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Del Mar College Popular Annual Financial Report

2011-2012

Del Mar College Foundation Annual Report


On the cover: Designed by Richter Architects, the College began construction on a $10.4 million Fine Arts Complex addition to expand instructional and performance space by 18,000 square feet for drama, audio engineering, dance and art. WKMC Architects provided coordinating architectural services for the College.


1

Message from President Escamilla Del Mar College Board of Regents 2011-2012 Trey McCampbell Chair Elva Estrada Vice Chair Minerva P. Arriaga Secretary Dr. Nicholas L. Adame Assistant Secretary James B. (Jim) Boggs Parliamentarian James Matthew Duerr Regent Susan E. Hutchinson Regent Gabriel Rivas III Regent Guy Leland Watts Regent

March 2013

Del Mar Colleges enhanced its relevance across the national and global arena while maintaining a local focus for the 2011-2012 academic year. Several faculty members achieved state and national recognition for publishing seminal works in history, cultural and children’s literature, mathematics and health science. Instructional programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology, Radiologic Technology and General Education Development received renewed accreditation or achieved 100% pass rates for student certification. The College began construction on a $10.4 million addition to our Fine Arts Complex to house the Sue Sellors Finley Theatre and a major expansion for our Drama program. In the Occupational and Technical area, we accepted two U. S. Navy training aircraft for our Aviation Maintenance program. We opened a Veterans Center on the West Campus to expand services for our military students and families. The Del Mar College Foundation met its largest fund raising challenge to date, raising over $2.6 million for student scholarships and program enhancements. I sincerely appreciate Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Bouligny for believing in Del Mar College and investing in our students. For the first time in the College’s history, this publication incorporates the achievements of the DMC Development, Foundation and Alumni operations in order to give you a comprehensive view of the impact the College has on our students, our community and beyond. I invite you to review other highlights and financial data in this publication. If you have any questions, please contact me.

Mark Escamilla, Ph.D. President mescamilla@delmar.edu (361) 698-1203


2

Del Mar College 2009-2014 Goals and Objectives Highlights from the College’s 2011-2012 Academic Year, presented in this Popular Annual Financial Report to the Board of Regents, reference the specific goals and objectives stated in the Access to Excellence, Del Mar College Strategic Plan 2009-2014.

Goal 2: Operational Resources • Objective 2.1 Budget: Assure fiscal responsibility connected to the planning process

Goal 1: Student Success

• Objective 2.2 Facilities: Integrate facility-wide planning process

• Objective 1.1 Quality: Maximize student learning

• Objective 2.3 Technology: Expand webbased functions and activities

• Objective 1.2 Access: Enhance student access to College

• Objective 2.4 Data Management: Enhance financial and personnel data management

• Objective 1.3 Enrollment Management: Streamline registration, advising, counseling, admissions and financial aid processes

• Objective 2.5 Operations: Coordinate institution-wide planning

• Objective 1.4 Retention: Maximize student retention and re-entry • Objective 1.5 Course Delivery: Enhance the means by which courses are delivered • Objective 1.6 Programs: Provide programs that enhance a student’s ability to progress to higher levels of academic achievement • Objective 1.7 Workforce Development: Provide courses that support those students seeking occupational and career advancement • Objective 1.8 Community Leadership: Advance programs to focus on the development of community leadership • Objective 1.9 Personal Enrichment: Provide courseware to meet the individual needs of a wide range of community interests

• Objective 2.6 Going Green: Assure a proactive stance and constructive programs related to the protection of the environment

Goal 3: Professional Capablities and Procedural Improvements • Objective 3.1 Instruction: Enhance quality of instruction • Objective 3.2 Leadership: Expand leadership skills of all cadres at DMC • Objective 3.3 Performance: Monitor and maximize the performance of all employees • Objective 3.4 Planning: Maximize systemwide planning protocols and resulting intercommunication • Objective 3.5 Personnel: Improve the hiring process to accelerate/enhance recruitment

• Objective 1.10 Services: Improve quality of student support services

• Objective 3.6 Compensation: Review the effectiveness of the compensation process.

• Objective 1.11 Information Management: Enhance the management of student information

• Objective 3.7 Professional Improvement: Assure a high standard of capability of all personnel


3

Del Mar College 2009-2014 Goals and Objectives Goal 4: External Partnerships • Objective 4.1 Educational Institutions: Improve linkages with current and potential allies • Objective 4.2 Government: Enhance interaction with all related government agencies • Objective 4.3 Communities: Reinvigorate regional relationships • Objective 4.4 Workforce: Expand relationships with business/industries/ military leaders • Objective 4.5 Capabilities: Influence the development of advanced skills within community leadership • Objective 4.6 School Relations: Enhance the working relations with area schools

Goal 5: Positioning

Goal 6: Governance

• Objective 5.1 Marketing Plan: Enhance branding and marketing plan

• Objective 6.1 Mission: Review and/or revise College Mission Statement

• Objective 5.2 Student Recruitment: Stimulate the enrollment of new students

• Objective 6.2 Board of Regents: Facilitate Board level information and communication

• Objective 5.3 Communications: Maximize internal/external communication efforts

• Objective 6.3 Foundation: Support the mission of the Del Mar College Foundation

• Objective 5.4 Market Segmentation: Differentiate marketing based on targeted client groups and programs

• Objective 6.4 Alumni: Expand alumni program

• Objective 5.5 Influence: Shift public perception as to the value of education • Objective 5.6 Media: Positively champion the College throughout the media

• Objective 6.5 Resources: Optimize the range of funding sources • Objective 6.6 Policies: Expand, maintain and support policy development for all College operations


4

Highlights for 2011-2012 Academic Year September 2011 • Children’s Book Award-Winner. Adjunct geography instructor Frank N. McMillan III wins the National Association of Elementary School Principals Children’s Book of the Year Award for The Young Healer. Objective 3.7

• Funding the Future. The College receives a $599,635 National Science Foundation grant covering 88 scholarships for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S-STEM) students with the Future Forward Scholarship Program (F2SP). Objective 1.2 • Sneak Peek. College Board of Regents and selected guests tour part of the $10.4 million Fine Arts Center project under construction to expand much needed teaching space for several programs. Objective 2.2

• Master Teacher. Natural Sciences Department Chair Dr. Loyd Poplin receives the 2010 Dr. Aileen Creighton Award for Teaching Excellence during Convocation, the ninth faculty member to receive the prestigious award. Objective 3.3

• National Accolades. The College Relations Office and local advertising firm Morehead, Dotts & Rybak receive notice the College’s “Where you want to go.” television ad campaign won a national Telly Award. Objective 5.1 • Helping Hand. The College Chapter of the Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education awards seven textbook scholarships for the 2011-2012 academic year. Objective 6.5

October 2011 • Graduating Cadets. Intensive training in the Basic Peace Officers Program ends as the College graduates 17 police cadets. Objective 4.3

• Cyber World Security. The Texas Department of Information Services selects Dr. David Abarca, Assistant Professor of Computer Science, to serve on the statewide Cybersecurity, Education and Economic Development Council. Objective 3.7

“I’ve always been interested in my history and the history of Chicano people in the United States, so I figured Mexican-American Studies would give me a chance to better understand my own culture and my own place in society to help provide a better understanding of Mexican-Americans to our country as a whole.” – Marcos Bustamante Mexican-American Studies graduate


5

Highlights for 2011-2012 Academic Year • Veterans Resources. The College opens its new Veterans Services Office on the East Campus to provide services to active military, veterans and family members pursuing higher education. Objective 1.10 • GIS Fast-Tracking. A $2 million grant from the National Information, Security and Geospatial Technology Consortium allows the College to pair with Workforce Solutions of the Coastal Bend to fast-track students into a Geographic Information Systems certificate. Objective 1.7 • STEM Focused. The College receives a five-year $4.34 million Hispanic Serving Institution Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Success Initiative grant to increase first-time in college students majoring in these fields and encourage transferring to four-year institutions. Objective 1.6

• Future Workforce. Del Mar and Coastal Bend Colleges receive a five-year $3.8 million Title V Celebrando Educación Cooperative grant to improve retention and completion rates and increase high school dual credit students’ enrollment in technical and professional occupational programs. Objective 4.6

• High-Tech Touch. Forty College students taking biology and biotechnology courses begin using iPads in the lab to review techniques for soil sample analysis and record research data as part of a two-semester program with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Science Education Alliance program. Objective 2.2

November 2011 • Recording History. Professor Darcy Gohlke and 10 Court Reporting students participate with the Veterans’ History Project for the Library of Congress during the 2011 Coastal Bend Veterans Summit, hosted by U.S. Congressman Blake Farenthold. Objective 4.2 • Acknowledged Author. Dr. Bryan Stone, Department of Social Sciences, receives the Southern Jewish Historical Society’s 2011 Book Prize Award for The Chosen Folks: Jews on the Frontier of Texas. Objective 3.7

I had trouble narrowing down my major to just one. I chose Math, because a lot of people have a fear of it, and I wanted to help them get over that fear. I also chose Kinesiology, because it’s the basics of life. My instructors taught me how to take my life and build something with it. – Rebecca Hill ROTC Alumna , Mathematics and Kinesiology major


6

Highlights for 2011-2012 Academic Year • Science Leads. Biotechnology graduate Tamara Griffiths represents the College in “Advanced Technological Education: Student Voices, Student Leaders,” a video series produced by the American Association of Community Colleges and the National Science Foundation. Objective 3.2 • Accreditation Continues. The Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT) awards the Nuclear Medicine Technology program “continued accreditation” through 2016. Objective 1.1

• Talented Singers. The Texas Music Educators Association names eight Music Department students to the 2012 Texas Two-Year College All-State Choir. Objective 1.6 • Career Focused. Nearly 1,000 students from 20 Coastal Bend high schools attend Career Fest to explore nontraditional careers and employment projections in the region. Objective 4.4

December 2011 • Excellent Teacher. The College selects Business Technology Professor Dolores Huerta for the 20112012 National Institute for Staf and Organizational Development Excellence in Teacher Award. Objective 3.1

• Three Times’ A Charm. Ten Cosmetology Program students achieve a perfect pass rate for the third straight semester on licensure certification exams required by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. Objective 1.7

• Successful Auditions. Auditioning challenging music pieces earns 11 Music Department students a seat with the 2012 Texas Community College Band Directors Association All-State Band. Objective 1.6

My instructors are amazing teachers, they really guide us in the hands-on experience we’ll need to work in refineries. I have an internship in the oil fields and I’m using a lot of these skills from our classes there. – Randi Wing Chemical Laboratory Technology major


7

Highlights for 2011-2012 Academic Year • Moving On Up. Spring 2011 Computer Science graduate Larry Medrano finishes 14th in Round 3 of the international Cisco Academy Netriders

Post-Secondary Competition in networking and information technology skills, competing against over 700 students internationally. Objective 1.8

January 2012 • Master Teacher. Speech Professor Marla Chisholm becomes the 10th faculty member to receive the Dr. Aileen Creighton Award for Teaching Excellence with selection based on her innovative teaching methods and involvement with College and professional activities. Objective 3.3 • Honored Leadership. College President Dr. Mark Escamilla receives the Presidential Award from the H. Boyd Hall Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People during their 42nd Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Freedom Fund Banquet. Objective 4.1 • Oklahoma History. Selected as a finalist for the Oklahoma Book Award, History faculty member Dr. Jim Klein’s Grappling With Demon Rum: The Cultural Struggle Over Liquor in Early Oklahoma (University of Oklahoma Press) is named Oklahoma Historical Society’s “Outstanding Book.” Objective 3.7 • Community Service. Accounting majors with the Business Administration Department offer free tax filing services to low-income community through the Volunteer Tax Assistance program organized by Goodwill Industries. Objective 4.3

• On Board. The Texas Workforce Commission names Mary Afuso, Director of Corporate Services, to the Board of Directors of Workforce Solutions of the Coastal Bend. Objective 4.4

• “Y” Woman. Lenora Keas, Executive Director of Strategic Planning and Assessment, becomes one of eight women the YWCA selects for the “Y Women in Careers” Award. Objective 4.5

February 2012

My father worked in the petroleum industry, and I really wanted to get into it myself. We have really good teachers. They always bring up examples with real-life equipment that you’ll be working with later on. They break it down into a language we can understand. –Keenen LaCour Process Technology major


8

Highlights for 2011-2012 Academic Year • Sweet Rewards. Culinary Arts students and faculty announce the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation Accrediting Commission’s approval of “initial accreditation” for Baking/Pastry Specialty and Culinary Arts degrees. Objective 3.1 • More Resources. The College officially opens the new Anatomy and Physiology Resource Room in the Student Success Center featuring

detailed anatomical models for Human Anatomy and Physiology classes. Objective 1.5

• Flying High. The U.S. Navy hands over two trainers, T-34C Turbomentors, that Aviation Maintenance Technology students will use to prepare for their profession. Objective 4.4 • Engineering Know-How. Ten students with the College’s Science, Engineering and Math Majors Organization earn second and third

place for their windmill designs during Engineering Day hosted by Texas A&M University-Kingsville College of Engineering. Objective 3.1

March 2012 • Mathematics for Nurses. Louie Asuncion, Associate Professor of Health Occupations, publishes a second edition of Math for Healthcare Professions, focused on math skills needed in the medical field. Objective 3.7

• Gold Winner. College Relations Office wins a Gold Award in Institutional Identity for “Del Mar College Celebrates 75 Years” from the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education District IV. Objective 5.3

• Certification Achieved. SBDC Business Counselor James Jones earns designation of Accredited Business Planning Advisor from the Apogee Center, certifying him to assist business owners to develop exit strategies for their businesses as they retire. Objective 4.1

The hardest part of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program was learning how to scan. You can read in the books about it but learning how to scan comes with experience. Even after a year and a half in the program working on patients and scanning ourselves and each other, there’s still a long ways to go. Even so, DMS is a really fun program; I’ve enjoyed every day in it. – Jessica Tobias Diagnostic Medical Sonography major


9

Highlights for 2011-2012 Academic Year • Top Honor. Educational Marketing Group names Claudia Jackson, Executive Director of Community and Legislative Relations, as one of three finalists and only community college marketing professional for the “International Brand Master Award.” Objective 3.3 • Peer Review. Ten Flour Bluff and Moody High School students in the dual credit Emergency Medical Technician program demonstrate their life-saving EMS skills during the Future Health Professionals Conference. Objective 4.6

April 2012 • Welcomed Addition. The College welcomes its first Veterans Center Coordinator Tammy Miller, after 21 years of experience with the U.S. Navy as Educational Service Officer, Veterans Benefits Coordinator and Chief Personnel Specialist. Objective 1.10 • Honors Abound. Marissa Yepez receives “Outstanding Honor Student” designation from among 54 students in College’s Honors Program. Objective 1.8 • New Fame. The College announces Hall of Fame inductees—kinesiology and history major Jaclean Yvette Harris and engineering major Thomas

Lane—during the 61st Recognition Ceremony. Objective 1.8 • Top Teachers. Students elect Instructors of the Year Joseph Dudek, Associate Professor of Airframe Applied Technology, and Maria Bujak Goodman, Mathematics Adjunct Instructor. Objective 3.1

• Good Inspiration. Aviation Maintenance Technology major Joseph Vasquez creates nonprofit “361 Share A Pair” to collect and distribute 70 pairs of shoes to children attending the Navarro Place Head Start Center. Objective 4.5

from 46 colleges and universities. DMC students with Foghorn and Siren publications won 16 awards. Objective 1.1

• TIPA Success. Del Mar College and Texas A&M UniversityKingsville co-host annual Texas Intercollegiate Press Association conference for 485+ students

I am a supervisor at an oil field in Corpus Christi. I was training interns out of the corporate office and I realized that the one advantage that they had over me was a degree. Thanks to the skills I learned at DMC, my company has created a new position for me. If I can do it, anybody can do it: Live your dream. –Ralph Martinez Logistics and Supply Chain Management major


10

Highlights for 2011-2012 Academic Year May 2012 • Getting Noticed. Mariachi Del Mar performs by invitation for the “Celebrating Excellence” reception during the 34th Annual NISOD Conference in Austin. Objective 4.1 • Student Leadership. Student Government Association members attend the 42nd Texas Junior College Student Government Association’s annual conference and serve on the State Committee 2011-2012 Conference. Objective 1.8 • Leadership Club. Student Leadership and Campus Life Director Beverly Cage organizes the College’s newest organization Sigma Alpha Pi Chapter of the National Society of Leadership

and Success, inducting 80 charter members with a mission to “build leaders who make a better world.” Objective 1.6 • Scientific Knowledge. Eleven SUCCESS students (South Texas Undergraduate Curriculum Consortium for Environmental and Biological Science Students) present research during the Texas Society of Microbiology, a first for a community college. Two students won awards. Objective 1.10

June 2012 • Passing Streak. Nuclear Medicine Technology graduates complete their Texas Department of State Health Services certification with a 100% pass rate, marking the fifth straight year to maintain a perfect pass record. Objective 1.6 • Future Engineers. The Society of American Military Engineers awards mechanical engineering majors Jesse Kelton and Robert Stewart $500 scholarships to continue their studies. Objective 4.4

• Exceeding Requirements. The Peer-Tutoring Program in the Student Success Center receives College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA) accreditation with International Tutor Training Program Certification noting the program “exceeded requirements.” Objective 2.3

July 2012 • Safety Honor. The Coastal Bend Chapter of the American Society of Safety Engineers names Sandra Cervantes, adjunct Occupational Safety and Health Technology instructor, as Safety Professional of the Year. Objective 3.3

I did four years of active duty and a 15-month tour in Iraq. When I got back, I decided to enroll in college. DMC has many services. The Writing Center helped out so much. The Veterans Center makes education a priority for you. The ROTC program betters you as a person, not only for the military, but for life. –Martin Garza ROTC Alumnus


11

Highlights for 2011-2012 Academic Year • 100% Success. The General Education Development Program meets all 11 performance measures that determine program funding and certification with 100% compliance. Objective 1.2 • Expanding Northwest. The General Education Development Program begins offering classes at the College’s Northwest Center in Calallen to provide greater access to residents in the surrounding area. Objective 1.4

• Collaboration Is Key. College President Dr. Mark Escamilla presents “Collaboration,” a program on forging alliances for effective leadership during the American Association of Community College’s Leadership Suite: Future Leaders Institute “Aspire to Go Higher.” Objective 4.3

August 2012 • Nursing Chair. Dr. Evangeline DeLeon, RN and Professor of Nurse Education, becomes the new Chair of the College’s Department of Nurse Education. Objective 3.2 • National Influence. The College receives a $777,800 National Science Foundation Advanced Technology Education grant for the South Texas Aviation Maintenance Technician Education Project focused on developing Web-enabled, interactive educational materials and professional development materials. Objective 2.3

• New State Director. The Texas Restaurant Association Educational Foundation elects Lisa Pollakis, Assistant Professor of Restaurant Management, to their Board of Directors, which administers the Texas ProStart Program for high school students preparing for careers in the restaurant industry. Objective 3.2

• 100% Pass Rate. The Radiologic Technology Class of 2012, 17 students, achieves a 100% pass rate on the national certification exam administered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Objective 1.1 • Giving Back. Thirteen Culinary Arts students donate their final projects—a variety of 50 different artisan breads—to Metro Ministries with CEO and Executive Director Patty Clark accepting the baked gifts. Objective 4.1

I was born with a profound hearing impairment. I’ve always loved food and cooking while growing up. Since coming to school, I’ve discovered a talent not only for culinary, but pastry as well, so I’m a double major. I couldn’t have asked for a better school. A lot of the students have been very supportive of me, and the instructors are very involved in making sure students make progress. – Vernon McNece Culinary Arts major


8,295

8,471

7,647

10000 Student Enrollment/ DegreesFalland 2010 Certificates Fall 2011 Fall 2012 12

16,923

16,231

12,071

12,236

Associate Associate in Art in Applied Science

16,923

1,635

Fall Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Enrolled

7,060

6,568 Fall 2012 Not certified*

493

1,481

456

7,060

6,568

Fall Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Enrolled

1,481 7,647

8,295 1,489

8,471 7,647 1,033

8,295 513

578

1,489

434

453

1,635

Fall Headcount

Fall 2012 Not certified* 539 1,635

Associate of Arts Associate in Teaching in Science

Fall 2012 Not certified*

1,489

29

Fall Headcount 17

24

43

36

1,096 1,481 988

,489

0

481

1,635

0

0

583

7,647

2011-12

22

0-11

0

1,033

5000

2011-12

500

U H

2011-12

2011-12

385

2010-11

2010-11 8,295

8,471

5000

09-10

2010-11

5000

1000 2009-10

Annual Unduplicated Headcount: Credit

Fall 2012 11,030

16,231

Annual Unduplicated Headcount: Noncredit

*Preliminary numbers not certified at time of printing.

10000

Fall 20

*Preliminary numbers not certified at time of printing.

8,471

10000

Annual Unduplicated Headcount: Credit

11,030

12,236

Fall Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Enrolled

12,071

1500

Fall Headcount

Fall 201216,923 Not certified*

10000

Fall 2011

11,030

12,071

12,236

2009-10

Fall 20

Fall Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) Enrolled

7,060

6,568

2000

15000

0 15000

Fall Headcount

Fall 2010 15000 Fall 2011 Fall 2012 Not certified*

5000

0

7,647

8,471

20000

8,295

20000

0000

Fall 2010

1,096

11,030

12,236

12,071

Fall 2010

Fall 2012 Not certified*

20000

5000

988

5000

16,231

16,923

0000

An Undup Head Cr

*Preliminary numbers not certified at time of p

Annual Annual Unduplicated Unduplicate Headcount: Headcount Total Total Total Degrees Credit and CertificatesNoncredit Degrees Certificates

*Preliminary numbers not certified at time of printing.


Unduplicated headcount: 9,780

13

Financial Aid Distribution

Scholarships

Employment 2.5 % 2.6 %

Scholarships

Federal /State/Institutional Grants

Employment

Federal/State/Institutional Loans

24.3 % 70.6 %

Federal /State/Institutional Grants

2.4 % 2.6 %

2010-11 Total: $31,947,042 Unduplicated headcount: 10,800

Federal/State/Institutional Loans

25 % Scholarships Employment

70 % 2011-12 Total: $30,707,617 Unduplicated headcount: 9,780

Federal /State/Institutional Grants Federal/State/Institutional Loans

Scholarships Employment Federal /State/Institutional Grants Federal/State/Institutional Loans


14

Del Mar College Annual Financial Report Del Mar remains fiscally sound. A complete financial condition and history based on assets, liabilities and net assets for all funds and account groups is detailed extensively for each of these years in the College’s Annual Financial Report , Distinguished Budget and Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for 2012.

Assets Current assets are those resources reasonably available within one year. Unlike other forms of assets, cash and equivalents such as checking account balances and demand deposits, can be used immediately for current operational needs, such as meeting the payroll or paying vendors. Short-term investments represent the College’s holdings in allowable financial instruments due within one year. Receivables represent those monies due to the College but not yet available for use; examples include property taxes not yet paid and accrued interest.

Noncurrent assets are the College’s long-term financial and plant resources. Restricted cash is the College’s endowed scholarships transferred to the Foundation in 2012. Bond issuance cost was the cost of issuing bonds which is being amortized over the life of the bonds. Plant and equipment account for the College’s equity in land, buildings, real estate improvements (such as roads and security lighting), and capital equipment expenditures such as computer network servers and digital projectors.

Liabilities Current liabilities are short-term obligations. Accrued payroll, accounts payable, and other accrued liabilities represent amounts due to employees or vendors for services, supplies or equipment provided to the College. Unearned revenues include property taxes and student tuition billed for the fall term and not yet earned. Noncurrent liabilities represent long-

term obligations, usually due over a number of years.

Net Assets Net assets are the accumulated resources invested in plant and equipment.

Property Taxes The local property owners provide almost 44 percent of total resources for the fiscal year 2012. However, for a typical homeowner, Del Mar’s 2012 rate of 0.258 dollars per $100 assessed valuation represents only 11 percent of the tax bill. This compares with a local school district rate of about 1.237 dollars and the City of Corpus Christi rate of 0.572 dollars per $100 assessed valuation. Property taxes are a significant source of revenue for all Texas community colleges.

College District Tax Fiscal Year

Tax Year

Tax Rate

Net Assessed Valuation

Percentage of Valuation Change

2007-08

07

.242089*

$16,144,199,746

14.65

2008-09

08

.241782*

$17,389,133,032

7.71

2009-10

09

.251391*

$17,966,262,266

3.32

2010-11

10

.258003*

$17,264,336,756

(4.07)

2011-12

11

.258003*

$17,572,669,749

1.75

Based on 100% of market value of property. All percentages are rounded off. * Includes debt service for $108 million capital improvement program.


15

Del Mar College Financial Report 2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

Cash & Cash Equivalents

$44,042

$59,707

$55,647

$54,993

$48,789

Short Term Investments

12,457

-

-

-

16,021

Accounts Receivable

8,052

7,474

7,009

4,197

4,171

Taxes Receivable

1,410

1,372

1,450

1,375

1,250

16

25

14

43

111

-

-

-

102

1,342

1,239

1,222

1,379

1,542

1,709

161,650

158,279

156,700

158,802

154,272

$228,866

$228,079

$222,199

$221,054

$227,665

-

-

-

-

$395

Accounts Payable & Accrued Liabilities

2,940

5,539

3,074

1,752

2,402

Retirement Incentive Payable

2,339

2,373

-

-

4,389

Funds Held for Others

1,577

1,315

1,431

1,620

1,499

Deferred Revenue

9,937

11,004

9,921

9,313

8,656

Current Portion of Non Current Liabilities

7,750

7,885

7,763

7,262

7,827

4,214

4,453

4,666

4,106

4,025

110

513

1,187

2,265

2,889

102,721

110,572

117,327

124,004

130,100

$131,588

143,654

$145,369

$150,322

$137,014

Invested in Capital Assets - net of related debt

$60,566

$62,437

$58,615

$50,721

$46,090

Restricted for Debt Service

$11,933

4,747

2,559

3,629

4,739

Unrestricted

$24,779

17,241

15,656

16,382

14,655

TOTAL NET ASSETS

$97,278

$84,425

$76,830

$70,732

$65,484

IN THOUSANDS Current Assets

Other Noncurrent Assets Endowment Cash & Cash Equivalent Endowment Investments Bond Issuance Cost Net Capital Assets Net TOTAL ASSETS Current Liabilities Cash Overdraft

Noncurrent Liabilities Accrued Compensated Liabilities Leases Payable Bonds & Notes Payable TOTAL LIABILITIES Net Assets


16

Revenues by Source Local residential and business property owners continue as the primary source of revenues for the College, followed in order by federal financial aid and grants, state apportionment and then student tuition and fees. Operating revenues increased by $5.7 million from 2011 to 2012 fiscal years, primarily due to a decrease in scholarship allowances funded by the federal government. Non-operating revenues decreased by $9.3 million primarily from a decrease in federal financial aid. Scholarship allowances are reductions of tuition and fees funded by outside sources such as federal Pell grants.

2011

2010

2009

2008

26,658

$25,588

$22,874

$21,692

$20,680

(11,783)

(15,738)

(13,313)

(9,712)

(6,648)

Federal Grants and Contracts

3,658

4,050

4,663

4,148

3,358

State Grants and Contracts

1,480

1,997

1,825

2,358

1,689

Local Grants and Contracts

1,779

535

1,863

957

698

Auxilary Enterprises Net

1,607

1,426

1,276

1,471

1,212

General Operating Revenue

1,234

1,089

1,636

1,260

1,465

Total Operating Revenue

24,633

$18,947

$20,824

$22,174

$22,454

Total Operating Expense

(86,295)

($95,247)

($104,853)

($99,304)

($98,019)

Operating Loss

(61,662)

($76,300)

($84,029)

($77,130)

($75,565)

State Appropriation

20,929

$23,890

$24,247

$25,144

$25,069

Operating Property Taxes

35,582

33,967

35,059

32,550

29,428

8,940

9,801

9,031

8,736

8,643

13,113

21,317

27,184

20,843

15,760

347

491

465

802

1,985

(4,570)

(5,876)

(5,950)

(6,140)

(5,735)

Other Non-Operating Expenses

(41)

6

(19)

(87)

(1,078)

Other Non-Operating Revenue

155

139

110

530

232

Total Non-Operating Revenue

74,455

$83,735

$90,127

$82,378

$74,304

Increase in Net assets

12,793

$7,435

$6,098

$5,248

($1,261)

IN THOUSANDS

2012

Operating Revenue Student Tuition and Fees Gross Scholarship Allowance

Non-Operating Revenue and Expense

Debt Service Property Taxes Federal Revenue Investment Income Interest of Capital Debt


17

Revenues for Year Ended August 31, 2012 0.2% Other Non-Operating 0.2% Other Non-Operating Revenues Revenues

Non-Operating Revenues Grants and Contracts

rants and Contracts

rants and Contracts

y Enterprises Net Operating Revenue

20.2% State Appropriation 20.2% State Appropriation

3.5%

Federal Grants and Contracts Federal3.5% Grants and Contracts

1.4%

1.4% and State Grants and Contracts State Grants Contracts

1.7%

1.7% and Local Grants and Contracts Local Grants Contracts

1.6%

AuxiliaryNet Enterprises Net Auxiliary1.6% Enterprises

0.3% Income 0.3% Investment Investment Income

1.2%

General Operating Revenue General1.2% Operating Revenue

14.3% Student14.3% Student Tuition and Fees Tuition and Fees

20.2% State Appropriation

34.3% Operating Property Taxes 8.6% Debt Service Property Taxes 12.7% Federal Revenue 0.3% Investment Income 14.3% Student Tuition and Fees

34.3% 34.3% Operating Operating Property Taxes Property Taxes 8.6% Property 8.6% Debt Service Debt Service Property Taxes Taxes 12.7% Federal12.7% Federal Revenue Revenue


18

Expenses The cost of instruction includes those activities that deal directly with, or aid in, the teaching process. Instruction expenditures include not only personnel costs and supplies but also the personnel and materials required to plan, implement and manage the instructional programs. Academic support comprises those programs that directly support the instruction process, such as tutoring, library operations and instructional media services. Student services include registration and records, financial aid, counseling and other activities that provide non-academic support services to students. Operation and maintenance costs relate to those maintenance, housekeeping, public safety and other costs necessary for the proper and safe operation of the physical plant of the College. General institutional support encompasses general regulation, direction and administration, as well as those costs applicable to the College on an institution-wide basis, such as Commencement and accreditation activities. Auxiliary enterprises are those activities that charge a fee for service, such as the food services and other business-type activities. Depreciation represents the financial acknowledgement of the costs of fixed assets prorated over their estimated useful service lives. Expenses by Type for Years Ended August 31 IN THOUSANDS Instruction

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

34,475

$35,632

$35,082

$33,919

$35,833

25

97

37

30

35

4,830

5,852

5,899

5,964

6,083

Student Services

10,906

11,315

10,870

10,647

12,379

Institutional Support

15,440

15,603

14,511

14,153

14,496

Plant Operation and Maintenance

7,748

9,486

11,131

11,620

11,281

Scholarships

5,755

18,925

20,066

15,559

10,970

Auxiliary Services

1,521

1,304

1,483

1,726

1,737

Depreciation

5,595

5,669

5,774

5,686

5,205

$86,295

$103,883

$104,853

$99,304

$98,019

Public Service Academic Support

TOTAL

As with any service organization, personnel costs – salaries and benefits – make up the largest single cost category at 58.8 percent. Salaries alone represent 43.6 percent of total costs. Benefits, including health, unemployment and Medicare insurance costs, constitute 15.2 percent of total expenditures. Supplies and service expenditures account for nearly 14 percent of operating expenditures. They include services provided by outside agencies, as well as instructional and administrative supplies. Scholarships, mostly funded by federal financial aid, represent almost 18 percent. Expenses by Type of Costs for Years Ended August 31 IN THOUSANDS

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

Salaries

$37,578

$45,279

$47,275

$46,742

$49,074

Benefits

14,235

15,786

13,404

11,783

12,437

Utilities

3,452

3,972

3,861

3,817

3,109

19,680

14,628

14,473

15,717

17,224

Scholarships

5,755

18,549

20,066

15,559

10,970

Depreciation

5,595

5,669

5,774

5,686

5,205

86,295

$103,883

$104,853

$99,304

$98,019

Supplies & Services

TOTAL


Academic Support

19

Expenses for Year Ended August 31, 2012 5.6%

6.5%

5.6%

12.6%

17.9%

9.0%

16.5%

4%

22.8%

Depreciation

Plant Operations and Maintenance

6.7%

Scholarships

Institutional Support

1.8%

Auxiliary Services

39.9%

Instruction

Scholarships

Plant Operations and Maintenance 1.8% Auxiliary Services

6.7%

6.5%

9.0%

Institutional Support

Student Services Plant Operations 9.0% and Maintenance 6.7%

Institutional Support

Student Services

12.6%

17.9%

17.9%

Academic Support

Academic Support

5.6%

Student Services

Depreciation

Depreciation

6.5%

12.6%

Scholarships

39.9%

Instruction

1.8%

Auxiliary Services

39.9%

Instruction

6.5%

Deprec

16.5%

Benefit

4%

Utilities

22.8%

Supplie and Se

6.7%

Scholar

43.5%

Salaries

44%

Benefits

Utilities Supplies and Services

6.7%

Scholarships

43.5%

Salaries


20

Message from the Executive Director of Development 2011-2012 Del Mar College Foundation, Inc. Board of Trustees Executive Committee Wayne M. Squires, President Richard J. Hatch, Jr., Vice President Lisa Hancock, Secretary Gary L. Malone, Treasurer Teresa Flores, Scholarship Chair Todd M. Walter, Special Projects Chair Paulette Kluge, Committee on Members Chair David Ainsworth, Sr. At-Large Steve Woerner, At-Large Members Dr. Janice Freeman Dr. Joyce Freeman Ernest R. Garza Dr. Mary Jane Garza Larry Hale Crissy Z. Hinojosa Susan E. Hutchinson Josephine W. Miller Judge S. Loyd Neal, Jr. John Norris J. Ted Oakley Trixy Y. Saldivar Eugene J. Seaman A. Wade Smith Joseph (Jay) C. Wise, Jr. Trustee Emeriti Mark Hulings Willie J. Kosarek Bernard A. Paulson Sylvia Whitmore Robert C. Wolter

Both Del Mar College (DMC) and the Del Mar College Foundation (DMCF) have a local focus. Ninety percent (90%) of DMC students come from the local area and remain in our community. As both consumers and the back-bone of our workforce, these are the people who power our economy. And with the credentials they earn through DMC, their increased earning potential can change their lives and the lives of their families forever. Established in 1983 as a separate 501(c)3, the DMC Foundation’s mission is simple: To transform students’ lives and the area economy. We do this by leveraging community resources and support to provide students access to higher education as well as assisting Del Mar College in providing the highest quality of education for the region. The 2011-2012 year ends my first full year as Executive Director of Development. This was also the first year of operation under the reorganized Office of Development and Foundation which now encompasses Development, Foundation, Scholarships, Alumni Association and Grants. The reorganization focused on consolidating efforts to raise friends, funds and support for Del Mar College and the students we serve. I am excited to share with you the strides the Foundation volunteers and the staff have made over this past year. We have many reasons to celebrate! • • • • • • • •

Over $11 million in DMC Foundation assets – more than doubled since 2006. $620,000 in scholarships given to 1,089 Del Mar students $519,000 provided in grants and other non-scholarship awards $1 million endowed scholarship gift Grant submissions of over $22 million with $12 million funded New web-based scholarship system introduced Two T-34C Turbo Mentor aircraft valued at $2.3 million each secured for the DMC Aviation Program Over $2.5 million total raised thanks to the generous support of over 700 donors

I look forward to many more milestones in the future. I hope you will join me and the DMC Foundation Board in our efforts to create a nationally recognized community college that keeps its local focus on the area it services. I would welcome the opportunity to discuss how you can help us with this important mission.

Mary McQueen, CFRE Executive Director of Development 361-698-1317, mmcqueen2@delmar.edu


21

Del Mar College Foundation Highlights A Million Thanks for the Challenge! As a man not wanting to be wined and dined, local businessman and philanthropist Mr. Eugene “Gene” Bouligny met quietly on October 1, 2010, with Del Mar College President Dr. Mark Escamilla to present a challenge: raise a million to get a million. The Del Mar College Foundation accepted the challenge to raise $1 million in cash gifts in order to secure a $1 million gift from Mr. Bouligny. The deadline was one year. During the 2011 “Come Home to Del Mar College” event, exactly one year from that initial meeting, the Del Mar College Foundation announced success! Hundreds of generous donors from throughout our community had provided more than $1.6 million in gifts for a total of more than $2.6 million raised during the challenge timeline. Mr. Bouligny’s gift established the Ella and Gene Bouligny Endowed Scholarship. Other gifts provided by so many generous donors in response to this challenge supported scholarships, equipment for the Engineering Technology Lab and other projects championed by the Foundation to support the College and its programs. In February 2012, our Million Dollar Man morphed into a Multi-Million Dollar Man when he issued a second challenge to the DMC Foundation: raise $2.65 million to receive another $2 million with a deadline of December 31, 2012. While this is a story for our 2012-2013 Annual Report, just a heads up – we made that one too!

Special thanks to the following companies and individuals who gave $15,000 or more to help meet the first $1 million challenge: • Anonymous • Behmann Brothers Foundation • Blanche Davis Moore Foundation • Coastal Bend Community Foundation • Edith Cosgrove • Hugh & Ann Dobson • The Estill Foundation • Flint Hills Resources/ Koch Companies • John G. & Marie Stella Kenedy Memorial Foundation • The L.C. Foundation, Inc. • Nueces County Senior Citizens • Yvonne H. Simard Foundation • South Texas Academic Rising Scholars (STARS) • Bryan Wagner/Wagner Oil Company Gifts of all sizes helped us meet this challenge. Thank you to the hundreds of generous individuals and organizations who stepped forward to help students in our community achieve their dreams. We couldn’t have done it without you… thanks a million!

New Web-based Scholarship Application Program In the Spring of 2011, the Foundation launched its webbased online scholarship application program. This new scholarship tracking and review system (STARS) makes it easier for students to apply and utilizes a questionnaire matching system to link the applicants to all scholarships for which they were eligible. The feedback has been very positive, and the program continues to enhance

the opportunities for DMC students. For scholarship managers, the system assists in organizing the process of accepting, processing and awarding scholarships, which allows more time for the development of additional scholarship opportunities as well as the marketing of our program.


22

Del Mar College Foundation Highlights

“Come Home” Brought it Home The Del Mar College Foundation, Inc. hosted its third “Come Home to Del Mar” on October 1, 2011, raising $347,052 with proceeds benefiting student scholarships. Over 550 guests were treated to a hit-filled concert performance by R&B legend Dionne Warwick at Del Mar College’s Richardson Performance Hall. VIP Sponsors of “Come Home” attended special receptions prior to the concert. In addition to delicious hors d’oeuvres and an open bar, guests heard performances by DMC students and faculty including a jazz ensemble, mariachi band, choral group and piano recitals.

Dionne Warwick’s 50 year career made her a great choice for this event. She has earned more than 60 charted hit songs, sold over 100 million records and has five Grammy Awards. Ms. Warwick was the first female artist to win the Best Female Pop and Best Female R&B Performance Awards.

During “Come Home,” Mr. Gene Bouligny presented Del Mar College Foundation President Mr. Wayne Squires and Del Mar College President Dr. Mark Escamilla a check for $1 million, signaling the successful conclusion of the Foundation’s first million dollar challenge campaign.


23

Del Mar College Foundation Highlights

Bernie’s Famous Crawfish Boil 2012 The fourth annual Bernie’s Famous Crawfish Boil was held on April 20, 2012, with over 500 people havin’ a rip roaring good time.

Foundation’s premier fundraising event. All proceeds go toward funding student scholarships. It is a fun event for a great cause!

From crawfish and shrimp to line dancing and cake decorating demonstrations, the annual crawfish boil was highly entertaining – and raised over $65,000 for Del Mar College student scholarships. Leroy Thomas and the Zydeco Roadrunners performed once again. There was a silent auction for people to browse after they filled up on the delicious crawfish prepared by the Ortiz Center. Bernie’s Famous Crawfish Boil is now Del Mar College

MARK YOUR CALENDARS! The 2013 Crawfish Boil will be held on Thursday, May 16th, 2013. To register to attend, visit www.delmar.edu/alumni. Laissez les bons temps rouler!

Scholarship Reception Del Mar College Foundation hosted its Annual Scholarship Reception on April 24, 2012. Over 100 students, donors, faculty, staff, and foundation and alumni volunteers attended. This event gives the donors

and students the opportunity to meet. Donors get a first-hand look at how their philanthropy is benefiting our many talented and deserving students. Students have a chance to meet their benefactors and thank them personally.

DMC Drama Major Meredyth Ilse, who received the Sue Sellors Finley Scholarship, spoke on the personal impact the scholarship has made in her life. Kim Frederick, DMC Drama Coordinator, spoke in place of major donor Mr. George A. Finley. Kim shared a letter from George on why he and his family choose this way to contribute to Del Mar and the community.


24

Del Mar College Foundation Highlights Aviation Program Donation In November 2011 the DMC Foundation Board approved $10,000 to secure two surplus airplanes, both T-34C Turbo Mentor aircraft, from the Navy. The value of each aircraft is about $2.3 million. This addition enables the DMC program to align its curriculum to meet local aviation maintenance training requirements. The Aviation Maintenance Program at Del Mar college has been operating under the auspices of the Federal Aviation Administration Air Agency since fall 2006. The program was instituted in the spring of 2001 for the purpose of supporting the needs of the Corpus Christi Army Depot. Since that time, DMC students have been recruited by other local employers including Sikorsky Support Services, L3 Communications, Lockheed Martin, Signature Flight Support, Corpus Christi Helicopters, Advantages Aircraft and McTurbine, Inc.

Laura Berry and Bay Ltd. provided a generous in-kind donation to move the planes to the new Aviation Maintenance Facility at the Corpus Christi International Airport.

Engineering Technology Lab The DMC Foundation raised $400,000 to support the College’s new state-of-the-art Engineering Laboratory designed to meet the needs of Engineering Technology students. This laboratory is equipped with state-of-the-art electrical, mechanical and pneumatic modules that enable students to learn how to install, calibrate, operate and repair mechatronic systems. This new laboratory provides essential

hands-on training that Engineering Technologists require to work in local petro-chemical and manufacturing plants. Donors to the Engineering Technology Lab in 2011-2012 include: AEP-Texas Foundation, the John G. and Marie Stella Kenedy Memorial Foundation, Mr. Brian Wagner and Wagner Oil Company and the Coastal Bend Community Foundation.


25

Alumni Association Highlights

T

he first alumni program at Del Mar College started in 1986 as the Former Students Association. Over the course of 24 years, the Former Students Association paved the way for the Alumni Association we have today.

The Alumni Association seeks to reach out to current students, former students, graduates and community supporters to keep them connected to our great school. In November 2011, a group of 24 dedicated individuals met in a strategic planning session to outline the future of the Del Mar College Alumni Association. From that meeting, over 54 action items were identified to strengthen our DMC Alumni Association with four main goals: • • • •

Connect and Serve Alumni Support Students Advocate to Strengthen Del Mar College Develop Leaders and Financial Strength

One of the first efforts was to restructure membership dues. Our goal was to make it easy and affordable to be a member, while offering great benefits – including discounts at attractions both locally and throughout the state. If you took just one class at Del Mar College, you are considered an alumnus! Check us out at www.delmar.edu/ alumni and join today! Membership makes a great gift too!

2012 Wall of Honor Recipients The Alumni Association proudly inducted Anna M. Flores, Dr. Mary Jane Garza, John Marez, and Janie B. Vela into the Wall of Honor on Saturday April 14, 2012 in the E.L. Harvin Student Center on the Del Mar College East Campus. The event was a huge success honoring community leaders and raising funds for student scholarships.


26

Alumni Association Highlights Buc Days Parade The Alumni Association Float won 1st Place in the 2012 Buc Days Parade for Educational Floats. The DMC Mariachi Band entertained the crowd while DMC President Mark Escamilla, wife Jodi and boys Luke and Ben waved to the crowd. Also aboard were Alumni Association Co-Chairs Jay Wise and Lisa Hancock.

Del Mar College Alumni Profile: Teresa Flores Teresa Flores began her career with Merrill Lynch in 1994 and has worked her way up through the ranks. She is currently the Assistant Vice President for a team of five. Her responsibilities include portfolio management and review, and sale of insurance products. Teresa’s passion for education has driven her to serve on the Ingleside ISD Board for the past 13 years. During that time, Teresa has held the positions of both Secretary and President. She’s also been chosen by her peers state-wide to serve as the Education Service Center Region 2 Director for the Texas Association of School Boards, representing 43 school districts at the

state level. Being no stranger to education, Teresa is also the Chair of the Scholarship Committees for both the Del Mar College Foundation and the Del Mar College Alumni Association. She also serves as the President of the Ingleside Economic Development Corporation. “I strongly believe that education is the power behind selfworth, economic growth and productive citizenship.” As a working mother, Teresa attended Del Mar College in the late 1980’s and relies upon the education she received every single day. “Thanks to Del Mar College for providing a quality education to all and changing so many lives.”


27

Grants Highlights

The Grants and Sponsored Research Department was moved under the Office of Development and Foundation Services in September 2011, consolidating the fund raising efforts of the College. Grants focus on the needs of the College and its students from equipment to academic program support and scholarships. During the 2011-2012 year, the Grants Department submitted over $22 million in proposals securing $12 million in support for Del Mar College and the Del Mar College Foundation. Some of the grants received include: •

The U.S. Department of Agriculture, $352,000, STEP UP to USDA Career Success grant to prepare an underserved Hispanic population in South Texas for careers in the biological and environmental sciences through 25000000 advanced education, training and research.

The National Science Foundation, 20000000 $599,635, for at least 88 scholarships for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S-STEM) for the College’s Future Forward Scholarship Program (F2SP). 15000000 The grant supports scholarships for students majoring in areas such as biology (non-medical), 10000000 biotechnology, chemistry, computer science, electrical engineering, engineering technology, geographic information systems, geology, 5000000 mathematics, mechanical engineering and physics.

U.S. Department of Labor, $2 million, 0 to promote rapid track students into GIS certificates. The grant is part of the National Information, Security and Geospatial Technology Consortium with Del Mar College as the lead institution for the geospatial technologies component of the grant.

Hispanic Serving Institution Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Success Initiative, $4.34 million over five years, to increase the number of first-time-in-college students majoring in STEM fields and to assist students with transferring to four-year institutions.

DMC Development & Foundation Total Grants - Submitted/Funded DMC Development & Foundation Total Grants - Submitted/Funded 2011-12 2011-12

Total submitted Total funded $22,494,143 $12,000,665

Total Submitted

Federal/State Federal/State submitted funded $20,488,646 $10,767,915

Corporate/ Foundation submitted $2,005,497

Corporate/ Foundation funded $1,232,750

Federal/State Submitt

Title V, $3.8 million, between DMC and Coastal Bend Total Funded College to improve retention and completion rates Funded Federal/State and to increase student enrollment in technical and/or professional occupational programs, focusing on high Corporate/ Foundation Submitted school dual credit students.

Corporate/ Foundations Funded City of Corpus Christi, Type A Funding, $750,000, to address the critical shortage of CDL trained drivers


28

Financial Positions Del Mar College Foundation Net Assets Comparisons

Del Mar College Foundation Statement of Financial Position, June 30, 2012 Assets

12000000

Cash and Equivalents

$993,362

8000000 Investments

$4,085,175

Unconditional Promises $187,156 to Give 6000000 Total Current Assets

$5,265,693

Endowment Investments

$6,804,616

Long Term Unconditonal Promised to Give

$5,927

2000000

Total Assets

0

Jun-11 $10,352,172 Jun-10 $8,599,663

Current Assets:10000000

4000000

Jun-12 $11,458,441

Del Mar College Foundation Net Assets Comparisons

$12,076,236

Liabilities and Net Assets

Jun-07 Jun-08 $6,597,673 $6,515,592 Jun-06 $5,095,815

Del Mar College Foundation Statement of Activities and Changes in Net Assets, June 30, 2012 Jun-06 Jun-07 Jun-08 Jun-09 Support, Revenue and Gains

Liabilities: Accounts Payable

$345,109

Due to Del Mar College

$272,686

Total Liabilities

$617,795

Net Assets:

Jun-09 $5,570,237

Scholarship Contributions 1,743,810 Jun-10 Jun-11 Jun-12 Contributed Services & Expenses 316,099

Grant, Managed Funds & Other Contributions

777,044

Net Investment Gain (Loss)

(201,420)

Total Support, Revenue and Gains

2,635,533

Unrestricted

$186,773

Temporarily Restricted

$4,467,052

Program and Support Expenses

Permanently Restricted

$6,804,616

Scholarships

620,025

Total Net Assets

$11,458,441

Grants, Managed Funds &Other Awards

519,382

$12,076,236

Fundraising Expenses

73,758

Administrative Expenses

316,099

Total Program and Support Expenses

1,529,264

Increase (Decrease) in Net Assets 1,106,269

Net Assets, June 30, 2011

10,352,172

Net Assets, June 20, 2012

11,458,441

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND ASSETS


29

Many Thanks to Our Donors The Del Mar College Foundation is grateful to the following individuals, companies and organizations for their support over the past year. More than 740 donors gave $2.6 million to support the students and initiatives of Del Mar College between July 1, 2011 and June 30, 2012. We would like to recognize all those whose cumulative giving was $1,000 or greater for their generous support. $1 million •

Mr. & Mrs. Eugene Bouligny

$100,000 up to $250,000 • •

AEP Texas Anonymous

$25,000 to $99,999 • American Bank • Mrs. John Chapman • City of Corpus Christi • Coastal Bend Community Foundation • Mr. George A. Finley, III • Flint Hills Resources • John G. & Marie Stella Kenedy Memorial Foundation • Orion Drilling Co., LLC • Yvonne H. Simard Foundation • Mr. Bryan Wagner • Wagner Oil Company $10,000 to $24,999 • AT&T Foundation • Bank of America -Merrill Lynch Trust Company • Behmann Brothers Foundation • Carlisle Insurance • CITGO Corpus Christi Refinery • Ms. Edith E. Cosgrove • Mr. & Mrs. Hugh C. Dobson • Dollar General Literacy Foundation • The Estill Foundation • Hispanic Women’s Network of Texas • Dr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Kennedy Foundation • L.C. Foundation, Inc. • Blanche Davis Moore Foundation • Nueces County Senior Citizens, Inc. • Scott Electric Company • Sembradores de Corpus Christi • Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation • South Texas Academic Rising Scholars Foundation • Stripes $5,000 to $9,999 • B&R Roofing Supply • Beecroft Construction • Robert and Janis Birchall Foundation • Ms. Julie Buckley • Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma • Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation • Will Cocke Holdings, LLC • Corpus Christi Council

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

of Hospital Auxiliary Corpus Christi Electric Company Driscoll Children’s Hospital Fox Scholarship Fund Mr. Ralph Galvan, Jr. H-E-B Mr. Mark Hulings International Scholarship and Tuition Service It’s Your Life Foundation, Inc. Lady Hot Shots Larry and Pat McNeil Foundation Ms. Barbara J. Namour Navy Army Community Credit Union Port Aransas Independent School District Richter Associates Architects, Inc. San Patricio Electric Education Trust Mr. & Mrs. Eugene J. Seaman Ruth Parr Sparks Foundation Topaz Power Barney Davis Energy Center Topaz Power Nueces Bay Energy Center Mr. W. T. Utter Valero Bill Greehey Refinery of Corpus Christi Wells Fargo Bank

$2,500 to $4,999 • ACT Recognition Program Services • Mr. & Mrs. Avinash C. Ahuja • Army Emergency Relief • AWS Foundation • BBVA Compass • C C Estate Planning Council • Mr. Bob Crow • Ms. Jennifer Danvers • Dell Direct Giving Campaign • The Devary Durrill Foundation • Former Texas Rangers Foundation • GCA Education Services, Inc. • Greater Corpus Christi Hospitality Association • Ms. Susan Hutchinson • Instituto De Cultura Hispanica de Corpus Christi • J M Supply Company • L.U.L.A.C. Council #4444 • Linebarger Goggan Blair & Sampson, LLP • Minority Advancement Project of Texas

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Oxbow Advisors, Mr J. Ted Oakley, Jr. Padre Island Business Association Mr. Bernard Paulson Port of Corpus Christi Repcon, Inc. Rockport Group of Morgan Stanley Smith Barney Royston, Rayzor, Vickery and Williams, LLP Scholarship America Sinton ISD Trust and Agency Fund Smart Scholarship Funding Corp. Texas Star Investments, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. William A. Ueeck United Married Couples Club Mr. Todd M. Walter and Mr. C. A. Citron Mr. Joseph Churchill Wise, Jr. WKMC Architects

$1,000 up to $2,499 • The Honorable Joseph A. Adame • Chris & Robert Adler • American Legion Auxilary Unit 185 • American Legion Bishop Post 185 • Ms. Nelwyn Anderson • Aransas-Corpus Christi Pilots • Asset Protection & Security Services L.P. • Association of Energy Service Companies • Awana • Bank of America Matching Gifts • Bay Ltd. • Gary N. Blum, DDS, MS • Miss Melody Brason • Buckley & Associates, LLP • C.H. Guenther & Son, Inc. • Calallen Independent School District • Calhoun County Band Boosters • Carroll High School Activity Fund • CC Housing Authority - Jurisdiction WideCouncil • CC United League Little Miss Kickball • Centerville Independent School District • Chase Power Development, LLC • Cheniere Corpus Christi LNG, LLC • Chickasaw Nation • Chick-fil-A, Inc.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Chief Petty Officer Scholarship Fund CITGO Petroleum Corporation Coastal Community and Teachers Credit Union Coastal Heart Foundation Collier, Johnson & Woods, P.C. Corpus Christi City Employees Credit Union Corpus Christi District Dental Hygiene Society Corpus Christi Freightliner and Western Star Corpus Christi Housing Authority Corpus Christi Human Resource Management Association Corpus Christi Principals & Supervisors Association Corpus Nephrology Network, PLLC The Dougherty Foundation Driscoll Health System Du-Tex, Inc. Ed Hicks Nissan, LTD. Mr. & Mrs. Moises Estrada Ms. Linda Eubank First Community Bank First United Methodist Church Dr. Janice Freeman Dr. Joyce Freeman Frost National Bank Fulton Construction Corp./Coastcon Corporation The GEO Group Foundation, Inc. George West High School Goldring Family Foundation Greater Houston Lumber & Building Material Dealers Assn. Charitable Foundation, Inc. Gregory Masonic Lodge No. 998, A.F. & A.M. Gulf Coast Federal Credit Union H & S Constructors Mr. & Mrs. Richard J. Hatch, Jr. Dr. C. H. Hood Kevin S. Hopkins M.D. Independent Insurance Agents - Coastal Bend Insurance Associates of Corpus Christi King High School Activity Fund Kleberg Bank Mrs. Paulette Good Kluge Laguna Little Miss

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Kickball Law Office of J. Heil Little Miss Kickball International, Inc. Miller High School Activity Fund National FFA Foundation, Inc. National Military Family Association Nueces County Head Start Policy Council Nueces Valley District Dental Society NuStar Energy Mr. J. Ted Oakley Padre Island Enrichment Club, Inc. Pan American Golf Association Mrs. Laura Parr Rabalais I & E Constructors Radisson Beach Hotel Rapier Educational Foundation Republic National Distributing Company RFHS Athletic Booster Club Mr. Sid Ridlehuber Rockport Gypsy Motor Cycle Club Rockport Masonic Lodge A.F. & A.M. #323 Rockport Rotary Club Scholarship Foundation Rockport-Fulton American Legion Auxiliary Unit 363 Rotary Club of Alice, Inc. San Antonio Livestock Exposition, Inc. Dr. Lee Sloan Smithville Noon Lions Club Mr. & Mrs. Wayne Squires St. Helens Student Foundation St. Mark’s Episcopal Church Mrs. Celika Storm Super S Foods Texas A&M UniversityCorpus Christi Texas Farm Bureau Texas Gas Association Scholarship Fund Texas Head Start Association, Inc. Tulsa Community Foundation Victoria Livestock Show Mr. & Mrs. Donald B. Walker Whataburger, Inc. Wichita Falls Area Community Foundation Woman’s Club of Aransas County, Inc. Woodsboro High School Activities


101 Baldwin Blvd. Corpus Christi, TX 78404-3897 www.delmar.edu Del Mar College is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and Educational Institution. The College takes affirmative action to endeavor that no person shall be denied the benefits of equal employment or be subjected to discrimination in employment or educational programs and activities of Del Mar College on the basis of race, color, sex, age, national origin, religion, disability, or any other constitutionally or statutorily impermissible reason. Š 2013 Del Mar College. All rights reserved.


Del Mar College Popular Annual Financial Report 2011-2012