, the programs of the Educational Foundation, the maintenance of the membership records and the archives, loans to help with housing, the awards program, our songs and the protection of our name, and trademarks —“Delta Chi.”

Delta Chi operates under a carefully planned and de­tailed budget approved by the Board of Regents.

“If Delta Chi does not do something positive towards making a man a stronger, more virile, broad-minded, refined, educated, and positive character, preparing him to better fill his place in the world and making him a better citizen, it has not lived up to its standard nor justified its existence. . . . “Delta Chi demands that its members further the best interests of the University. The University is bigger than any one individual, than any one fraternity, than any one student body. It is axiomatic that a man who works for and in the best interest of the University in all or any of its fields or endeavors will further the best interests of the man as an individual and as a member of the Fraternity.” — George B. Bush, “EE” and first Traveling Secretary

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The Delta Chi International Headquarters established in 1969 at 314 Church Street [P.O. Box 1817, Iowa City, Iowa 52244, (319) 337-4811] is the first permanent facility owned by the Fraternity. Other office space had been rented prior to the purchase of this property.


The Delta Chi Bond

Awards and Recognition Delta Chi recognizes individuals and chapters for the successful performance and implementation of their duties and programs. Composite Awards  The President’s Cup — the “AA” selects up to four chapters from the Award of Excellence category in each division and is a chapter’s highest honor.  Award of Excellence — goes out to chapters with outstanding academic credentials, above average membership and strength in all the “outstanding” areas listed below. A maximum of six chapters in each division can receive the Award of Excellence.  Raymond D. Galbreth Certificate of Achievement — for chapters making great strides in their membership and chapter operations within the last two-year period.

Your chapter can’t win if it doesn’t apply!

The composite awards are divided between two divisions: Red Division — a ll chapters applying with 15 or more fraternities or whose greek system has over 30% of the undergraduate student body. Buff Division — all other chapters. The Most Improved Chapter A chapter must complete the awards packet for two consecutive years and show significant improvement from one year to the next. One per division will be awarded. Core Competency Awards How can we improve the experience of being a member of Delta Chi? What would it take for our chapter to truly be outstanding? Where should we look at to begin? When one examines the many functions within a fraternity chapter, one quickly learns that, often, many parts of ‘fraternity’ are interconnected. For instance, when one seeks to improve recruitment results, one quickly realizes that retention plays a key role in the overall effectiveness of recruitment. That is, if one only focuses on recruitment, the Chapter will not realize full potential due to a lack of equal attention to issues concerning member retention. To gain a clear understanding of chapter performance, Delta Chi is promoting a common language for fraternity operations, which we call our ‘core competencies.’

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If you examine ‘fraternity’ as a whole, it is apparent that there are eight core areas of fraternity operations that are essential to the success of any chapter. Advising and Governance — recognizes setting a solid foundation of procedures that ensure long-term organizational success. Organizational governance ensures a chapter can function effectively and efficiently, while proper advising ensures stability from term to term and year to year. Alumni Relations — recognizes efforts in communicating with alumni members, hosting events throughout the year, and contributing to the alumni-oriented publications of the Fraternity. Financial Management recognizes sound financial practices and policies within a chapter and its membership. Alumni involvement in this area plays a critical role. Housing recognizes the maintenance of an attractive and competitive living environment. Proper maintenance, attention to safety and cleanliness, and the function of the House Corporation are all instrumental to the success of a chapter’s housing initiatives. Involvement recognizes relevance through activities on campus and in the community. Great involvement is composed of a variety of activities and programs, including campus organizations, philanthropic contributions, community service initiatives, intramural participation, and more. Manpower recognizes strength through a balance of recruitment and retention of members. A greater manpower gives a chapter more resources to achieve that much more. Member Education recognizes total member education. Member education initiatives include usage of an approved Associate Member Education Program, leadership programming, and other programs throughout a member’s undergraduate experience. Scholarship recognizes the “acquisition of a sound education.” Scholastic success is built on a chapter’s atmosphere of programming, sound membership standards, and goals.

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The Delta Chi Bond

Individual Awards  meritus Officer — for meritorious and conspicuous E service to Delta Chi. These awards, created in 1935, are the highest honors any Delta Chi can receive. Order of the White Carnation — presented at Convention for meritorious and inconspicuous service to Delta Chi. The recipients of this award are recommended by the current members of the Order. Delta Chi of the Year — to recognize our alumni who have succeeded in their profession or avocation. This award is limited to one alumnus to be selected for recognition annually. Meritorious Service Award — Awarded to an alumnus for making significant contributions to Delta Chi of a semi-conspicuous nature. This award fills the void between no recognition at all and awards like O.W.C. and Emeritus. Humanitarian Award — to recognize special acts in service to others without placing one’s own life in peril. Valor Award • For those who are charged to “Protect and Serve” Citizens and property and who are paid from federal, commonwealth, state, and/or local government funds. The Valor Award applies to those who distinguish themselves by selfless and heroic actions while on duty. One of the determinants for this category would be for those who are uni­formed and in a structured organization. This group includes first responders, such as police officers, state troopers, sheriffs, firefighters, Secret Service, and Park Rangers. Also National Guardsmen who have been activated by the Governor of their state and the Reserve Personnel who have been activated for duty not related to combat. • For civilians who are not included in any of the above categories and who commit acts that are selfless and heroic. For example, postal service workers, judges, lifeguards, as well as other Men of Delta Chi who risk their lives or who may risk suffering injury while performing a heroic act. Valor Award with Distinction — for Uniformed Military Personnel of any country (Army, Marines, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard), including National Guard and Reserve Members on Active Duty in Combat. This award applies to those who distinguish themselves conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity, personal bravery or self sacrifice so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish them and must involve risk of life.

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Those who receive this award shall receive a certificate reading: the “Valor Award with Distinction.” Valor Award with Merit — for Uniformed Military Personnel (cited above) who are killed in action or are grievously wounded in combat and suffer debilitating wounds that could take months and years of rehabilitation. The Award is not intended for those who suffer other wounds with expected reasonably quick and full recovery; nor does it apply to those who suffer injuries that are not due to combat with the enemy, i.e. a traffic accident unrelated to combat duties. John J. Kuhn — Recognizes significant contributions to the fraternity and sorority community regardless of affiliation. Richard McKaig Outstanding Fraternity & Sorority Professional Award — Dick McKaig’s devotion and commitment to the college fraternity is acknowledged by all. A graduate of Ball State University and a loyal member of Delta Chi Fraternity, Dick is known by his contemporaries as the “fraternal dean.” He has been involved with the Greek community at Indiana University, and nationally, since his arrival on campus in 1971. Each year this award recognizes an individual who has made similar contributions in the field. Outstanding Advisor — To recognize an outstanding chapter or colony advisor for a specific exceptional act of service. Distinguished Delta Chi Award — Significant achievement in one’s profession, or outstanding Civic service (by necessity a subjective consideration) while upholding the values and ideals of the Fraternity. May be awarded posthumously. Marge Lee “C” Award — a “C” who has performed his duties and responsibilities to their fullest. “E” Key Award—the Fraternity’s oldest award, recognizes exceptional performances in the office of “E”. Chapter Luminary — Usually a senior, a Chapter Luminary is an undergraduate member of the chapter who has “enlightened” his group through his service to the chapter. This awards program was developed for the recognition of those chapters and individuals whose work and performance reflect highly on themselves and Delta Chi. Recognition for many of these achievements can come only by applying for them on Delta Chi Connect. If your chapter is deserving of any of the aforementioned awards, or recognition, or both, make sure you submit your application. Be proud to be a Delta Chi, and let Delta Chi be proud of you.

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The Fraternity Today General Structure and Governance

Up to now we have focused on the founding and history of Delta Chi, including some references to the structure of the Fraternity as it was. This section will look at the structure and organization of Delta Chi today. Delta Chi is more than the loose federation of many chapters. The Fraternity is both the representative of all the chapters and the adhesive that binds all of the chapters together. The Frater­nity is the extension of the duty and responsibility of each member to advance the aims and purposes of Delta Chi. The Delta Chi Fraternity, Inc. is a product of the governance structure of the Fraternity. As set forth in Delta Chi Law, the government of Delta Chi is vested in the Convention, the Board of Regents, the Executive Committee, and the chapters.

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International Convention The Delta Chi Convention is the supreme legislative body of the Fraternity. A Convention is held every two years and consists of voting delegates from each undergraduate chapter and colony, as well as each alumni chapter, based on the size and nature of the group. In addition to delegates, chapters generally send one or more alternates to the Convention, and many Chapter “BB”s, other interested alumni, and colony members also attend. At each Convention the members of the Executive Committee (the “AA”, the “CC”, and the “DD”) are elected for a two-year term of office. Amendments to Delta Chi Law and other legislative and policy-making activities are undertaken. The Convention also receives and accepts reports from standing and special committees of the Fraternity, the Execu­tive Director, and the members of the outgoing Execu­tive Com­mittee. In addition to the general business meetings of the Convention, sessions on various facets of chapter operations are also conducted by the Headquarters staff and other qualified individuals. Most important of all, however, is the opportunity afforded each member present at the Convention to interact with

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his Brother Delta Chis from across North America and even worldwide. Many times these informal contacts provide the basis for lifelong friendships, and the information exchanged can be invaluable for improving specific chapter weaknesses. Board of Regents

Each chapter should consider its Regent as its nearest representa­tive of Delta Chi.

The Board of Regents consists of thirteen alumni members, the nine Regents elected by the chapters of each region and ex officio the “AA”, the “CC”, the “DD” and the retiring “AA”. Between conventions the Board of Regents is the legislative and policy-making body of the Fraternity. Among other duties the Board approves the granting and revocation of charters and the adoption of the annual budget of the Fraternity. The Board of Regents meets before and after each convention at the convention site. In non-convention years it meets at least once a year. All of the members of the Board are volunteers. They receive no pay for the time they devote on behalf of the Fraternity. They are, however, reimbursed for reasonable expenses incurred on behalf of Delta Chi. Each chapter should consider its Regent as its nearest representative of Delta Chi and the one who is closest to the programs and problems of the chapter. The officers of the chapter, the “BB”, members of the ABT, and members of the house corporation should call upon the Regent for any assistance they feel he can give them. Executive Committee The Executive Committee consists of the three elected officers of the Fraternity — the “AA”, the “CC” and the “DD”. Between conventions they have complete executive and administrative authority, subject to Delta Chi Law and the Board of Regents. The Executive Committee meets at least twice a year. Relationship with the Chapters The relationship between each chapter and the general structure of the Fraternity — whether convention, Executive Committee, Board of Regents or professional staff — is unique. Delta Chi’s resources — volunteer and professional — are available to each chapter upon request, but, except for the broad policies set forth in Delta Chi Law, each chapter is free to develop and manage its own programs and practices,

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The Fraternity Today

consistent with college or university regulations. With this broad latitude comes the obligation to exercise the freedom in a responsible manner that will reflect favorably upon the individuals, the chapter, and the Fraternity. The freedom accorded chapters is similar to the freedom you have received from your parents and from your school. You no longer have anyone telling you what to eat (or not eat), what to wear (or not wear), when to go to bed (or get up), etc. You are not forced to attend classes or to study. In short, subject to respecting the individual rights of those around you, you are free to lead your own life. With this freedom comes the responsibility to achieve academically and to be a positive (or at worst, neutral) force in the college community. You have the opportunity; you have the freedom; you also have the responsibility to exercise your freedom wisely. The same is true with the Fraternity. Each chapter of Delta Chi has the opportunity and freedom to develop its own programs and traditions. It is up to the individuals to ensure that this freedom is exercised wisely so as to bring credit and honor on the group, the college, and the Fraternity.

Professional Organization International Headquarters In 1923, realizing the growth that lay ahead for Delta Chi as it emerged from the status of a legal to a general membership fraternity, the Convention authorized the establishment of a central office. Temporarily set up and housed in the Schneider Office Building in Iowa City Iowa, during 1927-28, the International Headquarters was moved in 1929 to 161⁄2 South Clinton Street, where it remained for forty years. On July 1, 1969, the International Headquarters was moved to the Frater­nity’s first owned property at 314 Church Street. The International Headquarters constitutes the service department of the Fraternity. It is there that the records of Delta Chi are kept. Expansion, chapter visitation, and assistance programs are all coordinated through the Inter­ national Headquarters. The International Headquarters also publishes the Delta Chi Quarterly, programming, resources, newsletters, and all other publications of the Fraternity. The International Headquarters functions under the direction of the Executive Director. He is the chief administrative officer of the Fraternity.

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The Executive Director runs the International Headquarters with the help of other professional and clerical staff. The success of the International Headquarters operations depends in large measure upon extensive two-way, open communication between the chapters and the office. It is important for chapter officers to make their reports promptly and to make every effort to expedite responses to requests for additional information from the International Headquarters. Professional Staff Odis Knight Patton Iowa 1912

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In 1927, the Fraternity appointed George B. Bush, Stanford 1909, as the first “traveling secretary.” His job was to inspect the chapters, ensuring that high standards for housekeeping were maintained and that all chapter records conformed to the guidelines of the Fraternity. Although the number of professional staff may vary, it is common to have at least four to five leadership consultants (formerly field secretaries) on staff at any one time. Gone are the days of the Leadership Consultant’s “inspection” and report. Instead, each Leadership Consultant visits with the officers and men of the chapter, university officials, and key alumni to try to find ways in which Delta Chi can help the chapter. This may involve spending several hours with a newly elected “D” to suggest improvements for budgeting, billing, and managing funds and reports and discussing alumni relations techniques with the “E” or a chapter’s working committee on alumni affairs. The Leadership Consultant is a trained professional. He can help identify strengths and weaknesses of chapters and colonies. In addition to the brief visits with most chapters, the Leadership Consultants spend more time with chapters particularly in need of help, but only where there is a willingness on the part of the members to try to “bring the chapter back.” The Leadership Consultants also spend extended periods of time on expansion (starting new colonies) at selected colleges and universities. Delta Chi’s professional staff gains the personal satisfaction of helping Delta Chi brothers and the Fraternity in a positive and tangible way. In many respects they personify the founding spirit of Delta Chi.


The Fraternity Today

Housing in Delta Chi In 1960, the Convention created the “Building Loan Fund” to provide a fund of monies that would be available for loans to chapters and colonies for housing-related purposes. Recognizing the need for much more rapid growth, the 1962 Convention increased the assessment amounts and changed the name to the Delta Chi Housing Fund. The Housing Fund is administered by a committee of three alumni members who serve for six-year terms and two student members. The Housing Fund provides loans to assist in the purchase or refurbishing of chapter houses or furniture. Generally, the Housing Fund will not make a loan until other sources of loans (for example local banks) have been sought. The loans by the Housing Fund bear interest and, as they are repaid, provide funds for new loans. Delta Chi’s newest housing initiative is Barrister Capital Corporation (BCC). Funded through a special housing initiative assessment, BCC’s focus is on small-to-medium sized markets where modest properties can be obtained more quickly than the traditional larger house channels. BCC’s can provide assistance with managing properties and lease agreements for many first-time chapter house projects or with renovating and occuping a distressed property that has a good future potential.

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The Delta Chi Educational Foundation The Delta Chi Educational Foundation (DCEF) was founded November 26, 1954 as a 501(c)(3) charitable organization with the purpose of supporting Delta Chi’s educational and leadership development programs. The DCEF is headquartered in the same location as the Fraternity. The DCEF is a separate legal entity from The Delta Chi Fraternity. You can become a voting member of the DCEF by donating $200 or more in your lifetime and vote during the annual membership meeting each Summer. The DCEF operating budget is funded primarily by individual donors making unrestricted gifts to the General Fund, which makes it possible to offer tax-deductible status in every state, and account for restricted gifts supporting individual chapters. • The Mission of the DCEF is to develop, manage and steward financial resources in support of The Delta Chi Fraternity’s role in assisting in the acquisition of a sound education. • The Vision of the DCEF is an active and engaged membership base that recognizes the importance of continued participation and financial support of The Delta Chi Fraternity’s educational and leadership development programs. • The Values of the DCEF are Scholastic Achievement, Leadership, Character Development, and Lifelong Engagement. The DCEF supports the Fraternity by offering Scholarships at the Chapter (CSA) and International levels, grants for leadership development training such as the “A”s’ Academy, Emerging Leaders Academy, and Undergraduate Interfraternity Institute (UIFI) and grants for the educational portion of chapter housing (ECHI). These grants would not be possible without the generous support of members of the Fraternity as well as non-members who believe in the value of Delta Chi. “Most of us think in terms of, ‘I’m going to graduate and pursue my career. I’m going to hit it big and then I’m going to make a big donation.’ With rare exception, it just doesn’t work out that way. It must begin with moderate donations while getting in the habit of giving and finding ways to be involved. Suddenly you take a vested interest in the goals behind the funds and behind your invested time.” - Rod Arnold, Texas A&M ‘88, New Founder

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The Fraternity Today

As a member in our Fraternity, the expectation is that you will stay engaged with Delta Chi and continue to support the organization that gives so much to you. The original logo of the DCEF incorporates the Lamp of Learning, which stands as a reminder of our continuing responsibilities as educated men to give back to the upcoming generation. The words above and below the lamp, “Scholarship” and “Leadership,” reflect the major purposes that the Foundation endeavors to support. • Donate your time by serving as an Advisor to a local chapter or on an International Committee. Specific to the DCEF, we need ambassadors to advocate to others about the programs and services of the DCEF, and/or serving on a Board Committee, or joining the DCEF Board of Directors. • Donate your talent by offering your professional talents and / or influence to aid a chapter, or mentoring individual members throughout their life. Specific to the DCEF, we’re looking for professionals willing to donate their talent to advance our Foundation, including, but not limited to: Legal, Accounting, Audit, Investing, Non-Profit Management, Fundraising, Business Management, Technology, and so on. • Donate your treasure by making a commitment to support Delta Chi financially throughout your life-time. Consider joining the 1890 Society as a Student with an annual gift, then stepping-up to the Scholar’s Society by increasing the frequency and amount upon graduation and starting your career; as your career develops, eventually becoming a sustaining Trustee Society donor, and maybe one day, a New Founder.

“I will sustain my commitment to and my involvement with our Fraternity throughout my lifetime” - Basic Expectation #10

The DCEF recognizes donors with varying degrees of Lifetime Giving levels (LTG) and annual giving societies. Giving societies, such as the 1890 Society, Scholar’s Society, and Trustee Society recognize unrestricted gifts to the General Fund. Lifetime Giving Levels, which include all giving through the DCEF, range from $500 to $1,000,000. As of the date of publication, 26 men have reached New Founder, signified by lifetime donations over $100,000. To make your gift, or for additional information regarding programs, giving societies, and how to support Delta Chi through the DCEF, please visit www.dcef.com or by calling the Delta Chi International Headquarters.

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The Chapter Today

What Does It Take to Have a Successful Chapter? Think about it. Is it a big house? Active alumni? Intramural championships? What? When we look around at what we consider to be the successful fraternities, we see big houses, active alumni, and intramural championships. We then take those as the reasons for success and conclude, if we are lacking any of these, that we cannot be successful because we don’t have these things. We are confusing the issue. Those big houses, active alumni, championships, or whatever, are not the causes but the results of a successful chapter, and results occur from action taken or not taken. That big house didn’t just happen. It was worked for, alumni help (in terms of ideas and time as well as money) was solicited, and committees were organized. All of the involved alumni were cultivated through the establishment of a well thought-out and implemented alumni program, designed with both the chapter and the alumni in mind. Those championships, like most everything worthwhile, took weeks of practice and hard work. So we can say that successful chapters do things that make them “successful,” things that unsuccessful chapters fail to do either altogether or simply with less conviction. Two important points can be made here: First, if you want to be successful, form the habit of doing things that failures don’t like to do. Plan. Organize. Rework ideas. Try again. You may not like to do them either, but you will like what they enable you to achieve. That leads to the second and most important point: successful people are motivated by the desire for pleasing results, while failures are motivated by the desire for pleasing activities. A good example of this can be found in recruitment. Let’s compare two different approaches. The first chapter selects almost all of its new members from the friends of its current membership. The only attempt at contacting anyone else is through a mass mailing inviting “interested” people to their “rush parties.” The chapter continues to lack diversity and often complains about the poor turnout of prospective


The Fraternity Today

members at their parties. Later on, they wonder why so many of their members only show up for parties and don’t remember that was how the chapter introduced “fraternity” to them. The second chapter takes the list of prospective members and either calls them on the phone or visits them personally. They make an attempt to get to know the individual. They introduce him and often his parents to the meaningful side of fraternity first and solidify his (and many others’) decision to join by having a party where he can meet all the members as well as his future brothers. Not only friends of the current membership are contacted. Diversity and strength are not only encouraged, but also sought out. As a result, the second chapter has not only the number of men it needs, but more importantly, the quality. The other fraternity hides behind false claims of “quality not quantity” as they pledge four men for the second year in a row. They fall further behind in their payments and suffer through another year of meager social activities, due to a lack of money. Simply put, the fraternity that went out and talked with friends and total strangers alike did well in recruitment (thus obtaining pleasing results) while the other fraternity, which was motivated by pleasing activities (talking with friends and partying), did poorly in recruitment. Think of your own chapter and decide if it is motivated by activities or results. Think of all the things your chapter has been willing to do without in order to avoid doing the things “it” does not like to do. We still haven’t traced success back far enough. Since every action or inaction first has its origin in a thought or an idea, we need to look at attitude. There is a tribe that has been dying from a strange disease for many generations. Finally, it was discovered that the disease was caused by the bite of an insect that lives in the walls of their adobe homes. The natives have several possible alternatives. They can kill the insects with an insecticide, they can destroy and rebuild their homes, they can move to an area that does not have these insects, or they can continue to live and die early in the same way they have for generations. They have chosen to stay and die early. They have resisted change. They have chosen the “easy way out.” How many of our chapters have chosen the “easy way out”? How many of our chapters have resisted change and resigned

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themselves to a life of “permanent potential,” possessing the ability to be better but not taking advantage of it? When they could have changed their associate member program to develop not good associates but better members, they talked about it, but somehow slid back into the old ways. When it was suggested that they should hold a recruitment seminar to overcome the lack of recruitment skills, they said they couldn’t find a date when everybody could be there. When their scholastics looked suspect, they resisted all attempts to improve their grades. Quiet hours were “too restrictive.” Steak and bean dinners were “too embarrassing.” “Scholarships only award brains and not effort.” When it was pointed out that if they would pledge more men they could operate in the black (for a change), and increase their social budget, they countered with “we want quality, not quantity.” We simply put forth far more effort trying to adapt ourselves to the hardships of a poor living than it takes to adapt ourselves to the hardships of making a better one. We seem to have placed on ourselves an “invisible ceiling” which won’t allow us to “stand up straight.” We walk around stooped over, claiming we could stand up but don’t. That invisible “ceiling” is our assumptions and these assumptions determine our performance by placing artificial limitations on our behavior. How can your chapter be successful? It is not enough to say it wants to change. It must truly want to change. It must talk, eat, think, stop, and change. We become what we think, and we move in the direction of that which we dwell on. We must change not just for one recruitment week but for all time. Not just for one associate member class but for all associate member classes. Don’t expect it to just happen. The key to success is in that moment when the chapter could go either way: regress to the old ways or move on to the new. That moment is not the time to give up but to redouble your efforts or to try a new approach. The proof of the quality of the men in your chapter is in their actions and reactions when that time comes, and it may come more than once. With effort, your chapter could be one of the best, if not THE BEST, fraternities on campus. That is a FACT; if it already is the best, then you can widen the gap between you and second best.”

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The Chapter Today

Stop saying, “I’ll believe it when I see it” and start saying “I’ll see it when I believe it.” Success is ATTITUDE.*

Member Education What is the purpose of a membership education program? The member education plan should be designed to help the individuals in their efforts to become good brothers and, ultimately, successful alumni. To do that, it must achieve certain goals, which should include: orienting and assimilating new members into the chapter; motivating new members; instilling chapter unity, cultivating friendship and brotherhood; promoting scholarship; building and developing leaders. Delta Chi encourages you to develop, to your fullest potential, the high standards of fraternity living that are essential for quality brotherhood. Delta Chi takes great pride in being the first fraternity to abolish the humiliating pre-initiation practices of “Hell Week.” The general fraternity continues to uphold this historic position and opposes hazing in any form. Through your associate member oath and ultimate membership in Delta Chi, you are obliged to support and comply with Delta Chi Law. Should you ever see or experience any hazing activities during your membership in Delta Chi, it is your duty as a responsible Delta Chi member or associate, to report that situation to the Executive Director or the Delta Chi Risk Manage­ment Commission. Due to the sometimes ambiguous nature of hazing, it is impossible to write a concise definition that covers every possible hazing activity while simultaneously eliminating all non-hazing activities. In 1980, Delta Chi formed the Hazing Commission (the name was changed to the Risk Management Commission in 1992) to make rulings on reported hazing incidents. Hazing is tough to define in specific terms; however, the By-Laws gives us a general definition in Article V, Section 3, subsection (4)(b):

As a fraternity founded on the concept of justice to your fellow man, Delta Chi takes great pride in its stance against hazing. Delta Chi was the first fraternity to abolish “Hell Week” in 1929 and continues to pro­mote the cardinal principle of justice in all programming, espe­cially in the education of its members.

“Hazing is defined as any action or situation created, whether on or off Fraternity or campus premises, which produces mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, anxiety or ridicule, no matter how good the intent or end result.” *This article first appeared in the June 1979 Quarterly.

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Procedures for actions taken by the Risk Management Commission are outlined in the same article. These procedures act as the guidelines for the commission to interpret any possible hazing violation.

Opposed To Hazing Delta Chi’s eleven Founders were not hazed. Are they There is no “National Test” individually any less of a Delta Chi because of that? How about required for initiation. at the chapter level? Are those Founders not “real” Delta Chis? To say in response that what they experienced was a form of hazing is simply wrong thinking and a disservice to them. To say that they did something meaningful begs the question of why can’t the current associate members be given something meaningful to accomplish instead of simply being abused? In plain words, fraternity is about nurturing brotherhood, not testing it. For those who are opposed to hazing, you are in the right. We ask you to realize that real brotherhood is truly wondrous and worth standing up for. In every chapter there are the good guys, the bad guys and the swing team. For whatever reason, the bad guys seem to always have the loudest voices and the most forceful personalities. All too often, the good people walk or are driven away and leave the chapter in the hands of what can reasonably be called the “dark side of the force.” Start working with the other good guys in your chapter. Develop/refine your position with those who agree. Use points like the ones I made up and add more. Bad habits can only be broken by replacing them with good habits. Leaving a void (stopping hazing without doing something in its place) won’t work. Talk to the swing team and win them over one at a time. Surprisingly, some of the “bad guys” are really swing teamers in disguise. Waiting for someone to demonstrate courage in moving away from bad behavior to good. This will not be an easy process. Especially when you get to the point where the hard-core bad guys have to be confronted. They have spent a lifetime honing their bullying and persuasion skills. You probably have not. Then you will have to collectively stand your ground. You are more of a fraternity man than they are. They have truly acted in direct opposition to the very values to which they have given lip service and are false to what they claim to value. The number one characteristic we have to change is that initiation far too often signals the end of an effort rather than its beginning. Initiated members should work harder than any

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The Chapter Today

of the AMs at making their chapter and their fraternity better. Who should care more than them? If they are not, then the role model they are providing is a major, self-perpetuating problem. People support that which they help create. They also support that which they have done themselves. To ask your chapter to change is a hard thing to do. Some of the older members will have a hard time supporting something new. In response to that, here are two points: 1. If hazing had never existed in the Greek system and someone came along and suggested that the youth of our society needed to be abused in order to truly respect their “elders” and to truly value being an “elder” one day, would you expect that idea to be met with open arms? Human nature resists the concept of change. The four stages of change: a. Euphoria—“Things are going to be better!.” b. Doubt—“This doesn’t ‘feel’ right, I’m not so sure about this.” This phase is where most people cut and run for the “comfort” of the known, albeit failing system. We simply are willing to put out more effort to stay in a known but bad situation than to venture into a better but unknown one. c. Role playing—We go through the motions and pretend to have a full understanding of what the new situation is like, and d. New equilibrium—We internalize the new situation. We “learn” it. 2. If the current system is so “right” and so “effective,” why do so many go “inactive” (either in fact or in spirit)? What is our “batting average” for keeping a member truly involved for four years? Are we doing a good job of meeting their needs? If not, that may be why they keep leaving. When someone does leave, we usually label him as “deadwood” or simply say something like, “They need to focus on their grades so they can get a better job.” Are we lying to ourselves and refusing to see the reality of the situation? Somehow, we need to change that. On www.deltachi.org we have “Building Better Brotherhood,” “The Party Continues” and other resources. How about asking each member (initiated and associate alike) to find one idea that can help make your chapter better? If your initiates aren’t willing to make the effort, then that should tell you something about the true “effectiveness” of the current program.

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The Chapter You will recall that the Preamble to the Fraternity’s Constitution spells out four purposes or goals: promote friendship, develop character, advance justice and assist in the acquisition of a sound education. But these goals do not only apply to the general fraternity. For Delta Chi to be successful they must be translated into the experiences of each member. The vehicle for that translation is your chapter. The operation of a fraternity chapter is carried on in two important classifications. First, a college home is maintained, and second, the chapter must function to provide its members with the general advantages of membership in Delta Chi. The first function is purely business in nature. All business transactions are handled through the Alumni Board of Trustees and the chapter “D”. The living conditions are kept pleasant, adequate study facilities are made available, and the house is kept in order. The more general phase of chapter operations is the active responsibility of each member. The chapter delegates specific duties to various men through the election of officers. Election of the officers is one of the most important functions of the chapter. If qualified men are placed in the various positions, the chapter can look forward to a period of progress; if a poor selection of leaders is made, not only may the chapter be deprived of further development, but it may actually regress. Each chapter has at least six officers who are designated as the “A”, the “B”, the “C”, the “D”, the “E”, and the “F”. These six are required under the Fraternity’s Constitution. In addition, most chapters have other officers, or committee chairmen, as appropriate to their individual needs; for example, associate member counselor, recruitment chairman, social chairman, or house manager.

Brand Identity

If you claim to be everything to everyone then you are really nothing to anyone.

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A successful salesman needs two critical elements: a clearly defined product and a belief in that product. With this in mind, what public image does your chapter have on campus? More importantly, what is its “image” in the hearts and minds of your members? In regards to recruitment, many of you often have only a few days to sell a potential member on the value of investing his time, money, and life affiliation in your chapter. Those are some big steps, and trying to simply sell him “brotherhood”


The Chapter Today

will not be effective. Instead, look at some specific areas you, as a chapter, might be able to identify. Class: as part of our Preamble to develop character, you are the men on campus known for being polite, dignified, witty, and respectable. You open doors for people, offer a firm handshake, look people in the eye when you talk to them and in general have an air of respect for yourself and others. Your house is well kept and guests always feel welcome. Campus Involvement: men want to join your chapter because they know they have a better chance of being elected if they do. You are referred to as the “election machine” with a celebrated history of student leaders. Your recruitment materials read like a Who’s Who of student government and club officers. Through your involvement you have solidified strong ties with administrators who provide referrals and endorsements for your chapter. No Hazing: your associate members are treated with respect and are engaged in developmental activities. They attend chapter meetings. You see no reason to waste the first semester of their college career demeaning them. Men want to join your chapter because they know there is a mutual respect among all members. Housing: when guests stop by, there are members around to greet them. The facility is clean and orderly. You are located just off of or near campus. You have modern amenities like wifi. The food keeps everyone happy, particularly the seniors that signed up for the out-of-house food plan. Your flag flies proudly in the front yard as a couple of brothers play catch. Parents drive by with their high school senior sons and say, “Well, that looks like fun.” No House: while other chapters on your campus struggle to maintain a money pit that is taking money away from programming, your members are free to live wherever they want. Since you don’t have a live-in requirement, new members can live in the residence halls and meet new potential members. Seniors can live where they like without being harassed for “not supporting” the chapter. Social events are at third party establishments, where the business is responsible for security and clean up afterwards. Academics: you recruit from honor rolls of nearby high schools. Your grade point average requirements are enforced and it shows. The chapter is consistently in the top three in overall academics, well above the all-men’s average. Your faculty advisor talks up the chapter to his students, which

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brings in even more academically ambitious members. Other chapters label you as nerds to make their academic probation seem a little more reasonable. Members have an excellent graduation rate and go on to be successful alumni. The cycle of success just seems to continue. Scholarships: your alumni have pooled money together to create an endowment either through the University or through the Delta Chi Educational Foundation. Applications come in for a new member scholarship, which generates new names for the recruitment committee. The financial assistance helps free a few members up to volunteer more of their time to the chapter. Undergraduates understand the importance of assisting others in their needs, which also translates to more community service and philanthropic endeavors. Athletics: other chapters groan when they see you on their intramural calendar. Intramural flag football games resemble varsity athletics. Sidelines of brothers, girlfriends, potential members, and onlookers surround a team that practices like it is getting academic credit for victories. The playoffs are seen as the real beginning of the season. A glowing trophy case adorns a corner of the chapter house. The membership of the chapter is peppered with varsity athletes who then recruit their teammates who share in the virtues of Delta Chi. Tradition: sorority women have been won over long ago after being serenaded with “Delta Chi Sweetheart” after their recruitment week. Homecoming is a big event for the chapter since it has placed in the top five for ten years running. Alumni look forward to the chapter’s Homecoming event and spring golf outings. Girls tend to come out of the woodwork around the same time as the chapter’s annual social event, which is the talk of the town. It has printed invitations, a DJ, third-party licensed vendors, and party favors for the attendees. Successful Alumni: whether they are alumni from your chapter or Delta Chi as an international fraternity, potential members see your chapter as a place where successful people just congregate. Alumni were given the right environment academically, socially, and athletically as undergraduates to hone the life skills that have helped get them to the levels of success they now enjoy. The chapter also has a regular practice of initiating successful men in their geographic area to bolster its alumni base and solidify personal connections with local businesses. New: your colony or recently chartered chapter is still growing. Instead of being another number in a chapter with

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well-solidified procedures and activities, a new member is given the chance to be involved immediately with major structural decisions. Traditions are still being formed, so the personalities of all members are quickly reflected in the organization. Small Size: your members enjoy the fraternity life without the chaos of coordinating dozens of schedules. All members know one another very well, and recruitment is on more of a personal level. The chapter recruits the men that fill its needs and are comfortable where they are now. They are growing as the semesters go on, raising the caliber of each incoming class. Potential members see the chapter as a chance to be a big fish in a small pond, with the opportunity to get involved in a leadership position early. Medium Size: right in the middle, the chapter has enough members to fund all sorts of activities but doesn’t appear to take just anyone. It has a well-oiled committee system and a solid intramural program. All members know one another very well and recruitment is on more of a personal level. Associate Member classes have officers and organize various activities over the semester. The chapter has enough members to fill its house. Large Size: when your chapter decides to do something, others listen. The reach of 70+ members makes recruitment considerably easier. The chapter is well funded through the number of members paying membership dues. Members can be involved in all sorts of student organizations since the workload of the chapter is spread over many shoulders. All members know one another very well and recruitment is on more of a personal level, but with the assistance of many more resources. Success perpetuates success and, from the outside, other chapters think it just comes naturally to you. This list is meant to show some examples of what various chapters have chosen for their “identities.� What is important is for your chapter to decide what type of image it wants to have on your campus and then to live up to it. Selling a false product (pretending to be something you are not or at least are not even aspiring to the marrow of your bones to become) never works in the long run. Be proud of who you are or what you are fervently working to become and strive every day to be just a bit better at what you have chosen to be. Your members will know what they are selling and so will the campus. When a Delta Chi walks down the sidewalk wearing his letters, everyone will know what that means.

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Officer Responsibilities The most effective instrument for the administration of chapter affairs is the executive committee.

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Probably the best preface to Officer Responsibilities is the concept of officer transitions. Most members picture either a one-on-one conversation between the incumbent and the newly elected officer or possibly a full retreat involving the two (outgoing and incoming) executive committees. On occasion, the concept of officer notebooks, where each officer maintains a position notebook containing such items as Delta Chi Law, the chapter’s by-laws, after action analysis forms (see the Chapter Management BRIEF), etc. is mentioned as well. While better than doing nothing, these ideas simply do not go far enough. Every chapter should adopt this process to help strengthen the performance of their officers. Which is the real point of officer transition schemes. The first is to place into the chapter by-laws qualifications for running for office. Here is an example for the position of “A”. Any candidate for the position of “A” must, on the night of election be able to stand up in front of the chapter and attest that he has accomplished the following: 1. Held a meeting with the current “A”, 2. Met with the chapter’s ABT, 3. Met with the Greek Advisor, 4. Read the chapter’s by-laws, 5. Read the Chapter Management BRIEF. Now, when he is elected, he has some knowledge of what the job entails. But so does the individual(s) who ran against him. And if one of them decides to now run for “B”, he can but, since he did not read the Committee System BRIEF (hopefully a requirement to run for “B”), he has to attest that, if elected, he will complete any unfulfilled requirement for that position and, by x% vote of the chapter, he is allowed to run. The chapter can select the requirements for each office. They should be obvious. The following officer responsibility lists, while fairly exhaustive, are not to be used as the definitive list of the only responsibilities that the respective officers have. They do, however, give an excellent idea of what each office entails. Only by reading the various manuals, BRIEFs, and general letters can an officer keep abreast of his full responsibilities.


The Chapter Today

“A” a. Read the Chapter Management Brief. b. Chair general meetings. c. Meet with Greek advisor regularly, attend IFC meetings. d. Remain fair, unbiased and objective. e. Be the key representative of the chapter. Run efficient (one hour) meetings using parliamentary procedure and a written agenda. f. Be a good listener and facilitator. g. Iron out small problems and conflicts before they become big ones (a good resource text is Dale Carnegie’s How To Win Friends and Influence People). h. Coordinate officers’ and chapter retreats each semester. i. Take care of all paperwork needed for recognition on campus and by IFC. j. Get to know other fraternity presidents and try to maintain open communication with them. k. Meet regularly with support alumni. l. Communicate regularly with the Headquarters Office. m. Be familiar with the responsibilities of other officers and chairmen. Pay special attention to due dates (including your own). n. Communicate with neighbors. o. Communicate with “BB” and meet regularly with him. p. Set specific personal goals for the office. q. Attend all ABT meetings. r. Report “BB” election/re-election by November 1 in nonconvention years. s. Periodically check to make sure each officer is keeping his officer notebook up-to-date. The main responsibility of the “A”, outside of those specifically outlined above, is to keep tabs on everyone and assure that things are getting done. He should not be doing everything himself. “B” a. Read the Chapter Management Brief. b. Schedule, plan and chair executive committee meetings. c. Oversee all committees. d. Make sure chairmen are working with tangible plans and goals, as well as keeping their committee notebook up-to-date.

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e. Contact bookstore and local vendors to get them to stock Delta Chi decals, sportswear, etc. f. Keep a detailed calendar of events. Post and/or handout monthly. g. Arrange meeting rooms when needed (try to get the same room all the time). h. Act as parliamentarian during general meetings. i. May chair the by-laws committee (if not, at least makes sure they are adopted ASAP and kept up-to-date). j. Set up ad hoc committees as needed. k. Submit weekly officer/committee reports at executive committee meetings. l. Coordinate with “C” and “E” special correspondence with other Greeks, the University and alumni (holiday and congratulatory messages, etc.). m. Ensure all award applications are properly completed and submitted on a timely basis. n. Promote alumni initiations (faculty, fathers, ABT members, and community leaders). “C” a. Submit Chapter Meeting Report (CMR) forms to the Headquarters Office within three days of every Chapter meeting. b. Report all new associate members via MyDChi. c. Complete and submit grade verification form for all new associate members. d. Post minutes for each meeting. e. Give a copy of the election results to the Greek Advisor, IFC, ABT and the Headquarters Office (in next CMR). f. Read all materials pertaining to the office. (“C” Manual BRIEF, “C” Reference Sheet) g. Unless a separate chair is created, is in charge of communications among the members (phone tree, newsletter, help “B” with calendar of events). h. Regularly update and distribute membership list (copies to Greek advisor and the Headquarters Office). i. Update membership via MyDChi by October 15 and February 15. j. Complete and return the holdover and new associate member list by October 15. k. Send in list of ABT and house corporation members to the Headquarters Office by December 1 each year. l. In charge of constructing a scrapbook of the chapter.

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The Chapter Today

. Keep current on all correspondence. m n. Order and hold stationery, envelopes, thank you notes, etc. o. Make agendas for chapter meetings available to all the members. p. Keep and preserve all records, books, documents and archives of the chapter. q. Report all associate members via MyDChi who disassociate. Credit for disassociates can only be made if the man disassociates within two weeks after he affiliates. r. Update graduates and summer addresses for officers by April 15 each year. “D” a. Read all information pertaining to the office (Financial Management BRIEF, reference sheets, general letter). b. Have a basic understanding of accounting principles. c. Collect all dues and assessments. d. Organize bookkeeping system. e. File the 990 each year. IHQ has a resource to accomplish this. It is mandatory and required by the IRS. f.  Be the main contact for ordering supplies from the Headquarters Office and making other purchases on behalf of the chapter/colony. g. Request receipts for all purchases. h. Oversee budget process. i. Keep accurate files of debts owed by the members. j. Make sure a process for collecting accounts receivable goes into the by-laws. k. Send initiation fees to the Headquarters Office l. Organize a finance committee to assist with your duties. m. Send associate member dues to the Headquarters. n. Weekly report to executive committee on finances. o. Provide the Chapter and the ABT with a monthly financial report. p. Reaffirm periodically (at the beginning of dues periods) the chapter’s policies on overdue accounts. q. Attend ABT meetings. r. Provide a budget for each semester to the ABT for approval.

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“E” a. Read all information pertaining to the office (Alumni Relations and Alumni Newsletter BRIEFs). b. Contact alumni (ongoing). c. Produce an alumni newsletter. Secure an alumni advisor/ editor if possible. d. Submit Quarterly articles (deadlines: August 1, December 1, March 1, May 1). See “E” reference sheet for complete instructions on Quarterly submissions. Send pictures! Be sure to put your name and the chapter name on all submissions. e. Coordinate alumni functions (homecoming, Founders’ Day, special events, etc.). f. Correspondence with alumni: 1. Birthdays, anniversaries, etc. 2. Acknowledgments 3. Newsletter information 4. Thank-you letters 5. Special events 6. Invitations g. Maintain up-to-date mailing list and personal file on all alumni. h. Coordinate alumni events. i. Get a bulk-rate mailing permit (apply at post office). “F” a. Serve as the Risk Management Officer. b. Read the Risk Management Manual. c. Review of the Delta Chi Risk Management Policy each fall and spring with all ­members of the chapter. d. Maintain order at meetings. e. Coordinate initiations with the “A”. f. Monitor behavior of the chapter in general — in the house, toward the associate members, etc. g. Insure that ritual material is properly cared for (cleaned, replaced), securely stored and that all necessary materials are on hand prior to an initiation. h. Oversee security at the chapter house (in conjunction with the house manager).

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The Chapter Today

“BB” (Chapter Advisor) a. Read the Chapter Management Brief. b. Supervise transition of Officers and hold officer training workshops (see Chapter Retreat BRIEF). c. Assist officers in general operations and procedures. d. Make sure each chapter/colony officer reads and understands their respective resource manuals. e. Function as the liaison between the undergraduates and the alumni. f. Develop an ongoing, beneficial relationship with university administration (Greek Advisor/Dean of Students). g. Help chapter/colony prepare budgets in advance for each school term; do monthly budget checks so individual categories are not overspent. h. See that rush chairman plans the rush program prior to leaving for vacation. i. Meet with associate member class to educate on matters such as hazing and lifetime involvement in Delta Chi. j. Serve as a recourse person for area alumni. k. Make sure the “E” is publishing alumni news­letters. l. Be familiar with the Chapter Operations Manual (COM). m.  M ake semi-annual reports to the International Head­quarters (4/30 and 12/31). n. Attend (at least two per month) executive committee and general meetings. o. Review the chapter’s financial status with the “D” (monthly). p. Supervise initiation of new members. q. Make sure Form 990 is filed with IRS. r. Maintain close contact with the Regent. s. Review the officer responsibility checklist with each officer to ensure he knows his duties. When a Delta Chi alumnus is considering becoming a chapter’s “BB”, there is often a good deal of confusion on both sides. Most, if not all, of the uncertainty could be resolved by a simple process. When someone is considering or being considered for the position, he should sit down and write out, on a piece of paper, what he will and will not do as “BB”. On a second piece of paper he should write down what the chapter should and should not do. Simultaneously, the chapter should come up with the same two lists. Then the potential “BB” meets with the chapter officers and they work out mutually agreeable lists defining the “will and will nots” of each side.

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Brotherhood is a twoway street. If you accept its advantages, you must live up to its obligations.

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The results are taken to the chapter and voted on and the finalized version of the two lists approved with both parties signing the two lists. The lists should be reviewed once each year. The “BB” need not be a member of the faculty of the school where a chapter is located. Many chapters have both a “BB” and one or more Faculty Advisors. Faculty Advisors who have not previously joined a fraternity can be initiated accordance with Delta Chi Law. Perhaps the most effective instrument for administration of chapter affairs is the executive committee. This committee is made up of all chapter officers often supplemented with one or two elected members-at-large. The main job of the executive committee is to meet prior to chapter meetings, discuss items of business that will probably come up at the regular meeting, gather information in advance of the regular meeting, and plan the orderly conduct of the chapter meeting. An efficient executive committee means that time is saved in chapter meetings, better information is at the disposal of the members for deciding questions, a few officers are not burdened with all the work, and more members can participate in administering chapter affairs. Unofficially, it is the duty of every man in the chapter to see that each officer discharges the responsibilities given him. Any failure to do so should be brought to the attention of first, the individual officer, then to the “A” or “BB”, and finally, to the executive committee or the chapter at a meeting with a view toward a corrective measure. There is one responsibility that belongs to each member: maintenance of harmony and good feeling. Living up to the ideals of Delta Chi can only be accomplished through the whole-hearted effort of a united chapter. Politics have no place in chapter administration. Politicking can easily lead to cliques and factions that in turn lead to the downfall and destruction of the chapter. Only impartial judgment can insure the selection of men who are capable of leading the chapter. Each member has responsibility for the more general phases of fraternity operations. That responsibility cannot be “delegated” to the elected officers of the chapter. It is the duty of each member to be aware of what the chapter is doing, what it has planned, and where it hopes to strengthen itself. In order to meet that responsibility, each member must have some facts at hand upon which they can make considered judgments.


The Chapter Today

A good starting point is the annual budget of the chapter. How much does it cost for each of the programs — recruitment, social, scholarship, etc. — which has the chapter planned? How much are the dues, and will they be sufficient to cover those expenses? Would more members mean either lower dues or better programs (for instance, would ten additional men mean that more programming could be planned more often without any increase in the level of dues?). What would happen to next year’s budget if five men failed to return to school in the fall? If you can answer questions like these, you will not only have a better understanding of the chapter’s financial program, but can also see where extra recruitment efforts may be needed. For example, if there is an unusually large number of members in one class, the chapter could be faced with a serious problem when that class graduates.

The Basics The fifth expectation of a Delta Chi states, “I will meet my financial obligations in a timely manner.” A fraternity chapter is a small business, and the chapter members must manage aspects of fraternity life as such. Another way of saying it is, “The more you run your chapter like a business, the more it will feel like a fraternity.” Like any other activity, living up to your financial responsibilities is a matter of habit. The chapter can either teach its members good habits or bad habits. The strength or weakness of a chapter can be determined largely by looking at the financial operations of the group. When there is poor management of the finances, there is usually poor management of other operations. This is due to the relationship between chapter operations and resources that finance the activities. An essential ingredient to having a good chapter is sound financial affairs. It is the responsibility of each member to carry his fair share of the financial burden involved in operating a chapter. The man who does not pay his bills becomes a parasite feeding off those who meet their financial obligations. In effect, he is stealing from the treasury just as much as if he had walked off with the checkbook. If the debt were owed to a local landlord or to the university it would be paid. Why should a brother’s debt to Delta Chi be any different? When a chapter starts operating as a business, when brothers live up to their responsibilities and obligations, when there is sufficient money to keep the house in good repair, when there is an adequate budget for activities and events, you

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will be amazed at how strong the brotherhood will become. Brotherhood doesn’t stop at the pocketbook — it starts there. If you wish to enjoy the benefits, you must first live up to the obligations. Financial responsibility becomes a habit when the chapter “A” and “D” offer strong leadership. It’s tough to be firm in sometimes unpopular money policies. But that’s one of the chores of leadership. Brothers with decent regard for their fraternity will support their elected officers on sound financial decisions. Fraternity men pay their obligations as a point of pride. Set the example. Of course, not all information about the chapter is contained in its budget. The attitude of the members towards rush is also a key to the chapter’s future. Recruitment and retention are what make a chapter grow and prosper. They are two of the most important areas of fraternal responsibility for each member and associate member. You know the value of being associated with Delta Chi, yet the process of acquainting men with and “selling” the Fraternity to new prospective members is known as recruitment and is the lifeblood of the chapter. It is through this process of informing, selling and acquiring new members that our Fraternity continues to grow and improve. Because of this fact we are all, collectively and individually, concerned with the Delta Chi re­cruitment program. It concerns us all, from the newest associate up to the senior member, and is absolutely necessary for our continued expansion and improvement. Retention is much the same. Each member and associate member has an obligation to know every member and associate member in his chapter and to help each one when he needs it. This builds brotherhood and strengthens bonds between the chapter and its members. The main explanation for our Fraternity’s outstanding accomplishments has been the quality of men constantly moving into the organization. Large numbers of men allow many activities to be undertaken, but this is no substitute for quality. Every man who is recruited and associated by the chapter must be outstanding, and these individuals come to the Fraternity only through the efforts of all of us. A chapter can have sound finances, a well-constructed budget and an adequate recruitment and retention program.

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The Chapter Today

But the total development of its members will not be realized unless the chapter and its men participate in campus activities. Delta Chi urges each of its members to choose and take part in at least one extracurricular activity. On every campus there are many — often the problem is one of elimination rather than selection. You should guard against being a “joiner.” There are two demands on your time in college that are the most important: scholarship and fraternity. After considering the time element, care should be taken in the selection of other activities. Successful participation in extracurricular activities involves matching your abilities and interest with those of the activity. Often older members of the chapter can help you decide between activities based on their experience. Extracurricular activities result in practical experience, diversification, and intrinsic value. Employers and graduate schools are not solely interested in grades (although scholastic achievement is the first and most important item they look for). In many fields the general experiences gained from extracurricular activities — self-confidence, responsibility, poise, coordination, expressiveness and a general knowledge of business principles — are indispensable traits not necessarily gained from textbooks. The personal acquaintances to be made in outside activities are numerous. They influence a broadened understanding of human nature - an intensely practical and worthwhile attribute. Any factor contributing measurably to self-development has intrinsic value. The aim of education is both specific and general — specific in advanced objective learning, and general in subjective cultural attainment. Extracurricular activities harmonize with both of these aims of offering the individual the thrill of accomplishment and the joy of knowing. In addition to the personal values mentioned above, there is a chapter element. There are many opportunities for the chapter to take part as a group. Often fraternities are called upon to support various service projects and thus to demonstrate their loyalty to the institution and community. Your fraternity’s local reputation is built upon the quality of service rendered the campus community by its members. To achieve distinction, then, in an extracurricular activity is a service to your fraternity. Membership in your local interfraternity council can be a great aid to the chapter in carrying out its program. The local councils provide a medium through which individual member

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chapters can make known problems and seek the advice of the others. Closer cooperation with the college can be achieved and problems and grievances can be settled more readily. It is to the advantage of each Delta Chi chapter to aid, support, and participate in these councils. It is also the duty of the officers of every Delta Chi chapter to make sure that a close contact is maintained between the local IFC and their chapter. Highly capable men should be chosen to represent the chapter at the council meetings due to the importance of the material covered in these meetings. Just as you are a student with a purpose, so must the chapter have a purpose. Through group living and mutual sharing and improvement, your chapter better prepares you to take your place in the world. By understanding your chapter’s programs and contributing to their development and implementation, you provide a service to not only your chapter brothers but to your school, your community, and your fraternity. Success requires the dedication and participation of every member from the oldest active to the youngest associate member. Nothing else will suffice.

Alumni Board of Trustees Through an Alumni Board of Trustees (commonly referred to as an “ABT“) interested alumni with experience in the business or professional world become responsible for the supervision of a chapters operations, giving continuity to chapter guidance and eliminating the inherent disadvantage of rapid turnover of chapter officers. The worth of a competent Alumni Board of Trustees is immeasurable: an older and wiser head is essential to a chapter’s proper operation. The Alumni Board of Trustees usually consists of five alumni, “D”, “A”, and “BB”. The primary responsibility of the ABT is to oversee the chapter financial operations. In addition, the ABT can give advice in public relations, recruitment, leadership, scholarship and membership education. Each board member has one vote. Regular meetings are held in order that each member may be well informed on all affairs of the chapter, and at each meeting there is systematic analysis and discussion of the monthly operating statements. If the chapter is departing from its authorized budget or otherwise operating inefficiently, the causes are determined and definite steps are taken

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The Chapter Today

to correct the difficulty. Careful attention is given to the accounts receivable schedule to insure prompt payment by all members and businesslike consideration is given to any unusual purchases that may be proposed. The chapter’s ability to pay expenses must be carefully evaluated in arranging the financing. Proper attention is given to adequate membership; the Alumni Board of Trustees assists the chapter in arriving at the membership figures necessary to operate the chapter without undue financial hardships. Every alumnus who serves a chapter as a volunteer member of an Alumni Board of Trustees is rendering an invaluable service to the chapter and the general fraternity.

House Corporations The actual ownership of the chapter house, land and other real property usually rests in the chapter’s house corporation. Incorporated under the laws of the state in which the chapter is located, the house corporation is organized as a not-forprofit corporation. It has its own officers who are generally alumni of the chapter. It is highly recommended that ABT members do not serve on the house corporation - they must remain separate entities. While the “BB”, the “A”, and the “D” might be ex-officio, nonvoting officers of the house corporation, having two groups involves more alumni in the activities and work of the chapter. Generally less time is required to fulfill the duties of a house corporation officer than those of a member of the Alumni Board of Trustees. Thus it is possible to involve alumni who could not otherwise afford the time because of business and family pressures. A fraternity house represents more than a place to eat, sleep and hold social functions while attending college. It represents years of accumulation of thought, effort, and sacrifice on the part of those who have gone on before, and who laid the foundation for an organization for future generations of college students to enjoy.

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“This isn’t a business; it’s a Fraternity!” Does that mean that chapter members should not be charged a fair, market rent or adequate monthly dues? Does that mean that “brothers” should be allowed to run up a large debt to their chapter and then leave while bills go unpaid and normal maintenance goes undone? Does that mean that no money is set aside to help pay that year’s fair share of the new roof (or whatever) that will soon be needed? And does that mean that next year’s members are left to pick up the pieces? That is a strange kind of brotherhood! It is our responsibility to pass on to the next generation of brothers a Delta Chi better than the one we inherited. Just because there may not be a mortgage to be paid doesn’t mean that a fair rent shouldn’t be collected and a maintenance reserve started. Where the rent has been lowered after a debt retirement there has been a grave injustice done to the future brothers of that chapter. The next few years will be using up the asset, its roof, its furnace, its wiring, etc., and not paying for it. The men involved will be in effect walking away with pieces of that building. Years from now, when a particular renovation might cost, let’s say, $100,000 and there is no money set aside to help pay for it, will all those alumni give back those pieces they took? Unfortunately not. Who then will pick up the tab for the cheap ride that was had in the past? The new brothers will. Let’s not call that brotherhood. The same effect occurs when a “brother” is allowed to build up a debt to his chapter and then leaves without paying. When the “D” tries to make him pay, others in the chapter say it isn’t “brotherly.” The next time that happens, have the “D” add a fair share of the delinquency to the monthly dues of those individuals and ask them to carry their “brother” until he decides to pay them back. Now who isn’t being “brotherly?” What would he have done if he had lived in an apartment or a dormitory? I’d hazard a guess that he would have paid his bill. If I’m right then why can’t we expect him to pay Delta Chi as well? What values are we teaching when we allow this sort of thing to take place? Are we guilty of tempting our own brothers to abuse Delta Chi by painting themselves into a hole from which they cannot get out? Meanwhile, the rest of the brothers suffer from an insufficient food budget and a house in disrepair. That’s not brotherhood. We must not only have expectations, but enforcement as well.

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The Chapter Today

How many empty beds are in the chapter house? How many “brothers” don’t want to recruit anyone because they might have to give up their privacy when the new man moves in to what should be a double? Why not double everyone up and lock all the empty rooms? Unlock the rooms as men move into the house. How much revenue is the chapter losing from all those empty beds? And some then have the nerve to say that the alumni aren’t sending enough money. Is that brotherhood? Once in a while there will be a house corporation that is doing its job and either the undergraduates and/or other alumni decide that it is “ripping off” the chapter. “Where is all that money going?” “The mortgage isn’t that big!” Doubt as to the integrity of the house corporation officers grows. Accusations are even made. Shouting matches break out and often the house corporation officers quit in disgust. Sometimes their positions are filled, sometimes they aren’t. A couple of years after one of these incidents where the positions remained empty and the chapter “D”s “took care of things” the chapter was shocked to see its house listed for auction for failure to pay the property taxes. Apparently, the house corporation officers did need the money for something. Needless to say the rent had been lowered and what little was available had been spent elsewhere. Why doesn’t the house corporation board just show everyone the books? A simple accounting of revenues and expenditures could suffice. Maybe an internal audit, or better yet a real audit by an independent accounting firm should be considered. Often, the existing revenue doesn’t begin to cover the basic necessities like mortgage payments, property taxes, property and liability insurance and utilities. Let alone maintenance or major renovations. In the all-toorare situation where there is something left over after the basics are covered, many house corporations are afraid that the undergraduates will want the “extra” money back instead of establishing the proper reserves. Inflation alone should cause the realization that just standing still is actually falling backwards. Finally, if the good years are allowed to only break even, how are we going to cover the lean years? Delta Chi’s dead chapter list can answer that one. In the name of “brotherhood” and with the cry of “This isn’t a business; it’s a Fraternity!” some of our own members have been guilty of damage beyond measure. Not out of any malicious intent but simply out of a lack of understanding of what it really takes

Some of our members, in the name of ‘Brotherhood,’ have been guilty of damage beyond measure.

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to keep a fraternity chapter operating. That’s where mature, alumni involvement is essential. When the chapter starts operating as a business, when brothers live up to their responsibilities and obligations, when there is sufficient money to keep the house in good repair and looking nice, when there is an adequate budget for food and social activities, I think you will be amazed at how strong the brotherhood will become. Brotherhood doesn’t stop at the pocketbook — it starts there. If you wish to enjoy its benefits, you must first live up to its obligations. It’s a two-way street.

Fair Share vs. A Piece At A Time A few years back, two of Delta Chi’s oldest chapters undertook major renovation projects on their respective houses. Each spent approximately $400,000. What is interesting is how these two projects were funded. At the first chapter, there was an alumni house corporation that, over the years, helped ensure that the rent charged to the undergraduates living in the house was comparable to the rent charged by the residence halls and off-campus housing. Parlor fees were also charged for the out-of-house members, who were benefiting from the use of the house. At the same time, the ABT kept a close eye on the chapter’s operations to help ensure a financially sound chapter. This all continued even after the mortgages were retired and the house was debt free. Involved alumni understood that the structure would eventually need such maintenance as a new roof, a new furnace, and rewiring. They prepared for the future. The undergraduates did not walk away with one piece of the house at a time, which is what they would have been doing had they been undercharged for rent. The alumni insisted that each member pay his fair share for the long run as well as for the short run. Alumni of this chapter were often accused of being “unbrotherly.” During the radical years of the 1970s, an oil portrait of a key alumnus that was prominently displayed in the house was even burned. But the alumni stuck it out. At the second chapter, there were years when the involved alumni held the chapter’s “feet to the fire” but this was inconsistent. During the years when the chapter went without strong alumni involvement, any savings from the years of sound fiscal management were quickly eroded. When the house deteriorated, insufficient money had been set aside to replace the depreciating asset. The chapter’s operating

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The Chapter Today

budget had often been allowed to go awry. Losses in the chapter’s operations precluded, it was then argued, charging a more appropriate rent. Delta Chi Law grants the ABT the authority to seize the checkbook and even remove the “D”, but this was either overlooked or dismissed in the spirit of a “learning experience.” Or quite possibly there simply wasn’t the willingness within a sufficient number of alumni to fight the problem once it was allowed to get out of hand. “Maybe next year . . .” was a common phrase as each year came, and went. Finally, the time had come at both structures to bite the bullet and do the necessary work. Each structure underwent significant renovation: new plumbing, fire safety features, rewiring, and more. One chapter had the funds to write a check. One went out and borrowed. One remained debt free and continued setting aside money for the next renovation. One ended up 95% leveraged, leaving only 5% equity to show for more than eight decades of existence. Borrowing $400,000 at 10% for thirty years put the chapter in the position of having to pay a total of $1,263,715, the original $400,000 plus $863,715 in interest. That interest alone is more than twice the actual cost of the renovations! Furthermore, the interest can not be written off against taxes since the house corporation normally does not pay income taxes. Members of the second chapter have been picking up the tab for the previous lack of sound financial management, much of it due to past members who had effectively argued that they shouldn’t have to pay what economic principles would deem as their share. When this is pointed out to members in similar situations today and they are told what this kind of debt means to future brothers, some reply, “That’s their problem,” or, “They get to live in the new structure, not me,” which fails to acknowledge that they had been the ones using up the current house so that the renovations were made necessary. An interesting perspective on brotherhood. There is a great saying that seems appropriate here: “The more a chapter is run like a business, the more it feels like a fraternity.” Oh, by the way, the oil portrait at the second chapter has been replaced.

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8

The Alumni Rededication Ceremony signals a recommitment for its inductees. It does not actually make one an alumnus.

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The Role of the Alumnus Alumni Responsibilities

There are three stages of membership within Delta Chi: associate member, student member, and alumnus. An alumnus who is really involved as a fraternity man is not just comfortably sentimental about “the good old days” and the group he knew as an undergraduate. He is interested in helping to pass on to younger generations the values of Delta Chi as exemplified in its Preamble, Ritual, Associate Member Ceremony, Basic Expectations and historic stance against hazing. He helps by referring names of incoming students to chapters across the country. He understands the importance of relationships and works to maintain strong connections with others. He meets with chapter members, sharing his experiences and offering his assistance. He helps by visiting a chapter (it need not be his own) when he is nearby. He is willing to address a Regional Leadership Conference or facilitate a chapter retreat. He remains engaged in the business of the Fraternity. In short, he is a brother for life. Throughout the Cornerstone are found references to positions within the Fraternity that are filled by interested alumni: membership on standing committees or the Board of Regents; serving as “BB” or on a chapter’s Alumni Board of Trustees or house corporation; even working for a time as a paid staff member of Delta Chi. But there are many roles and opportunities to engage. Delta Chi’s Alumni Rededication Ceremony was developed with two main goals in mind. The first goal is to remind our members that they are still Delta Chis even after they leave school. Their membership carries with them throughout their lives. A Delta Chi should never say, “I was a Delta Chi.” The second goal is to encourage our members to remain involved. Our fraternity and our chapters are always in need of support of our members. Like members of the Masons who go on to higher degrees, members who go through the Alumni Rededication Ceremony are not claiming to be “more of a Delta Chi” but are saying that they wish to stand up and be counted on to make an even greater effort to help Delta Chi be a better fraternity. There is simply no reason why our chapters or Delta Chi as a whole should go wanting for lack


The Role of the Alumnus

of alumni involvement. The Alumni Rededication Ceremony is Delta Chi’s “charge” to put an end to that. Delta Chi has a fourth “degree,” the Memorial Ceremony. We all need to live our lives “as becomes a man” so that, at our passing, a group of our fraternity brothers will naturally desire to hold that Ceremony out of respect for us (and our families).

Stay Involved The day a member graduates or leaves the institution where he was initiated, he becomes an alumnus. This is an exciting new cornerstone for one’s life and is full of amazing opportunities. One of the first things you can do straight out of college is join a local alumni chapter. The chapters are comprised of alumni from different chapters who care about the Delta Chi experience and seeing its legacy continue well beyond the undergraduate years. For more information on these chapters or how to start an alumni chapter, visit the Fraternity’s website. Delta Chi’s chapters and colonies will always benefit from positive alumni engagement. This could range from supporting end mentoring members, providing opportunities for networking, or sharing internship or job postings with members. There is also the option to serve as a “BB” or member of the ABT or house corporation. Volunteering for the International Fraternity is also an option to consider. You can be a Vice-Regent, Regent, Executive Committee Member, Foundation Board Member, Committee Chairman, or assist one of the many committees. Part of the Fraternity’s continued success is due to the involvement of alumni. These men bring real life experiences and knowledge to Delta Chi that allows it to dynamically grow. There are many ways for our members to be engaged, no matter where life takes them. Delta Chi truly is a lifelong endeavor - it is not meant to end when you graduate college. In fact, the Fraternity experience that began as an undergraduate will be a part of your entire life.

“Delta Chi is not a weekend or once-ayear affair, but a lifelong opportunity and privilege.” -Albert Sullard Barnes

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9

Order of Business

Parliamentary Procedure Knowledge of at least the rudiments of parliamentary procedure will prove of value to each member throughout his life. When the chapter is versed in these matters, its business can be conducted efficiently and in short time. The following review will be found helpful, but it must be remembered that chapters may, by custom or by law, vary the commonly accepted forms. In their own meetings the associate members will have an opportunity to become familiar with these procedures. Following this review of certain parliamentary questions, a summary table of motions can be found. In the following discussion the more familiar term “chairman” is used for the “A”. Order of Business At the appointed hour the “F” will call the meeting to order and determine if a quorum is present. Unless otherwise stated in the chapter’s by-laws, a quorum is a majority of members. The requirements of the Ritual must then be met, after which the chairman proceeds to call for each item of the order of business. For most regular meetings the order of business is: 1. Roll call. 2. Reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 3. Reports of officers. 4. Reports of committees. 5. Unfinished business from previous meetings. 6. New business. 7. Miscellaneous: announcements, requests, etc. 8. Adjournment. While a “special order of business” may be adopted for any meeting, it is important that there be an order of business so that each member may know when he should mention the matter he wishes discussed. In this way much time-consuming confusion can be avoided. The reading of the minutes of the previous meeting is a “must” unless a motion is adopted by the group dispensing with it. Approval of the minutes does not require positive action by the group, nor do corrections and additions. In the event of controversy, the matter must

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Order of Business

be settled by motion in the regular manner. Ordinarily such difficulty is not met, and the minutes are approved “as read” or “as corrected” by the silent acquiescence of the group to the statement by the chairman. The acceptance of the reports of officers and committees may be accomplished in much the same manner as the minutes are approved. In most cases it will suffice for the chairman to say, “If there is no objection, we will accept the report as made,” pausing before presenting the next item of business to permit the raising of an objection if there is one. If the report of an officer or a committee includes a proposal for action, this should be treated as a motion. Since committees are usually composed of more than one individual, it is customary, in the case of committees only, to consider that such a motion has been seconded. Calling for the reports of officers and committees should not be omitted even though the chairman may have been informed in advance of the meeting that there are no reports ready to be given. Adhering to the adopted order of business provides the chairman with a difficult task. It is an important one, however, and probably the greatest waste of time in a chapter meeting is occasioned by interruptions of thoughtless members causing the discussion to jump from one topic to another with no one item of business being completely disposed of before the attention of the chapter is diverted to another. The chairman must keep his wits about him and promptly rule a member “out of order” when his remarks are not to the point. Introducing Motions “I move that . . .” is the usual form for the presentation of a motion. Any member may introduce a motion, when such is in order, by first receiving recognition from the chairman. Motions should be phrased as simply as possible and should be recorded by the secretary as they are made. Requiring a second to a motion is a way of making sure that at least two people wish the motion discussed and acted upon. It is not necessary to await recognition by the chair before seconding. If a second is not immediately forthcoming, the chairman asks, “Is there a second to the motion?” and if there be none, follows with, “The motion is lost for want of a second.” If the motion is seconded, it is proper for the chairman to restate it, or to ask the secretary to do so, before calling for discussion. The discussion of motions is carried on, as is discussion of any other business. Members wishing to speak must address the chairman and receive recognition before doing

Once recognized by the chairman, stand up, and say, “I move that . . .”

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so. Only one individual may have the floor at any one time, but questions may be directed to him through the chair, and he may answer them if he wishes. Sometimes discussion tends to be prolonged. The chairman may take it upon himself to urge that it be limited, and he may “put the question” when he has determined that a majority of those present wish the discussion ended. A member of the group may call “Question” to urge the taking of a vote. This must be voted on before proceeding to vote on the question itself (see Previous Question). To vote on any motion, the chairman or the secretary repeats the motion, whereupon the chairman asks that “All those in favor say aye; all those opposed say no.” If the outcome is doubtful, it is the chairman’s duty to call for a “show of hands” or a “rising vote.” It is also the privilege of any member to request such. Ordinarily these voting methods will suffice, but occasionally a secret ballot may be desired or required, and sometimes a “roll call” vote may be wanted as a matter of record. Amending Motions Sometimes discussion of a motion brings out a need for a change in its provisions. In such event someone must propose the amendment as a motion and it must be seconded, discussed, and voted upon before consideration of the original motion can continue. If the need for an amendment arises it can often be accomplished by obtaining permission of the maker and the second to the change, thereby saving time necessary to consider a formal motion to amend. As is often the case, if the chairman or someone else feels that the wording of the motion could be improved upon without any change in its provisions, the change can be made with the maker’s consent and without consulting the second. Special Motions To facilitate the efficient and fair conduct of business, a number of special motions are provided for in parliamentary procedure. Most of them are in reference to main motions that may be before the group and must be disposed of before the main motions. They are to be handled as quickly as possible and frequently are neither amendable nor debatable. Those that propose rather drastic action require two-thirds majority for adoption. In the case of a few of these motions, it is perfectly proper to interrupt a speaker to make them.

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Order of Business

Previous Question. The purpose of this motion is to terminate discussion of a main motion and may be used when the chairman has been unable to bring the main motion to a vote or seems indisposed to do so. “Mr. Chairman, I move the previous question” is the usual phraseology. The motion requires a second and a two-thirds majority for adoption. It is not debatable or amendable; a speaker may not be interrupted to make it. Limit Debate. The purpose of this motion is to restrict the amount of time that may be used in discussing a subject. It is usually stated, “Mr. Chairman, I move to limit debate on . . . to . . . minutes.” It requires a second and a two-thirds majority for adoption. It may be amended but not debated, and a speaker may not be interrupted in order for it to be made. Take From the Table. This motion is used to revive discussion of a matter that was tabled by motion at some previous time. It should be stated, “Mr. Chairman, I move to take from the table . . .” and if adopted by a simple majority, the subject to which it refers becomes the next order of business. A second is required, but it may not be debated or amended, nor may a speaker be interrupted. Postpone to a Certain Time. This motion is usually stated, “Mr. Chairman, I move that consideration of . . . be postponed until . . .” It requires a second, is debatable and amendable, and may be adopted by a simple majority. No speaker may be interrupted. Table. The principal difference between this and the preceding motion is that in tabling a motion no special time is set for further consideration of it. “Mr. Chairman I move to table the . . .” must be followed by a second and supported by a simple majority. A speaker may not be interrupted, nor may the motion be amended or debated. Refer to a Committee. One may make this motion by saying, “Mr. Chairman, I move to refer the matter of . . . to a committee. . . .” It requires a second and is subject to debate and amendment. A speaker may not be interrupted. Object to Consideration. Occasionally, a matter may be presented which one or more members feel should not be considered by the group: subjects of a frivolous or objectionable nature, or matters about which the group as a whole is not concerned. In most instances, the chairman will rule a presenting such a matter “out of order,” or in debatable cases may on his own initiative call for a vote as to whether it shall be considered. In lieu of such action on the part of the chairman it is the privilege of any member to force such a

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vote by saying, “Mr. Chairman, I object to the consideration of . . .” To do so he may interrupt a speaker and his motion does not require a second. It is ordinarily not debatable, may not be amended, and requires a two-thirds majority for adoption. Withdraw a Motion. Only the maker of a motion may request that it be withdrawn, and he usually does so only after discussion has disclosed its generally accepted undesirability. Should anyone object to the withdrawal, the chairman must put the matter to a vote. Since a withdrawal request is not really a motion, it requires no second and may not be debated or amended. A speaker may not be interrupted. Reconsider. The purpose of this motion is to give the group the opportunity to consider again an action taken previously. It is not used with reference to action taker longer ago than the previous meeting, and must be made and seconded by individuals who voted with the prevailing side when the action was taken. This last requisite is to make sure that at least two persons have changed their minds about the question. It is permissible to interrupt a speaker to make the motion. However, before the motion to reconsider is acted upon, the pending business must be disposed of. It may not be amended and may be debated only if the action to which it refers was debatable. A simple majority suffices for adoption, whereupon the original action is again before the group for consideration. The accepted form is “Mr. Chairman, I move to reconsider the action of this group in . . . .” Rescind. If an individual is reasonably sure that the group is ready to reverse some previous action, he may make a motion that will effect this more quickly than a motion to reconsider. “Mr. Chairman, I move to rescind the action of . . . taken . . .” must be followed by a second and is open to debate and amendment. It requires only a two-thirds majority, but, contrary to a motion to reconsider, may not interrupt a speaker. No special qualifications are imposed upon the maker or second. To Maintain Rules and Order. It is the privilege of any member to question the chairman on a point of order, procedure, or to request that he take some action in regard to offending remarks, emergency situations, etc. If he feels that the prevailing discussion is out of order, he may rise and say, “Mr. Chairman, I rise to a point of order,” following which the Chairman asks him to state his point. If his objection is to the procedure of the meeting he rises to “question of

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Order of Business

procedure” and if to a personal matter he rises to “question of personal privilege.” To do so, he may interrupt a speaker and his question does not require a second. The chairman must ask the individual to state his point or question and then must give a ruling on the matter. There is no debate or opportunity to amend. If the chairman is unable to give a ruling, he may put the matter to the vote of the group. Whenever anyone objects to a ruling of the chairman, he may appeal to the group by saying, “Mr. Chairman, I appeal the decision of the chair.” If the appeal is seconded, the chairman must place the matter before the group for debate and vote. The Chairman may participate in the debate, defending his ruling. A simple majority is required to reach the final decision. Recess. To disband the meeting temporarily, a member may say, “Mr. Chairman, I move a recess for . . . (length of time).” The motion may not interrupt a speaker, but it may interrupt any business except that of voting. It may be amended but not debated, and requires a simple majority for adoption. Adjourn. A motion to close the meeting is in order any time except when another speaker has the floor. It is not amendable or debatable and must be put to the simple majority test immediately. Precedence of Motions To prevent confusion, it is necessary that certain motions take precedence over others. Unless a chairman is familiar with the classification of motions in this regard, he is likely to find the job of directing the meeting a very complex one. There are certain privileged motions that take precedence over all others. They are: ● Adjourn ● Recess ● Question or privilege ● Question of order Then there are subsidiary motions made in connection with main motions and which have precedence over all but the above list. In the order of their precedence among themselves, they are: ● Lay on the table ● Previous question ● Limit debate ● Postpone to a certain time

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● Refer to a committee ● Amend Finally, there are the motions which nave no precedence, even among themselves, and which may not be acted upon if a privileged or subsidiary motion is before the group. They are: ● Main motion for general business ● Take from the table ● Reconsider ● Rescind ● Withdraw a motion ● Object to consideration ● Appeal from decision of chair

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Order of Business

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10

The Essence of Good Taste The college fraternity is the center of the social life of the fraternity member. As such it seeks to develop the social graces, the art of good living, the development of courtesy and kindness. Good manners, good taste and good companionship are a part of the training of every fraternity member.

Introductions Introductions are simple if you know the system. The most important thing to remember about introducing people is to do it, even if you forget names. ● Introduce a younger person to an older person. ● Introduce a member of your fraternity to the member of another fraternity. ● Introduce a nonofficial person to an official person. ● Introduce a lower classman to an upper classman. ● Introduce a fraternity brother to a house guest. As with most rules, there are exceptions, of which you must be the judge. Example: “Senator Jones, I would like you to meet my date, Sue Smith.” (Older male of distinction first... younger female second.) “Grandmother Smith, I would like you to meet Senator Jones.” (Older female first . . . younger male, even though distinguished, second.)

Shaking Hands Many people feel they can “take the measure” of another person by his or her handshake. A good, vigorous handshake can be the difference between a successful first impression and an unsuccessful one. Men stand up when shaking hands while women may remain seated. A good handshake is one that: ● Is made with a firm, but not bone crushing or fish-limp, grip. ● Is held for about three or four seconds. This asset will be invaluable to all your relationships and especially so in recruitment. 104


The Essence of Good Taste

Arriving at a Restaurant If valet parking is available, let the attendant park the car. He will hand you a ticket that you will give back to him when leaving, along with a tip.

Entering and Being Seated Arriving at the restaurant knowing who leads to the table, seating women (and yourself), ordering for the woman, and tipping all have a practical reason, which is to help keep you and your guest at ease. Check in advance for the restaurant hours, reservations costs, dress requirements and parking. ● If there is a headwaiter who comes forward to seat you, the man steps back and lets the woman go first. Otherwise, the man goes first. ● Everyone is seated from the left side of his/her chair unless something prevents it. ● The man should assist the woman and then seat himself to her left. ● At some “traditional” restaurants it is courteous to order for the woman. You should recommend food to her, ask the waiter for information (if needed) and place her order before yours.

How to hold a spoon, hold a fork, and cut food.

Table Manners Recognize that the three things we eat with today — the knife, fork and spoon — each have a specific use, purpose, and proper way to be handled. Normally, they are placed on the table in order of use, starting from the outside and working to the plate. A good guideline is to use a fork on a flat plate and a spoon in a bowl. It is important to also hold a knife, fork, and spoon properly. ● Pass food to your right. Pass the salt and pepper together. Don’t reach across the table or over another person. Ask that the dish be passed to you. ● Eat fruit cocktail with a spoon. Don’t use a fork. ● Eat pie — even a la mode — with a fork. Don’t use a spoon. ● Cut one bite of meat or vegetable at a time. Don’t cut numerous bites. ● Keep the salad and bread plates to your left. Don’t move them around. ● Never leave a spoon in a bowl, cup, glass, or dessert dish. 105


Formal Place Service

3 Items at a Formal Meal 1. Napkin 2. Salad Fork 3. Dinner Fork

4. Service Plate 5. Dinner Knife 6. Teaspoon 7. Soup Spoon

 8. Seafood Cocktail Fork  9. Butter Spreader 10. Bread and Butter Plate 11. Dessert Spoon

12. Dessert Fork 13. Water Goblet 14. Wine Goblet

● Place the knife and fork on the edge of the plate while eating and in the center of the plate when finished. ● Keep your napkin folded in half on your lap throughout the meal except when using it to wipe your mouth. ● Eat noiselessly. ● Never speak when your mouth contains food. Avoid mention of unpleasant subjects at the table. Talk only with those seated close to you. ● Don’t stack your dishes. Don’t assist the waiter unless an unusual situation seems to require it. ● Put your phone away at the table. Social media can wait.

Tipping We must remember that tips are part of the employee’s salary (unless there is a service charge on your bill) and part of what we pay for the overall service. ● The wine steward (if his services were enlisted) receives ten percent of the bill. ● Bartenders receive ten percent. ● A waiter receives 15 to 20 percent (depending on the service).

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The Essence of Good Taste

Conduct in the House Living together in a fraternity house, sometimes in close quarters, presents problems that may be new to you. Respect the other fellow’s feelings and property. Remember that your own actions bear an important relation to collective and individual reaction of others. If you see that something you are doing disturbs someone, let up, there may be a more appropriate time and place. Everyone must do his share of maintaining the appearance of the rooms in the house that are common to all. See that your own use of furniture and furnishings is not detrimental to further and future use by others. When you get through with a newspaper, a magazine, or whatever, put it back where it belongs — whether you found it there or not. Even if you are the only one assigned to your room, you can hardly do as you please with its furniture and your belongings. That room is part of the rest of the house where others live. When two or more people share a room, it becomes even more important to keep everything in as good order as possible. Above all, do not get into the habit of using somebody else’s property without permission just because it’s handy. Borrowing and lending things are a way of life in a fraternity house . . . just taking things is not. No one likes to be an unconsulted lender.

Phone Courtesy In the day and age of social media and text messages, the art of phone etiquette is becoming a lost art. ● Although caller ID is a standard feature on cell phones, that does not mean the person receiving the call knows who’s calling. Leave a voicemail with your name, number, and reason for calling. ● If someone calls you, do not return the communication with a text message. ● Set up your voicemail with a professional greeting. State your name and inform the caller you will return the call as soon as possible. ● Return all calls within 48 hours.

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Electronic Etiquette As our society grows more accustomed to and dependent on high-tech communication, a modern gentleman must be cognizant of his writing and how it appears to others. E-mail is the most common and most abused form of electronic communication. Here are some guidelines and suggestions to avoid embarrassing situations and to communicate in an effective manner: ● Write the message first, then re-read what you have written and check to make sure any attachments or information is included, then write the subject of the message, and then add the recipients’ e-mail addresses. Writing and proofreading the message first will help you avoid accidentally sending it with either an incomplete message or missing attachments. ● Keep your messages brief and to the point. ● Use proper grammar and letter-writing style. Just because a message is electronic does not mean that the same rules do not apply. Avoid beginning a message with “Hey, . . .” or just blurting out your message with no salutations. ● Make sure the subject line for your message is specific and related to the e-mail. Avoid generic topics like “Good afternoon” or just leaving the subject line blank. ● Use the “Cc” and “Bcc” options frugally. If someone is to receive your message, send it to him or her directly. Avoid copying a large list of people on a message unless absolutely necessary as it also sends all recipients the other persons’ e-mail addresses. ● The ‘Reply All’ button is just a button, but it can generate tons of unnecessary e-mails. For example, if you send a dozen people an e-mail asking if they are available and if each person hits the “Reply All’ button, everyone gets 144 messages! ● Use abbreviations sparingly. Avoid “LOL”. ● Use proper e-mail addresses for your communication. It is suggested to use an e-mail address that includes or references your name, and does not contain any slang, profanity, or inside jokes that may not reflect well upon you as a person. ● E-mail messages sent from an office e-mail address are regarded as official company communications regardless 108


The Essence of Good Taste

of content and could possibly expose you and your company to unnecessary risk. The messages are also not “private” property and could be copied or recorded by your employer. ● Use numbers or bullets if your message contains multiple items. It is easier to read that way. ● Once you send an e-mail, you can never delete it. Copies of that message will remain somewhere forever. Never send a message you wouldn’t mind the wrong person reading. ● Use proper punctuation and capitalization. Writing in all capital letters is difficult to read and can imply various “emotions” such as anger, while run-on sentences or lack of any punctuation can cause complicated grammatical issues and misreading of your message. ● If your message is urgent, call the recipient. Do not send an e-mail and expect it to be read within the hour. Along with e-mails, many of our members also maintain personal websites. Some are tied to chapter websites, while others are part of social media sites. These websites are, at times, forgotten and left “up” indefinitely regardless of their creator’s intentions. Be aware that there is also no such thing as a private website. What you post on the Internet is public domain and may continue to float in Cyberspace forever. Here are some tips and guidelines to keep in mind when creating or editing your chapter or personal website: ● Make sure your website or your chapter’s website is an accurate reflection of you and of reality. Misleading someone with false information or having links to things you think are funny at the moment might come back to haunt you and your chapter later. ● Minimize the moving, flashing or animation on a site. This goes for having too many advertisements on your site that take forever to load as well. Keep the resolution of images at 72 dpi (dots per inch) to avoid long load times. ● Have consistent, intuitive navigation in the same place on every page throughout your site. Make sure you also offer a “Home” option in your navigation. ● Make a point of having some contact information easily found on your site. Basic information would be name, e-mail address and a phone number that you are comfortable publicizing. Also be aware not to put

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too much personal information on a website for fear of identity theft. ● Never post pictures you do not want everyone to see. And just because it seems funny at the moment does not mean that it is always a good idea. What is funny when you are 19 may not be funny when you are 40 and have a family. ● At the very least make an effort to respond quickly to specific inquiries from your website. Don’t ignore complaints, concerns or questions.

Chapter Hospitality The fraternity house is a home and the members, individually and collectively, are responsible for the comfort and pleasure of all guests. ● Greet guests with genuine interest and enthusiasm at the door. Don’t force them to make out for themselves until “someone” introduces you. That “someone” should be you. ● Inconspicuously arrange to introduce guests to all others present. They will not feel at home until this is done. Intro­duc­tions on a large scale are sometimes difficult but courtesy demands that they be performed. ● Everyone knows to rise when a woman enters the room. However, some variations to this rule may be necessary on special occasions. Learn these from the older members. ● Cater to your guests. Anticipate their desires. Make sure that when they leave they will remember and talk about their visit as a pleasant and enjoyable occasion. No better opportunity exists for bringing favorable publicity to the chapter. ● When you have overnight guests see that they have a comfortable room in which to dress and make sure that they have clean sheets on their beds.

Personal Cleanliness It may seem unnecessary to mention body odor, dirty necks, unkempt hair, black fingernails, dirty teeth and bad breath, but no one can be careless or thoughtless about these details if he hopes to be regarded as a well-groomed gentleman.

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The Essence of Good Taste

Avoid excessive use of cologne and aftershaves. A slight fragrance is just fine, but an overwhelming smell of cologne can be offensive.

The Basic Dress Wardrobe The following list is a guideline to clothing that can form the foundation of a man’s wardrobe. It is not intended to be all-inclusive, but the list is a basic guide to correct dress and will assure those who follow it that they are dressed properly for almost any social occasion. 1. The Suit A. Color — Conservative ranges of navy or gray. Solids or soft stripes. B. Fabric — All wool or wool blends. C. Style — Single Vented-single breasted 2 or 3 piece with standard lapels. 2. The Sports Jacket A. Color — Navy blue. B. Fabric — Wool or wool blend. C. Style — Single vented-single breasted blazer with gold buttons. 3. Slacks (worn with blazer) A. Color — Gray, tan or khaki. B. Fabric — All cotton, wool or wool blend. C. Style — Plain front or pleated. 4. The Shirt A. Color — White, pink, blue, gray, ecru, maize, or subtle stripe. B. Fabric — 100% cotton or cotton blends. Oxford cloth or Pinpoint. C. Style — Button-down collar, plain point color, traditional body. 5. The Neck Tie A. Color — Should complement suit/sports jacket. B. Fabric — All silk or polyester/silk blends. C. Style — Solid, subtle stripe or small print. 6. Socks A. Color — Black, dark navy or medium gray. B. Fabric — Natural fiber blends, wool or silk with nylonreinforced heel and toes. C. Style — Socks should be high enough so skin does not show when sitting or crossing legs. 7. Shoes

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A. Color — Black, brown or dark cordovan. B. Style— Dress lace or dress loafer (suit). Dress or casual loafer (sports jacket). 8. Belts A. Color — To match shoes. B. Fabric — All leather. C. Size — 1 inch to 11/4 inches wide. Buying ties is relatively simple once you know the rules. The first thing you should do before buying ties is to determine what length they should be. There is nothing worse on a man than a tie that is either too long or too short. When tied properly, the tip of the tie should come just to your belt buckle, no more, no less. Next, it is important that the tie make a good knot. To do so, it must have substance, which is provided by a lining of coarse material sewn into the tie, as well as the material from which the tie itself is made. Finally, it should harmonize in color with the outfit and the pattern should not conflict with the pattern of the suitor sports coat. For instance, combining a plaid suit or sports coat with a strongly patterned tie seldom works.

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The Essence of Good Taste

How to Tie a Tie THE FOUR-IN-HAND KNOT Long and straight ‚ to complement a standard shirt collar. YOUR LEFT IN MIRROR

YOUR RIGHT IN MIRROR 1 Start with wide end of tie on your right and extending a foot below narrow end.

2 Cross wide end over narrow, and back underneath.

3 Continue around, passing wide end across front of narrow once more.

4 Pass wide end up through loop.

5 Holding front of knot loose with index finger, pass wide end down through loop in front.

6 Remove finger and tighten knot carefully. Draw up tight to collar by holding narrow end and sliding knot up snug.

THE HALF — WINDSOR KNOT Medium Symmetrical triangle — for standard shirt collars.

1 Start with wide end of tie on your right and extending a foot below narrow end.

4 Pass wide end around front from left to right.

2 Cross wide end over narrow and turn back underneath

5 Then, up through loop . . .

3 Bring up and turn down through loop.

6 And down through knot in front. Tighten carefully and draw up to collar.

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The Bow Tie Your reflection in the mirror.

1 Start with end in left hand extending 11⁄2” below that in right hand.

2 Cross longer end over shorter and pass up through loop.

3 Form front loop of bow by doubling up shorter end (handling) and placing across collar points.

4 Hold front loop with thumb and fore­finger of left hand. Drop long end down over front.

5 Place right forefinger pointing up, on bottom half of hanging part. Pass up behind front loop.

6

Poke resulting loop through knot behind front loop. Even ends and tighten.

Walkout Policy Walkouts (i.e., “skips” or “roadtrips” to other chapters or colonies by groups of members and/or associates) have become common practice by some chapters and colonies in recent years. While activities that promote brotherhood and provide for the useful exchange of ideas between members are encouraged, the Fraternity is strongly opposed to such events unless there is strict compliance with the guidelines of this policy. Delta Chi does not, in any way, condone unorganized, unannounced, or spontaneous trips involving several members. If more than four (4) members of a chapter or colony wish to visit another chapter or colony (while it may or may not be their intention to also seek lodging for one or more nights), the visiting group must adhere to the conditions for visitation.

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The Essence of Good Taste

Preparation for the Visit A. The visiting chapter must designate at least two elected officers to assume leadership and authority of the event, at least one of whom must travel with the group and remain involved from the function start to finish. B. It is the responsibility of the visiting chapter or colony to contact the chapter or colony to be visited at least three weeks (21 days) in advance of the projected date of the visit. C. Approval of the chapter or colony to be visited must be received, ideally at least ten (10) days in advance of the visit. It is the right of the chapter or colony selected for the visit to deny permission to the inquiring group. The chapter or colony wishing to travel must also seek approval from its own elected chapter/colony officers, who will ultimately be held responsible for the behavior of the visiting group. D. A travel itinerary and activity plan must be sent by the visiting chapter or colony to the group receiving the visit at least one week (7 days) in advance of the proposed visit. The itinerary must also include any revisions in the proposal as deemed necessary by the host group. The host may still deny permission for the visit if the final plans are not in order as determined by the host. E. The chapter/colony “BB” of the group to be visited, as well as the respective Regent, must also receive the itinerary and activity plans from the visiting chapter. It is also the responsibility of the visiting chapter to insure the receipt of these materials. Failure to insure receipt of these materials may result in the cancellation of the visit by either the “BB” or the Regent, or both. Responsibilities of the Host Chapter/Colony A. Policies regarding lodging should be established. The availability of floor space and/or bed space should be determined and communicated in advance of the visit. Areas of the house considered off-limits should be also stated. B. The host chapter or colony may choose to incur the costs of providing meals for its guests, but is in no way required to do so. The host should prepare a report outlining potential expenses based on the proposal supplied by the visiting group. This may permit the visiting group to bring sufficient payment with them.

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Travel Arrangements Sufficient travel arrangements are imperative. The following guidelines must be adhered to as indicated: A. A trip that involves utilization of illegal and/or unsafe modes or methods of transportation is strictly prohibited. Such examples include, but are not limited to the following: 1. U sing “U-Haul” or similar equipment of which the primary purpose of the vehicle is not the transport of people. 2. Open flat bed or pick-up trucks. 3. A number of people in an automobile that exceeds the number of available and operative seatbelts. B. Alcohol may not be consumed before or during the trip either by the drivers or other vehicle passengers. C. If alcohol is to be taken to the chapter or colony being visited, it must be done so only with the permission of the chapter or colony being visited and within all applicable laws. Any alcohol must be properly prepared for travel (ideally boxed and sealed), safely stored for transit, and remains so until arrival. D. Only those members who maintain valid driver’s licenses may operate the vehicle(s) involved in the trip. E. E ach vehicle used during the trip should have been sufficiently maintained and serviced prior to departure. In addition, each vehicle should be properly insured so as to cover all occupants in the event of a mishap.

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Appendices

The Nine Regions of Delta Chi Region No.

Region No. Region No. Region No. Region No. Region No. Region No.

Region No. Region No.

I The states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Alaska, the provinces of British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan, and the territories of the Yukon, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. II The states of California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Hawaii. III The states of Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana. IV The states of North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Colorado, Missouri, Iowa, and Minnesota. V The states of Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana, and the northern (upper) peninsula of Michigan. VI The states of Michigan (exclusive of the northern peninsula), Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia, and the province of Ontario. VII The states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, and the provinces of Quebec, Newfoundland, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. VIII The states of Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, and Tennessee. IX The states of Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and The District of Columbia.

Delta Chi Law also provides that a chapter or colony may request that it be assigned to a Region other than that provided for above for reasons of geographic proximity to the chapters and colonies of another Region or for other valid reasons. Such a change can be made only by the approval of the Board of Regents.

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Locations of Current Undergraduate Chapters and Colonies* Chapters (Arranged in the order of their establishment.) Cornell University (1890) University of Michigan (1892) University of Minnesota-Twin Cities (1892) Northwestern University (1893) Syracuse University (1899) The Ohio State University (1902) University of California-Berkeley (1910) University of Iowa (1912) University of Wisconsin-Madison (1921) University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign (1923) Iowa State University (1923) University of Kansas (1923) University of Alabama (1927) Purdue University (1927) Pennsylvania State University (1929) Oregon State University (1931) Miami University (1932) Louisiana State University (1941) Washington State University (1943) Hobart and William Smith College (1948) Lake Forest College (1950) Auburn University (1951) University of Missouri (1951) Lehigh University (1952) Southern Illinois University at   Carbondale (1955) Northern Arizona University (1959) Florida State University (1961) Kansas State University (1964) Mississippi State University (1964) Troy University (1966) Eastern Illinois University (1967) California State University at Fullerton (1967) University of West Alabama (1967) Jacksonville State University (1968) * As of June, 2017

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California State University at Long Beach (1968) Valdosta State University (1968) Denison University (1969) University of Massachusetts-Amherst (1969) University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh (1969) Trine University (1969) California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo (1970) University of Wisconsin-Whitewater (1970) Gannon University (1971) University of Windsor (1971) University of Central Missouri (1971) Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University   at Daytona Beach (1972) Georgia Southern University (1972) University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown (1972) University of Alabama at Huntsville (1977) Marquette University (1977) Southeast Missouri State University (1977) Truman State University (1978) Augusta University (1983) Texas Tech University (1983) Eastern Washington University (1984) University of Northern Colorado (1984) Appalachian State University (1986) Missouri State University (1986) Louisiana Tech University (1987) Tarleton State University (1988) Northern Illinois University (1989) Penn State Erie-Behrend College (1990) Bryant College (1990) Clemson University (1990) California State University at Eastbay (1990) Montclair State University (1990) State University College at Fredonia (1991) Georgia Institute of Technology (1991) Virginia Commonwealth University (1991) American University (1992)


Appendices

Duquesne University (1994) West Chester University (1996) University of Alberta (1997) Radford University (1997) Kettering University (1998) Rutgers State Univ. of New Jersey-New Brunswick (1999) Bowling Green State University (2002) South Dakota State University (2004) University of Pittsburgh (2005) University of Rhode Island (2005) College of William & Mary (2005) Hofstra University (2008) George Mason University (2009) East Stroudsburg University (2010) Kennesaw State University (2010) University of North Alabama (2010) Hamilton College (2011) University of the Sciences in Philadelphia (2011)

University of North Carolina at Wilmington (2011) Case Western Reserve University (2012) Adelphi University (2013) University of California-Riverside (2013) Spring Hill College (2013) Ferrum College (2015) University of North Georgia (2015) University of Arkansas-Little Rock (2016) Texas A&M University - Kingsville (2018) Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville (2019)

Colonies (arranged alphabetically)

University of Nebraska Omaha University of Nevada, Las Vegas University of Nevada, Reno University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill University of Texas at San Antonio Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

California State University - Chico Colorado State University Kent State University Towson University University of Alaska Anchorage University of Central Oklahoma University of Delaware University of Denver Alumni Chapters (arranged alphabetically) Alberta Arizona Valley Atlanta Augusta Alumni Baton Rouge Boston Area Cape Fear Area Capital Area Charlotte Chicago Area Colorado Front Range Columbus Connecticut Area Greater Wisconsin Houston Area Kansas City Area Las Vegas Los Angeles

Monongahela Valley Nashville New Orleans Northeast Ohio Portland Rio Grande Sacramento Area San Diego Seattle South Florida Tallahassee/Capital Area Tampa Bay Area Tennessee Valley Three Rivers Troy Area Twin Cities Area West Virginia 119


The Delta Chi Fraternity Officers “AA”s Owen Lincoln Potter, Cornell 1891................................... Charles A. Park, Michigan 1894......................................... Bertrand Lichtenberger, Michigan 1896........................ John E. Amos, Chicago-Kent 1896.................................. A. Dix Bissell, Cornell 1898.................................................. Mark H. Irish, Osgoode Hall 1897...................................... Robert R. McKee, N.Y.U. 1893............................................ Carleton Gillespie Ferris, Michigan ’01........................... James O’Malley, Cornell ’01................................................ A. Frank John, Dickinson ’00............................................. Edward C. Nettels, Chicago-Kent ’00............................ Floyd L. Carlisle, Cornell ’03.............................................. John J. Kuhn, Cornell 1898.................................................. Harry Hyde Barnum, Chicago-Kent ’03........................ Joseph Hartigan, N.Y.U. ’06............................................... Frank W. Atkinson, Michigan ’01...................................... Ward Wright, Osgoode Hall ’08...................................... Osmer C. Ingalls, Ohio State ’07...................................... Henry V. McGurren, Chicago-Kent ’10........................... John J. Kuhn, Cornell 1898.................................................. Henry V. McGurren, Chicago-Kent ’10........................... William W. Bride, Georgetown ’04................................. John B. Harshman, Ohio State ’07.................................. Charles M. Thompson, Illinois Faculty............................ Marsh W. White, Penn State Faculty.............................. Jefferson J. Coleman, Alabama ’29................................ L. Orville Edlund, Illinois ’33............................................... Joseph F. Lacchia, N.Y.U. ’25............................................. Lewis S. Armstrong, Washington ’39............................. L. Harold Anderson, Stanford ’24.................................... Claude B. Layfield, Jr., Auburn ’46.................................. David A. Gillespie, Illinois ’27............................................. Ralph E. Prusok, Union ’52.................................................. George W. Obear, DePauw ’30........................................ Frank Granat, Jr., Washington ’51.................................... James C. Steffan, Ohio State ’22...................................... Marcus Gary Monk, Auburn ’65........................................ J. Nick Gray, Missouri ’56.................................................... Robert P. LaBouy, Jr., Washington ’66......................... Raymond F. Borelli, Illinois ’58..........................................

1890 to 1894 1894 to 1896 1896 to 1897 1897 to 1898 1898 to 1899 1899 to 1900 1900 to 1901 1901 to 1902 1902 to 1903 1903 to 1904 1904 to 1905 1905 to 1906 1906 to 1907 1907 to 1908 1908 to 1909 1909 to 1910 1910 to 1911 1911 to 1913 1913 to 1917 1917 to 1921 1921 to 1927 1927 to 1929 1929 to 1935 1935 to 1952 1952 to 1954 1954 to 1956 1956 to 1958 1958 to 1960 1960 to 1962 1962 to 1964 1964 to 1966 1966 to 1968 1968 to 1969 1969 to 1970 1970 to 1973 1973 to 1975 1975 to 1977 1977 to 1979 1979 to 1981 1981 to 1985

The current use of letters (double for international officers, and single for chapter officers) was first adopted in 1903.

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Appendices

Fredrick B. Hammert, Oklahoma ’60............................. Larry P. Audlehelm, Iowa ’71.............................................. Gregory F. Hauser, Michigan State ’75.......................... Michael L. Carroll, Auburn ’71............................................ Larry K. Nothnagel, Truman State ’79........................... Paul W. Bohlman, Ohio State ’70.................................... William A. Williams, Gannon ’83...................................... Charles A. Mancuso, Florida State ’84........................... Steven P. Bossart, Kent State ’90 .................................. Thomas S. Horowitz, Michigan State ’87...................... Ratheen C. Damle, Texas ’01.............................................. Miles C. Washburn, Massachusetts ’87........................... Aaron Otto, Kansas State ’98.............................................

1985 to 1987 1987 to 1990 1990 to 1992 1992 to 1994 1994 to 1996 1996 to 1998 1998 to 2002 2002 to 2004 2004 to 2008 2008 to 2010 2010 to 2012 2012 to 2016 2016 to 2020

International Vice Presidents John Milton Gorham, Cornell 1891..................................... Charles Edward Travis, N.Y.U. 1891..................................... Albert E. Shaw, Minnesota 1890........................................ Thomas A. Berkebile, Michigan 1897............................... Mark H. Irish, Osgoode Hall 1897....................................... Alfred J. Feight, Dickinson 1897......................................... Carleton Gillespie Ferris, Michigan ’01............................ James O’Malley, Cornell ’01.................................................. Charles Diebold, Jr., Buffalo 1897...................................... Marcus R. Hart, Michigan ’04..............................................

1890 to 1894 1894 to 1896 1896 to 1897 1897 to 1898 1898 to 1899 1899 to 1900 1900 to 1901 1901 to 1902 1902 to 1903 1903 to 1904

“CC”s George A. Nall, Cornell 1892................................................ Charles A. Simmons, Cornell 1895.................................... J. Francis Tucker, N.Y.U. 1892............................................... Herman J. Westwood, Cornell 1897................................. Charles Harris Moore, N.Y.U. ’00........................................ Floyd L. Carlisle, Cornell ’03................................................ Harry Hyde Barnum, Chicago-Kent ’03.......................... William W. Bride, Georgetown ’04................................... O.K. Patton, Iowa ’12................................................................ Howard L. Kellogg, Iowa ’31................................................. Marsh W. White, Penn State ’20........................................ Jefferson J. Coleman, Alabama ’29.................................. Warren W. Etcheson, Indiana ’42...................................... Lewis S. Armstrong, Washington ’39.............................. Claude B. Layfield, Jr., Auburn ’46.................................... David A. Gillespie, Illinois ’27............................................... H. Walter Steffens, Idaho ’29............................................... Charles Wright, Jr., Kansas ’41............................................

1890 to 1894 1894 to 1896 1896 to 1898 1898 to 1901 1901 to 1903 1903 to 1905 1905 to 1906 1906 to 1923 1923 to 1935 1935 to 1940 1940 to 1952 1952 to 1954 1954 to 1956 1956 to 1960 1960 to 1962 1962 to 1964 1964 to 1966 1966 to 1968

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George W. Obear, DePauw ’30.......................................... 1968 to 1969 Frank Granat, Jr., Washington ’51...................................... 1969 to 1970 Frank H. Zigrang, Iowa ’61.................................................... 1970 to 1973 Robert P. LaBouy, Jr., Washington ’66............................ 1973 to 1975 J. Nick Gray, Missouri ’56....................................................... 1975 to 1977 Gregory P. Schreiber, Iowa State ’71................................. 1977 to 1979 Leroy A. Mendenhall, Kansas ’68....................................... 1979 to 1981 Frank Carter, Northwest Missouri ’75.............................. 1981 to 1982 Fredrick B. Hammert, Oklahoma ’60............................... 1982 to 1985 Larry P. Audlehelm, Iowa ’71................................................ 1985 to 1987 Michael L. Carroll, Auburn ’71.............................................. 1987 to 1990 Larry K. Nothnagel, Truman State ’79............................. 1990 to 1992 Paul W. Bohlman, Ohio State ’70...................................... 1992 to 1994 William A. Williams, Gannon ’83........................................ 1994 to 1998 Scott T. Klinefelter, Northern Iowa ’76............................ 1998 to 2000 Larry K. Nothnagel, Truman State ’79............................. 2000 Michael V. Woolbright, Long Beach ’86......................... 2000 to 2002 Steven P. Bossart, Kent State ’90 ..................................... 2002 to 2004 Thomas S. Horowitz, Michigan State ’87........................ 2004 to 2006 Ratheen C. Damle, Texas ’01................................................ 2006 to 2008 Miles C. Washburn, Massachusetts ’87........................... 2008 to 2010 William R. Tallman, Embry-Riddle ’95............................. 2010 to 2012 Keith R. Shriver, Florida ’79.................................................. 2012 to 2014 Marquez Brown, Iowa ’01...................................................... 2014 to 2016 Ratheen C. Damle, Texas ’01................................................ 2016 Thomas L. Carroll III, Hayward ’98.................................... 2016 to 2020 “DD”s Albert T. Wilkinson, Cornell 1891........................................ 1890 to 1894 Thomas Kelsey, Cornell 1895............................................... 1894 to 1896 Walter Henry Edson, Cornell 1896.................................... 1896 to 1897 George B. Somerville, Dickinson 1897............................. 1897 to 1898 Louis R. Frankel, Minnesota 1899...................................... 1898 to 1900 Edward C. Nettels, Chicago-Kent ’00............................. 1900 to 1904 Rufus G. Shirley, N.Y.U. ’02.................................................... 1904 to 1905 John J. Kuhn, Cornell 1898................................................... 1905 to 1906 Joseph Hartigan, N.Y.U. ’02.................................................. 1906 to 1908 Osmer C. Ingalls, Ohio State ’07........................................ 1908 to 1911 Henry V. McGurren, Chicago-Kent ’10............................. 1911 to 1913 John B. Harshman, Ohio State ’07.................................... 1913 to 1929 Cecil S. DeRoin, Kansas ’16................................................... 1929 to 1934 *Henry V. McGurren, Chicago-Kent ’10........................... 1934 to 1935 Charles M. Thompson, Illinois ’09...................................... 1935 *Acting “DD”.

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Appendices

Marsh W. White, Penn State ’20........................................ 1935 to 1940 L. Harold Anderson, Stanford ’24...................................... 1940 to 1954 Lewis S. Armstrong, Washington ’39.............................. 1954 to 1956 Joseph F. Lacchia, N.Y.U. ’25................................................ 1956 to 1958 Claude B. Layfield, Jr., Auburn ’46.................................... 1958 to 1960 L. Harold Anderson, Stanford ’24...................................... 1960 to 1962 Claude B. Layfield, Jr., Auburn ’46.................................... 1962 to 1964 David A. Gillespie, Illinois ’27............................................... 1964 to 1966 Ralph E. Prusok, Union ’52................................................... 1966 to 1968 Frank Granat, Jr., Washington ’51...................................... 1968 to 1969 Joseph F. Lacchia, N.Y.U. ’25................................................ 1969 to 1970 Boyd W. Boehlje, Iowa State ’61......................................... 1970 to 1973 Marcus Gary Monk, Auburn ’65.......................................... 1973 to 1975 Robert P. LaBouy, Jr., Washington ’66............................ 1975 to 1977 Michael J. Moriarty, Oshkosh ’71........................................ 1977 to 1979 Raymond F. Borelli, Illinois ’58............................................ 1979 to 1981 Frank L. Stephenson, Gannon ’74..................................... 1981 to 1983 Larry P. Audlehelm, Iowa ’71................................................ 1983 to 1985 Gregory F. Hauser, Michigan State ’75............................ 1985 to 1990 Michael L. Carroll, Auburn ’71.............................................. 1990 to 1992 Larry K. Nothnagel, Truman State ’79............................. 1992 to 1994 Paul W. Bohlman, Ohio State ’70...................................... 1994 to 1996 Luther M. “Ken” Young, Auburn ’69................................. 1996 to 1998 William E. Humphrey, Purdue ’85...................................... 1998 to 2000 John M. Shelby, Sacramento ’86........................................ 2000 to 2002 Michael V. Woolbright, Long Beach ’86......................... 2002 to 2004 Charles A. Mancuso, Florida State ’84............................ 2004 to 2006 Thomas S. Horowitz, Michigan State ’87........................ 2006 to 2008 Ratheen C. Damle, Texas ’01................................................ 2008 to 2010 Miles C. Washburn, Massachusetts ’87........................... 2010 to 2012 Aaron Otto, Kansas State ’98............................................. 2012 to 2016 Ronald J. Martin, New Haven ’87....................................... 2016 to 2020 “EE”s* (This office was not created until the First Convention — hence, no “EE” was elected until 1894, and the office was discontinued from 1904 to 1907 so there were no incumbents during the years 1905 and 1906. The office was again discontinued in 1929.)

Herman J. Westwood, Cornell 1897................................. J. Wilmer Fisher, Dickinson 1896....................................... A. Dix Bissell, Cornell 1898................................................... George Harris Smith, Michigan 1899................................ Fraser Brown, Cornell ’00....................................................

1894 to 1896 1896 to 1897 1897 to 1898 1898 to 1899 1899 to 1901

*The “EE” served as the curator of the archives of the Fraternity; maintained a record of all initiates, and was responsible for gathering annual chapter histories. These functions have been taken over by the International Headquarters staff.

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A. Frank John, Dickinson ’00.............................................. Arthur G. Slaght, Osgoode Hall 1898............................... Osmer C. Ingalls, Ohio State ’07........................................ Stephen Hart, Northwestern ’03....................................... Walter B. Williams, Georgetown ’04................................ Frank A. Paul, Pennsylvania ’10.......................................... George B. Bush, Stanford ’09............................................. Edward W. Allen, Washington ’09.................................... Roger Steffan, Ohio State ’13.............................................. William W. Bride, Georgetown ’04................................... Milton E. Cornelius, Nebraska ’07......................................

1901 to 1903 1903 to 1904 1907 to 1908 1908 to 1909 1909 to 1911 1911 to 1913 1913 to 1921 1921 to 1923 1923 to 1925 1925 to 1927 1927 to 1929

EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS† This position was not created until 1923 at the twenty-second Convention, and it was not filled until 1929.

O.K. Patton, Iowa ’12 (part-time)..................................... 1929 to 1951 Donald G. Isett, Kansas ’28 (part-time)......................... 1951 to 1953 Warren W. Etcheson, Indiana ’42 (part-time)............ 1953 to 1956 Harold E. Buchanan, Wisconsin ’35................................ 1961 to 1966 F. Kenneth Brasted, Florida ’35........................................ 1967 to 1975 Larry P. Audlehelm, Iowa ’71.............................................. 1975 to 1979 Raymond D. Galbreth, Missouri ’69................................ 1979 to 2012 Justin P. Sherman, Central Missouri ’08......................... 2012 to 2016 Keith R. Shriver, Florida ’79.................................................. 2016 to 2018 Jerod L. Breit, Central Missouri ‘04..................................... 2018 to Prsnt

The Delta Chi Fraternity Officers Emeriti Upon recommendation of the Board, the Convention may designate one or more outstanding men who have formerly served as “AA”, “CC”, “DD”, or “BB” of the Fraternity as “AA” Emeritus, “CC” Emeritus, “DD” Emeritus, or “BB” Emeritus. Such designation shall be for meritorious and conspicuous service to the Fraternity. Any person so designated shall retain the title for life.

“AA”s Emeriti Henry V. McGurren, Chicago-Kent ’10.......................................... 1935 John B. Harshman, Ohio State ’07................................................. 1956 Charles M. Thompson, Illinois ’09................................................... 1956 Marsh W. White, Penn State ’20..................................................... 1962 Jefferson J. Coleman, Alabama ’29............................................... 1966 Lewis S. Armstrong, Washington ’39............................................ 1970 Joseph F. Lacchia, N.Y.U. ’25............................................................ 1970 George W. Obear, DePauw ’30....................................................... 1975 †Before 1970, the title was Executive Secretary. *Posthumous

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Appendices

*James C. Steffan, Ohio State ’22................................................... 1975 *William W. Bride, Georgetown ’04.............................................. 1983 M. Gary Monk, Auburn ’65................................................................. 1985 Raymond F. Borelli, Illinois ’58......................................................... 2004 *John J. Kuhn, Cornell 1898............................................................... 2006 Gregory F. Hauser, Michigan State ’77......................................... 2008 Larry K. Nothnagel, Truman ’79...................................................... 2008 “BB”s Emeriti W. Lee Smith, Kentucky ’16............................................................... 1966 Rowland R. Manatt, Iowa State ’21................................................. 1975 Jimmie J. Underwood, Kansas ’51................................................... 1977 Prof. Claude McNorton, Auburn ’64.............................................. 1981 William D. Lindquist, Idaho ’40........................................................ 1985 Joseph W. Crabtree, Truman St. Alumnus................................. 1990 John G. Copeland, Indiana ’49......................................................... 1998 Merlin M. Harlow, Purdue ’34............................................................ 2000 John P. White, Texas Tech Faculty................................................ 2000 Alan H. Brightman, D.V.M., Kansas ’67.......................................... 2004 Ron J. Montgomery, Oshkosh ’88.................................................. 2006 Mark D. Sluss, Missouri State ’87..................................................... 2006 Luther M. “Ken” Young, Auburn ’69.............................................. 2006 Frank C. Hinds, Illinois Faculty......................................................... 2008 Stephen B. Spencer, Penn State ’54.............................................. 2008 Father Arthur F. Humphrey, Montclair Faculty......................... 2008 James P. Sturm, Fredonia Alumnus............................................... 2008 John C. Holke, Truman State ’78....................................................... 2012 Joseph C. Pickett, Troy State ‘66...................................................... 2018 “CC”s Emeriti O. K. Patton, Iowa ’12............................................................................ 1964 H. Walter Steffens, Idaho ’29............................................................ 1975 William R. Tallman, Embry-Riddle ‘95.......................................... 2018 “DD”s Emeriti L. Harold Anderson, Stanford ’24................................................... 1966 Faculty Advisor Emeriti Richard R. Kruger, Tri-State Faculty............................................. 2008 Regent Emeriti Hamilton B. Henderson, Northwest Missouri Faculty............ 2008 E. Duane Meyer, Hobart ’58................................................................. 2012 David K. Weber, Cornell ‘68................................................................. 2018 Executive Director Emeriti Raymond D. Galbreth, Missouri ’69............................................... 2016 *Posthumous

125


The Delta Chi Educational Foundation Officers President Charles M. Thompson, Illinois Faculty.......................... 1954 to 1956 Donald G. Isett, Kansas ’28................................................ 1956 to 1971 Victor T. Johnson, Purdue ’32.......................................... 1971 to 1983 Jimmie J. Underwood, Kansas ’51.................................. 1983 to 1992 M. Gary Monk, Auburn ’65................................................. 1992 to 1997 Fred W. Hammert, Oklahoma ’60.................................. 1997 to 2008 Chad M. Wolett, Arizona State ’94................................. 2008 to 2009 Patrick Weber, Oklahoma ’87........................................... 2009 to 2010 Chad M. Wolett, Arizona State ’94................................. 2010 to 2011 James M. Marascio, Bryant ’93........................................ 2011 to 2018 Lyle E. Sprinkle, Georgia Tech ’92.................................. 2018 to 2019 Vice President John B. Harshman, Ohio State ‘07................................. 1954 to 1958 Richard F. Kauders, Cornell ‘69....................................... 1971 to 1983 Marcus Gary Monk, Auburn ‘65....................................... 1983 LaVon P. Linn, Nebraska ‘38.............................................. 1983 to 1985 Richard F. Kauders, Cornell ‘69....................................... 1985 to 1992 Boyd W. Boehlje, Iowa State ‘62..................................... 1992 to 1996 Frederick B. Hammert, Oklahoma ‘60.......................... 1996 to 1997 Robert D. Hendershot, Purdue ‘72................................. 1997 to 2000 Michael L. Carroll, Auburn ‘71........................................... 2000 to 2007 Steve R. Michels, Marquette ‘87...................................... 2007 to 2009 James M. Marascio, Bryant ‘93........................................ 2009 to 2010 Donald E. LaPlante, Southern California..................... 2010 to 2018 Donald E. LaPlante, Southern California..................... 2018 to Prsnt Vice President of Programs Andrew R. Haggerty, New Mexico State ‘03............. 2018 to Prsnt Vice President of Committees

126


Secretary* Donald G. Isett, Kansas ‘28................................................ C. Woody Thompson, Illinois ‘22.................................... Ralph E. Prusock, Union ‘52.............................................. Victor T. Johnson, Purdue ‘32.......................................... Mark W. Putney, Iowa ‘51.................................................... Larry P. Audlehelm, Iowa ‘71............................................. Raymond D. Galbreath, Missouri ‘69............................. Bobby L. Dewrell, Troy ‘95................................................. Patrick F. Weber, Oklahoma ‘87...................................... Donald E. LaPlante, Southern California..................... John G. Tunila, Connecticut ‘81........................................ Lyle E. Sprinkle, Georgia Tech ‘96.................................. J. Donald Turk, Florida ‘68.................................................

1954 to 1956 1956 to 1962 1962 to 1966 1966 to 1971 1971 to 1979 1979 to 1982 1982 to 2006 2006 to 2007 2007 to 2008 2008 to 2010 2010 to 2014 2014 to 2018 2018 to Prsnt

Treasurer* Donald G. Isett, Kansas `28............................................... C. Woody Thompson, Illinois `22.................................... Ralph E. Prusock, Union `52.............................................. Victor T. Johnson, Purdue `32.......................................... John H. Hogeland, II, Iowa `48......................................... Kenneth M. Snyder, Illinois `30......................................... Edward Fusco, Embry-Riddle `73.................................. Raymond D. Galbreth, Missori `69................................. Robert D. Hendershot, Purdue ’72................................. Bobby L. Dewrell, Troy ’95................................................. Thaddeus A. Tatum, III, S.M.U. ’68.................................. Kenneth J. Sousa, Bryant................................................... Rod Arnold, Texas A&M ’88............................................... John S. Ziegler, Louisiana Tech ‘01.................................

1954 to 1956 1956 to 1962 1962 to 1966 1966 to 1971 1971 to 1976 1976 to 1979 1979 to 1982 1982 to 2007 2007 to 2008 2008 to 2009 2009 to 2010 2010 to 2014 2014 to 2016 2016 to Prsnt

*From 1954 until 1971, and since 1982, the office was combined as Secretary-Treasurer.

127


Order of the White Carnation Victor T. Johnson, Purdue ’32.......................................................... 1975 *James C. Steffan, Ohio State ’22................................................... 1975 Douglas S. Holsclaw, Arizona ’25.................................................... 1977 Dr. Marsh W. White, Penn. State Faculty.................................... 1979 George W. Obear, DePauw ’30....................................................... 1981 Joseph F. Lacchia, N.Y.U. ’25............................................................ 1983 *O.K. Patton, Iowa ’12........................................................................... 1983 *Donald G. Isett, Kansas ’28.............................................................. 1985 Dr. Jimmie J. Underwood, Kansas ’51........................................... 1985 J. Nick Gray, Missouri ’56................................................................... 1987 *Roger Steffan, Ohio State ’13.......................................................... 1987 Boyd W. Boehlje, Iowa State ’61...................................................... 1990 *Frank E. Thomas, Cornell 1890....................................................... 1990 Jefferson Coleman, Alabama ’29.................................................... 1992 M. Gary Monk, Auburn ’65................................................................. 1992 Christopher W. Johnson, Kentucky ’77........................................ 1994 Gregory F. Hauser, Michigan State ’75......................................... 1996 Frederick B. Hammert, Oklahoma ’60.......................................... 1998 Richard N. McKaig, Ball State ’66................................................... 2000 Michael L. Carroll, Auburn ’71........................................................... 2002 *John B. Harshman, Ohio State ’07................................................ 2002 *Gene A. Johnson, Oklahoma State ’58....................................... 2004 Monte L. Johnson, Ohio State ’69.................................................. 2004 John G. Tunila, Connecticut ’81........................................................ 2004 Edward Fusco, Embry-Riddle ’73................................................... 2006 *Charles A. Hatch, Minnesota ’22.................................................... 2006 *James D. Price, Eastern Illinois ’74............................................... 2006 Kenneth L. Shepard, Long Beach ’77............................................ 2006 Russell H. Driscoll, Florida ’57.......................................................... 2008 Steven R. Michels, Marquette ’87.................................................... 2008 Keith R. Shriver, Florida ’79............................................................... 2008 Paul W. Bohlman, Ohio State ’70................................................... 2010 Donald E. LaPlante, Southern California...................................... 2010 Charles A. Mancuso, Florida State ’84.......................................... 2010 John L. Mica, Florida ’67..................................................................... 2010 Hamilton B. Henderson, Northwest Missouri Faculty............... 2012 Patrick J. Phelan, Embry-Riddle ’72................................................. 2012 Patrick Weber, Oklahoma ’87........................................................... 2012 *Gregory J. Nelli, Embry-Riddle Faculty........................................ 2014 Thomas Horowitz, Michigan ’87....................................................... 2016 John Shelby, Sacramento ’86........................................................... 2016 Steven P. Bossart, Kent State ‘89 ................................................... 2018 James Donald Turk, Florida ‘65....................................................... 2018 David K. Weber, Cornell ‘65............................................................... 2018 *Posthumous

128


Appendices

The Delta Chi of the Year Award To be eligible for this award, Delta Chi alumnus nominees must have distinguished themselves in such a manner that they are recognized by their peers throughout the land.

Henry M. Jackson, Washington ’34, Senator............................ 1983 Henry M. Hartsfield, Auburn ’54, Astronaut............................. 1984 Peyton N. Rhodes, Ph.D., Virginia ’20, College President... 1985 Otis R. Bowen, M.D., Indiana ’39, Governor and Secretary of Health and Human Services.................................. 1986 Charles T. Manatt, Iowa State ’58, Chairman of the   Democratic National Committee............................................... 1987 Kevin Costner, Fullerton ’77, Actor................................................ 1988 Raymond D. Galbreth, Missouri ’69, Executive Director...... 1989 William S. Sessions, Kansas ’51, Director of the FBI.............. 1990 Herbert G. Klein, USC ’40, Editor and Chief,   Copley Newspapers........................................................................ 1991 Edward A. Kangas, Kansas ’66, Managing Partner,   Deloitte & Touche............................................................................. 1992 Charles Marshall, Illinois ’51, Vice Chairman of the   Board of AT&T.................................................................................... 1993 Melvin A. Fisher, Purdue ’45, “The World’s Greatest   Treasure Hunter”............................................................................... 1994 Thomas W. Glasgow, Michigan State ’68, Chief Operations   Officer for McDonald’s Corporation......................................... 1995 Forrest E. Hoglund, Kansas ’56, CEO of Enron Oil & Gas... 1996 Patrick L. Gillick, Southern Cal. ’58, General Manager of   The Baltimore Orioles..................................................................... 1997 Samuel R. Johnson, SMU ’51, U.S. Representative,   Vietnam P.O.W................................................................................... 1998 John L. Melvin, M.D., Ohio State ’55, Physchiatrist................ 1999 Raoul “Rod” Dedeaux, USC ’35, College Baseball Coach... 2000 Chauncey W. W. “Tex” Cook, Texas ’30, President and   Chairman of the Board, General Foods.................................. 2001 James H. Webb, USC ’67, Secretary of the Navy................... 2002 Robert L. Stump, Arizona State ’51, U.S. Representative.... 2003 Richard C. Shelby, Alabama ’57, U.S. Senator.......................... 2004 John L. Mica, Florida ’67, U.S. Representative......................... 2005 James B. Stewart, DePauw ’73, Author...................................... 2006 Richard Peck, DePauw ’56, Author............................................... 2007 G. D. Spradlin, Oklahoma ’41, Actor.............................................. 2008 Christopher “Ashton” Kutcher, Iowa ’00, Actor...................... 2009 Ronald J. Mix, Southern California ’60, NFL Hall of Fame.. 2010 Alexander Vraciu, DePauw ’41, US Naval Fighter Pilot.......... 2011 William A. Meehan, Jacksonville State ’72,   University President........................................................................... 2012

129


Fredric K. Welts, Washington ‘75, COO,   Golden State Warriors...................................................................... 2013 Timothy A. Crown, Kansas ‘86, Founder of   Insight Enterprises.............................................................................. 2014 David Zuchowski, Washington ‘80, CEO of Hyundai............. 2015 David Krane, Indiana ‘94, Google Ventures   Managing Partner............................................................................... 2016 James H. Conway, MD, Cornell ‘84, Pediatric Infectious   Disease Specialist*.............................................................................. 2017 William B. Vollbracht, Kansas ‘58,Founder of Land Title Guarantee................................................................................................... 2018

John J. Kuhn Award This award, named after the former three-time “AA” and a former President of the North American Interfraternity Conference, is presented to individuals who have contributed significantly to the Greek movement.

Eileen Stevens........................................................................................... 1992 Durward Owen, Pi Kappa Phi............................................................ 1994 Mary Peterson, Sigma Lambda Beta/Sigma Lambda Gamma 1996 David Westol, Theta Chi....................................................................... 1998 Gregory F. Hauser, Delta Chi ............................................................. 2000 Jonathan Brant, Beta Theta Pi.......................................................... 2002 Edward Pease, Pi Kappa Alpha......................................................... 2004 Ed King, Sigma Chi................................................................................. 2006 William D. Jenkins, Phi Kappa Tau................................................... 2007 Kevin O’Neill, Lambda Chi Alpha..................................................... 2008 Richard N. McKaig, Delta Chi............................................................. 2009 George W. Spasyk, Lambda Chi Alpha......................................... 2010 Maureen Syring, Delta Gamma......................................................... 2011 Philip Josephson, Alpha Gamma Rho........................................... 2012 Shelly Sutherland, Alpha Phi.............................................................. 2013 Patrick Alderdice, Delta Chi................................................................ 2014 Sid Dunn, Alpha Epsilon Pi.................................................................. 2015 Dr. Lori Hart, Alpha Omicron Pi........................................................ 2016 Raymond D. Galbreth, Delta Chi...................................................... 2017 James B. Ewbank II, Phi Delta Theta.............................................. 2018

*Posthumous

130


Appendices

New Founders In recognition of a member whose gifts to Delta Chi Fraternity or Foundation total at least $100,000.

Patrick J. Alderdice, Ball State ‘92 Rod Arnold, Texas A&M ‘88 Lee P. Berlin, Cornell ’58 Michael L. Carroll, Auburn ’71 David C. Cloutier, Embry-Riddle ‘92 James D. Dodson Oklahoma ’58 David G. Falconer, Michigan ’62 Edward Fusco, Embry-Riddle ’73 Fredrick B. Hammert, Oklahoma ’60 Robert D. Hendershot, Purdue ’72 *Gene A. Johnson, Oklahoma State ’58 *Joseph F. Lacchia, NYU ’25 E. Duane Meyer, EdD, Hobart ’58 Steven R. Michels, Marquette ’87 *George W. Obear, DePauw ’30 K. Spence Price, Embry-Riddle ’71 Roy R. Payne, Jr. Cornell ’52 *Clayton T. Roberts, Florida ’31 *Bernhard C. Shaffer, Penn State ’25 Lyle E. Sprinkle, Georgia Tech ’96 William B. Vollbracht, Kansas ’60 Miles C. Washburn, Massachusetts ’87 David K. Weber, Cornell ‘68 Patrick F. Weber, Oklahoma ’87 F. Phil Yang, Abracadabra ’80 John S. Ziegler, Louisiana Tech ’01

*Posthumous

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Significant Dates 1750 — Flat Hat Club founded at the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia. This is thought to be the first American collegiate fraternity. 1776 — Phi Beta Kappa was founded at the College of William and Mary as the first Greek-letter fraternity. Phi Beta Kappa has always retained its honorary standing. 1780 — Phi Beta Kappa installed a chapter at Yale. This marks the first expansion of a Greek-letter fraternity. 1825 — Kappa Alpha Society founded at Union. This is the oldest Greek-letter general fraternity and has enjoyed a continuous existence. It is not connected with the Kappa Alpha Order that has chapters mainly in the South. 1827 — Completion of the Union Triad. 1839 — Beta Theta Pi founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio. This was the first fraternity to be founded in the “West.” 1851 — A delphean, first university secret society for women, founded at Wesleyan Female College; known today as Alpha Delta Pi. 1855 — Miami Triad completed with the founding of Sigma Chi at Miami. 1864 — First modern fraternity house, including dormitory living quarters, built at Williams College. 1867 — Chi Phi established a chapter at Edinburgh, Scotland. This constituted the first foreign expansion of the Greek-letter fraternities. 1870 — Kappa Alpha Theta founded at DePauw University as the first sorority to bear a Greek-letter name. Kappa Kappa Gamma followed in the same year at Monmouth College. 1883 — F irst effort to promote interfraternity organization at Philadelphia. 1890 — Delta Chi founded at Cornell University, October 13. 1891 — First Intersorority Conference called at Boston. 1894 — The first Delta Chi Convention was held in Ann Arbor, Michigan. 1909 — Delta Chi became the first single membership general fraternity in a professional field. 1909 — Organization and first meeting of the National Interfraternity Conference, New York City. 1911 — Delta Chi admitted to National Interfraternity Conference. It has since been renamed as the North-American Interfrater­nity Conference. 1922 — Delta Chi became a general fraternity. 1923 — Permanent central office and position of Executive Secretary authorized by Convention. 1927 — Delta Chi activated its first Field Secretary program. 1929 — Delta Chi Headquarters Office established at 161⁄2 South Clinton Street, Iowa City, Iowa, and O. K. Patton, Iowa ’12, appointed the Fraternity’s first Executive Secretary. 1929 — Hell Week activities officially abolished by Delta Chi. It was the first fraternity to outlaw the antiquated practice.

132


Appendices

1935 — Delta Chi instituted its voluntary Alumni Dues program that permits alumni to participate in a material way in the Fraternity’s programs and progress. 1947 — Peter Schermerhorn Johnson, last surviving Founder of Delta Chi, passed away in Tulsa, Oklahoma, at the age of 78. 1954 — The Delta Chi Educational Foundation was established. 1958 — New method adopted for selecting members of the Executive Board to ensure representation of all areas on the Board. 1960 — A t the Indianapolis Convention, the Executive Committee consisting of the “AA”, the “CC” and the “DD”, was established and given complete administrative authority between conventions, subject to the Constitution, By-Laws, and the acts of the Convention; “Building Loan Fund” created. 1961 — Harold F. Buchanan, Wisconsin ’35, former Field Secre­ tary, 1935-39, returned as Delta Chi’s first full-time paid Executive Secretary. 1962 — T he Delta Chi Housing Fund was established to replace the “Building Loan Fund”: and the name of the Executive Board was changed to the Board of Regents. 1969 — Headquarters Office moved to the general Fraternity’s first owned building at 314 Church Street, Iowa City, Iowa. 1975 — Order of the White Carnation created by the Chicago Convention. 1988 — Delta Chi joined the Fraternity Insurance Purchasing Group (FIPG). It has since been renamed, “Fraternity Informa­tion and Programming Group.” 1990 — A t the Centennial Convention Delta Chi banned women’s auxiliary groups. 2006 — The V Foundation for Cancer Research is named as Delta Chi’s first international philanthropic partnership. 2014 — The Scottsdale Convention adopts a resolution that reaffirms the Fraternity’s stance against and commitment to curtailing sexual assault and harassment. 2015 — The quasquicentennial (125th) anniversary of the Delta Chi Fraternity was celebrated throughout the year, with a special banquet held that October in Atlanta. 2016 — Delta Chi’s 60th International Convention officially adopts a resolution on gender identity, clarifying that any individual who identifies as a man is eligible for membership. 2019 —Delta Chi Board of Regents votes to ban hard alcohol from all Fraternity facilities.

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Greek-Letter Groups of All Kinds The 24 Greek letters along with a few words in other languages have been combined in hundreds of ways to designate collegiate organizations considered to be fraternities or socie­ties. Baird’s Manual of American College Fraternities, the reference for the total Greek system, is the source of some particulars to differentiate between the major groupings.

International General College Fraternities and Sororities The general college fraternity, whether for men or women (the latter commonly known as a sorority), is considered a general fraternity if it organizes the social life of its members to promote their educational objectives, draws its memberships primarily from the undergraduate body of the host institution, does not limit its membership to any one department or special interest of the host institution, and cooperates with campus authorities to maintain high standards of behavior and achievement. Because general college fraternities were once known as social fraternities and because the social aspect is fundamental to their purpose and function, “there has been general misapprehension of the significance of social as applied to the frater­nities. There is no connotation of family prestige or of prefer­ment among those who are prospective members. The social fraternities have stressed the individual’s relations to and with his fellows and to the group as a whole. They have thus been pioneers in the insistence that education be socialized, that is, directed with a proper consideration of the student’s future responsibilities in society” and his/her development as a whole person. Men’s fraternities located on pages 16-17.

134


Appendices

Women’s Sororities Alpha Chi Omega, 1885 Alpha Delta Pi, 1851 Alpha Epsilon Phi, 1909 Alpha Kappa Alpha, 1908 Alpha Gamma Delta, 1904 Alpha Omicron Pi, 1897 Alpha Phi, 1872 Alpha Sigma Alpha, 1901 Alpha Sigma Tau, 1899 Alpha Xi Delta, 1893 Chi Omega, 1895 Delta Delta Delta, 1888 Delta Gamma, 1873 Delta Phi Epsilon, 1917 Delta Sigma Theta, 1913

Delta Zeta, 1902 Gamma Phi Beta, 1874 Kappa Alpha Theta, 1870 Kappa Beta Gamma, 1917 Kappa Delta, 1897 Kappa Kappa Gamma, 1870 Lambda Delta Sigma, 1967 Phi Mu, 1852 Phi Sigma Sigma, 1913 Pi Beta Phi, 1867 Sigma Delta Tau, 1917 Sigma Gamma Rho, 1922 Sigma Kappa, 1873 Sigma Lambda Gamma 1989 Sigma Sigma Sigma, 1898 Theta Phi Alpha, 1912 Zeta Phi Beta, 1920 Zeta Tau Alpha, 1898

National Professional Societies The professional fraternity is a specialized organization that differs from the general fraternity in one key respect; confining its membership to students and faculty in a specified field of professional or vocational preparation (or practice) at an institution offering courses leading to recognized degrees therein. Maintaining exclusive membership in its professional or vocational field, it may initiate members of general fraternities. Social life of the professional fraternity is organized in harmony with their specific and common educational interests. Alpha Alpha Gamma (architecture), 1922 Alpha Beta Alpha (library science), 1950 Alpha Chi Sigma (chemistry), 1902 Alpha Delta Theta (medical technology), 1944 Alpha Epsilon Rho (broadcasting), 1941 Alpha Eta Rho (aviation), 1929 Alpha Tau Delta (nursing), 1921 Alpha Kappa Psi (business and commerce), 1904 Alpha Kappa Kappa (medicine), 1888 Alpha Omega (dentistry), 1901 Alpha Psi (veterinary medicine), 1907 Alpha Rho Chi (architecture), 1914 Alpha Tau Alpha (agricultural education), 1921

135


Alpha Zeta (agriculture), 1897 Alpha Zeta Omega (pharmacy), 1919 Beta Alpha Psi (accounting), 1919 Delta Kappa Phi (textiles), 1899 Delta Omicron (music), 1909 Delta Pi Epsilon (business education), 1936 Delta Psi Kappa (physical education), 1916 Delta Sigma Delta (dentistry), 1882 Delta Sigma Pi (commerce and business administration), 1907 Delta Sigma Theta (pharmacy), 1914 Delta Theta Phi (law), 1913 Gamma Eta Gamma (law), 1901 Gamma Iota Sigma (insurance), 1965 Kappa Alpha Mu (photojournalism), 1944 Kappa Beta Pi (law), 1908 Kappa Delta Epsilon (education), 1933 Kappa Delta Phi (education), 1900 Kappa Epsilon (pharmacy), 1921 Kappa Kappa Psi (band), 1919 Kappa Phi Kappa (education), 1922 Kappa Pi Sigma (commerce and business administration), 1945 Kappa Psi (pharmacy), 1879 Keramos (ceramic engineering), 1902 Lambda Kappa Sigma (pharmacy), 1913 Mu Phi Epsilon (music), 1903Nu Beta Epsilon (law), 1940 Omega Epsilon Phi (optometry), 1919 Omega Tau Sigma (veterinary medicine), 1906 Phi Alpha Delta (law), 1902 Phi Alpha Tau (forensic arts), 1902 Phi Beta (music and speech), 1912 Phi Beta Gamma (law), 1922 Phi Beta Pi & Theta Kappa Psi (medicine), 1891 & 1879 Phi Chi (medicine), 1889 Phi Chi Theta (business administration and economics), 1924 Phi Delta Chi (pharmacy), 1883 Phi Delta Phi (law), 1869 Phi Epsilon Kappa (physical education), 1913 Phi Gamma Nu (business and economics), 1924 Phi Mu Alpha-Sinfonia (music), 1898 Phi Psi (textile arts), 1903 Phi Rho Sigma (medicine), 1890 Phi Sigma Pi (education), 1916 Phi Upsilon Omicron (home economics), 1909 Pi Lambda Theta (education), 1917 Psi Omega (dentistry), 1892

136


Appendices

Rho Pi Phi (pharmacy), 1919 Scarab (architecture), 1909 Sigma Alpha Iota (music), 1903 Sigma Delta Chi (journalism), 1909 Sigma Delta Kappa (law), 1914 Sigma Nu Phi (law), 1903 Sigma Phi Delta (engineering), 1924 Tau Beta Sigma (band), 1939 Tau Epsilon Rho (law), 1921 Theta Tau (engineering), 1904 Women in Communications, 1909 Xi Psi Phi (dentistry), 1889 Zeta Phi Eta (communication arts & Sciences), 1893

Osteopathic Organizations Atlas, 1898 Delta Omega, 1904 Iota Tau Sigma, 1902 Lambda Omicron Gamma, 1924 Phi Sigma Gamma, 1915 Psi Sigma Alpha, 1924 Sigma Sigma Phi, 1921 Theta Psi, 1921

National Honor Societies An honor society is an association of primarily collegiate members and chapters whose purposes are to encourage and recognize superior scholarship and/or leadership achievement either in broad fields of education or in departmental specialties at either undergraduate or graduate levels. Membership is conferred solely on specified eligibility, usually in the middle of the junior year (except a few societies for underclassmen), and usually irrespective of the individual’s membership or affiliation with other Greek-letter groups. Alpha Chi (general scholarship), 1922 Alpha Delta Mu (social work), 1976 Alpha Epsilon (agricultural engineering), 1959 Alpha Epsilon Delta (pre-medicine), 1926 Alpha Kappa Delta (sociology), 1920 Alpha Kappa Mu (all academic fields), 1937 Alpha Lambda Delta (freshman scholarship), 1924 Alpha Omega Alpha (medicine), 1902 Alpha Phi Sigma (Criminal justice), 1941

137


Alpha Pi Mu (industrial engineering), 1949 Alpha Sigma Mu (metallurgy & materials engineering), 1932 Alpha Sigma Nu (general scholarship), 1915 Beta Alpha Psi (accounting), 1919 Beta Gamma Sigma (commerce), 1913 Beta Kappa Chi (natural sciences & mathematics), 1923 Beta Phi Mu (library science), 1948 Chi Epsilon (civil engineering), 1922 Delta Epsilon Sigma (general scholarship), 1939 Delta Mu Delta (business administration), 1913 Delta Phi Delta (art), 1909 Delta Sigma Rho/Tau Kappa Alpha (forensics), 1963 Eta Kappa Nu (electrical engineering), 1904 Gamma Sigma Alpha (Greek academic), 1989 Gamma Sigma Delta (agriculture), 1905 Gamma Theta Upsilon (geography), 1928 Iota Sigma Pi (chemistry), 1900 Kappa Delta Pi (education), 1911 Kappa Gamma Pi (leadership), 1926 Kappa Mu Epsilon (mathematics), 1931 Kappa Omicron Phi (home economics), 1922 Kappa Tau Alpha (journalism), 1910 Lambda Iota Tau (lecture), 1953 Lambda Sigma Society (sophomore leadership/scholarship), 1922 Mortar Board (student leadership), 1918 National Collegiate Players (drama), 1922 Omega Chi Epsilon (chemical engineering), 1931 Omega Rho (operation research & management sciences), 1976 Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics), 1963 Omicron Delta Kappa (student leadership), 1914 Omicron Kappa Upsilon (dentistry), 1914 Omicron Nu (home economics), 1912 Order of Coif (law), 1902 Phi Alpha Theta (history), 1921 Phi Beta Kappa (scholarship), 1776 Phi Eta Sigma (freshman scholarship), 1923 Phi Kappa Phi (all academic fields), 1897 Phi Sigma (biological science), 1915 Phi Sigma Iota (foreign languages), 1922 Phi Sigma Tau (philosophy), 1930 Phi Upsilon Omicron (home economics), 1909 Pi Alpha Alpha (public administration), 1974 Pi Delta Phi (French), 1906 Pi Gamma Mu (social science), 1924 Pi Kappa Lambda (music), 1918

138


Appendices

Pi Mu Epsilon (mathematics), 1944 Pi Omega Pi (business teacher education), 1923 Pi Sigma Alpha (political science), 1920 Pi Tau Sigma (mechanical engineering), 1915 Psi Chi (psychology), 1929 Rho Chi (pharmacy), 1922 Sigma Delta Pi (Spanish), 1919 Sigma Epsilon Sigma (scholarship), 1927 Sigma Gamma Epsilon (earth sciences), 1915 Sigma Gamma Tau (aerospace engineering), 1953 Sigma Lambda Alpha (landscape architecture), 1977 Sigma Pi Sigma (physics), 1921 Sigma Tau Delta (English), 1922 Sigma Theta Tau (nursing), 1922 Sigma Xi (scientific research), 1886 Tau Beta Pi (engineering), 1885 Tau Sigma Delta (architecture & allied arts), 1913 Theta Alpha Kappa (religious studies — theology), 1976 Xi Sigma Pi (forestry), 1908

National Recognition and Service Societies A recognition or service society is an organization that confers membership in recognition of a student’s evidenced interest and participation in a specific field of collegiate, professional, or vocational study or activity with more liberal membership requirements than are prescribed for honor socie­ties. Alpha Phi Omega (service), 1925 Alpha Phi Sigma (scholarship), 1930 Alpha Psi Omega (drama), 1925 Angel Flight (Air Force), 1957 Arnold Air Society (Air Force), 1947 Beta Beta Beta (biology), 1922 Blue Key (student activities), 1924 Cardinal Key (activities), 1932 Chi Beta Phi (science), 1916 Chi Delta Phi (literature), 1919 Delta Phi Alpha (German), 1929 Delta Tau Kappa (social science), 1961 Eta Mu Pi (retailing), 1922 Eta Sigma Phi (classics), 1914

139


Gamma Alpha (graduate science), 1899 Gamma Sigma Epsilon (chemistry), 1919 Intercollegiate Knights (service), 1919 Iota Lambda Sigma (industrial education), 1925 Iota Tau Tau (law), 1925 Kappa Eta Kappa (electrical engineering), 1923 Kappa Pi (art), 1911 Lambda Delta Lambda (physical science), 1925 Lambda Tau (medical technology), 1942 Mu Beta Psi (music), 1925 National Block & Bridle (animal husbandry), 1919 The National Spurs (service), 1922 Phi Delta Gamma (graduate), 1923 Phi Lambda Upsilon (chemistry), 1899 Phi Zeta (veterinary medicine), 1925 Pi Alpha Xi (floriculture), 1923 Pi Kappa Delta (forensics), 1913 Pi Sigma Epsilon (marketing & sales management), 1951 Rho Epsilon (real estate), 1947 Scabbard & Blade (military), 1904 Sigma Delta Epsilon (graduate science), 1921 Sigma Delta Psi (athletics), 1912 Sigma Iota Epsilon (management), 1927 Sigma Mu Sigma (general), 1921 Sigma Phi Alpha (dental hygiene), 1958 Sigma Zeta (science & mathematics), 1925 Society for Collegiate Journalists (D. Delta Epsilon-Alpha Phi Gamma), 1975 (merger) Theta Alpha Phi (dramatics), 1919

140


Appendices

The Greeks Have a Word for It Active — a person who has been initiated into a lifelong membership in a Greek organization. Traditionally, it has designated a member who is currently an undergraduate. How­ever, it is preferable to use the terms “undergraduate member” or “student member” for those still in school. Alumna — a sorority member who is a non-student. Plural: Alumnae. Alumnus — a fraternity member who is a non-student. Plural: Alumni. Alumni Association — an organization of Greek alumni from an individual fraternity or sorority. It may be chapterrelated or represent a geographical area. Delta Chi has alumni chapters in place of “associations.” Alumni Board of Trustees — a committee or group of alumni sharing chapter advising responsibilities, usually with each alumnus assigned to a specific area of chapter operations (such as finances). Associate Member — a person who has accepted the bid of a Greek organization, received the associate member pin, and is engaged in preparing for initiation, but who has not yet been initiated into full membership. Badge — the symbol worn by the initiated member of a Greek organization. Bid — an invitation to a prospective member to join a Greek organization. Brother — an initiated member of a fraternity. It is used as a term of address when an initiated member refers to another member. Chapter — an individual, chartered campus member unit of a Greek organization. Some groups also use this term for its alumni membership units. Chapter Advisor — an alumnus who establishes and maintains a close advisory relationship with a chapter and serves as a teacher, counselor, and friend. Colony — a student organization in the final stage prior to being installed as a chartered chapter of a Greek organization. Community Service — a program of projects conducted by a Greek organization, benefiting persons or groups on the campus and/or in the community.

“Active” should not be used as a noun. All Fraternity members are expected to be active members.

“Associate Member,” not “pledge.”

141


Dry Recruitment — The practice of holding recruitment events without the presence of alcohol, regardless of ones legal ability to consume alcholic beverages. Faculty Advisor — a member of the faculty or administration who establishes and maintains a close advisory relationship with a chapter and its scholarship program. The Faculty Advisor is not necessarily an initiate of the particular Greek organization. Faculty Initiate — a member of the faculty or governing board of a college or university who is initiated into full membership, as is possible by some fraternities, including Delta Chi. FIPG, Inc. —A risk management association, whose purpose is to promote risk management for the North American fraternity and sorority movement. As adopted, the FIPG Policy is a piece of the Delta Chi Risk Managent policy. The risk management policy of FIPG, Inc. can be found on pages 165-168. Formal Recruitment — the major recruitment period of the year with specific scheduled events. This most concentrated period for selecting associate members is sometimes known as “Rush Week.” Fraternity — an individual men’s Greek organization, especially a general college fraternity (as distinguished from an honor, professional or recognition fraternity or society) and the term applied to all Greek organizations. Some sororities are identified as a fraternity in their official name; others describe themselves as being a “women’s fraternity.” FRMT, Ltd. – A consortium of 33 men’s fraternities whose purpose is to provide low cost liability insurance coverage for its members through superior risk management education and practices. Delta Chi is a Founding member. Hazing — any willful act or practice by a member or associate member, directed against a member or associate member, that, with or without intent, is likely to: cause bodily harm or danger, offensive punishment, or disturbing pain, compromise the person’s dignity; cause embarrassment or shame; cause the person to be the object of malicious amusement or ridicule; cause psychological harm or substantial emotional strain; and impair academic efforts. In addition, hazing is any requirement by a member or associate member that compels a member or associate member to participate in any activity that is illegal, is contrary to a member’s or associate member’s moral or religious beliefs, or is contrary to the rules and regulations

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Appendices

of the fraternity, institution of learning, and civil authorities. Hazing is any of the above described actions or situations on or off fraternity or campus premises. Hazing in any and all forms is prohibited by Delta Chi. House — a chapter’s physical facility that serves as its home. House Corporation — a legal entity holding title to any real property (land and buildings) for a chapter’s living/meeting purposes. This alumni body has basic responsibilities relative to property ownership, maintenance, and management. Inactive Member — a member attending the same institution in which his undergraduate chapter is located shall not become inactive except upon the recommendation of his undergraduate chapter and the approval of the Alumni Board of Trustees of his chapter. An inactive member shall have no material participation in undergraduate chapter activities, including, but not limited to, social activities, living in the chapter house, and voting at undergraduate chapter meetings. Informal Recruitment — a year-round (or extended period) of continuous, open recruitment with no specific, scheduled, system-wide activities of recruiting and pledging. Bids may be extended and accepted at any time. This is also known as “Open Rush.” In-House Advisor — a “housemother,” “housefather,” house director, or any other person serving a chapter as its live-in advisor. Initiation — a ritualistic ceremony in which an associate member becomes an initiate: a full, lifelong member of a Greek organization. Please note that a member is “initiated” as opposed to being “activated.” Interest Group — an individual campus membership unit in the first stage of the process leading to installation as a chapter of a Greek organization. Legacy — a male relation in your family (i.e., son, grandson, nephew, father, grandfather, etc.). Little Sisters — a woman’s auxiliary of some chapters that are prohibited by most national fraternities. Local Fraternity — a Greek-letter group that exists on a cam­pus but that has no affiliation with a national Greek organization.

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Open House — a time free of specific, scheduled activities when a rush guest can visit any Greek organization chapter. An “Open House“ is also achapter’s reception or similar event to honor a person, celebrate a milestone, etc. Open Party — Meaning those with unrestricted access by non-members of the fraternity, without specific invitation, where alcohol is present. All social events, either on or off fraternity premises, require a guest list and those not on the guest list are not permitted to attend. Open Recruitment — see Informal Recruitment. Pinning — the practice of a fraternity member giving his member’s badge to a woman. Preferential Bidding — a system used (primarily by sororities) to conclude rush with the organizations and rush guests indicating their choices, following which there is a procedure for an individual’s ultimate association with one organization. Risk Management — The indentification, analysis, assessment, control, and avoidance, minimization, or elimination of unacceptable risks. “Potential New Member” (PNM) — a non-member who is eligible to participate in the recruitment program,

visiting Greek organizations with an interest in possibly affiliating with one organization. Sister — an initiated member of a sorority.

Sorority — an individual women’s Greek organization. This is the term commonly used to distinguish between men’s (fraternities) and women’s (sororities) organizations. As noted previously, some sororities are identified as a fraternity in their official name.

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Convention Sites 1894 1st 1896 2nd 1897 3rd 1898 4th 1899 5th 1900 6th 1901 7th 1902 8th 1903 9th 1904 10th 1905 11th 1906 12th 1907 13th 1908 14th 1909 15th 1910 16th 1911 17th 1913 18th 1915 19th 1919 20th 1921 21st 1923 22nd 1925 23rd 1927 24th 1929 25th 1931 26th 1933 1935 27th 1937 1940 28th 1952 29th 1954 30th 1956 31st 1958 32nd 1960 33rd 1962 34th 1964 35th 1966 36th 1968 37th 1970 38th 1973 39th 1975 40th

Ann Arbor, Michigan 1977 New York, New York 1979 Ithaca, New York 1981 Chicago, Illinois 1983 Carlisle, Pennsylvania 1985 New York, New York 1987 Buffalo, New York 1990 Chicago, Illinois 1992 New York, New York 1994 Ithaca, New York 1996 Toronto, Ontario, Canada 1998 Ann Arbor, Michigan 2000 Washington, D.C. 2002 Syracuse, New York 2004 Ithaca, New York 2006 Columbus, Ohio 2008 Chicago, Illinois 2010 Toronto, Ontario, Canada 2012 San Francisco, California 2014 —World War I— 2016 Minneapolis, Minnesota 2018 Columbus, Ohio 2020 Evergreen, Colorado Glacier National Park, Montana Lake of Bays, Canada Estes Park, Colorado West Baden, Indiana Convention not held Yellowstone National Park Convention not held Ithaca, New York —World War II— French Lick, Indiana Biloxi, Mississippi East Lansing, Michigan Lake Texoma (Near Durant, Oklahoma) Indianapolis, Indiana Colorado Springs, Colorado New Orleans, Louisiana St. Louis, Missouri Chicago, Illinois Dallas, Texas New Orleans, Louisiana Chicago, Illinois

41st 42nd 43rd 44th 45th 46th 47th 48th 49th 50th 51st 52nd 53rd 54th 55th 56th 57th 58th 59th 60th 61st 62nd

Kansas City, Missouri Iowa City, Iowa Indianapolis, Indiana Nashville, Tennessee Chicago, Illinois New Orleans, Louisiana Syracuse, New York Irvine, California Atlanta, Georgia Dallas, Texas Saint Louis, Missouri Phoenix, Arizona Orlando, Florida Washington, D.C. Cleveland, Ohio Las Vegas, Nevada New Orleans, Louisiana Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Scottsdale, Arizona Louisville, Kentucky Denver, Colorado St. Louis, Missouri

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Words by MAUDE ELAINE CALDWELL

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Male Quartet Arrangement Melody in Second Tenor

The Bond Of Delta Chi


The Bond Song (continued) VERSE II Each year, each hour has seen her greater, So ever more may she increase; Confusion fall on them that hate her, And on her lovers be all peace. The strength and glory of our nation, The holiest trust beneath the sky, The fairest hope of all creation, Rests safe with thee, O Delta Chi VERSE III O raise on high the brimming glasses, And toast the colors we hold dear, The tints that when the summer passes, Proclaim the harvest of the year. All hail our emblem true and knightly, In homage with each other vie, Then pledge the stars that shine most brightly, The loyal girls of Delta Chi. VERSE IV Now fill once more the glasses fellows, And strongly grasp each other’s hands. O yield you when the moment mellows, And closely knit fraternal bands. So heart to heart, Now and forever, With faith and fervor pledge the tie, That naught in heav’n or earth can sever, The holy bond of Delta Chi. CENTENNIAL VERSE* Words by Marian Hammert, wife of Fredrick Hammert, OK ’60, past “AA” and OWC As joyously we raise our glasses, To toast our founding at Cornell. We forever will remember, Our bothers in the Bond to tell. The century of our proud traditions, That we’ll hold dear until we die. And ever promised to be loyal To thee, our glorious Delta Chi!   *adopted by the Board of Regents at its July 24, 1988 meeting

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    Words by P.S. JOHNSON ‘91   Cornell Chapter Tune: “ANNIE LISLE”

Fovens Mater

P.S. Johnson, Cornell, ‘91 — one of the founders.

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Vive La Delta Chi Tune: Vive L’amour Old Student Song

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Vive La Delta Chi (continued)

There Are No Delta Chis In Hell

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There Are No Delta Chis In Hell (continued)

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There Are No Delta Chis In Hell (continued) VERSE II

There was Charlemagne, and Cicero and Frederick the Great. Napoleon was booted out because he didn’t rate We were famous then we’re famous now as you can plainly see, Cause the Better Guys are Delta Chis wherever they may be. There’s the Delts, Delta Upsilons and Sigma Nus But there are no Delta Chis in Hell.

VERSE III

Methuselah was a Delta Chi who lived to be quite old. Don Juan was a Delta Chi, with women he was bold. and Venus vamped Adonis to wear the Delta Chi pin and Napoleon fell down on his knees and begged to be let in. There are no Delta Chis in Hell boys. There are no Delta Chis in Hell! There are Pi Kappa Phis and Beta Theta Pis But there are no Delta Chis in Hell     Like Hell!

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Delta Chi Sweetheart (continued)

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Delta Chi Sweetheart (continued)

The Delta Chi Whistle At the fifteenth Annual Convention of the Fraternity, the Delta Chi whistle was reaffirmed and the editor of the Quarterly was instructed to print the whistle in the May 1999 issue.

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Delta Chi Glorious

Words and Music by G.B. ARNOLD, M.D. ‘17-’27 Kansas Chapter

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Delta Chi Glorious (continued)

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Delta Chi Glorious (continued)

MARCHING SONG Lyrics by R. HEMANS ‘21, Chicago Chapter W. HOUSTON ‘20, O.S.U. Chapter

INTRO. 3

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Tune: MADELON


Chapter Marching Song (continued)

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Chapter Marching Song (continued)

Delta Chi Dad

Tune: “THERE IS A TAVERN IN THE TOWN”

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The Sons of Delta Chi Words by JOHN  J. KUHN

* Obtained locally.

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Recommended Officer Notebooks “A” Chapter Management Brief “B” Chapter Management Brief “C” “C” Manual “C” Reference Sheet “D” Financial Management BRIEF “D” Reference Sheet Tax Guidelines “E” Alumni Relations BRIEF Alumni Newsletter BRIEF Public Relations BRIEF Quarterly Reference Sheet “F” FIPG Risk Management Policy Risk Management Manual Crisis Management BRIEF Recruitment Chairman Recruitment BRIEF Building Better Brotherhood Associate Member Counselor Big Brother BRIEF New Membership Education BRIEF Pre-Initiation BRIEF Social Chairman Building Better Brotherhood FIPG Risk Management Policy Executive Committee   Members (other than “A”, “B”, and “BB”) Optional: Chapter Management Brief

“BB” Chapter Management Brief Faculty Advisor Scholarship BRIEF Public Relations BRIEF Optional: Chapter Management Brief ABT MEMBERS: President ABT By-laws* Chapter Management Brief Financial Management Advisor ABT By-laws* ABT BRIEF Financial Management BRIEF “D” Reference Sheet Tax Guidelines Membership Education Advisor ABT By-Laws* ABT BRIEF New Membership Education BRIEF Pre-Initiation BRIEF Big Brother BRIEF Recruitment Advisor ABT By-laws* ABT BRIEF Recruitment BRIEF Founder’s Day Manual Alumni Relations Advisor ABT By-laws* ABT BRIEF Public Relations BRIEF Alumni Relations BRIEF Alumni Newsletter BRIEF Public Relations BRIEF Founders’ Day Manual

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Danger Signs of Overconsumption and Alcohol Poisoning Responsible consumption of alcohol is the BEST step! • • • • • •

You are concerned someone has consumed too much alcohol Unconsciousness, semi consciousness or confusion Breathing less than 10 times per minute Cold, clammy, pale or bluish skin Cannot be awakened by pinching, prodding or shouting Vomiting without waking up

Appropriate Action if ANY Danger Sign is present.:   1. Immediately call 911. Be safe rather than sorry. They cannot afford you being wrong!! 2a. IF they are not breathing: Clear their airway and administer CPR until they are breathing on their own or qualified help arrives. 2b. IF they are breathing: Gently roll them onto their side and keep them there until qualified help arrives.   3. NEVER leave the person alone! Alcohol consumption by anyone under the age of 21 is illegal.

The information printed on this page is for informational purposes only and is not intended to be, nor should it be considered to be, medical advice. You should always rely on the advice of trained medical personnel.

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DELTA CHI RISK MANAGEMENT POLICY Reviewed and Reaffirmed January 2019 The Risk Management Policy of the Delta Chi Fraternity includes the provisions that follow and shall apply to all Fraternity entities and all levels of Fraternity membership. ALCOHOL AND DRUGS  1. The presence, consumption and use of any alcohol product containing more than 15% alcohol by volume (ABV) is prohibited at any chapter facility or chapter event, except when served by a licensed and insured third party vendor. The presence, possession or consumption of an alcohol product below 15% ABV at a chapter facility or chapter event shall be in compliance with all of the provisions of this Policy and all applicable laws of the state, province, county, city and institution of higher learning.  2. No alcoholic beverages shall be purchased through or with chapter funds nor shall the purchase of same for members or guests be undertaken or coordinated by any member in the name of or on behalf of the chapter. The purchase or use of a bulk quantity or common source(s) of alcoholic beverage, for example, kegs or cases, is prohibited  3. SOCIAL EVENTS, meaning those with unrestricted access by non-members of the fraternity, without specific invitation, where alcohol is present, are prohibited. Any event with alcohol present that can be associated with the fraternity requires a guest list prepared 24 (twenty four) hours in advance of the event submitted to the Chapter “F” and Social Chairman, and must comply with either the Bring Your Own beverage (BYOB) or Third Party Vendor Guidelines as set forth in the Social Event Planning Guide.  4. No members, collectively or individually, shall purchase for, serve to, or sell alcoholic beverages to any minor (i.e., those under legal “drinking age”).  5. The possession, sale or use of any ILLEGAL DRUGS or CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES while on chapter premises or during a fraternity event or at any event that an observer would associate with the fraternity is strictly prohibited.  6. No chapter may co-sponsor an event with an alcohol distributor or tavern (tavern defined as an establishment generating more man half of annual gross sales from alcohol) at which alcohol is given away, sold or otherwise provided to those present. This includes any event held in, at or on the property of a tavern as defined above for purposes of fundraising. However, a chapter may rent or use a room or area in a tavern as defined above for a closed event held within the provisions of this policy, including the use of a third party vendor and guest list. An event at which alcohol is present may be conducted or co-sponsored with a charitable organization if the event is held within the provisions of this policy.  7. No chapter may co-sponsor, co-finance or attend or participate in a function at which alcohol is purchased by any of the host chapters, groups or organizations.  8. All recruitment or rush activities associated with any chapter will be non-alcoholic. No recruitment or rush activities associated with any chapter may be held at or in conjunction with a tavern or alcohol distributor as defined in this policy.  

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9. No member or pledge, associate/new member or novice shall permit, tolerate, encourage or participate in “drinking games.” The definition of drinking games includes but is not limited to the consumption of shots of alcohol, liquor or alcoholic beverages, the practice of consuming shots equating to one’s age, “beer pong,” “century club,” “dares” or any other activity involving the consumption of alcohol which involves duress or encouragement related to the consumption of alcohol. 10. No alcohol shall be present at any pledge/associate member/new member/novice program, activity or ritual of the chapter. This includes but is not limited to activities associated with “bid night,” “big brother—little brother” events or activities, / “big sister—little sister” events or activities, “family” events or activities and initiation.

HAZING No chapter, colony, member, Associate Member, or alumnus shall conduct nor condone hazing activities. Permission or approval by a person being hazed is not a defense. Hazing activities are defined as: “Any action taken or situation created, intentionally, whether on or off fraternity premises, to produce mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule. Such activities may include but are not limited to the following: use of alcohol, paddling in any form, creation of excessive fatigue, physical and psychological shocks, quests, treasure hunts, scavenger hunts, road trips or any other such activities carried on outside or inside of the confines of the chapter house; wearing of public apparel which is conspicuous and not normally in good taste, engaging in public stunts and buffoonery, morally degrading or humiliating games and activities and any other activities which are not consistent with academic achievement, fraternal law, ritual or policy or the regulations and policies of the educational institution or applicable state law.”

SEXUAL ABUSE AND HARASSMENT 1. The Delta Chi Fraternity does not tolerate or condone sexual harassment, stalking, domestic violence, dating violence, or sexual assault, or sexual violence as defined by Delta Chi Law. This is to include any actions, activities or events, whether on chapter premises or an off-site location which are demeaning to women or men, including but not limited to verbal harassment, sexual assault by individuals or members acting together. 2. The employment or use of strippers, exotic dancers or similar, whether professional or amateur, at a fraternity event as defined in this policy shall not be allowed.

FIRE, HEALTH AND SAFETY 1. All chapter houses should meet all local fire and health codes and standards.

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2. All chapters should post by common phones and in other locations emergency numbers for fire, police and ambulance and should have posted evacuation routes on the back of the door of each sleeping room. 3. All chapters should comply with engineering recommendations as reported by the insurance company or municipal authorities. 4. The possession and/or use of firearms or explosive or incendiary devices of any kind within the confines and premises of the chapter house is prohibited. 5. Candles should not be used in chapter houses or individual rooms except under controlled circumstances such as initiation. 6. No swimming pools, hot tubs, slip and slides or other similar water related activities shall be installed or used at any chapter facility or chapter sponsored event, except that a swimming pool or hot tub that exists at a chapter facility prior to August 1, 2018 may continue to be used. GAMBLING Gambling or games of chance in any form whatsoever shall not be permitted in any chapter facility or at any chapter event except as permitted by all applicable laws of the state, province, county, city and institution of higher education.

EDUCATION Each chapter and colony shall annually instruct its students and alumni/alumnae in its risk management policies and practices both of the Fraternity and higher education institution. The undergraduates and key volunteers will receive on an annual basis a copy of the organization risk management policy and that a copy of the policy be posted on the organization website.

THIRD PARTY VENDOR CRITERIA THE VENDOR MUST: 1. Be properly licensed by the appropriate local and state authority. This may involve both a liquor license and a temporary license to sell on the premises where the function is to be held. 2. Be properly insured with a minimum of $1,000,000 of general liability insurance, evidenced by a properly completed certificate of insurance prepared by the insurance provided.   The certificate of insurance must also show evidence that the vendor has, as a part of his/her insurance coverage, “off premises liquor liability coverage and non-owned and hired auto coverage.”   Named insureds included on the certificate of insurance must as a minimum include the local chapter hiring the vendor as well as the international fraternity that the local chapter is affiliated with.

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3. Agree in writing to cash sales only, collected by the vendor during the function. 4. Assume in writing all the responsibilities that any other purveyor of alcoholic beverages would assume in the normal course of business, including but not limited to: a. Checking identification cards upon entry; b. Not serving minors; c. Not serving individuals that appear to be intoxicated; d. Maintaining absolute control of ALL alcoholic containers present; e. Collecting all remaining alcohol at the end of a function (no excess alcohol—opened or unopened—is to be given, sold or furnished to the chapter). f. Removing all alcohol from the premises.

GOOD SAMARITAN POLICY 1. INDIVIDUAL: If a member assists another person in obtaining immediate and appropriate medical care related to the use or consumption of alcohol, drugs, or to another medical emergency, then that member, as well as those who are assisted, will not be subject to individual disciplinary action by the Fraternity with respect to the incident. This is the case even if the member who is assisting was a contributing factor to the emergency, so long as the member did not intentionally cause any physical injury. To be eligible for the benefit of this policy the member must fully and truthfully cooperate with any Fraternity investigation regarding the incident. An individual may benefit from this policy more than once, though repeated use of the policy may receive stricter scrutiny. 2. CHAPTER/COLONY: A chapter that seeks immediate and appropriate medical assistance for a person in need related to the use or consumption of alcohol, drugs, or to another medical emergency, may be eligible for mitigation of the level of corrective action imposed for violations of Delta Chi law and this Risk Management Policy. To be eligible for this potential mitigation, the chapter and its leadership must fully and truthfully cooperate with any Fraternity investigation regarding the incident. A chapter may benefit from this policy more than once, though repeated use of the policy may receive stricter scrutiny.

POLICY GUIDELINES  1. At chapter social events, signs should be posted that indicate the chapter complies with and enforces the laws and policies with respect to alcohol, illegal drugs, and controlled substances.  2. All persons present should not be allowed access to alcohol if they are intoxicated, regardless of age.  3. Alcohol should only be used as an adjunct to the event rather than its focus.

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4. The use of alcohol on the premises should be stopped at least one hour before the end of the function.  5. Plenty of non-salty foods and non-alcoholic alternative beverages should be provided. 6. Adequate professional security should be provided to deal with uninvited guests and monitor any other potential problems.  7. Trained party monitors should be present to respond to situations. A ratio of one party monitor for every 20 attendees is suggested. Party monitors should agree to the following: a. Not to consume alcohol, and remain sober for the duration of the event. b. Make sure the party starts and ends on time and that the bar opens and closes on time. c. Wear distinctive clothing to identify themselves at all times.  8. Buses, taxis, phone numbers, etc. should be provided for any event to promote the safe return of members and guests.  9. “Hard” liquor (alcohol rated by proof rather than percentage) should be prohibited from all parties. For “bring your own” parties, a six pack of beer (or the alcoholic equivalent), or less, per person is allowed. 10. Glass bottles of any sort should not be allowed. Restrict consumption of any beverages to cans and plastic cups.

“The fraternity is a living center, established and maintained from generation to generation by men who choose each other’s companionship and pledge themselves to help each other in the achievement of a wellrounded development. When fraternities live up to this ideal they render an immeasurable service to young men and supplement in valuable ways the formal education of the classroom and laboratory. The fraternity becomes, in effect, a laboratory of social living.” —Edmund Ezra Day

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Profile for Delta Chi Fraternity

Delta Chi Cornerstone 2019, 23rd Edition  

Delta Chi Cornerstone 2019, 23rd Edition