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DEL MAR COLLEGE CATALOG 2014-2015


CATALOG PROVISIONS

Information contained in this catalog reflects the College operations at the time of publication. The College maintains the right to adjust operational parameters as necessary to efficient College management. Students must be familiar with the information in this catalog in order to avoid problems and complete their educational goal in a timely manner.

DISCLAIMER

The provisions and information set forth in this publication are intended to be informational and not contractual in nature. Thus, this publication is not intended, and shall not be construed, to constitute a contract between the Del Mar College District and any student, prospective student, agency of the local, state, or federal government, or any other person or legal entity of any and every nature whatsoever. Del Mar College hereby reserves and retains the right to amend, alter, change, delete, or modify any of the provisions of this publication at any time, and from time to time, without notice, in any manner that the Administration or the Board of Regents of Del Mar College deems to be in the best interest of Del Mar College.

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

Del Mar College is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and Educational Institution. The College takes affirmative action to endeavor that no person shall be denied the benefits of equal employment or be subjected to discrimination in employment or educational programs and activities of Del Mar College on the basis of race, color, sex, age, national origin, religion, disability, or any other constitutionally or statutorily impermissible reason.

101 Baldwin Blvd. Corpus Christi, TX 78404-3897 (361) 698-1200 or 1-800-652-3357 www.delmar.edu Š Copyright 2014 Del Mar College. All rights reserved.


Del Mar College

2014-2015 CATALOG www.delmar.edu

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Campus maps are located in the back of this catalog. 2014-2015 Catalog

CONTENTS

Volume 78

Calendar..............................................................................................4 Telephone Directory.........................................................................11 Introduction......................................................................................13 Getting Started................................................................................18 Student Enrollment Center..........................................................18 Veterans Services...........................................................................26 Financial Aid....................................................................................32 Achieving Success...........................................................................43 Student Activities and Recognition............................................51 College Costs....................................................................................55 Tuition.............................................................................................55 Fees..................................................................................................56 Academic Policies...........................................................................62 Assessment and Placement...........................................................74 List of Advisors.............................................................................83 Student Rights, Responsibilities, and Safety............................86 Student Records............................................................................86 Standards of Student Conduct....................................................87 Immunization Policy....................................................................92 Meningitis Vaccination Requirement.........................................92 Parking............................................................................................98 Planning your Academic Future................................................104 Student Right to Know Graduation and Transfer Rates.......105 General Education Requirements.............................................106 Core Curriculum Requirements................................................107 Selecting a Program......................................................................113 Degree and Certificate Programs................................................123 Division of Arts and Sciences....................................................124 Department of Art and Drama...............................................125 2


CONTENTS (CONTINUED) Department of Communications, Languages and Reading............................................................................126 Department of English and Philosophy...............................126 Department of Kinesiology....................................................126 Department of Mathematics...................................................127 Department of Music...............................................................127 Department of Natural Sciences............................................130 Department of Social Sciences................................................131 Division of Business, Professional and Technology Education...............................................................132 Department of Allied Health..................................................134 Department of Business Administration..............................135 Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology..................................................136 Department of Dental and Imaging Technology.................138 Department of Human Sciences and Education..................138 Department of Industrial Education.....................................139 Department of Nurse Education............................................140 Department of Public Safety Education................................142 Department of Technology Education..................................142 Degrees and Certificates..................................................... 146-311 Course Descriptions.....................................................................312 Business Affairs and Continuing Education...........................454 Strategic Planning/Assessment & Institutional Advancement.................................................455 Workforce Initiative....................................................................455 Career and Community Continuing Education.....................456 GED/ESL/ABE Instruction.......................................................457 Health Care Programs................................................................457 Transportation Training Services..............................................458 Business Services.........................................................................459 Small Business Development Center.......................................459 Procurement Technical Assistance Center...............................459 Board, Administration and Faculty...........................................460 Index of Catalog............................................................................478 Index of Courses............................................................................481 Campus Maps................................................................................484 3


ACADEMIC CALENDAR

2014-2015 Calendar

See Web site (www.delmar.edu) to access the credit class schedule for admissions information and advising and registration dates.

Fall Semester 2014

[On-going Pre-Advising August 25-November 6; check with department for availability.]

August 2014

April 7-August 13........................ Early Advising and On-campus and Online Registration for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions closes on August 13 at 6:30 p.m. August 11-15................................. Viking Experience Week: New Student Orientation Sessions August 13..............................................Early Advising and On-campus and Online Registration for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions closes at 6:30 p.m. August 13...................................Tuition Payment Deadline for Early Advising and On-campus and Online Registration for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions ends at 6:30 p.m. August 15....................................................................................Summer Semester 2014 Graduation August 16-20................................................. Online Express Registration available on WebDMC beginning at 12:01 a.m. for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions and closes on August 20 at 6:30 p.m. August 18.......................................................................................Faculty Return Day/Convocation August 19.................................................................On-campus Express Registration available for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions with extended hours at both East and West Campuses between 7:30 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. August 20 ............................ On-campus Express Registration available for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. August 20...................................Tuition Payment Deadline for On-campus and Online Express Registration for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II and 8 weeks’ Sessions Ends at 6:30 p.m. August 21.....................................................................................................Faculty Development Day August 23.........................................................On-campus Express Registration available on East and West Campuses from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions August 23....................................................... Online Express Registration available on WebDMC beginning at 12:01 a.m. for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II and 8- weeks’ Sessions August 25.........................................Classes begin for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, and 8-weeks’ Session I August 25-26......On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only available at East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on WebDMC from 12:01 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on August 26 for the Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, and 8-weeks’ Session I August 25-October 13.....................Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for Rapid Track Session II closes on October 13 at 6:30 p.m. August 25-October 20....Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for 8-weeks’ Session II closes on October 20 at 6:30 p.m.

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR August 26.............. Online Express Registration for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track II, and 8-weeks’ Session I closes at 6:30 p.m. August 26............... Tuition Payment Deadline for On-campus and Online Schedule Changes for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I and 8-weeks’ Session I closes at 6:30 p.m. August 27-30................. Schedule Changes Only with Chair Approval for Fall Semester 2014, Rapid Track Session I and 8-weeks’ Session I

September 2014

September 1.................................................................................................. Labor Day Holiday September 29............................................Last Day to drop a class for Rapid Track Session I

October 2014

October 1....................Priority Deadline to Apply for Financial Aid for Spring Semester 2015; East Campus at 6:30 p.m./West Campus at 6 p.m. October 6...................................Last day of classes and final exams for Rapid Track Session I October 6.............................................................Last day to drop a class for 8-weeks’ Session I October 13............................................. Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for Rapid Track Session II closes at 6:30 p.m. October 13......................................................................Classes begin for Rapid Track Session II October 13-14..... On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for Rapid Track Session II available at East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on WebDMC from 12:01 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. October 15......................................... Deadline to Apply for Graduation for Fall Semester 2014 October 15-18..........Schedule Changes Only with Chair Approval for Rapid Track Session II October 16.........................................Last day of classes and final exams for 8-weeks’ Session I October 20............................................. Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for 8-weeks’ Session II closes at 6:30 p.m. October 20............................................................................. Classes begin for 8-weeks’ Session II October 20-21............................................. On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for 8-weeks’ Session II available at East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on WebDMC from 12:01 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. October 22-25............. Schedule Changes Only with Chair Approval for 8-weeks’ Session II

November 2014

November 3-December 17................ Early Advising and On-campus and Online Registration for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, Rapid Track Session IV, 8-weeks’ Sessions, and Maymester Session closes on December 17 at 5:00 p.m. November 17...................................................... Last day to drop a class for Rapid Track Session II November 24..............................................................Last day to drop a class for Fall Semester 2014 (16-weeks’ Session and 8-weeks’ Session II) November 24.................................Last day of classes and final exams for Rapid Track Session II November 26.........................................................Last day of classes before Thanksgiving Holiday November 27-29.....................................................................................................Thanksgiving Holiday

December 2014

December 1.................................................................................... Classes Resume/Offices Open December 3..............................Last day of classes for Fall Semester 2014 (16-weeks’ Session)

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR December 4-10.......................................Final exams for Fall Semester 2014 (16-weeks’ Session) [Advising continues; please check with department for availability.] December 10....................................Last day of classes and final exams for 8-weeks’ Session II December 12.................................................................................. Fall Semester 2014 Graduation December 17................................... Early Advising and On-campus for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, Rapid Track Session IV, and 8-weeks’ Sessions and.Maymester Session and closes at 5 p.m. December 17-January 1.......................................................................Online registration remains open for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, Rapid Track Session IV, 8-weeks’ Sessions, and Maymester Session and closes at midnight on January 1 December 17.....................................................................Offices close for Winter Break at 5 p.m.

Spring Semester 2015 [On-going Pre-Advising January 20-April 3; check with department for availability.]

January 2015

January 1....................Online Registration for Spring Semester 2015 closes at 12 midnight January 2........................................................................................................DMC Offices Open January 5.............Tuition Payment Deadline for Early and Online Registration for Spring Semester 2015 closes at 6:30 p.m. January 5,8-9..............................Viking Experience Week: New Student Orientation Sessions January 10-14............Online Express Registration available on WebDMC beginning at 12:01 a.m. for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, Rapid Track Session IV, 8-weeks’ Sessions, and Maymester Session and closes on January 14 at 6:30 p.m. January 12............................................................................ Faculty Return Day/Convocation January 13.................... On-campus Express Registration available for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, Rapid Track Session IV, 8-weeks’ Sessions, and Maymester Session with extended hours at both East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. January 14.......................On-campus Express Registration available for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, Rapid Track Session IV, 8-weeks’ Sessions, and Maymester Session from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. January 14........ Tuition Payment Deadline for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, Rapid Track Session IV, 8-weeks’ Session I, and Maymester closes at 6:30 p.m. January 15....................................................................................................Faculty Development Day January 17................................................On-campus Express Registration available on East and West Campuses from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, Rapid Track Session IV, 8-weeks’ Sessions, and Maymester Session January 17...................................Online Express Registration available on WebDMC beginning at 12:01 a.m. for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, Rapid Track Session IV, 8- weeks’ Sessions, and Maymester Session January 19................................................................................................Martin Luther King Holiday January 20................................Classes begin for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, and 8-weeks’ Session I January 20-21..........On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for the Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, and 8-weeks’ Session I available at East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on WebDMC from 12:01 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on January 21

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR January 20-March 9.........................Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for Rapid Track Session IV closes on March 9 at 6:30 p.m. January 20-March 23..... Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for 8-weeks’ Session II closes on March 23 at 6:30 p.m. January 20-May 14.................................Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for Maymester Session closes on May 14 at 6:30 p.m. January 21.................................................Online Express Registration for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, and 8-weeks’ Session I closes at 6:30 p.m. January 21.........Tuition payment deadline for Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, Rapid Track Session IV, 8-weeks’ Session I, and Maymester closes at 6:30 p.m. January 22-24.................Schedule Changes only with Chair Approval, Spring Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session III, and 8-weeks’ Session I

February 2015

February 16...........Priority Deadline to Apply for Financial Aid for Summer Semester 2015; East Campus at 6:30 p.m./West Campus at 6 p.m. February 23................................................Last day to drop a class for Rapid Track Session III

March 2015

March 2........................................Deadline to apply for Graduation for Spring Semester 2015 March 2................................... Last day of classes and final exams for Rapid Track Session III March 2...............................................................Last day to drop a class for 8-weeks’ Session I March 9....................................................................... Classes begin for Rapid Track Session IV March 9................................................Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for Rapid Track Session IV closes at 6:30 p.m. March 9-10............................................... On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for Rapid Track Session IV available at East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on WebDMC from 12:01 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. March 11-13......... Schedules changes with Chair Approval Only for Rapid Track Session IV March 12..........................................Last day of classes and final exams for 8-weeks’ Session I March 13........................................................................ Last day of classes before Spring Break March 16-21..............................................................................................................Spring Break March 23......................................................................................Classes Resume/Offices Open March 23..............................................Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for 8-weeks’ Session II closes at 6:30 p.m. March 23......................................................................... Classes begin for 8-weeks’ Session II March 23-24.............On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for 8-weeks’ Session II available at East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on WebDMC from 12:01 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. March 25-28.................. Schedule changes with Chair Approval Only for 8-weeks’ Session II

April 2015

April 6-May 20.........Early Advising and Registration for Summer Semester I (6-weeks’ and 12-weeks’ Sessions) closes on May 20 at 6:30 p.m April 6-June 3................. Early Advising and Registration for Summer Semester I (5-weeks’, 9- weeks’, and 10-weeks’ Sessions) closes on June 3 at 6:30 p.m April 6-June 30................................ Early Advising and Registration for Summer Semester II (6-weeks’ Session) closes on June 30 at 6:30 p.m.

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR April 6-August 12.............................. Early Advising and Registration for Fall Semester 2015 closes on August 12 at 6:30 p.m. April 20.......................................................Last day to drop a class for Rapid Track Session IV April 27................. Last day to drop a class for the Spring Semester 2015 (16-weeks’ Session) April 30................................... Last day of classes and final exams for Rapid Track Session IV April 30 (Postmarked)...................................Deadline to Apply for Foundation Scholarships for the 2015-2016 Academic Year

May 2015

May 1............ Priority Deadline to Apply for Financial Aid for the 2015-2016 Academic Year May 4.................................................................Last day to drop a class for 8-weeks’ Session II May 6................................... Last day of classes for Spring Semester 2015 (16-weeks’ Session) May 7-13.........................................Final exams for Spring Semester 2015 (16-weeks’ Session) [Advising continues; please check with department for availability.] May 14........................................... Last day of classes and final exams for 8-weeks’ Session II May 14.................................................Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for Maymester Session closes at 6:30 p.m. May 14...............................................................................Classes begin for Maymester Session May 15....................................................................................Spring Semester 2015 Graduation May 20...............................................Early Advising and Registration for Summer Semester I (6-weeks’ and 12- weeks’ Sessions) closes at 6:30 p.m. May 20.........................................................Tuition Payment Deadline for Summer Semester I (6-weeks’ and 12-weeks’ Sessions) at 6:30 p.m. May 21..............................................................Last day to drop a class for Maymester Session May 25..................................................................................................... Memorial Day Holiday May 26....................Classes begin for Summer Semester I (6-weeks’ and 12-weeks’ Sessions) May 26-27.......................................... On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for the Summer Semester I (6-weeks’ and 12-weeks’ Sessions) available at both East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on WebDMC from 12:01 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on May 27 May 27.........................................................Tuition Payment Deadline for Summer Semester I (6-weeks’ and 12- weeks’ Sessions) closes at 6:30 p.m. May 28-30...................................................... Schedule changes with Chair Approval Only for Summer Session I (6- weeks’ and 12-weeks’ Sessions) May 29...........................................Last day of classes and final exams for Maymester Session

June 2015

June 3...... Early Advising and Registration for Summer Semester I (5-weeks’, 9- weeks’, and 10-weeks’ Sessions) closes at 6:30 p.m. June 3 ................Tuition Payment Deadline for Early Advising and Registration for Summer Semester I (5-weeks’, 9- weeks’, and 10-weeks’ Sessions) closes at 6:30 p.m. June 8..... Classes begin for Summer Semester I (5-weeks’, 9-weeks’, and 10-weeks’ Sessions) June 8-9.....................................................On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for Summer Semester I (5-weeks’, 9- weeks’ and 10-weeks’ Sessions) available at East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on WebDMC from 12:01 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on June 9 June 9....................Tuition Payment Deadline for On-Campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for Summer Semester I (5-weeks’, 9-weeks’, and 10-weeks’ Sessions) June 10-13....................................................... Schedule changes only with Chair Approval for Summer Semester I (5- weeks’, 9-weeks’, and 10-weeks’ Sessions)

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR June 22...............................Last day to drop a class for Summer Semester I (6-weeks’ Session) June 29...............................Last day to drop a class for Summer Semester I (5-weeks’ Session) June 30......................................Deadline to Apply for Graduation for Summer Semester 2015 June 30....................................... Last day of classes for Summer Semester I (6-weeks’ Session) June 30....................... Early Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline closes for Summer Semester II (6-weeks’ Session) at 6:30 p.m.

July 2015

July 1-2................................................. Final exams for Summer Semester I (6-weeks’ Session) July 3 ............................................................................Independence Day Holiday (Observed) July 4 ..............................................................................................Independence Day Holiday July 4 ..........................Online Registration available on WebDMC beginning at 12:01 a.m. for Summer Semester II (6-weeks’ Session) July 6 ............................................... Classes begin for Summer Semester II (6-weeks’ Session) July 6-7........... On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for the Summer Semester II (6-weeks’ Session) available at both East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on WebDMC from 12:01 a.m. until 6:30 p.m. on July 7 July 7 ......Online Registration for Summer Semester II (6-weeks’ Session) closes at 6:30 p.m. July 7 ................................... Tuition Payment Deadline for On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for the Summer Semester II (6-weeks’ Session) closes at 6:30 p.m. July 7 ........................................ Last day of classes for Summer Semester I (5-weeks’ Session) July 8 ............................ Registration and Tuition Payment Deadline for Summer Semester II (5- weeks’ Session) July 8-9................................................ Final Exams for Summer Semester I (5-weeks’ Session) July 8-11 ......................................................... Schedule changes only with Chair Approval for Summer Semester II (6- weeks’ Session) July 13 ............................................. Classes begin for Summer Semester II (5-weeks’ Session) July 13-14 ............. On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for Summer Semester II (5-weeks’ Session) until 6:30 pm on July 14 July 14 ..................................................Tuition Payment Deadline for On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for Summer Semester II (5-weeks’ Session) July 15-18 ....................................................... Schedule changes only with Chair Approval for Summer Semester II (5- weeks’ Session) July 27 ..............................Last day to drop a class for Summer Semester I (9-weeks’ Session)

August 2015

August 3............. Last day to drop a class for Summer Semester I (10-weeks’ and 12- weeks’ Sessions and Summer Semester II (5-weeks’ and 6-weeks’ Sessions) August 4................................... Last day of classes for Summer Semester I (9-weeks’ Session) August 5-6.......................................... Final Exams for Summer Semester I (9-weeks’ Session) August 10-14..............................Viking Experience Week: New Student Orientation Sessions August 11................... Last day of classes for Summer Semester II (5-weeks’ and 6-weeks’ Sessions) and Summer Semester I (10-weeks’ and 12-weeks’ Sessions) August 12........................................ Early Advising and On-campus and Online Registration for Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions closes at 6:30 p.m. August 12...............Tuition Payment Deadline for Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions ends at 6:30 p.m.

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR August 12-13.............Final exams for Summer Semester II (5-weeks’ and 6-weeks’ Sessions) and Summer Semester I (10-weeks’ and 12-weeks’ Sessions) August 14............................................................................Summer Semester 2015 Graduation August 15-19.......................... Online Express Registration available on WebDMC beginning at 12:01 a.m. for Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions and closes on August 19 at 6:30 p.m. August 17.............................................................................. Faculty Return Day/Convocation August 18........................... On-campus Express Registration available for Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions with extended hours at both East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. August 19........................... On-campus Express Registration available for Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. August 19.................................Tuition Payment Deadline for On-campus and Online Express Registration closes at 6:30 p.m. August 20................................................................................................Faculty Development Day August 22.................On-campus Express Registration available on East and West Campuses from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions August 22................................ Online Express Registration available on Web DMC beginning at 12:01 a.m. for Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, Rapid Track Session II, and 8-weeks’ Sessions August 24.......................................Classes begin for Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, and 8-weeks’ Session I August 24-25........................................On-campus and Online Schedule Changes Only for the Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, and 8-weeks’ Session I available at East and West Campuses from 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and on WebDMC from 12:01 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on August 25 August 24-October 12......................... Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for Rapid Track Session II closes on October 12 at 6:30 p.m. August 24-October 19......................... Advising, Registration, and Tuition Payment Deadline for 8-weeks’ Session II closes on October 19 at 6:30 p.m. August 25................Tuition Payment Deadline for Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, and 8-weeks’ Session I closes at 6:30 p.m. August 25.............. Online Express registration for Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, and 8-weeks’ Session I closes at 6:30 p.m. August 26-29.................Schedule Changes Only with Chair Approval for Fall Semester 2015, Rapid Track Session I, and 8-weeks’ Session I

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Telephone Directory

TELEPHONE DIRECTORY

All numbers are area code 361. For Registration Information 698-1970 1-800-652-3357 (for out of town) • Advisors (See the Advising section of this Catalog for a list of advisor phone numbers.) • Campus Events Hotline (recorded information on Del Mar-sponsored events) 698-1600 Cashier/Business Office • East Campus 698-1050 • West Campus 698-1746 Student Services • Dean of Student Outreach and Enrollment Services 698-2474 • Outreach and Recruitment 698-2473 • Registrar • East Campus 698-1255 • West Campus 698-1738 • Student Enrollment Center • Admissions (if calling from out of town) 1-800-652-3357 • Admissions East Campus 698-1290 • Advising East Campus (Liberal Arts and Undeclared) 698-1290 • Admissions West Campus 698-1741 • Advising West Campus (Liberal Arts and Undeclared) 698-1741 • Northwest Center 698-2450 • Testing Center 698-1645 • Financial Aid • East Campus 698-1293 • West Campus 698-1726 • Disability Services • East Campus 698-1298 • Foghorn (Student Newspaper) 698-1246 • Dean of Student Engagement and Retention 698-1277 • Dean of Student Outreach and Enrollment Services 698-2474 • Intramural Recreational Sports 698-1337 • Outreach and Recruitment 698-1290 • Retention Services • East Campus 698-1285 and 698-1584 • West Campus 698-1861 • Counseling Center 698-1586 • Student Leadership and Campus Life 698-1279 • Student Success Center 698-2259 • Scholarships Office of Development, Foundation and the Alumni Association 698-1033 • Title V 698-2682 • TRiO Student Support Services • East Campus 698-1589 • West Campus 698-1863 • Tutoring Services 11


TELEPHONE DIRECTORY • East Campus 698-2267 • West Campus 698-1893 • Veterans Services • East Campus 698-1250 • West Campus 698-1876 Division of Arts and Sciences • Dean of Arts and Sciences 698-1218 • Art and Drama Chairperson 698-1216 • Communications, Languages and Reading 698-1534 • English and Philosophy Chairperson 698-1234 • Kinesiology Chairperson 698-1334 • Mathematics Chairperson 698-1238 • Music Chairperson 698-1211 • Natural Sciences Chairperson 698-1240 • Social Sciences Chairperson 698-1228 Division of Business, Professional and Technology Education • Dean of Business, Professional and Technology Education 698-1700 • Allied Health Chairperson 698-2820 • Business Administration Chairperson 698-1372 • Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology Chairperson 698-1299 • Dental and Imaging Technology Chairperson 698-2858 • Human Sciences and Education Chairperson 698-2809 • Industrial Education Chairperson 698-1701 • Nurse Education Chairperson 698-2860 • Public Safety Education Chairperson 698-1724 • Specialized Law Enforcement Training Director 698-1706 • Technology Education Chairperson 698-1701 Division of Strategic Planning & Workforce Initiatives • Career and Community Education 698-2122 Career Training Children and Youth Computer Training Health Care Programs Job Preparation Personal Enrichment Real Estate Registration 698-1328 GED Test Preparation Classes 698-1756 ESL Hotline 698-1824 Center for Economic Development - Building Reservations 698-2402 • Off-Campus Programs 698-2404 • Strategic Planning/Assessment and Institutional Research 698-1207 • Workforce Programs 698-2408 Corporate Services 698-2408 Transportation Training 698-2707 Small Business Development Center 698-1021 Learning Resources/Library • Director of Libraries 698-1308 • Library, East Campus 698-1308, West Campus 698-1754 Distance Learning and Instructional Technology • E-Learning Services 698-1312 12


TELEPHONE DIRECTORY-ACCREDITATION University of the Incarnate Word Adult Degree Completion Program • UIW Del Mar College Center 698-1985

Early College Programs • Dual Credit 698-1634 • Collegiate High School 698-2425 Administration • President 698-1203 • Provost and Vice President of Instruction and Student Services 698-1205 • Chief Financial Officer and Vice President of Operations 698-1259 Campus Operator (for numbers not listed) 698-1200 Campus Security • Emergency 698-1199 • Environmental, Health, Safety and Risk Management Office 698-1641

2014-2015 Catalog

Volume 78

Accreditation

Del Mar College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award certificates and associate degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call (404) 679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Del Mar College.

Program Accreditation

Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education of the American Occupational Therapy Association (Occupational Therapy Assistant) Accreditation Review Committee on Education in Surgical Technology (Surgical Technology) American Culinary Federation Education Foundation Accrediting Commission (Baking and Pastry and Culinary arts) American Society of Health System Pharmacists Commission on Credentialing (Pharmacy Technician) Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), (Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Echocardiography, Respiratory Therapy) Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIM), (Health Information Technology) Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education of the American Physical Therapy Association (Physical Therapist Assistant) Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association (Dental Assisting, Dental Hygiene) Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (Respiratory Therapy) Joint Review Committee on Education for Radiologic Technology (Radiologic Technology) Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography (Diagnostic Medical Sonography, Echocardiography) 13


ACCREDITATION Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT) (Nuclear Medicine Technology) National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences (Medical Lab Technology) National Association of Schools of Art and Design (Art) National Association of Schools of Music (Music) National Association of Schools of Theatre (Drama) National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (Registered Nurse Education)

Certifications and Approvals

Federal Aviation Administration (Aviation Maintenance – Airframe & Powerplant) National Association for Developmental Education (English and Reading) National Association for the Education of Young Children (Center for Early Learning) Texas Board of Nursing (Registered Nurse Education) Texas Commission on Fire Protection (Fire Science) Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education (Law Enforcement) Texas Department of Aging and Disabilities Services (Long-Term Care Nursing Home Administrator) Texas Department of State Health Services (Emergency Medical Services) Texas Education Agency (Adult Basic Education) Texas Veterans Commission (Veterans Services) Any student, prospective student, agency of the local, state or federal government or any other person or legal entity wishing to examine these documents may contact the Office of the Provost and Vice President of Instruction and Student Services at Del Mar College for direction.

Institutional Membership

Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE)

History

Del Mar College was founded in 1935, under the control of the Board of Trustees of the Corpus Christi Independent School District, to provide two years of postsecondary education. In 1951, the College became an independent political subdivision, legally Corpus Christi Junior College District. In 1999, the Board of Regents adopted Del Mar College District as the official name of the institution. Del Mar College started in borrowed classrooms with 154 students in the first class. Today the College registers more than 22,000 persons each year in academic, occupational and noncredit courses. The College now offers programs on two primary campuses, one campus annex and a satellite Northwest Center with combined physical assets of more than $177 million.

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ACCREDITATION

Philosophy

Del Mar College is committed to the following concepts: Academic freedom and responsibility provide the foundation for the creation of a learning environment which promotes academic excellence, independent and creative thinking and respect for the individual. Lifelong learning is a process for self-development and self-realization by which the individual assimilates knowledge, develops skill and competency and establishes values which enhance his or her understanding of career choices, quality of life and responsibilities of citizenship. All individuals have the right to pursue educational goals and should have the opportunity to realize the potential of their abilities through quality education. Involvement and interaction between the College and the community are essential to ensure relevance and vitality in all educational programs, activities and services and to enhance cultural, economic and social life. The College is committed to the concept of the learning college, an institution of higher education that focuses on student learning. Currently, important learning initiatives include the implementation of curricular learning communities, campus-wide incorporation of the latest in innovative instructional methodologies and technologies, definition and assessment of student mastery of the six intellectual competencies in the core curriculum and measurement of demonstrable student learning and student success in all courses and programs.

Mission

Del Mar College provides access to quality education, workforce preparation, and lifelong learning for student and community success.

Core Values

• Learning: meeting individual needs • Student Success: achieving full potential • Excellence: high-quality instruction • Integrity: honesty and transparency • Access: open to all • Accountability: responsibility to stakeholders • Innovation: progressive programs and services • Diversity: valuing differences

Statement of Purpose

Del Mar College is dedicated to providing access to educational opportunities for all persons without regard to race, color, sex, age, religion, national origin or disability. The College affirms that student learning is its highest priority. By encouraging and supporting continuing excellence in instruction and institutional support services at reasonable student cost, the College will fulfill its mission within the limitations of its physical and financial resources. Specifically, the College has the following seven purposes: •  To provide fully accredited occupational, academic and pre-professional courses leading to certificates, associate degrees and/or the first two 15


ACCREDITATION years of transferable credit toward baccalaureate degrees. •  To provide opportunities to train for economic independence; and to prepare for job entry, occupational advancement and career development. •  To provide developmental, adult literacy and basic skills instruction to help entering students to perform successfully in their chosen academic or occupational fields of study. •  To provide student support services, including a continuing program of counseling and guidance, to assist students in achieving their individual educational goals. •  To provide opportunities for lifelong learning in occupational and avocational pursuits, personal enrichment and general education based on a liberal arts curriculum. •  To provide opportunities to increase intellectual capacities; to develop aesthetic awareness; to expand the dimensions of personal, social, ethical and cultural development; and to develop civic responsibility and qualities essential to good citizenship. •  To provide educational activities for workforce and economic development and for community and academic initiatives in cooperation with area independent school districts, other institutions of higher education, area industries and area military bases; and to encourage and provide cultural activities, both independent of and in cooperation with, organizations and groups in the community. Del Mar College is a comprehensive community college with two primary campuses, one campus annex and a Northwest satellite center located in Corpus Christi, Texas. Del Mar College is supported by local taxes, appropriations by the Texas Legislature, tuition and fees and gifts and grants.

Student Centered Institution

Del Mar College is an open-admission institution of higher education committed to offering opportunities for academic achievement, career development and lifelong learning that prepares individuals to achieve their dreams in today’s global and technical society. Students will be immersed in some of the greatest works of philosophy, politics, literature, business, science, technology and art that higher education has to offer. Throughout its academic and student development structure, Del Mar College is committed to supporting the College population in the attainment of an excellent education that will empower students to achieve their career potential and become participating citizens in the community. The Provost and Vice President of Instruction and Student Services carries responsibility for maintaining the College’s position as an instructional leader in all disciplines represented throughout the institution. The faculty focuses on academic excellence and innovation in teaching. The College collaborates with area school districts and universities to facilitate a seamless transition for students as they achieve their educational goals. The College affirms that student learning is its highest priority. Higher education is essential to human progress. Providing opportunities for demonstrable, measurable student learning multiplies intellectual, cultural and civic development. Del Mar College is committed to these core concepts of a Learning College, as outlined by the League for Innovation in the Community Colleges: 16


ACCREDITATION • create substantive changes in individual learners • engage learners as full partners in the learning process • insist that students assume primary responsibility for their learning choices • create and offer as many options for high quality learning as possible • assist learners in forming and participating in collaborative learning activities • truly succeed only when improved and expanded learning can be documented for learners The College upholds the principles of collaborative participation and decision making and views the staff, faculty and students as equal partners in the learning environment. Staff and faculty facilitate student success, encourage students to play an active role in their own learning and development and embrace the diverse needs and backgrounds of the individuals who comprise the student body. The Dean of Student Engagement and Retention is responsible for administering and coordinating student services and for representing students’ interest to the fullest possible extent. The services provided are an integral part of the educational process and are supportive, informative and geared to benefit the students. Specifically, Student Services: • affords opportunities for students to develop and enhance intellectual capacity, aesthetic and ethical awareness, social and cultural enrichment and qualities essential for successful scholarship, citizenship and leadership • supports students’ holistic learning experiences, educational goals, career aspiration and personal development • regards students with respect and dignity and as unique and diverse individuals • continually seeks to identify and provide coordinated, comprehensive and quality programs and services to encourage lifelong learning and self-empowerment of students • empowers students in the acquisition of knowledge and skills essential for success by providing access to College support services, technology and information and • is committed to standards of excellence and measures its effectiveness by the satisfaction and achievement of the students it serves.

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GETTING STARTED

Getting Started

There are a lot of ways you can walk through our doors. Student Enrollment Center (SEC)

The Student Enrollment Center (SEC) provides students with a fluid transition to Del Mar College by connecting students with knowledgeable staff who can assist with the admissions process, as well as providing academic advising for students majoring in liberal arts or classified as undecided. Contact the SEC East at (361) 698-1290 or SEC West at (361) 698-1741. Students seeking admission to the college should submit an application for admission, a valid placement examination and an official copy of their high school transcript. If transferring from another institution, students should submit official copies of all transcripts from other institutions attended. Additionally, students who meet the criteria are required to submit proof of having received a bacterial meningitis vaccination pursuant to Texas Senate Bill 1107. Visit www.delmar.edu/meningitis to learn more. Testing is discussed in detail in the “Assessment and Placement” section of this Catalog.

Open Enrollment Admissions

Del Mar College has an “open enrollment” admissions policy under the authority of the Texas Administrative Code Title 19 and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Open enrollment means that all students will be granted admission as long as they complete the application process outlined on the next page.

Limitations

Admission to the College does not guarantee your admission to all programs of the College. Certain programs have limited enrollment due to special equipment needs or space limitations. Additionally, Del Mar College also offers selective admission programs that have specialized admission requirements, such as additional testing and GPA requirements. These admissions limitations are listed under specific programs in the Catalog.

Right to an Academic Fresh Start

If you are a Texas resident and have academic course work that is over 10 years old and would like to request to have the work ignored for admissions purposes to a special admission program, you will need to contact the Registrar’s Office. You must complete the Right to an Academic Fresh Start Agreement with the Registrar’s Office prior to the deadline for applying to a special admissions program. In signing the agreement, you confirm that the course credit or grades earned by you 10 or more years prior to the date of the semester in which you plan to seek your enrollment will not be considered for admissions purposes and cannot apply towards your degree. The Right to an Academic Fresh Start does not change your transcript and cannot be used for financial aid purposes. Since Del Mar College has “open admissions” to the college, Academic Fresh Start is not applicable to admission to the college -- just to a special admissions program.

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GETTING STARTED

General Application

Before you can register for classes, you must apply to the College.

Application for Admission: First Step

Apply through Del Mar College’s link at www.delmar.edu or by using the Texas Common Application at www.applytexas.org (click on “Create a new 2 year application”) or by completing a paper application which can be obtained from the Student Enrollment Center. General Checklist of Admissions Documents 1. Application for Admission 2. Official high school transcript or GED test scores 3. Official college transcripts, if transferring 4. Proof of Texas residency 5. Texas Success Initiative approved placement examination. First time college students require a completion of a Pre Assessment Activity prior to registering for the exam. Visit www.delmar.edu/tsi for more information. 6. Meningitis Vaccine: All incoming students who are 21 years of age or younger will need to show proof of a bacterial meningitis vaccination at least 10 days prior to the first day of class. All admissions documents should be submitted at least two weeks prior to inperson registration and five days prior for Web registration to avoid delays. All information on the application must be true, accurate and complete. Any submission of false information is grounds for rejection of an application, withdrawal of any offer of acceptance, cancellation of enrollment or appropriate disciplinary action.

Social Security Number

You are encouraged to use your Social Security number as part of your permanent student record. The number will assist the College in managing your student record when utilizing federal resources such as financial aid and/or veterans benefits etc. If you choose not to use your Social Security number or do not have one, you may obtain a unique matriculation number from the Student Enrollment Center. In order to protect the privacy of your Social Security number, the College will assign an alternate identification number. You will use this alternate ID number in conducting all transactions at the College. DEL MAR COLLEGE STUDENT RECORDS POLICY RELEASE OF STUDENT RECORDS All records submitted for a student’s file become the property of the College and a part of the student’s permanent record. High school transcripts, transcripts from other colleges, test scores, immunization records and other similar documents are not duplicated for any reason to any person and/or institution, including the student.

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GETTING STARTED STUDENT PRIVACY The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (Buckley Amendment) FERPA, sets forth the guidelines for the release of student records to other parties. Under this federal law, students have the right to inspect their records and correct any inaccuracies that might be found in them. Access to the record by anyone other than the student is limited and generally requires prior written consent by the student. The College will mail confidential records, including grades and transcripts, at the student’s direction. Any person, who picks up sealed copies of these records for the student must have written, signed permission to do so from the student. Directory information, which includes a student’s name, address, date and place of birth, field of study, dates of attendance, and degrees and awards received may be released by the College without consent of the student. Any student who wishes to withhold any or all of this directory information from release must notify the Registrar in writing within three weeks of the date of the student’s initial enrollment.

Specific Application Requirements

In addition to filling out the general Application for Admission, there are other specific requirements depending on which category of student you are.

Category of Student

There are seven categories of students admitted to the College, each with specific admissions requirements. 1. First-Time College Student Follow these requirements: A. Submit an official transcript from an accredited high school with date of graduation or GED (General Education Development) test scores. B. If you graduated from a non-accredited high school or home school program, provide a notarized transcript with date of graduation. C. If you are a Texas high school student and have not passed the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) test, you may be admitted to Del Mar College by individual approval from the Dean of Student Outreach and Enrollment Services. An official high school transcript (A) and test scores (D) must be submitted before applying for individual approval. D. Submit test scores utilizing the Texas Success Initiative Placement Exam. Completion of a Pre Assessment Activity will be required prior to registering for the exam. Some students may be exempt from these tests based on their SAT, ACT, *STAAR or *TAKS scores. (* Check with the Student Enrollment Center on the eligibility of scores.) E. If you are 21 years of age or younger, submit proof of a bacterial meningitis vaccination at least 10 days prior to the first day of class. Note: Students who are entering the College under individual approval will not be eligible to receive financial aid.

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GETTING STARTED 2. High School Students: Special Programs Del Mar College, in cooperation with specific area high schools, has designed special programs in which high school students can earn college credit while still attending high school. Requirements to participate in one of these programs can be obtained from your high school counselor or the Del Mar College Student Enrollment Center. The special high school programs are: A. Dual Credit This program offers you the opportunity to receive credit for a college course while simultaneously earning credit toward high school graduation. You need to fill out a Dual Credit application form. To participate in Dual Credit classes, your high school district must have a contractual agreement with Del Mar College. B. Early Admissions The program offers you the opportunity to study at the College and receive college credits while completing requirements for high school graduation. You need to fill out a Request for Early Admissions form at the Del Mar College Student Enrollment Center. Both Dual Credit and Early Admissions are designed for high school students who have demonstrated the ability to accept academic challenge and responsibility. To be eligible for Dual Credit or Early Admissions Programs, you must meet the following requirements: • completed sophomore year of high school • submit proof of Meningitis vaccination • approval of the high school counselor, principal and parent or guardian • meet Del Mar College admissions requirements, including assessment • take only those classes for which assessment levels are met • take no more than two College courses per semester (some exceptions can be made) • adhere to all policies of the College Standardized test norms and appropriate scores are subject to change. C. High School Articulation Programs Del Mar College offers college credit for high school occupational studies in specific programs. For more information on these programs, contact the Dean of Business, Professional and Technology Education at Del Mar College at (361) 698-1700 or your high school counseling office.

3. Returning Students If you were previously enrolled at Del Mar College but have been away for one year or longer, you must submit, to the Student Enrollment Center, a new Application for Admission and official transcripts of study completed at other colleges during the period of absence. Placement tests may be required. Additionally, students will need to submit proof of having received a bacterial meningitis vaccination pursuant to Texas Senate Bill 62.

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GETTING STARTED 4. Transfer Students Transcript Requirement Official transcripts are critical if you are transferring from other colleges. Be sure to follow these steps. A. Submit current official transcripts of credit earned from each institution of higher education previously attended. If you attended another higher education institution but earned no credit, you must submit an official high school transcript or GED certificate. If your previous course work does not include college credit in English and math, you must provide placement test scores. B. If you are unable to furnish a transcript prior to registration, you may be allowed to register with the understanding that an official transcript(s) must be on file in the Student Enrollment Center within the first semester. If you do not meet this deadline, you may be ineligible to register in any subsequent semesters. C. If you wish to continue beyond one semester at Del Mar, you must file a degree plan with the appropriate department within the first semester. D. Students transferring in credit will be required to complete a Transfer Evaluation Request Form (TERF) and submit to the Registrar’s Office. The form can be accessed on the Registrar’s Office webpage at www. delmar.edu/registrar. Credit Earned You will be credited with all courses you are entitled to according to the transcript of record and can receive advanced standing if the former institution is recognized by one of the following associations: • Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools • New England Association of Schools and Colleges • North Central Association of Colleges and Schools • Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities • Southern Association of Colleges and Schools • Western Association of Schools and Colleges Students transferring in credit will be required to complete a Transfer Evaluation Request Form (TERF) and submit the form to the Registrar’s Office. The form can be accessed on the Office of the Registrar’s webpage. Once all of your official transfer transcripts have been received by the Student Enrollment Center, the evaluation request will be processed. To ensure proper advising and course selection, submit your transcripts as early as possible. You will be notified via your Del Mar College email account once your request has been completed. Evaluation of credits may take from 5 to 6 weeks to process. It is highly encouraged to submit your documentation as soon as possible to ensure timely evaluation. Transfer Disputes The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) has established the following procedures for Del Mar College to resolve transfer disputes involving lower division courses: • If Del Mar College does not accept course credit earned by you at another institution of higher education, Del Mar College will give written notice to you and the other institution that the transfer of the course credit is denied. 22


GETTING STARTED • The two institutions and you shall attempt to resolve the transfer of the course credit in accordance with Coordinating Board rules and/or guidelines. • If the transfer dispute is not resolved to your satisfaction or to the satisfaction of the institution at which the credit was earned, within 45 days after the date you received written notice of the denial, Del Mar College will notify the commissioner of the THECB of its denial and the reason for the denial. The commissioner of higher education, or the commissioner’s designee, will make the final determination about a dispute concerning the transfer of course credit and give written notice to you and the institutions. You may consult with the College’s Provost and Vice President of Instruction and Student Services throughout this process. Admissions Conditions When transferring, there are four conditions of admission. 1. If you are eligible for readmission to your former college, you are eligible for admission to Del Mar College. 2. If you are on scholastic probation, you will be admitted under the same status at Del Mar College. 3. If you are on scholastic suspension, you must appeal for admissions through the Registrar’s Office. 4. If you are on disciplinary probation at your former college, you must appear before the Dean of Student Engagement and Retention before registering. If approved for admission, you may be placed on disciplinary probation at Del Mar. 5. Transient (Summer Only) Students If you are transferring from another institution of higher education for the summer terms only, you must provide an official transcript from your most recent institution attended and meet the eligibility requirements for the courses that you will register for at Del Mar College. Assessment scores may be required to be able to make this determination. 6. International Students If you are an international student wishing to study at Del Mar College, you must complete the following procedures to be considered for admission. Once you obtain your F-1 visa and begin studies, you must comply with all international student regulations in order to maintain the status of your visa and remain enrolled. Submit all of the following documents: • Completed application for admission • Official transcripts showing completion of secondary education or college work • Bank statement showing proof of funds of at least $18,000 per academic year to cover your educational and living expenses • Provide certified Affidavit of Support from sponsor. You may use the I-134 form located at www.uscis.gov/i-134. • Transfer Clearance Form (if student attended a U.S. institution) • Copy of your current passport information (name, passport number, citizenship, etc.)

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GETTING STARTED Upon admission, you will be issued the I-20 form. Present this form and the receipt for the I-901 fee when you apply for your student visa. If you are an international student transferring from a U.S. college or university, you must provide a current I-94, I-20, and passport in addition to the documents listed on previous page. You must show proficiency in English unless you will enroll in the ESOL program. You will be referred to the ESOL program for testing and evaluation. Before beginning your academic program, you must take the Texas Success Initiative placement test. Del Mar College does not provide housing. There are a number of real estate agents and housing locator services in Corpus Christi that may assist you in securing accommodations. As an F-1 student, you are not eligible for financial aid. However, you may be eligible to apply for scholarships. Also, you may not work without permission. If you are in an academic program, you may be eligible to work part-time on campus. After one academic year you may be eligible to work off campus; however, specific criteria must be met and authorization is required by the U.S. government. 7. Military Personnel and Military Dependents Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC) Del Mar College has been designated a “Servicemembers Opportunity College” and is committed to serving the educational needs of servicemembers and their dependents. If you are an active duty military personnel or a dependent enrolling through the SOC program, you must complete the regular College admissions requirements and must complete 15 semester credit hours, in residence, at the College. Credits remaining for completion of a degree program may be earned in the following ways: • Resident study at Del Mar College • Credits earned through other regionally-accredited institutions may be transferred when applicable to a Del Mar College degree or certificate • Semester credit hours may be earned through successful completion of CLEP Subject Examinations • Courses completed through the United States Armed Forces Institute (USAFI) may be accepted following the recommendations of the American Council on Education (ACE) when such courses are applicable to a specific Del Mar College degree or certificate • Del Mar College will accept DANTES courses, but the scores must be submitted in the official educational transcript to the Del Mar College Registrar’s Office for evaluation. DANTES scores are not automatically transferred to Del Mar College. • Military service schools and Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) credits may be evaluated and credits awarded following ACE recommendations when such credits can be applied to a specific Del Mar College degree or certificate. • Successful completion of Del Mar College departmental examinations will result in an award of credit which would normally be given for completion of the course. Such credit does not serve to meet the residency requirement.

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GETTING STARTED

Student Classifications

If you have completed college-level, non-developmental semester hours, you are classified as follows: • Freshman: First-year student, or less than 30 semester credit hours. • Sophomore: Second-year student who has completed the equivalent of one year of full-time undergraduate work; that is, at least 30 semester credit hours and not more than 72 semester credit hours. • Unclassified: More than 72 semester hours; no associate degree. • Associate Degree: Previously earned associate degree. • Baccalaureate or Above: Previously earned a baccalaureate or above degree.

Registration

Now that you’ve completed the admissions process, you can register.

Registrar’s Office

The Registrar’s Office assists you with registration, graduation, as well as requests for transcripts and other student-related records at Del Mar College.

Registration Process

• If you have a complete admissions file, you may register on the Web or through your advisor on campus. • See Website for details about dates, times and procedures for registration. • If you have less than 24 hours of credit, you must see an advisor before registering for classes. • Tuition and fee charges must be paid at the time of registration, or a payment plan may be arranged via online via WebDMC. Registration is not complete until all payments have been made.

Advising

Advising, including a list of advisors, is discussed in detail in this Catalog. • If you have selected a major, faculty advising is available for you. The Student Enrollment Center can direct students to the appropriate department for advising. • If you have not selected a major or are a liberal arts major, advising staff can advise you. Services are available in the Student Enrollment Center on the East and West Campuses.

Residency

Proof of Texas Residency In accordance with state law, if you plan to register as a Texas resident, you must prove that you are legally entitled to pay in-state tuition. Documentation proving state residency must be presented at the time of application or readmission. If you have had a break of a year or more in education, you must again show proof of Texas residency upon reapplying for admission. For a list of acceptable documentation to prove residency, contact or the Student Enrollment Center. Acceptable Documentation Following are examples of acceptable proof that may be used to establish Texas residency. • Texas high school or college transcript showing enrollment one year prior, • Employer’s statement confirming employment in Texas for the previous full 25


GETTING STARTED year, • Deed, mortgage papers, or property tax statements that name you as the Texas property owner (appropriately dated), • Valid Texas driver’s license that is at least one year old at the time of enrollment, or • Utility bills, cancelled checks, rent receipts or lease agreements showing your Texas address for the previous full year.

Non-Texas Resident If you originally came to Texas from another state for the purpose of attending an educational institution, you are presumed to be nonresident unless you have legally established residency under the rules of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Rules: Chapter 21. If you have not proven your Texas residency at the time of preregistration and/or registration, you will be considered out-of-state and billed accordingly. You must correct residency problems within the first week of the term to receive any type of refund. Admissions personnel can help clarify residency status. Establishing Residency of Military/Military Dependents In order to qualify for in-state and in-district tuition, if you are a military service member or military dependent, you must submit a letter from the commanding officer or from the individual assigned to handle such duty, verifying Texas as the state of duty station. This verification must be submitted once per year to Del Mar College on or before registration. Forms are available from the Registrar’s Office.

Change of Name, Address, Social Security Number or Major

If you change your name, address, social security number or major, you are required to submit the changes to the Registrar’s Office. A Social Security number or name change requires a legal document to support the change. Any communication from the College using information you provided for its files is considered to be properly delivered.

Veterans Services and Benefits

Del Mar College’s programs are approved for those who wish to attend and receive benefits under the Post-9/11 GI Bill (Chapter 33), Montgomery GI Bill-Active Duty (MGIB-AD-Chapter 30), Montgomery GI Bill-Selected Reserve (MGIB-SR-Chapter 1606), Reserve Education Assistance Program (REAP-Chapter 1607), Veterans Education Assistance Program (VEAP), Education Assistance Test Program (Section 901), Survivors’ and Dependents’ Educational Assistance Program (DEA-Chapter 35), the National Call to Service Program, and Vocational Rehabilitation (Chapter 31). The monthly rate of payment to veterans is determined by Public Law 94-502. Students attending Texas public institutions of higher education must be in compliance with the Texas Success Initiative (TSI), as of Fall 2003 (Texas Education Code 51.3062) in order to enroll in public institutions of higher education. The law requires all entering college students to be assessed for college readiness in reading, mathematics and writing unless the student qualifies for an exemption. Each student must be placed in a developmental education program designed to help the student achieve college readiness.

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GETTING STARTED Veteran Exemption A student who on or after August 1, 1990, was honorably discharged, retired or released from active duty as a member of the arned forces of the United States or the Texas National Guard or service as a member of the reserve component of the arned forces of the United States may be exempted. The veteran must provide a valid DD214. Military Exemption A student who is serving on active duty as a member of the armed forces of the United States, The Texas National Guard or as a member of a reserve component of the armed forces of the United States and has been serving for at least three years preceding enrollment may be exempted. The service member must provide a valid statement of service from his or her unit of assignment. You are strongly encouraged to consider placement testing under the TSI. Even though you may qualify for the exemption and may be placed directly into college level courses in math and English, this placement may not actually be appropriate based on your academic skills. Taking the placement test will give you a good idea of the appropriate level of coursework. This may help you be more successful in your studies. If you are eligible for this exemption, and elect to take the exemption it is irreversible and you may not be eligible to utilize VA benefits for future developmental coursework. Please contact the Coordinator in the College Veteran’s Center for more information.

Prior to Enrollment

Prior to enrollment, if you are planning to attend classes and utilize veteran benefits, you should contact the Veteran Services Office to inquire about required documentation relative to your enrollment and “certification” of attendance to the Veterans Administration.

Upon Enrollment

Prior to certification of your initial semester, you must provide an approved, signed degree plan to Veterans Services. Degree plans are available through the Student Enrollment Center or through departmental advisors. Be sure to have copies of all previous transcripts for initial counseling sessions. You do not have the option of having prior credit reviewed. All previous education and training must be provided to the school for review. This includes all credits from postsecondary institutions and military credits. You may have your military transcript converted to Texas Credit by submitting a College Credit for Heroes Application. For more information refer to www.collegecreditforheroes.org/ or contact the Veterans Services Office.

Close of First Semester

At the close of the first semester or upon the successful completion of 12 semester hours, you should have military credit and any transfer credits from prior education evaluated and furnish Veterans Services with a copy of the updated degree plan.

Each Semester

Each semester, you must advise the Veterans Services Office of courses in which you are enrolled and request certification of Veterans benefits. Courses at Del Mar College are approved for veterans’ training. It is your responsibility to inform Veterans Services 27


GETTING STARTED Office of any changes in enrollment status. The VA will not be notified of your enrollment or request for benefits if you fail to complete a request for certification for each semester that you intend to use veterans benefits.

Standards of Progress for Veterans Satisfactory

If you are receiving veteran’s educational benefits, you must make satisfactory academic progress by maintaining a 2.0 grade point average (GPA) each enrollment period.

Unsatisfactory

The first term you fall below a 2.0 grade point average will result in your being placed on probation. If you fail to meet the minimum standard the next semester, you will be placed on suspension. Failure to achieve the required GPA will cause the benefits to be terminated until the GPA is satisfactory. If you are enrolled in a one-semester certificate program and do not maintain a 2.0 GPA or better, you will be reported to the Veterans Administration for unsatisfactory progress. You will have only one more opportunity to retake the program and be eligible to receive VA benefits.

Eligibility

To regain eligibility, you must register for at least half time in the next semester at your own expense and earn at least a 2.0 grade point average. (Hazlewood exemption may be used during this time if you are deemed eligible by the Veterans Services Office).

Appeal

If you have mitigating circumstances that caused you not to make satisfactory progress, you may appeal to the Veterans Administration.

Veterans Semester Hour Classification

The Veterans Administration uses the semester hour classification scale below to determine your payment. The number of semester hours enrolled at this college is reported to the Veterans Administration. This classification scale is used only for the fall and spring semesters. The summer sessions are calculated differently. To ensure classification, contact Veterans Services. Semester Classification Semester Classification Hours Hours 1-5 1⁄4 time 9-11 3⁄4 time 6-8 1⁄2 time 12 or more Full-time The monthly rates of payment to veterans are provided for by Public Law 94-502.

Veterans Registration Process

If you have a complete admissions file, you may register on the Web or through your advisor on campus. See Website for details about dates, times and procedures for registration. If you have less than 24 hours of credit, you must see an advisor before registering for classes. Tuition and fee charges must be paid at the time of registration, which is not complete 28


GETTING STARTED until all payments have been made. The Veteran Services Office will work closely with the Business Office and Cashier to ensure that prospective payments from your VA benefits are anticipated. Certain Chapters will require advance payment of tuition and fees as indicated on the next page: Chapter 30 - Student payment by payment deadline is required. Chapter 31 - Veterans Services Office will notify Cashier that VApayment is anticipated. Chapter 33 - Veterans Services Office will notify Cashier that VA payment is anticipated Chapter 35 - Student payment by payment deadline is required. Chapter 1606 - Student payment by payment deadline is required. Chapter 1607 - Student payment by payment deadline is required. VRAP - Student payment by payment deadline is required. Hazlewood - Veterans Services Office will notify Cashier that tuition exemption is authorized.

Veteran Student Advising

Advising, including a list of advisors, is discussed in detail in this Catalog. If you have selected a major, faculty advising is available for you. The Veterans Services Office, the Student Enrollment Center or the Registrar can direct you to the appropriate department for advising. If you have not selected a major or are a Liberal Arts major, Student Enrollment Center staff can advise you. Services are available in the Student Enrollment Center on the East and West Campuses.

Veteran Student Residency

A person is entitled to pay tuition and fees at an institution of higher education at the rates provided for Texas residents without regard to the length of time the person has resided in this state. If the person files with the institution at which the person intends to register a letter of intent to establish residence in this state and resides in this state while enrolled in the institution and the person: 1. is eligible for benefits under the federal Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008 (38 U.S.C. Section 3301 et seq.) or any other federal law authorizing educational benefits for veterans; 2. is the spouse of a person described by subdivision (1); or 3. is a child of a person described by Subdivision (1) who is 25 years of age or younger on the first day of the semester or other academic term for which the person is registering, except that the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board by rule shall prescribe procedures by which a person who suffered from a severe illness or other debilitating condition that affected the person’s ability to use the benefit provided by this subsection before reaching corresponding to the time the person was unable to use the benefit because of the illness or condition. A form letter may be obtained from the Veterans Services Office for students who meet this eligibility requirement. Student Enrollment Center personnel and Veterans Services representatives can help clarify residency status.

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GETTING STARTED

Changes in Registration

Any time your course schedule changes you must immediately notify the Veterans Services. Title 38, Code of Federal Regulations, Section 21.4203 requires that all changes in enrollment credit must be reported in a timely manner. Reducing the number of semester hours attempted within a given semester may cause a decrease in VA benefit amount and could generate an overpayment from the VA. If overpayment occurs, you will become indebted to the VA and future benefit payments could be reduced by the amount of the overpayment.

Implications for Financial Aid

You should be aware that dropping courses may affect eligibility for financial aid. Contact Financial Aid Services prior to dropping a course or completely withdrawing from school. If you stop attending class without officially withdrawing from the College, then the grade is an automatic “F.” Students receiving Veterans Benefits for education should contact Veterans Services for specific policies concerning drops and withdrawals. These changes may have a direct effect on your VA benefits. Students using Hazlewood Legacy benefits must meet Financial Aid Eligibility standards in order to remain eligible for Hazlewood Legacy. You do not have to be in receipt of Financial Aid, but must be eligible to receive Financial Aid. For more information, please contact the Veteran’s Services Office.

Commencement

Graduation is held three times a year: May, August and December. Only if you have completed all of the graduation requirements will you be permitted to graduate.

Veteran Graduate Congratulatory Reception

A congratulatory reception will be held for all veteran graduates and their family members each Commencement cycle. Look for a written invitation from the Veterans Service Office. Additionally, all veteran graduates will receive a gift from the Veterans Services Office.

Veteran Graduate Top Student Award

Each Commencement cycle, the Coordinator of the College Veterans Center will award a Special Plaque to the top veteran graduate.

Veterans Honors Cord

Every veteran student who graduates will be issued a Red, White and Blue Honor cord to wear with their graduation regalia. Honor cords will be issued at the Congratulatory Reception each commencement cycle.

VA Workstudy

The Department of Veterans Affairs sponsors a workstudy program. Students receiving veteran’s educational benefits under Chapters 30, 31, 32, 33, 35, 1606 and 1607 may qualify. Students must be certified to the VA for at least ¾ time enrollment and must perform duties that are directly related to veteran benefits and files in the Veterans Services Office. Several positions are filled on a continuous basis. For more informa30


GETTING STARTED tion, contact the Coordinator of the College Veterans Center.

Student Withdrawal or Excused Absence for Active Military Service

Upon notice from a student required to participate in active military service, students shall be excused from attending classes or engaging in other required activities, including examinations. A student shall not be penalized for an absence which is excused under this subsection and shall be allowed to complete an assignment or take an examination from which the student is excused within a reasonable time after the absence. • Maximum Excused Absence: A student called to service as a member of a reserve military component or the Texas National Guard will not be penalized and shall be excused for absences accrued during the period of active military service for a period of active duty no longer than 25% of the total number of class meetings or the contact hour equivalent (not including the final exam period) for the specific course or courses in which the student is currently enrolled at the beginning of the period of active military service. (Example: During a 16 week semester with 32 planned class meetings, no more than 4 weeks and 8 class meeting absences may be excused.) • Retention of Student’s Work: Faculty members will retain the student’s coursework completed during the portion of the course prior to the student being called to active military service to be used when the student returns and completes the course requirements in order to ascertain a proper grade award. • Course Syllabus or Instructional Plan: The course syllabus or other instructional plan that was in effect when the student was called to active military service shall be retained for future use so that the student will be able to complete the course without prejudice and under the same course requirements that were in effect when the student enrolled in the course. • Completion of Assignments and Examinations: The student shall be granted a reasonable period of time after the absence to complete assignments and examinations. A reasonable period of time shall be defined as “within 30 calendar days of completion of active service period or one week prior to the final examination date scheduled, whichever occurs first.” • Failure to Complete Assignments and Examinations: If a student fails to complete missed assignments and examinations, the student will not receive credit for uncompleted assignments and examinations and will be awarded a course final grade accordingly.

Summary

No matter how you walk through our doors, you have started on your path to success. 31


FINANCIAL AID

Financial Aid

Assistance

While you and your family are expected to assume a major responsibility for the costs associated with attending a certificate or degree program at the College, there are resources to help you. While there are many free resources available to you, there are many opportunities for students seeking assistance to be taken advantage of. There are several websites and companies who offer help with filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for a fee. These sites and companies are not affiliated with or endorsed by the U.S. Department of Education or Del Mar College. We urge students not to pay for these sites for assistance that you can get for free. Never send money (no matter how small) to companies for free financial aid information and if you are asked for any credit card information while filling out the FAFSA online, you are not at the official government site. The financial aid office at Del Mar College is here to assist you free of charge in finding ways to fund your education. If you have a demonstrated financial need, or even if you are not able to demonstrate need, you can apply for financial assistance to fund your education. Read on to find out how. Financial Aid Services encourages you to seek financial assistance to help pay for college. Assistance comes in the form of gift aid (grants and scholarships) and self-help aid (loans and employment).

Eligibility

Requirements

To be considered for aid eligibility, you must: • Be a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen • Be registered with Selective Service (male, U.S. citizens and permanent residents, ages 18-26) • Have demonstrated financial need as determined by your processed FAFSA and your school cost of attendance • Attend a school that takes part in one or more of the financial aid programs • Have a high school diploma, GED (or its recognized equivalent) or have been home schooled • Be enrolled at least half-time (6 hours) in an eligible program as approved by the Department of Education (in some cases, students may receive a Federal Pell Grant for less than half-time enrollment) • Be working toward a degree or certificate • Be making satisfactory academic progress as defined by Del Mar College Policy. Refer to “Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy” section • Not owe a refund on any Title IV (Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Academic Competitiveness Grant or Federal State Student Incentive Grant) or any other Higher Education Grant program received at any institution previously attended. Refer to “Return of Title IV Funds” under CONSEQUENCES OF WITHDRAWING/DROPPING section • Not be in default on any Title IV Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Staf32


FINANCIAL AID ford Student Loan, Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (FPLUS), Federal Supplemental Loan to Students (FSLS) or any other Higher Education Act Loan Program received at any institution previously attended

Application Process FAFSA: First Step

To qualify for financial assistance, including loans and some scholarships, you must first complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This can be done one of three ways: 1. Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) on the Web, or 2. Obtain a printed FAFSA at Financial Aid Services at Del Mar College (due to high costs, these may be issued in a limited amount), or 3. Complete the FAFSA Renewal Application on the Web.

Electronic FAFSA

The U.S. Department of Education has an electronic version of the FAFSA. By using this version, you may reduce the processing time of your application by two to three weeks. Applying on the Web allows you to complete the FAFSA over the Internet in an easy-to-use format. FAFSA on the Web/Renewal FAFSA on the Web can be found at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The questions on the Web application will be listed differently than those on the paper application; therefore, it is important to complete a Pre-Application Worksheet instead of a paper FAFSA to guide you. You can print a copy of the Worksheet from Section I of the FAFSA on the Web home page at www.fafsa.ed.gov or pick up a copy from Financial Aid Services. The Renewal FAFSA is a tremendous time saver as responses from the prior cycles’ FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA are displayed, and you answer only those questions that are likely to have changed from the previous year. The online application procedure is also available in Spanish.

Personal Identification Number (PIN)

If you applied for the 2013-2014 school year, you will receive an electronic Personal Identification Number (PIN) from the Central Processing Center. This PIN serves as your electronic signature as well as enabling you to access your account information. If you are a dependent student, you must have one parent sign the signature page unless your parent has also obtained a PIN. For more information on the PIN, log on to www. pin.ed.gov.

Application Steps

Below are important steps that you need to follow to apply for financial aid. 1. Complete your FAFSA with your correct legal name as it appears on your Social Security Card. 2. Complete the FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA using the actual figures from your 2013 Federal Income Tax Return, annual statements you receive 33


FINANCIAL AID from Social Security, TANF and/or Child Support, including any other documentation of other sources of income. Accuracy is very important when completing this step of the FAFSA, especially these items. Accuracy can be obtained by using the IRS data retrieval option in place of your Income Tax Return: a. Adjusted Gross income from the IRS 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ. b. Income tax paid from the IRS 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ. c. Income received from other sources, such as gift money from family, private sources, housing, food and other living allowances paid to members of the military, clergy and others (including cash payments and cash value of benefits). d. Household size should reflect only those family members who are being supported by the student or the student’s parents. (Do not include family members who do not fit the description found in the FAFSA instructions). e. Number of family members from the household who are in college (Do not include your parents). f. Cash and savings. g. Investment and other real estate net worth (Do not include the value of the house in which you or your family live). h. Dependent student’s income. 3. After completing the FAFSA online, submit the application electronically and either mail the signature page within 10-14 days or utilize the PIN which serves as an electronic signature. 4. About a week after filing your FAFSA electronically, you should receive a Student Aid Report (SAR) in the mail. If you provided an email address, the SAR will be emailed to you. If you listed Del Mar College on your FAFSA (code 003563) you are not required to bring the SAR to Financial Aid Services. Although we will receive an Electronic Institutional Student Information Record (ISIR) with your information, you must still contact Financial Aid Services for any other missing information. 5. The following documentation may be requested to complete your file: a. Del Mar College Resource Application available on the “eForm” section of the WebDMC portal. (Mandatory to open file after FAFSA has been received). b. 2013 IRS tax transcripts for parent and/or student (if IRS data retrieval option was not used). c. Verification Worksheet provided by Del Mar College located under “forms” on the Paying for College link (check your Missing Information page on WebDMC portal for appropriate worksheet, if applicable). d. Academic transcripts from all colleges attended. e. High School transcript with graduation date. f. GED certificate. Failure to complete any of these steps, or if any of the information is inaccurate or missing, may cause a delay in the processing of your file. In addition to these steps, you may request to schedule a personal interview 34


FINANCIAL AID with financial aid personnel.

Financial Aid Deadlines: Priority

Priority is given to you when you complete your financial aid file by the priority deadlines and show the greatest documented need. Priority deadlines are established to allow ample time for the processing of your file and timely delivery of funds to you. Applications for financial assistance are accepted after January 1 of each year for the following academic year. It is recommended that you apply at least two months before the priority deadline. Financial Aid Program Deadline Academic Year May 1 Spring Only October 1 Summer Sessions February 15 If the scheduled deadline falls on a holiday or weekend, you have until the next business day to turn in your paperwork. All applications received after the priority deadline are awarded according to the availability of funds on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Types Of Aid

The source and amount of any aid will depend greatly on your demonstrated need as determined by the U.S. Department of Education and Del Mar College Financial Aid Services. Aid comes in two major forms: gift aid and self-help aid. For detailed information on types of aid, go to www.delmar.edu/Paying_for_College.aspx.

I. Gift Aid

There are two kinds of gift aid—grants and scholarships: A. Grants Del Mar College participates in numerous federal, state and local grant programs. • Federal Pell Grant (PELL) • Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG) • Texas Public Educational Grant (TPEG) • Texas Public Educational Grant (TPEGN) • Toward Excellence, Access, and Sucess (TX) Grant (TxNEW) • Toward Excellence, Access and Success (TX) Grant Renewed (TxCON) • Texas Educational Opportunity Grant Initial (TEOG1) • Texas Educational Opportunity Grant Renewal (TEOG2) B. Scholarships Del Mar College Foundation, Inc. offers over $750,000 in scholarships each year to help deserving students pay for their college education. Scholarships are monetary awards to students that do not have to be repaid. Every scholarship awarded by the Foundation is made possible through charitable gifts from individuals, corporations, organizations or foundations. Scholarships are awarded on the basis of scholastic achievement, financial need, field of study or a variety 35


FINANCIAL AID of criteria set by the benefactor. Average awards are between $500 to $1,000 and students can be awarded multiple scholarships to help offset the cost of education. The Foundation oversees more than 440 different scholarship funds made available through generous donation or grants. A single on-line application matches students to all the Del Mar College Foundation scholarships for which they are eligible. While students are required to fill out the FASFA, they are not required to be eligible for financial aid to apply for Foundation scholarships unless financial need is a requirement of that particular scholarship. The on-line application is open mid-January through April of each year with scholarships awarded for the upcoming academic year (Fall/Spring or Fall/Spring/Summer). Apply on-line at www.delmar.edu/scholarships. Emergency scholarships are available for students encountering unexpected situations which jeopardize their ability to complete their program of study. Emergency scholarships are awarded on a case-by-case basis throughout the year as funding is available. Emergency scholarship applications are available at the Del Mar College Foundation, Inc. office located in the Del Mar College Center for Economic Development, 3209 S. Staples, Room 131 or the application can be downloaded and printed through the scholarship website listed above. For additional information on Del Mar College Foundation scholarships, visit the Del Mar College website at www.delmar.edu/foundation or contact the Foundation Office at (361) 698-1317.

II. Self-Help

There are two forms of self-help—loans and employment: A. Loans Loans are available to assist you in meeting your educational costs. All of the loans available are long-term, low-interest loans. No loan may be made if you are unwilling to repay the loan. A prior default or delinquency on a loan or an established history of nonpayment of debts may be taken as evidence of unwillingness to repay the loan. There are three kinds of loans: 1. Student Loans The following student loan programs are available: • Direct Loan Subsidized (DLSUB) • Direct Loan Unsubsidized (DUNSB) * The Federal Direct Loan Program consists of both the Federal Subsidized and Unsubsidized student loans; however, the U.S. Department of Education is your lending institution and will be responsible for all your correspondence and repayments. 2. Parent Loans The following is the main parent loan: • Federal Parent Loans for Undergraduate Students (FPLUS) 36


FINANCIAL AID Your parents may borrow funds under this loan program on behalf of you, if you are a dependent undergraduate student. Parents can borrow up to the cost of education minus other financial aid you may have received. Parents must have a good credit history to qualify. A processed FAFSA must be on file. For detailed information on how to apply for a FPLUS Loan, go to www.delmar.edu/federal_parent_loans_for_undergraduate_students.aspx 3. Alternative Loans Alternative loans are private loans offered by lending institutions. They are not part of the federal government guaranteed loans and should only be used when all other options have been exhausted. Research all possibilities for scholarships, grants, work-study and federal loans before borrowing from an alternative loan program. What should you look for in an Alternative Loan? • Annual Percentage Rate (APR) • Loan Limits • Repayment Terms • Cosigner Requirement • Repayment Incentives • Interest Capitalization • Lender for Federal Loans B. Student Employment Programs You may opt to work part-time, usually on campus, to help pay for college. There are three student employment programs: 1. Federal Work-Study Program (FWSP) 2. Texas College Work-Study Program (TXWKS) 3. Student Assistant Employment Program For detailed information about these student employment programs, go to www.delmar.edu/Employment_and_Work_Study.aspx

Protect your Financial Aid – Don’t lose it!

Federal regulations require educational institutions to review the academic progress of all students applying for student financial assistance. Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) must be maintained in order to receive aid. A student’s academic process is evaluated after each long semester and summer term with the following standards as mandated by the federal regulations: • Qualitative (Grades and Cumulative Grade Point Average) • Quantitative (Maximum Time Frame for completion) This review will include all periods of the student’s enrollment, even those for which the student did not receive financial aid. Students are expected to be continuously aware of their grades.

DMC Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy

Del Mar College has adopted the following Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy (be advised these standards apply to all financial aid programs unless the terms of a particular program indicate otherwise):

37


FINANCIAL AID Federal/State Regulations require students to be making Satisfactory Academic Progress at the time they receive financial assistance. All financial aid recipients must be enrolled in a program of study leading to an Associate’s degree or a certificate program. All course work attempted at Del Mar College will be evaluated, regardless of whether the student previously received assistance. All transfer course work, accepted for credit towards your program at Del Mar College, will be counted towards the maximum time frame. A student’s academic progress is evaluated after each long semester and at the end of the summer session. The evaluation includes all coursework attempted for the semester/sessions (withdrawals, incompletes and “R” grades will be included in determining the total number of hours for which the student enrolled). It also includes all periods of the student’s enrollment, even those for which the student did not receive financial aid. (Rapid Track semesters, mini-semesters and Maymesters will be included in the semester in which they began.) The Progress Standards required are shown below: • Must successfully complete the number of hours/credits stated below: - Students enrolled for a full-time course load, 12 hours or more, will be required to pass a minimum of nine (9) semesters hours of the courses enrolled or - Students enrolled for three-quarter time, 9 to 11 hours, will be required to pass a minimum of six (6) semesters hours of the courses enrolled or - Students enrolled for half-time, 6 to 8 hours, will be required to pass six (6) hours of the courses enrolled or - Students who enroll for less than six (6) hours must complete all hours attempted and • Must have a 2.0 or better GPA on the minimum numbers of hours required to pass. • Must maintain an overall 2.0 GPA at the end of the fourth semester, including Summer Terms. • Must complete a certificate/degree program within the maximum time frame of 150% of the published length of the educational program your current major. For example, if a student is pursuing a program (certificate/associate degree) requiring 64 credit hours, no financial consideration would be available after completing 96 credit hours, even if the student has not yet earned the certificate/associate degree and meets all other satisfactory academic progress standards. (64 X 150%=96) Successful completion means a student has received a minimum grade of D. Grades of F, IP (in progress), W (withdrew) are not considered a completed courses.

Good Standing

• Students who meet the above requirements are considered to be in good standing for financial aid purposes.

Failure To Meet Standards

Financial Aid Warning • Financial aid warning is a caution that the student is jeopardizing future eligibility but can still receive financial aid. • The first time the minimum standard is not met, the student will be 38


FINANCIAL AID placed on a financial aid warning. Financial Aid Suspension • Financial aid suspension is a cancellation/denial of awards or disbursements of financial aid. • The second time the minimum standard is not achieved; the student will be placed on financial aid suspension. • Students placed on academic suspension by the Registrar’s Office will automatically be placed on financial aid suspension. This financial aid status will continue should the student be granted permission to enroll after an academic suspension appeal. Students under this status must meet the Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress standards in order to get back on financial aid. • Students placed on enforced scholastic suspension the last time they were enrolled will be on financial aid suspension. • Any student exceeding the maximum time frame of 150% of the program will be placed on financial aid suspension. • A cumulative 2.0 GPA must still be maintained for students who have attended four semesters, including Summer Terms. Regaining Eligibility A student may regain eligibility for financial aid by: • Paying for expenses related to enrollment from personal resources until the student has satisfied the minimum Standards of Academic Progress (SAP). • Students placed on financial aid suspension while enrolled for six (6) or more hours must enroll for six (6) or more hours and meet the minimum requirements as stated above. • Students placed on financial aid suspension while enrolled less than six (6) hours may enroll for less than six (6) hours and complete all hours with a 2.0 or better to remove the financial aid suspension status; however, their status will only improve to financial aid warning. • Students who had extenuating circumstances for not maintaining SAP, may appeal the suspension status by filing a written appeal with Financial Aid Services within two (2) weeks from the date the email is sent to the student notifying them of the status. • The time frame for filing an appeal will be strictly enforced. • The student automatically waives their right to appeal if they fail to submit documentation within two (2) weeks, as stated above and must regain eligibility without financial assistance (maximum time frame cannot regain eligibility).

Financial Aid Suspension Appeal Process

Federal regulations provide for hardship waivers based on the death of a relative, personal injury, illness (self and family) or other extenuating circumstances that prevent the student from making progress. Students must complete a Financial Aid Appeal Form and a narrative as to the circumstance(s) that prevented SAP and attach supporting documentation such as: • Death Certificate • Letter from a doctor on official letterhead • Police records or court documents • Other verifiable documents that support the student’s claim. 39


FINANCIAL AID In addition, students must also provide a statement indicating what provisions have been made to ensure the circumstance(s), if any, will not reoccur or interfere with future academic progress.

Maximum Time Frame Appeal

A student appealing due to having exceeded the maximum time frame must complete the Maximum Time Frame Appeal form along with a narrative explaining the reasons why the time frame was exceeded. A signed copy of an up-to-date degree plan along with a degree plan summary sheet must also be submitted to Financial Aid Services.

Additional Appeal Information

Maximum Time Frame Adjustment for Change of Major Students who change their major may have credits attempted and grades earned excluded from the Maximum Time Frame calculation if those credit hours do not count toward the new major. Exclusion of credit hours from the Maximum Time Frame Calculation will be allowed once, for change of major. All developmental courses and academic courses where the student earned grades of “F”, “R”, “W” or “I” will be excluded from the Maximum Time Frame calculation when those courses are between the first major and the second major change; these grades cannot be excluded after the second major. The review for change of Major is limited to two degree changes. Students who graduate and return to DMC for a Second degree If a student graduates from DMC and re-enrolls at DMC to pursue another educational program, all developmental courses and academic courses where the student earned grades of “F”, “R”, “W” or “I” will be excluded from the Maximum Time Frame calculation. Students may request a review by providing a degree plan furnished by their program advisor and submitting it to Financial Aid Services Office for review. The degree plan will be reviewed by Financial Aid Services to determine exactly which credit hours from the graduated program apply to the student’s new program of study. Classes from the program the student graduated from, which do not count toward graduation for the new program, will be eliminated from the total. The review for a new degree after graduation is limited to one degree plan review per graduation. Financial Aid Services will notify the student of the findings and recommendations. Students whose appeal has been granted will be placed on financial aid probation. During the Appeals Process, the student must be prepared to pay for expenses such as tuition, fees, books and supplies and/or other educational related expenses from personal resources. Additional Information: • There is a limit of 30 semester hours of developmental course work that may be eligible for financial aid. Any developmental hours beyond this 30 hour limit will not be eligible for financial aid consideration. All developmental course work will be counted toward the maximum time frame. • All repeated course work will count toward the maximum time frame. **SEE Retaking Coursework • Transfer work: All transfer work, accepted for credit toward their program at Del Mar College, will be counted towards the maximum time frame. Students 40


FINANCIAL AID will be required to have an appropriate advisor evaluate the transfer hours and certify on the DMC Transfer Credit Evaluation Form (TRCR), the number of transfer hours applicable towards their current educational objective. A signed degree plan must also be submitted along with the TRCR. Financial Aid Services will adjust the total attempted semester hours accordingly. • Transient students (students attending for the Summer Term only) are not eligible to receive any financial aid from Del Mar College. • TEXAS Grant and TEOG awards cannot be appealed. • Pell Grant recipients can only receive up to 12 full-time semesters (600%) throughout their entire education

Retaking Coursework

Changes to Financial Aid regulations will prohibit, in some cases, payment of previously repeated courses. These changes will be effective beginning with the Summer 2012 term. Rules will permit payment for retaking a course under the following conditions: - If a student earns/receives a non-passing grade (I, R, W, F) in a course, the student may retake the course and can be included for payment. - If the student passes the course (D is considered passing), the student may retake the course one more time to improve the grade and can be included for payment - Any second or subsequent repetition of a passed course may not be counted for payment - Retaking courses will be counted in evaluating the student’s record for Satisfactory Academic Progress and maximum time frame eligibility (www.delmar.edu/protect_your_financial_aid.aspx)

Consequences Of Withdrawing/Dropping

It is important that you consider very carefully the consequences of withdrawing/dropping or not attending all of your classes at Del Mar College; this can adversely impact your financial aid.

Return of Title IV Funds

Return of Title IV Funds applies to you if you have been awarded assistance from a federally funded loan or grant and have completely withdrawn (officially or unofficially) from Del Mar College or if you earn all non-passing grades and your instructor reports your last day of attendance before the official end of the semester the Department of Education considers you to have officially withdrawn. A Return of Title IV funds calculation is then performed.

Calculation of Return

Federal aid is earned on a daily prorated basis up to and including the 60% point in the semester. After the 60% point, all aid is considered earned and no refunds/repayments are required. Your Return of Title IV Funds will be calculated accordingly: • The percent earned is calculated by dividing the number of calendar days completed by the number of calendar days in the semester. • The earned percentage received in federal assistance is the amount you are 41


FINANCIAL AID

permitted to keep. The unearned percentage (remaining amount) must be returned to the federal government by both the College and you. This may cause you to owe both the College and the federal government. The percent Del Mar College must return, on your behalf, will be returned to the appropriate federal fund program. The Del Mar College Business Office will bill you for the amount owed to the College. Outstanding balances at the end of the term will be referred to a collection agency by the Del Mar College Business Office. The funds will be refunded to the Federal Funds Program in the following order, if applicable: 1. Unsubsidized Federal Direct Student Loan 2. Subsidized Federal Direct Student Loan 3. Pell Grant Program 4. Federal SEOG You must repay the amount owed to the appropriate federal program within 45 days. After the 45th day, if payment is not received, your overpayment will be referred to the Department of Education for collections and to the National Student Loan Database. You must then make repayment arrangements with the Department of Education in order to maintain future eligibility for federal funds.

Summary

Financial Aid Services is ready to assist you with exploring options to financing your higher education costs.

42


Achieving Success

ACHIEVING SUCCESS

In this section, you can find what you need to succeed in your classes at Del Mar. Support Services

There are six general types of support services that help you from beginning to end. The Division of Student Engagement and Retention provides essential information about the College, its policies, campus life, peer tutoring, career counseling, personal counseling, new student orientation and TRiO student support services and much, much more.

1. Student Success Center

The Student Success Center (SSC) located in the St. Clair Building on the East Campus provides academic support for students who want assistance outside of the regular classroom. Housed in the SSC are Peer Tutoring, Supplemental Instruction, laptop checkout program, computer lab, graphing calculators and a variety of student oriented workshops to promote retention and completion. Office hours: Monday - Thursday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Contact the SSC office at (361) 698-2265 for additional information. West Campus Peer Tutoring Services are located in Emerging Technology Building, Room 114. Hours of operation are Monday – Thursday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

2. New Student Orientation

The New Student Orientation program held prior to the beginning of each semester facilitates a successful academic and personal transition of new students and their families into the Del Mar College community. New Student Orientation is designed to help students: • Prepare for academic life at Del Mar College • Make new friends • Explore the campus and its resources • Learn about activities and campus life • Learn about relevant policies and regulations • Familiarize themselves (and their families) with the College experience New Student Orientation familiarizes prospective incoming and transfer students with essential information concerning College rules and regulations and student services and activities. Attendance is required, since pertinent information is shared which enhances and improves a student’s opportunity for success.

3. TRiO Student Support Services

The TRiO Student Support Services Program, funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, offers eligible students a variety of support services. Among the services are tutoring, financial aid information, mentoring, college transfer assistance, career exploration, assistance with goal setting and attainment and academic and social activities. The goal of TRiO is to assist you in your efforts to successfully accomplish your educational and career objectives. TRiO has two locations to include the St. Clair Building Room 111 on the East Campus and the Emerging Technology 43


ACHIEVING SUCCESS Building, Room 114 on the West Campus. For additional information, contact the TRiO office at (361) 698-1589.

4. Career Advisement and Placement Office

The Career Advisement and Placement Office offers information, assistance and guidance to you and alumni interested in identifying and planning a new career, preparing for employment, changing careers or providing referrals to part-time, full-time and career positions. Del Mar works in conjunction with Texas Workforce Solutions to put you in touch with employers in our area and to advise you as to the targeted occupations which can afford the best opportunity for you. Del Mar uses Work in Texas (http://workintexas.jobs) for both applicants and employers for all of those positions not with Del Mar College. Employers interested in Del Mar College students should contact the Office directly at (361) 698-1329 or visit the Center for Economic Development located at 3209 South Staples. Workshops and individual appointments are available to help you with career goals, job search strategies, resume writing, labor market information and interviewing techniques. For more information, please call (361) 698-1329. DMC Student Job Bank The Financial Aid Services Office uses the Del Mar College Student Job Bank for on campus positions. This site (www.delmar.edu/placement) provides job search information. The DMC Student Job Bank is a free job posting service available to you 24 hours a day. You can review these employment opportunities by following instructions provided on the DMC Student Job Bank site. For further information or assistance, contact: Center for Economic Development Financial Aid Services 3209 South Staples Harvin Student Center (361) 698-1329 101 Baldwin Boulevard jhayen@delmar.edu (361) 698-1293 Office Hours Monday-Thursday: 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Friday: by appointment Saturday: by appointment After hours appointments available upon request.

5. Counseling Center

The Counseling Center provides students with an opportunity to engage in shortterm personal counseling. In addition, the counselors can work with students that want to spend time working one-on-one with a counselor on their career exploration. Professional Counselors are available to help students understand and deal with social, behavioral and personal problems. They work with students individually or in groups. The services provided through the Counseling Center aid students in coping with obstacles such as test anxiety, stress, low self-esteem and other issues which might otherwise interfere with educational and personal development. Counselors may also suggest referrals to other community and college resources when appropriate and with the agreement of the student. All services are confidential. The Counseling Center is located in the Harvin Center, Room 233A on the East 44


ACHIEVING SUCCESS Campus, phone (361) 698-1586 and Emerging Technology Building, Room 108 on the West Campus on Tuesdays and Wednesday.

6. Retention Services

The Retention Services Office was established in order to identify students potentially at risk for academic, social, financial and/or personal reasons and to provide them with the resources necessary for a positive college experience, to promote maximum academic potential and self-efficacy. Our belief is that every student is capable of reaching their academic goals, and we strive to facilitate the empowerment of students through the development of intervention strategies that address academic, financial and social barriers. Del Mar College and the Retention Services Office staff are committed to working collaboratively with all campus departments to facilitate, support, and promote programs and activities that give students the best change for academic success. Services for students at risk of dropping out of college include: • Assistance with the financial aid appeals process to include developing Success Plans • Referrals to campus and community resources • Decision-making and values clarification • Understanding and overcoming barriers to academic success Furthermore, the case managers conduct on-going contact and follow-up with students and coordinate referrals to College and community services as needed. The Retention Case Manger on the East Campus is located in the Harvin Center, Room 217; phone (361) 698-1285 and (361) 698-1584. The Retention Case Manager on the West Campus is located in Health Science Building 2 Room 242, (361) 698-1861.

Instructional Support

There are four specific types of instructional support.

1. Freshman Seminar

Freshman Seminar (FSEM 0101) helps you make a successful transition to college. The course covers topics vital to college success: getting organized, time management, goal setting, test taking, note taking and personal communication. In addition, you are introduced to the wide variety of resources on campus.

2. Developmental Courses

You might need to enroll in developmental courses to build a strong academic foundation prior to enrolling in college-level courses. It takes determination on your part to postpone career plans while doing developmental work in English, mathematics or reading. However, these academic enrichment courses will establish the needed preparations prior to enrolling in college-level work. You should know that you pay tuition for these courses, the grades earned are reflected on your permanent transcript and, in most instances, these courses do not count toward a degree. However, through these classes, you develop good study habits, improve reading comprehension, increase ability to analyze and develop reasoning skills. This is what building an academic foundation is really all about. 45


ACHIEVING SUCCESS Your developmental course needs might be met by non-semester length developmental education interventions (NCBO) rather than semester length developmental education coursework. Check with the Chairperson of the appropriate department to see if you are qualified to take an NCBO.

3. Supplemental Instruction

If you are enrolled in a historically difficult academic course, Supplemental Instruction (SI) provides regularly scheduled, out-of-class, peer-facilitated study sessions led by trained SI Leaders. If you regularly attend SI sessions, you will learn study strategies and refine learning skills which can help you earn higher course grades, stay enrolled and graduate. Call (361) 698-2138 or visit www.delmar.edu/si

4. Peer Tutoring

Peer Tutoring Program assists students to identify strategies to support learning and enhancing academic performance. Tutoring is conducted in a constructive atmosphere of learning using a variety of tutoring techniques tailored to each student’s individual learning style. Our main goal is to inspire students to become confident, independent learners prepared to meet academic and personal challenges. This free tutoring is provided in a number of academic areas such as: • Business • Computer Information Systems • Electronic/Communication Technology • English • Math/Industrial Math • Science • Social Sciences • Health Sciences • Nursing The Peer-Tutoring Program strives to create a win-win environment for Del Mar College students. Peer tutors assist students to reach their academic goals while at the same time earn money for their efforts. Our Peer-Tutors have an overall GPA of 3.0 to 4.0, are currently enrolled and have an “A” or a “B” in the subject area. Peer-Tutors are certified through the CRLA Certification program and participate in 10 hours of OCATS Training each semester. For more information about tutoring or becoming a Peer-Tutor, call (361) 698-2267. East Campus St. Clair Building Student Success Center Room 111 (361) 698-2267 Office Hours Monday-Thursday: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. West Campus Emerging Technology Room 114 (361) 698-1893 46


ACHIEVING SUCCESS Office Hours Monday – Thursday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m

Resources

There are three major resources—libraries, computers and the Web.

1. Library Facilities

You have access to two excellent library facilities at Del Mar College. One is the William F. White, Jr. Library, which supports the instructional programs taught on the East Campus; the other is the Howard E. Barth Learning Resources Center, which has materials pertaining to the technical, safety and allied health programs taught on the West Campus. Holdings Together, the libraries contain over 193,000 bound volumes; 2,200 print periodical titles, including 300 current subscriptions; 80,000 unique electronic titles, including research databases, e-books and periodicals; 16,000 audiovisual items, including microfilm, motion pictures, video and audio recordings, pictures and slides. The libraries have 340 Internet-accessible computers available for use. DMCNet/TexShare Borrowers Card The library’s automated catalog, DMCNet, provides online access to Del Mar College’s collection. Staff and students may also request a TexShare library card, which provides direct borrowing privileges at many public and college/university libraries throughout the state, including Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and Kingsville and Coastal Bend College. These library catalogs are also accessible from the Del Mar Library website. Student Technology Centers Computer centers available in both libraries provide access to personal computers, scanners, printers (including a wide paper plotter), a variety of word processing and instructional support software and the Internet. A valid Del Mar College ID card must be presented when using the Centers. Laptops may be checked out at the Access Services Desk for use within the libraries. Open access computers are also availabe for research and accessing the Internet throughout the libraries. Other Services Other library services include in-library viewing and listening carrels for all media titles, formal library instruction, reference desk services and on-line and printed library instruction guides. Borrowing Materials Library materials may be borrowed upon presentation of a valid Del Mar College ID card. Prompt return of borrowed materials is expected so that other students may use them. You cannot register for the next semester, nor get a transcript, unless library records are clear. Website The library website (http://library.delmar.edu) offers a wide variety of reference resources and training guides for off-campus users. Library hours, services available and other library information are posted on the library website.

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ACHIEVING SUCCESS

2. Computers on Campus

Computer and Network Resources Use Policy You are granted the privilege to use the computer and/or network resources of Del Mar College and accept the responsibility for reasonable and legitimate use. Legitimate use of computer and network resources is limited to College-related instruction, independent study, research, official college work and other specific uses as expressly authorized by the College. The computer and network resources may not be used for personal, commercial, illegal or for-profit purposes. You must be currently registered to use these resources and consent to being monitored. If monitoring reveals possible evidence of any activity violating the Del Mar College Computer and Network Resources Use Policy, appropriate disciplinary action - including suspension and/or dismissal from the College - will be taken. A copy of the Computer and Network Resources Use Policy may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Student Engagement and Retention.

3. Website/WebDMC

All the information you need about the College is at your fingertips through the website: www.delmar.edu. Take advantage of WebDMC, a student-friendly website at www.delmar.edu/ webdmc. WebDMC provides you Internet access to a world of tools and features that will enhance your college experience. All you need is your DMC-issued user ID and password.

Learning Labs And Centers

There is a centralized success center plus individual learning labs to help you.

Centralized Center

Student Success Center The Student Success Center (SSC) located in the St. Clair Building on the East Campus provides academic support for students who want assistance outside the regular classroom. Housed in the SSC are multi-discipline Peer Tutoring, Supplemental Instruction, Technology Resources Center, laptop and graphing calculator checkout program and student oriented workshops. Contact number is (361) 698-2259. The Technology Resource Center provides student computer workstations for academic support to include a variety of software programs, music key boards, laptops and graphing calculators for student checkouts. The contact number is (361) 698-2234. Office Hours: Monday-Thursday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Individual Labs/Centers

There are several individual learning labs and centers that focus on specific academic skills. 1. Stone Writing Center You are encouraged to visit the Stone Writing Center on the fourth floor of the White Library. The SWC has three components: A. Virginia Stone English Learning Lab 48


ACHIEVING SUCCESS If you want to improve your writing skills, check out the Virginia Stone English Learning Lab, located on the fourth floor of the White Library. You can take advantage of many free services and resources, including computers with Internet, professional tutoring (both in-person and online), interactive workshops and specialty handouts. Services are available to students in all disciplines, not just English. B. One-Hour Writing Labs When you sign up for English 0305/0306 and 0307, you will also be enrolling in a one-hour writing lab. You attend one hour per week in one of five computer writing labs, located in the English Building and the fourth floor of the White Library. In addition to these on-campus labs, there are hybrid and online labs for fulfilling your lab requirement. Each level of lab curriculum is tailored to complement instruction given in English class. Throughout the semester, you will apply writing and research skills that will empower you to succeed in your English classes and other College classes requiring writing. C. Online Writing Center All of the above services and resources, plus podcasts and videos, can be accessed virtually through the Online Writing Center (OWC). You may access the OWC on the Web at www.delmar.edu/swc. 2. Reading Lab If you want to improve your reading skills, stop by the Reading Lab, located in Room 121 in the Coles Building on the East Campus. The lab provides instruction and tutoring to help you complete classroom reading assignments. When you enroll in Reading 0305 and Reading 0306, you will attend the Reading Lab one hour per week to receive additional instruction and practice in the computer lab. You will be learning lessons on the computer, which provide additional practice on skills you are studying in your reading classes. If you need tutorial assistance with your College reading assignments, you may call (361) 698-1535 to make an appointment. In addition, the Reading Lab offers workshops on a variety of reading topics. 3. ESOL Lab If you want to improve your English speaking and comprehension skills, visit the English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Lab, located in Rooms 102 and 104 in the Coles Building on the East Campus. If you are enrolled in ESOL courses, you will attend the ESOL Lab to receive additional instruction and practice on material covered in your ESOL classes. The Lab offers a variety of instructional materials, including books, audio and videotapes and computer-assisted instruction. In addition, tutors are available to help, with tutorial sessions organized on special topics throughout each semester. 4. Languages Lab If you are enrolled in Spanish or French classes, visit the Languages Lab, located in the Coles Building, Rooms 106 and 108, on the East Campus. The Lab provides computerized language instruction, review materials and conversational practice. You can use computers, audio players, videos and camcorders. Lab assistants lead conversational practice groups which emphasize oral interaction and proficiency. 5. Resources for Excellence in Communication Center If you want help in the creation and performance of any speech activity, the Resources 49


ACHIEVING SUCCESS for Excellence in Communication (REC) Center is the place to be, located in Memorial Classroom Building, Room 211, on the East Campus. The REC Center has personal computers, video viewing equipment, a conversation area and three practice rooms equipped with computer units with which you may incorporate presentation software into your presentations and video cameras with which to record yourself for self-analysis. The REC Center is open to all students and faculty. 6. Math Learning Center If you are enrolled in math classes and need help, you are encouraged to attend the Mathematics Learning Center, located in the Coles Building, Room 116, on the East Campus. The Center has student tutors and full-time faculty available for assistance with all levels of mathematic and is open weekday, evening and weekend hours. Call (361) 698-1579.

Disability Services

Del Mar College and the Disability Services Office (DSO) is committed to ensuring equal access to College services, programs and activities for qualified students with disabilities in accordance with The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), The Americans with Disabilities Act Amendment Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Texas state laws. Who can receive services? Individuals with varying abilities who are currently enrolled, and students seeking enrollment or re-enrollment. How can students access services? • Self-identify by contacting the Disability Services Office to schedule an intake appointment. • Referral by faculty or staff. • Provide information that verifies the disability, which may include assessments reports and/or letters from qualified evaluators, professionals, or institution. Services Available: Tape recording of lectures, scribes, extended time test/quiz time; enlarge print; test in a private, reduced distraction area; note-taking assistance; assistive technology/software; accommodating furniture; special seating arrangement; braille; alternative text books; community agency referrals; accommodations for GED/TSI; and consultations to faculty, staff, and students. The Disability Services Office is located in the Harvin Student Center Room 188 on the East Campus, phone (361) 698-1298 and in the Coleman Center Room 106E on the West Campus on Wednesdays.

Summary

We’re here to help you succeed…so take advantage of the many free services on campus.

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STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND RECOGNITION

Student Activities and Recognition

Outside of the classroom, you can learn leadership skills, make new friends and attend more than 100 special events throughout the year. Most are free or cost very little. Activities

Student Leadership and Campus Life

The Office of Student Leadership and Campus Life is committed to promoting campus life and student leadership through cultural, social and leadership development. Along with a strong intramural sports program, DMC has more than 30 clubs and organizations, providing students exposure to community projects, leadership and volunteer opportunities.

Campus Life

There are three ways you can participate in campus life—through student organizations, cultural programs and intramural sports. 1. Registered Student Organizations Many leadership opportunities exist for you to pursue your special interests by joining one of the many Registered Student Organizations (RSOs) on campus. All RSOs have the privilege of being represented in the Campus Organization Council, which acts as a coordinating agency for RSO activities. RSOs are registered with the Office of Student Leadership and Campus Life. Departmental Departmental RSOs are organized to give you opportunities for self-expression and leadership in activities related to your major field of study. Special interest Special interest RSOs are organized to serve and to promote special interest areas for you such as governmental affairs, writing, physical and recreational activities or religious groups. Honorary Honorary RSOs sponsor activities that promote and encourage scholarship, leadership and fellowship among students. Your membership in honorary organizations is selective based on academic achievement. If you are not part of a recognized club and wish to conduct an activity on campus which contributes to the educational and cultural environment of the College, you must obtain permission from the Office of Student Leadership and Campus Life. Approved requests will be scheduled at a time and location which will not interrupt other activities on campus.

2. Cultural Programs Several informative and entertaining events—from concerts to theatrical productions to lectures—are scheduled each semester free of charge as long as you have a valid Del Mar College ID. The programs are paid for by your student services fee and are selected by the Cultural Programs Series Committee.

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STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND RECOGNITION 3. Intramural and Recreational Sports Del Mar College’s intramural and recreational sports program is designed to provide opportunities for athletic competition and physically active recreation for all currently enrolled academic students as well as employees of the College. It is the goal of the intramural and recreational sports program to be as broad as possible, offering you opportunities to participate in a variety of activities. The intramural and recreational sports program is funded by your student services fee. Activities You may participate in organized intramural activities including tournaments, leagues and special events. These may include team and individual sports for men, women and co-recreational competition. For information, please call (361) 698-1337 or view the schedule online at http://dmc122011.delmar.edu/kine/imcalendar.html Facilities With a currently validated Del Mar College ID card, you may use the recreational facilities including a gymnasium, 25-meter indoor pool, fitness center, jogging track, racquetball and tennis courts. The facilities are also available on weekdays and weekends during non-class hours. For information, call (361) 698-1334 or view the schedule online at http:// dmc122011.delmar.edu/kine/facilityrechours.html

Publicity

Here’s how to get the word out about an activity…

College Relations Office

If you are planning an event open to the public, you should contact the College Relations Office at least two weeks in advance. The College Relations Office coordinates all publicity and publications for College events that are open to the public. The staff will be happy to assist you with any news releases, public service announcements, publications distributed off-campus or contacts with the news media. Contact the College Relations Office at (361) 698-1247.

The Foghorn

A good way to keep up with events on campus is the College newspaper, The Foghorn. It is published bi-weekly (except holidays, summer and exams) and is distributed free on campus. It is produced by students enrolled in journalism classes, but non-journalism students are welcome on the staff. The Foghorn is partially funded by your student services fee.

Printed Materials

Printed materials (displays, posters, petitions, handouts, surveys, etc.) which originate outside the College Relations Office must be presented to the Office of Student Leadership and Campus Life for approval before being distributed or posted.

Other

Here are some details about life on campus that you should know.

Student Identification Cards

Student identification cards (IDs) are issued free of charge to you when you first register; however, a charge will be made for replacements (We know, you hate 52


STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND RECOGNITION the picture). Also, IDs must be validated each subsequent registration period. Cards are good for admission to College functions, for obtaining library materials and for using recreational facilities. You should carry it with you at all times and present it upon request. You can get your ID card at the White Library (East Campus) or the Barth Learning Resources Center (West Campus) by showing proof of registration. Identification cards are made during all library hours except the first and last 30 minutes of operation.

Parking Permits

To park your car on campus, you need a Vehicle Identification Permit (VIP). To get a VIP, fill out a parking registration card and submit it to Campus Security. They, in turn, will issue you a VIP. See the section on Parking Regulations.

Lost and Found

If you have lost or found an item, check with the Office of Student Leadership and Campus Life, located in the Harvin and Coleman Student Centers. If books or other items are turned in and they have your name and phone number, an Office of Student Leadership and Campus Life staff member will attempt to contact you.

Recognition

Now that you’ve succeeded both in and out of the classroom, it’s time to be recognized for all of your hard work.

Hall of Fame

Each spring, faculty, administrators and students nominate sophomore students for consideration to the highest honor that can be bestowed on a Del Mar College student: the Hall of Fame. Selection is based on student scholarship, leadership and participation in Registered Student Organizations. A committee elects students from the list of nominees to join a select and distinguished group of students whose photographs are placed on the Hall of Fame Walls located in the Harvin Student Center. For information, call the Director of Student Leadership and Campus Life at (361) 698-1279.

Recognition Ceremony

Each April, outstanding students are chosen by various departments for their academic achievement or students nominated to the Who’s Who Among Students in American Junior Colleges. Hall of Fame finalists are announced at the end of the Recognition Day program. This program is funded by your student services fee. Contact the Director of Student Leadership and Campus Life for additional information at (361) 698-1279.

Scholarships Recognition Reception

Each year the Del Mar College Foundation, Inc. recognizes scholarship recipients with a reception where students have the opportunity to meet the generous benefactors who made their scholarship possible. For additional information on Del Mar College Foundation, Inc. scholarships, visit the Del Mar College Web site at www.delmar.edu/foundation or see the Financial Aid Section of this catalog and look for the scholarship information.

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STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND RECOGNITION

Student Alumni Membership

The Del Mar College Viking Alumni Association offers a special $10 membership to all current students. Membership benefits include a Viking Alumni T-Shirt as well as discounts to various venues, like the Texas State Aquarium, Six Flags Texas, Sea World San Antonio, Hurricane Alley and Schlitterbahn Waterparks. For more information on the Viking Alumni Association, go to delmar.edu/ alumni/Membership_Benefits_and Options.aspx or call the Foundation Office at (361) 698-1317.

Summary

Find your niche and be recognized at Del Mar College.

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College Costs

COSTS

We care about the cost of your education. Del Mar College is one of the most affordable colleges in the state. Tuition

Residency/Tuition Estimates

There are three ways to define your residency. 1. College District If you live in the independent school districts of Calallen, Corpus Christi, Flour Bluff, Tuloso-Midway and West Oso, you are included in the College District without exception. • If you live in the Del Mar College District, you can register for a fulltime course load for as little as $1,169 tuition and fees per semester. 2. Texas Resident In determining residency, the College will use the same guidelines as the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. In order for the State of Texas resident’s tuition rate to apply, you must supply the documentation required. See “Proof of Texas Residency” under “ADMISSIONS” for a list. • If you live outside the district, you can register for full-time status for about $1,769 tuition and fees per semester.

3. Out-of-State If you have not proven your Texas residency at the time of preregistration and/ or registration, you will be considered an out-of-state student and billed accordingly. • If you are from out-of-state or from a foreign country, you may register for full-time status for about $2,249 tuition and fees per semester.

The tuition estimates provide for 12 semester hours or four regular 3-credit-hour courses. Estimated tuition for additional courses or specialized classes that require special instruction, labs or uniforms may increase tuition costs.

Tuition by Type of Course

There are basically two different types of courses—credit and noncredit—at the College. Tuition differs for each type. There’s actually a third—General Education Development (GED) preparation—which is absolutely free! 1. College Credit Courses There are two ways of looking at tuition for credit classes—the total cost or the per hour cost.

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COSTS A. Total Cost This first chart gives you an idea of the total cost of a semester at the College for Fiscal Year 2014-2015: Semester District Out of Out of State/ Hours Residents District Foreign 3 $353.00 $503.00 $614.00 6 $629.00 $929.00 $1,151.00 9 $905.00 $1,355.00 $1,688.00 12 $1,181.00 $1,781.00 $2,225.00 15 $1,457.00 $2,207.00 $2,762.00 B. Semester Hour This second chart breaks down the tuition charge per semester hour: Tuition Charges Minimum Tuition

Resident of Texas, In-District Texas, Out-of-District Out-of-State Foreign

Per Semester Hour Per Semester 2014-2015 2015-2016* $56.00 $57.00 $55.00 $56.00 $57.00 $55.00 $93.00 $94.00 $250.00 $93.00 $94.00 $250.00

*Fiscal years 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 tuition correct as of date of printing but is subject to change by the Board of Regents.

2. Noncredit Courses Tuition for typical noncredit courses ranges from $2 to $6 per hour of instruction.

General Education Development (GED)

If you don’t have a high school diploma and wish to earn a GED, test preparation classes are offered free of charge.

Additional Courses

If you need to learn English communication skills, classes are offered free of charge. And if you need to improve your basic literacy skills, free classes are also offered.

Tuition Policy

The Texas resident in-district and out-of-district per-semester credit hour tuition rate shall be the same as determined by the Board of Regents. The tuition for out-of-state residents and foreign students shall be at rates mandated by state statutes. Texas State legislative action may affect the tuition and fee structure of the College. Tuition and fee charges must be paid at the time of registration, which is not complete until all payments have been made.

Fees

There are a number of fees associated with classes, but keep in mind what you’re getting in return–safe campuses, top-notch facilities, state-of-the-art labs and tools, student clubs, cultural events, intramural sports and more. 56


COSTS There are two types of fees—basic and special. 1. Basic Fees Basic fees are charged to everyone. • General Use $12 per semester hour is charged each registration for college-credit courses. This fee is charged to cover the cost of transcripts, graduation, grounds improvements, technology centers, campus security and parking control. • Building Use $12 per semester hour will be charged each semester to assist in maintaining, improving and equipping campus facilities. A $25 general use fee will be charged with all noncredit courses. • Instructional Support $70 per semester will be charged for the support and maintenance of writing, math, reading and other learning labs. • Student Services $7 will be charged each semester you enroll in the College. This fee defrays the cost of cultural programs, intramural sports, student club activities, the student newspaper and other related student programs. • Matriculation $12 per semester hour is charged each registration for college-credit courses. This fee is charged to defray the cost of creating and maintaining student records. • Vehicle Identification Permits (VIPs) VIPs, which are provided by the College, are required of all students to park on campus and may require a fee for replacements.

2. Special Fees Special fees are only charged if required. • Out-of-District $50 per semester credit hour will be charged if your legal residence is outside the Del Mar College District. However, out-of-district tuition/ fee is not applicable to noncredit courses. • Laboratory $8 to $72 will be charged for selected courses in subjects such as art, engineering, foreign languages, kinesiology, sciences, business administration, business technology, health sciences, technology programs and occupational (industrial) programs. - $55 to $165 will be charged for selected courses offered in the music program. - $8 to $60 will be charged for selected courses offered by Workforce and Personal Enrichment. • Dual Credit $33.33 per semester credit hour will be charged for Dual Credit students. • Late Registration $10 will be charged if you register after the official registration date. • Credit Card Processing A fee for credit card use may be authorized by the Board of Regents. 57


COSTS • Returned Check $25 will be charged on any personal check returned unpaid by the bank. If you place a Stop Payment notice on a check issued to Del Mar College for payment of tuition and/or fees, you will be dropped from the College without further notice. The returned check fee of $25 will be assessed. If your check is returned unpaid by the bank, you may not pay future financial obligations to the College using a personal check. • Testing and Evaluation Various fees will be charged to help defray costs of administering, scoring, recording, reporting and processing of tests and evaluation-rated services. Those services include but are not limited to: - Departmental Examinations - Evaluation of Credentials - General Education Development Test - Specialized tests for credit, certification or licensure - Correspondence and end-of-course examinations • Special Record $50 will be charged to establish a transcript at Del Mar College if you wish either to: - convert to semester hours previous noncredit bearing studies in which the applicants have appropriate professional certification, or - take examinations to receive credit for courses offered in the current Catalog. • 3-Peat Fee $50 per semester hour will be charged if a student is attempting a class for the third time. Tuition and fees shown are correct as of the date of printing but are subject to change by the Board of Regents. A schedule of currently approved fees is available in the Counseling and Advising Centers on both East and West campuses.

Other Costs

Besides tuition and fees, there might be a few other costs associated with your education.

Occupational and Health Sciences Education

If you are in an occupational or health science field, you must furnish your own books and hand tools. Such items may be obtained from sources of your choice. A list of required books and tools will be furnished at the time of registration.

Insurance

You should be aware that you are responsible for your own private health and accident insurance. Liability or malpractice insurance is required in certain programs. See “Student Liability.”

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COSTS

Student Liability

Activities during occupational programs and courses may expose you to more than the usual degree of responsibility and liability. Health sciences, cosmetology, criminal justice, law enforcement, fire science, emergency medical services and occupational safety and health students may be required to carry professional liability insurance. For example, $5 per semester will be charged in all health sciences courses, and $21 per semester will be charged in all Emergency Medical Services and Fire Science programs to provide general liability coverage for students.

Payment

Tuition and fees must be paid or payment arrangements made by the appropriate due date for the registration process to be considered complete. Course credit and grades may be withheld until all obligations to the College are met. Auditors in all courses must pay the same tuition and fees as those who are enrolled for credit. You will not be sent a bill by mail. You may view total tuition and fees on WebDMC. Payment may be made by mail, on the Web, or in person at the Business Office in the Harvin Student Center (HC) on the East Campus or in the Coleman Center (CC) on the West Campus. Payment may also be made with a credit card by phone (see “Telephone Directory” in this Catalog). If you do not pay, or make satisfactory arrangements to pay, all financial obligations to the College, you may have your registration voided and/or you may be removed from all classes; also course credit, grades, degree or certificate may be withheld. Also, you may be charged for loss of, or damage to, College property for which you are responsible, including library books.

Refunds

If for some reason you have to interrupt your education, you might get some of your costs refunded. In order to be eligible for a refund, you must complete the withdrawal requirements of the College. First, you must complete, sign and file a College Withdrawal form in the Registrar’s Office, and a refund application with the Business Office. Applications for refunds will not be accepted after the end of the semester in which withdrawals are made, and refunds will be processed as soon as possible after the census date for the semester.

Withdrawing

If you withdraw or are withdrawn from Del Mar College, you may be eligible for a refund of a portion of the tuition and fees paid to Del Mar College for that semester. If you received financial assistance to cover tuition and fee costs from outside the family, then a portion of the refund will be returned to the grant, scholarship or loan source from which the assistance was received. Please note that you must visit the Registrar’s Office and complete the Notice of Withdrawal. This step will allow Del Mar College to refund the maximum possible amount of tuition and fees.

Refund Formulas

The College refund and repayment policy is applicable if you attend traditional 16-week semesters. There are two refund formulas used at Del Mar College. 59


COSTS 1. First Formula The first formula applies if you haven’t received financial aid. Fall and Spring Prior to first class day 100% During the first 15 class days 70% During the 16th - 20th class days 25% After 20th class day 0% Summer Prior to first class day 100% During the first five class days 70% During the sixth and seventh class days 25% After the seventh class day 0% 2. Second Formula The second formula applies if you have received financial aid and the refund is as mandated by the Higher Education Act Reauthorization of 1998. The formula provides a Return of Title IV aid if you received Federal Financial Aid in the form of a Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) or Direct Student Loan. The amendment states that if you withdraw before completing at least 60% of the semester or earn all non-passing grades, you may have to pay back a portion of your federal funds. The percentage of the refund is equal to the number of days attended divided by the number of days in the semester. The first class day is defined as the “day classes start at Del Mar College and not as the first day a student attends classes.” The first class day is based on the Texas College and University System Common Calendar as determined by the state. Refer to the current semester credit class schedule for applicable first class date. A 100 percent refund is made for courses dropped prior to the first class day. If any portion of the refund amount is left after satisfying the federal Return of Title IV Aid, the remaining balance will be applied to Del Mar College funds, state programs and any other sources of financial assistance. Worksheets used to calculate the Return of Title IV funds are available at Financial Aid Services. For a detailed discussion, see “Financial Aid Services” section of the Catalog.

Distribution of Funds

No cash refunds will be made; all refunds will be issued via the DMC Debit Card. With the DMC Debit Card, refunds will be delivered in the manner the student selects at www.DMCDebitCard.com. Payments made by credit cards will be credited to the respective card account.

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COSTS

Rebate Opportunity

If you began a baccalaureate degree from a Texas general academic teaching institution in the Fall 1997 semester or later, you are eligible for a tuition rebate of $1,000. In general, this rebate opportunity is based on your attempting no more than three semester hours in excess of the minimum required to complete the baccalaureate degree. Complete information concerning this rebate is available from the College Business Office.

Summary

It costs to go to College, but it costs more not to. Think about it.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES

Academic Policies

Registrar’s Office

The Registrar’s Office assists you with all matters pertaining to your student records at Del Mar College, most importantly the careful tracking of your grades. The Registrar’s Office maintains your official Del Mar College transcript and is charged with complete confidentiality abiding by all FERPA regulations. Additionally, they can provide you with free copies of your DMC transcript, assistance in dropping courses, changes in residency and applying for graduation. The Registrar’s Office can also assist you in evaluating your transfer coursework from another institution for the purpose of advising and registering at Del Mar College. (see credits earned for more information on completing a Transfer Evaluation Request Form (TERF). DEL MAR COLLEGE STUDENT RECORDS POLICY RELEASE OF STUDENT RECORDS All records submitted for a student’s file become the property of the College and a part of the student’s permanent record. High school transcripts, transcripts from other colleges, test scores, immunization records and other similar documents are not duplicated for any reason to any person and/or institution, including the student. STUDENT PRIVACY The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (Buckley Amendment) FERPA, sets forth the guidelines for the release of student records to other parties. Under this federal law, students have the right to inspect their records and correct any inaccuracies that might be found in them. Access to the record by anyone other than the student is limited and generally requires prior written consent by the student. The College will mail confidential records, including grades and transcripts, at the student’s direction. Any person who picks up sealed copies of these records for the student must have written, signed permission to do so from the student. Directory information, which includes a student’s name, address, date and place of birth, field of study, dates of attendance, and degrees and awards received, may be released by the College without consent of the student. Any student who wishes to withhold any or all of this directory information from release must notify the Registrar in writing within three weeks of the date of the student’s initial enrollment.

Academic Honesty

You are expected to maintain the integrity of the College by maintaining academic honesty for yourself and by expecting academic honesty from your fellow students. One of the requirements for passing the courses you take at Del Mar College is that you do your own work. Meeting this requirement means avoiding 62


ACADEMIC POLICIES plagiarism, collusion and cheating. Plagiarism occurs when a student takes another’s words or ideas and uses them as if they were the student’s own. This can happen in three ways: 1) A student copies another’s words without using quotation marks and without giving the source, 2) A student puts another’s ideas into the student’s words but does not give the source and 3) A student duplicates another’s structure of thought or organization of ideas but does not give the source. Collusion occurs when someone else writes all or any part of a student’s paper. Cheating includes, but is not limited to, a student looking at another’s work or using unauthorized materials during a test or written assignment; or fabricating data, methodology, results, findings from those in an official document, publication or research and claiming them to be authentic.

Course Load

To be classified as full-time, you must register for a minimum of 12 semester hours. To complete a program in two years, the degree/certificate plans in this Catalog suggest how many semester hours you must take each semester. According to the Texas Administrative Code, you should not carry more courses in any term than would equal more than one semester credit hour per week over the course of the term. For example, in the fall or spring semester, you should not enroll in more than 16 semester hours. In a six-week summer session, you should not enroll in more than six semester hours.

Course Prerequisites And Co-Requisites

Pre-requisites and co-requisites (also known as concurrent pre-requisites) are two kinds of entry requirements for particular courses. You must satisfy prerequisites, or their equivalent, before registering for a course. You must enroll in a co-requisite course at the same time you register in the other course. In most cases, you can register for the other course if you have already success fully completed the co-requisite. Pre-requisites and co-requisites are identified in the course descriptions at the back section of this catalog.

Auditing A Course

Permission to audit a course or courses may be granted by the Registrar’s Office if you are eligible for admission to the College and either already have credit in the course(s) or do not wish credit for the work. You may audit a course on a space-available basis and are required to pay the full tuition and fees at the time of registration. Tuition and fees for auditing are the same as those rates charged to students enrolled for credit. Since auditors are only observers, you may not under any circumstances claim credit for the course. Change from credit to audit status must be done before the 12th class day in the long session and before a proportional period of time in the summer and short sessions. Kinesiology Activity Courses (KINE 1100-1299, KINE 2100-2299 and DANC 1101-2154) may not be audited.

Grading System

At the end of each semester, the grades and credits awarded are posted to your official academic record. Your grades may be accessed using WebDMC at www. 63


ACADEMIC POLICIES delmar.edu/webdmc. Grades are not mailed to you. At Del Mar College, grades are expressed in letters that are equated in points used in calculating the cumulative grade-point average. Del Mar College uses a four (4.0) point system of grading. Four grades (A, B, C, D, F, R, P) indicate that the course was completed for credit and a grade was awarded. Two grades (I, W) indicate that the course was attempted and not completed. One grade (AU) indicates that the course did not earn credit. One grade (CR) indicates credit earned for courses accepted toward program completion and graduation as a result of evaluation, credit by examination, or other validations of course-required knowledge and skills. One grade (X) indicates that a grade has not been assigned. The following system of final grades is used to report student performance. Grade or Mark Grade Points Per Semester Hour A (Excellent) 4.00 B (Good) 3.00 C (Fair) 2.00 D (Poor) 1.00 F (Failure) 0.00 P (Pass) 0.00 R (Repeated) 0.00 For use in developmental course AU (Audit) 0.00 I (Incomplete) 0.00 W (Withdrawal) 0.00 CR (represents credit for courses 0.00 that are accepted toward program completion and graduation as a result of evaluation, credit by examination or other validations of course-required knowledge and skills) X (no grade assigned) 0.00

Grade Point Average

Your Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated multiplying the semester-hour value of the course by the point value in which a completion grade of A, B, C, D, F, R, or P was earned. For example: 3 semester hours with a “B”grade = 9 grade points. To determine the grade point average, add up the grade points from all courses and divide by the total semester hours attempted. For example: 15 semester hours with 30 total grade points = 2.0 average. The semester hour, a unit of credit, means the amount of credit given for one classroom hour a week for 16 weeks or the equivalent. Laboratory work may add a semester hour’s credit to a course.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES

Incomplete Grade (I)

When you do not complete a course because of illness or extenuating circumstances in any semester, the instructor may assign the “I” grade, signifying that your work is incomplete. The instructor will provide you and the department chair with: 1) a written reason for the assignment of an “I” grade, 2) a description of the work to satisfy course requirements, 3) a timeline for you to complete the work and 4) a timeline for the instructor to submit a grade change form to the Registrar. The “I” grade will not be computed into the grade point average. If the “I” grade change is not completed at the end of the subsequent full-term semester (Fall or Spring), the “I” grade will automatically change to an “F” (for failing) in college-level classes, or “R” (for repeat) in developmental classes. Any exceptions to this timeline can be made only with the approval of the Provost and Vice President of Instruction and Student Services. If you have an “I” grade, you may not enroll in the same class in the next semester as a substitution for completing unfinished work on the “I” grade. However, if you receive a grade of “F” or “R” because you failed to complete the requirements for the removal of the “I” grade, you may re-enroll for the same course again. If you repeat the course, the grade in the repeated grade will become the grade of record and will be calculated into the Grade Point Average. The “F” or “R” from the “I” grade that was not completed will remain on the transcript.

Withdraw Grade (W)

An official withdrawal from a course may be initiated by a student or faculty member, resulting in the assignment of a “W” grade which is not computed in a grade point average. Students must meet the “W” grade deadline in order to be eligible to receive this designation. Failure to meet the deadline will result in a failing grade.

Pass/Fail (P/F) Grade

Courses taken on a pass/fail basis do not earn grade points. All pass/fail grades will be entered on the transcript. If a student fails a pass/fail course, the attempted credits will be calculated in your attempted hours that determine grade point average. The Pass/Fail grade is assigned to RNSG clinical courses in the Nurse Education program and in the Court Reporting program to CRTR 2435 Accelerated Machine Shorthand (Web-based course only).

Repeat Grade (R) For Developmental Courses

Del Mar College offers a number of courses to prepare students for college credit work. They are required, based on placement test scores, for you if you need additional preparation in specific subjects in degree programs. Developmental courses do not count toward graduation or calculate into your semester or cumulative grade point average. In developmental courses the “R” grade is used to indicate that you have made some progress but are not ready for a more advanced course within the discipline. The grades of “D” and “F” are not used in developmental courses. The grade of “R” does not automatically convert to any other grade and is not used in computing grade point averages or academic status. 65


ACADEMIC POLICIES If you receive the grade of “R” in a developmental course, you must reregister for that course or complete course requirements and make a grade of “A,” “B,” or “C” in order to: 1) receive credit for that developmental course and 2) to be eligible to register for a more advanced course in the discipline. Developmental courses in which the “R” grade may be used include: • ENGL 0305, 0306, 0307 • ESOL 0305, 0306, 0307, 0311, 0312, 0313, 0314, 0321, 0322, 0323, 0324, 0341, 0342, 0343, 0344, 0354 • FSEM 0101 • MATH 0370, 0371, 0373 • READ 0305, 0306 • DE02 • INRW 0408

Repeating A Course And Grade Calculation

If you repeat a course, only the highest grade earned will become your official grade for the course and will be calculated into your grade point average and will count towards total credits earned. Your first grade will remain on your transcript of record; however, it will be removed from the calculation of your cumulative grade point average and the total credits earned. If you repeat a course for three or more times, you may be subject to paying higher tuition and fees. For a repeated course, a grade of “W” may not replace a completion grade. Since clinical laboratories in health science courses utilize interaction with hospital patients, failure by you (grade of “F”) due to unsafe practice in the clinical area is reason to deny readmission to a clinical course. If you earn a grade of “D,” you may apply for readmission to the department the following year.

Grade Appeal

The evaluation of academic work is the prerogative of the instructor and the rules for determining final course grade should be established by the instructor and provided to the students in an electronic or printed course syllabus at the beginning of the semester. A student who believes grounds exist for the appeal of a final grade must first consult with the instructor. If the appeal cannot be resolved, a student may proceed to the grade appeal process. The procedures described in this policy are available only for appeal of a semester or term grade based on one or more of the following reasons: 1. A mathematical error in calculation of the grade or clerical error in recording of the grade that remains uncorrected; 2. The assignment of a grade to a particular student by application of more exacting requirements than were applied to other students in the course; 3. The assignment of a grade to a particular student on some basis other than performance in the course; 4. The assignment of a grade by a substantial departure from the faculty member’s previously announced standards; 5. Extenuating circumstances such as illness, incapacity, or absences of the instructor generate uncertainty regarding appropriateness of the grade assigned. Grades given as a result of academic dishonesty cannot be appealed under the grade appeal procedure, but should be made under the provisions of the Policy on Scholastic Dishonesty B7.13.7. The procedures for submitting a grade appeal are available in the office of the Dean of Student Engagement and Retention. 66


ACADEMIC POLICIES

Course Numbering

Courses are numbered to indicate level of instruction. Freshman level courses are designated in the 1000 sequence, and sophomore level courses are designated in the 2000 sequence. All Del Mar College courses are identified with letter abbreviations followed by a set of numbers. Courses are alphabetized in this Catalog according to their abbreviations; see the Index of Courses in the back of this Catalog to locate a specific subject. The numbers in parentheses after the course title indicates the number of lecture hours, lab hours and credits respectively. For example, CHEM 2401, Quantitative Analysis (2-6-4) meets for two lecture hours and six lab hours a week in a regular semester and awards four semester hours of credit.

Four-Digit Numbers

Del Mar College has adopted the Texas Common Course Numbering System for most academic courses and the Workforce Education Course Numbering System for occupational and technical courses. These four-digit numbers were developed to simplify the process of transferring credits from Del Mar College to other Texas colleges and universities and to ensure the maximum credit possible for each transfer student. These numbers are approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. In the four-digit common course numbers the first digit usually indicates the level of the course: 0 - developmental, 1 - freshman and 2 - sophomore level. Some exceptions to this rule exist. (These courses will not count toward fulfilling the 18-hour sophomore requirement for graduation with an associate degree: MSCI 2371 and 2372.) The second digit indicates the credit value in semester hours. The third and fourth digits are used to differentiate courses or as an indicator of course sequence.

Schedule Changes

Schedule Changes (Adding or Dropping a Course)

You may make schedule changes (add or drop a course) during the time specified in the Del Mar College class schedule and by completing the necessary forms required by the Registrar’s Office.

Dropping an Individual Course with a Grade of “W”

The grade of “W” will be assigned to a course that you have dropped by the date stated in the class schedule. You are not eligible to receive a grade of “W” without completing the official paperwork by the deadline stated in the schedule of classes. Each term or session has its own “W” drop deadline, which must be met in order to be eligible for a “W” grade.

Six Drop Limit

If you are a first-time student who entered college in Fall 2007 or after, you cannot drop more than six courses, including any course you have dropped at another college in Texas, according to Senate Bill 1231. There are exceptions to this policy if you can show good cause for dropping a course(s). For further information, contact the Registrar’s Office.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES

Implications for Financial Aid

You should be aware that dropping courses may affect your eligibility for financial aid. You should contact Financial Aid Services prior to dropping a course or completely withdrawing from school. If you stop attending class without officially withdrawing from the College, then the grade is an automatic “F.” Students receiving Veterans Benefits for education should contact Veterans Services for specific policies concerning drops and withdrawals. These changes may have a direct effect on your VA benefits.

Class Attendance

Students are responsible for attendance and are advised that excessive absences may adversely affect their grades or their continued enrollment in the course. Regular and punctual class and laboratory attendance is expected of you. A record of attendance may be kept by instructors, beginning the first day of class. If attendance is unsatisfactory, the instructor retains the right to initiate an instructor withdrawal from class. If you desire readmission, you should contact your instructor to discuss the option of reinstatement. If you do not carry out that procedure, your withdrawal from the class is final. If you have been reinstated into a class and are absent again without excuse, the instructor may request your final dismissal from class. Certain absences are ruled valid and acceptable, such as participation in recognized student activities of the College or illness. Specific programs, such as health sciences, may have additional attendance requirements that are applicable to the students enrolled in the program.

Student Absences on Religious Holy Days

In accordance with Texas Education Code 51.911, the College will excuse you from attending classes or other required activities, including examinations, for the observance of a religious holy day, including travel for that purpose. If your absence is excused under this subsection, you may not be penalized for that absence and will be allowed to take an examination or complete an assignment within a reasonable time after the absence. “Religious holy day” means a holy day observed by a religion whose places of worship are exempt from property taxation under the Tax Code. Notifications of planned absences must be in writing and must be delivered by you, not later than the 15th day after the first day of the semester, either (a) personally to the instructor of each class, with receipt of the notification acknowledged and dated by the instructor or (b) by certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the instructor of each class.

Withdrawal From The College

Failure to file a withdrawal form may result in grades of “F” for courses in progress.

Administrative Withdrawal

The Administration may drop you for administrative reasons for reasonable cause. You may also be withdrawn for those incidents that may be related to violating the student code of conduct and in particular, disrupting the classroom and the educational process. Should you be subject to administrative withdrawal, the College will provide proper notification. You may seek the advice of the Provost 68


ACADEMIC POLICIES and Vice President of Instruction and Student Services about this procedure and any due process procedures that will be afforded. You may be withdrawn for issues related to academic integrity. Instructors with evidence of your plagiarism or other forms of cheating will follow the procedures outlined in A7.13.6.4 of the Board of Regents “Policies and Procedures Manual, Penalties for Dishonest Behavior.” A recommendation by the faculty member to suspend and/or dismiss you from the College for academic dishonesty must be submitted through the department chair to the academic dean. The appropriate academic dean will convene an Academic Ethics Committee prior to suspending/dismissing you to afford you due process.

Instructor Withdrawal

Instructors may withdraw you from class for lack of attendance or other academic reason, such as not meeting course pre-requisite.

Appeal of Administrative Withdrawal or Instructor Withdrawal

If you are withdrawn from a class, you may • Appeal to the instructor by first obtaining an Extenuating Circumstances Schedule Change Form from the Registrar’s Office and presenting it to the instructor. • If satisfactory arrangements can be made between you and the instructor, readmissions to the class will be permitted upon the instructor’s completion of the Reinstatement Form. • The completed form must be returned by you to the Registrar’s Office within 10 working days from the date of the drop by the instructor.

Scholastic Standing

Scholastic standing will be established once you have completed 12 college credit hours. Scholastic standing is determined at the end of each semester when an evaluation is made of your cumulative grade point average, which determines your academic standing. To be in good scholastic standing, you must maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average (GPA). It is important that you remain in good standing with the College. The grades posted on your transcript are a permanent record and will always be a part of your academic history. Grades can affect your eligibility for admissions to a specialized program, transferability to another university, or qualifications as an applicant for employment. If your cumulative grade point average falls below a 2.0, then the following applies

Probation: Probation I

Probation means you can still enroll at the College but are not in good standing and a hold will be placed on your registration to meet with an academic advisor to develop a learning contract. Student will also receive correspondence from Dean of Student Engagement and Retention outlining student support options and contact information for Retention Case Managers.

Second Warning: Probation II (continued probation)

Continued probation means you can still enroll at the College but are still not in good standing and a hold will be placed on your registration for a mandatory meeting with a Retention Alert case manager who can develop a tailored retention program that includes regular adviser meetings and a clearly defined 69


ACADEMIC POLICIES student support regimen. Student will receive correspondence from Dean of Student Engagement and Retention outlining next steps.

Suspension

Students placed on academic suspension must appeal in writing to the respective Dean of their academic unit and make an appointment to discuss their appeal and grounds for continued enrollment. Student must provide direct proof of having met with their academic adviser and a retention case manager and present a copy of a retention support plan and/or learning contract.

Effect of Summer Enrollment on Academic Standing

If you are on scholastic suspension, you may enroll in the summer sessions as a means of raising your GPA to meet the cumulative 2.0 minimum without having to make an appeal for admission.

Suspension Appeals

If you are on scholastic suspension from Del Mar College or from any other college, you may complete a suspension appeals form at the Registrar’s Office to request permission to enroll. The appeal will be based on individual merit. It is your responsibility to initiate the request and set an appointment to meet with the Registrar.

Transfer Student Appeal for Admission

If you are transferring from another college or university on scholastic suspension, you may appeal for admission by contacting the Registrar’s Office.

Academic Recognition Honors Program

The Office of the Provost and Vice President of Instruction and Student Services coordinates the Honors Program which offered several discipline-related honors plans to provide intellectual stimulus, professional development and awards special recognition. The Honors Program is not accepting new participants. However, students currently enrolled in the Honors Program are eligible to continue their participation in the Program unless there is a break in semester enrollment at Del Mar College. For continuance in any honors plan, you must maintain the requirements of the program. Reasonable progression towards the completion of a plan, with a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA, is required in the Program. Re-admittance in the Program is possible for extenuating circumstances.

Honors Courses

Honors courses are available to every student continuing in the Honors Program and has met the prerequisites for the standard course and the honors component. Most employers and university faculty equate honors credits with challenged, enriched study. Therefore, the honors component of any course must have amplified substance and elevated prerequisites beyond those of the standard course. Assessment levels of R3, E3, M3 are recommended for all honors courses.

Honors Program Learning Contract

The Office of the Provost and Vice President of Instruction and Student Services 70


ACADEMIC POLICIES provides the learning contract to current honors students. To receive honors credit, you must enroll in a standard class and, after the semester starts, sign a learning contract with the instructor for the honors component of the course. Credit for honors will be awarded at semester end, after the course project grade of “A” or “B” has been registered and completion of the honors contract has been verified by the Office of the Provost and Vice President of Instruction and Student Service. An “H” indicates honors credit on transcripts.

Honors Designation on Diploma

If you have completed the requirements of your selected honors plan at the time of graduation and if you have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, you will receive special designation on your official transcript.

Honors List

If you are enrolled for and complete 6 or more semester hours of college-level course work and earn a grade point average of 3.5 or more on your semester grades, your name will be included on the Honors List. Developmental courses beginning with the number zero are not considered in Honors List calculations.

President’s Honors List

If you are enrolled for and complete 6 or more semester hours of college-level course work and earn a grade point average of 4.0 on your semester grades, your name will be included on the President’s List. Developmental courses beginning with the number zero are not considered in President’s List calculations.

Graduation with Honors List

If your cumulative GPA falls within one of the following ranges at the end of the semester prior to the commencement ceremony, you will be recognized at the commencement ceremony and the honors designation will be noted on your transcript. To graduate with honors, you must meet the following overall grade point average

Cum Laude (with honor) Magna Cum Laude (with great honor) Summa Cum Laude (with highest honor)

3.7 to 3.799 3.8 to 3.899 3.9 to 4.000

Graduation

General Graduation Requirements

Students planning on graduating should meet with an advisor the semester before they plan to graduate to make sure they have met all graduation requirements. • Complete all requirements for your degree or certificate. • A minimum of 25 percent of degree required courses must be earned at Del Mar College. • Students may transfer hours from another accredited institution to Del Mar College in order to graduate from Del Mar College as long as all graduation requirements have been met as evaluated by the program department. • A student with an Associate or higher degree seeking an Associate Degree at Del Mar College must: (a) complete 25 percent of semester hours 71


ACADEMIC POLICIES

• • • • • • •

at Del Mar College beyond the original degree and (b) meet all of the specified requirements for the second degree as outlined in the catalog in effect upon the student’s entry into Del Mar College, provided the length of attendance at this institution does not exceed five years. Complete an Application for Graduation in the Registrar’s Office on or before the graduation application deadline. Meet all of the degree and/or certificate requirements as specified under your designated catalog. Your student records must be clear of “holds.” Return all properties of the College, including library books. Pay, or make satisfactory arrangements, to pay all financial obligations to the College. If you do not initially meet the graduation requirements, you must reapply for any subsequent graduations. Distance Learning Note: You may not take more than 50% of your cumulative credits towards your degree or certificate in online classes, unless you are enrolled in an approved on-line degree or certificate program.

Catalog Designation for Graduation

The Catalog that is in effect upon your entry or reentry into Del Mar College determines the degree and/or certificate requirements that you must meet for graduation. It is your responsibility to know and satisfy all of the requirements in your designated catalog. Catalog designations are made according to the following guidelines: • If you are entering Del Mar College for the first time, you are assigned to the Catalog that is in effect at the semester of entry. You must follow the degree requirements as specified in that Catalog, as long as the length of time of your attendance does not exceed five years. • If your attendance at Del Mar College exceeds five years, you forfeit the initial Catalog designation. You must then meet the degree and/or certificate requirements specified in the Catalog in effect in the sixth or subsequent year of enrollment. • If you are absent for two or more regular (fall or spring) semesters, you must meet the degree and/or certificate requirements of the Catalog in effect at the time of re-entry.

Application for Graduation

You are required to apply for graduation at the Registrar’s Office on the East or West Campus by the deadline for the semester in which you intend to graduate. The deadlines are as follows: May graduation deadline for application is February 28 or the following Monday if the deadline falls on a weekend. August graduation deadline for application is June 30 or the following Monday if the deadline falls on a weekend. December graduation deadline for application is October 15 or the following Monday if the deadline falls on a weekend.

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Regalia

Graduates must wear the designated Del Mar College academic regalia. You need to purchase regalia for graduation. Information on how to purchase regalia will be provided to you at the time of application for graduation.

Diplomas

Diplomas are mailed to you approximately eight weeks after the semester ends. The only honors posted on diplomas may be: Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, Summa Cum Laude, Phi Theta Kappa, Sigma Alpha Pi and Alpha Beta Gamma.

Commencement

Graduation is held three times per year: May, August and December. If you are currently enrolled in your last semester of classes, you may apply for graduation and participate in the commencement ceremonies. Participation in the ceremonies and/or inclusion in the commencement program does not constitute evidence of completion of program or honors requirements. Only after verification of completion of all graduation requirements will a student be awarded a certificate or degree.

Summary

Your college experience can influence all other aspects of your life. Manage it carefully for best results.

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ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT

Assessment and Placement

The College is committed to make certain that you are placed in the correct course sequence to ensure success. Assessment Of Skills

Assessment of basic skills, through testing, is essential because it helps you and your academic advisor with proper course selection. Specifically, you need to be tested for reading, writing and English, and mathematics skills to determine your readiness for college-credit courses prior to registration. This testing requirement is part of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI). Performance on tests will not be used as a condition of admission to the College. However, placement levels are used to determine which classes you can sign up for.

Levels

All college-level courses at Del Mar College require specific assessment levels. Any assessment below Level III means that you will be placed in developmental course to further stregthen your skills and ensure academic success. An assessment level chart is found on the next page and in the “Course Descriptions� section of this Catalog to assist you and advisors in determining your placement in coursework.

Testing

Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Compliance

All new students are required to take a placement test to determine if developmental courses are needed in reading, writing and English and mathematics as required by the Texas Success Initiative. The purpose of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI), mandated by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board is to grant institutions of higher education the flexibility and responsibility to improve individualized programs and ensure the success of students in higher education. All students must meet the following requirements before enrolling in restricted courses. ** The following examinations all qualify to satisfy the TSI requirement: ACT - American College Test TAKS - Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills SAT - Scholastic Aptitude Test (taken before March 2005) NOTE: The above exemptions may be used within a five year period of enrollment. **Beginning Fall 2013 the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board will be implementing a new benchmark examination. Any students testing after the first 74


ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT day of class for Fall 2013 will be required to take the new examination. NEW TSI ASSESSMENT

Level 0

Reading

Level 1

Level 2

Below 341

342-350

(READ 0305)

(READ 0306)

Level 3 (COLLEGE) 351+ (No Reading

Writing

Below 358 & Essay 0-3

Course Required)

359-362 & Essay 0-3

363+ & Essay

and English

(ENGL 0305, 0306

(ENGL 0307

of 4 or 5+

W/LAB ENGL 0005)

w/Lab ENGL 0007

(ENGL 1301

Mathematics

and FSEM 0101)

Below 335

336-345

346-349

(MATH 0370)

(MATH 0371)

(MATH 0373 w/Lab

w/Lab ENGL 1001) 350+ (College level

MATH 0008)

Mathematics)

Once the student completes the New TSI Assessment, the following scores may be used to adjust the students’ remedial levels.

READING

Level 0

Level 1

Level 2

(READ 0305)

Level 3

(READ 0306)

ACT (Reading)

---

0-14

15-18

SAT1 (Reading)

---

200-419

420-499

(COLLEGE) 19+ 500+

TAKS (English Language Arts)

2200+

and Essay of 3 or 4

WRITING AND ENGLISH

Level 0

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3 (COLLEGE)

(ENGL 0305, 0306 w/Lab ENGL 0005)

(ENGL 0307 w/Lab ENGL 0007

(ENGL 1301 w/Lab ENGL 1001)

and FSEM 0101)

ACT (English)

---

0-14

15-18

19+

SAT1 (Reading)

---

200-419

420-499

500+

TAKS (English Language Arts)

MATHEMATICS

Level 0

Level 1

Level 2

(MATH 0370)

(MATH 0371)

(MATH 0373 w/Lab

2200+ and Essay of 3 or 4 Level 3 (COLLEGE)

MATH 0008)

ACT (Mathematics)

0-12

13-15

16-19

20+

SAT1 (Mathematics)

200-310

311-459

460-499

500+

TAKS (Mathematics)

2200+

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ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT EXEMPTIONS FROM ALL OR SOME ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS

Exempt from Reading

and Writing

ACT taken within 5 years

English 19+

Exempt from Math Mathematics 19+

with composite of 23+

At Del Mar College, must have 20

to be at Math assessment Level 3.

SAT I taken March 2005 or later

Reading 500+

Mathematics 500+

ELA 2200+

Mathematics 2200+

with total reading and math of 1070+ 11th Grade TAKS within 5 years

with writing sample 3+

Earned Degrees

A student who has graduated with an associate or baccalaureate degree from a Texas public institution of higher education.

TSI Exemptions* All students taking college-level courses must satisfy Texas Success Initiative (TSI) requirements, unless they qualify for a TSI exemption, waiver or exception. Official documents must be submitted to the Student Enrollment Center for determining exemption. Exemptions are permanent and do not need to be renewed each semester. Score Exempt Students who meet qualifying standards on the SAT, ACT, or TAKS test may be eligible for an exemption. Please reference the preceding assessment chart to verify your eligibility for a score exemption or contact the Student Enrollment Center at (361) 698-1290. Degree Exempt Students who have earned an associate or baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited post-secondary institution or from a recognized international institution are exempt from all Texas Success Initiative requirements. Transfer Exempt/Passed Students whose previous Texas public college or university has determined that they have met minimum passing standards in reading, writing and English, and/ or math are exempt in the curricular area/s indicated, but must develop and pursue an Academic Success Plan in any remaining area/s. An official transcript or other appropriate documentation of status must be submitted. Private/Out-of-state Transfer Exempt Students who transfer from a regionally accredited college or university and have earned at least three semester hours of college level credit (ANY course) are exempt at entry. (The private/out-of-state institution must be the last institution attended). An official transcript must be submitted. Course Exempt Students who have completed a restricted course from a regionally accredited college or university earning a grade of C or higher are exempt in the curricular area of that course, but must develop and pursue an academic success plan with 76


ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT an advisor in any remaining area/s. Veteran Exempt A student who on or after August 1, 1990, was honorably discharged, retired or released from active duty as a member of the arned forces of the United States or the Texas National Guard or service as a member of the reserve component of the arned forces of the United States may be exempted. The veteran must provide a valid DD214. Military Exempt A student who is serving on active duty as a member of the armed forces of the United States, The Texas National Guard or as a member of a reserve component of the armed forces of the United States and has been serving for at least three years preceding enrollment may be exempted. The service member must provide a valid statement of service from his or her unit of assignment. International Students If you are an international student whose primary language is other than English, and you are taking only English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) classes, you will take the Comprehensive English Language Test (CELT) to determine your placement into ESOL classes. Certification/Licensing Exams There are special licensing/certification/registry exams that students may be required to take upon completion of specific occupational degree programs. Check with your departmental advisor for additional information upon completion of your degree requirements.

Additional Methods of Earning Credit

You may also earn credit through two other methods: 1. Credit by examination A. Advanced Placement (AP) B. ACT C. SATI and SATII D. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) E. DANTES F. International Baccalaureate (IB) 2. Credit by evaluation of credentials gained through work experience or independent study.

Testing For Credit Credit by Exam

You can earn credit by exam by taking national tests and departmental exams. 1. Nationally-Recognized Tests A. College Board Advance Placement (AP) Exams Del Mar Course Examination Passing Score ARTS 1316 Studio Art (Art Department must review portfolio.)........................................ 3 ARTS 1303 Art History......................................... 3 77


ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT BIOL 1406 Biological Concepts I........................ 4 CHEM Chemistry (See below) ECON 2301 Principles of Macroeconomics........ 3 ENGL 1301 Composition I.................................... 3 ENGL 1302 Composition II.................................. 3 FREN 1411 French................................................. 3 FREN 1412 French................................................. 4 GERM 1411 German............................................... 3 GERM 1412 German............................................... 4 GOVT 2305 American Government.................... 3 HIST 1301 United States History....................... 4 HIST 2311 European History............................. 4 MATH 2413 Calculus AB....................................... 3 MATH 2414 Calculus BC....................................... 3 PHYS Physics (See below) PSYC 2301 General Psychology.......................... 4 SPAN 1411 Spanish Language............................. 3 SPAN 1412 Spanish Language............................. 4 SPAN 2311 Spanish Language............................. 5 PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY NOTE: Course and number of hours credited depend on exams successfully completed. May require chairperson’s evaluation of scores and your credentials, including high school transcript and record of laboratory work. B. ACT/SAT The Department of English and Philosophy will award credit for ENGL 1301 when any of the following conditions are met: 1. Have an ACT English score of 31/SAT verbal score of 680 or 2. Have an ACT English score of 28-30/SAT verbal score of 670 and predominantly “A” grades in four years of high school English or 3. Have an ACT English score of 26-27/SAT verbal score of 660 and all “A” grades in four years of high school English. Scores cannot be more than five years old. C. College Board Achievement Exams (SAT II) Del Mar Course Examination Passing Score CHEM...................................... Chemistry (See next page) ENGL 1301..............................English Composition Achievement Exam........................... 620 (DMC Essay required) ENGL 1302..............................English Literature and Composition.............................. 620 (DMC Essay required) D. DANTES (DSST, DANTES Subject Standardized Test) Del Mar Course Examination Passing Score ACCT 2301.............................. Principles of Financial Accounting........................................ 60 78


ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT ARTS 1301............................... Art Appreciation............................... 44 BMGT 1327.............................. Principles of Management............... 48 BUSI 1301................................Business Principles........................... 54 CETT 1303...............................DC Circuits........................................ 46 CETT 1304...............................Soldering Skills and Shop Safety........................................ 45 COSC 1301 or CRIJ 1301................................. Introduction to Criminal Justice ................................ 50 GEOG 1303..............................Geography......................................... 60 GERM 1411..............................Beginning German I......................... 45 GERM 1412.............................. Beginning German II........................ 48 HART 1407..............................Refrigeration Principles................... 45 ITSC 1301................................. Introduction to Computers............. 56 MRKG 1311.............................Principles of Marketing................... 51 PSYC 2314...............................Life Span Developmental Psychology (Student must pass an essay exam administered by the psychology faculty.).............. 55 RELE 1406...............................Principles of Real Estate................... 48 E. CLEP (College Level Examination Program) Subject Examinations No credit is awarded for the General Examinations. Del Mar Course Examination Passing Score ACCT 2301.............................. Accounting........................................ 50 BIOL 1406................................Biology................................................ 50 BIOL 1407................................Biology................................................ 50 BMGT 1327.............................. Principles of Management............... 47 BUSI 2301................................Business Law..................................... 51 CHEM...................................... Chemistry (See below) ENGL 1301..............................College Composition (Essay section required)................... 55 ENGL 2326..............................Readings in American Literature (Essay section required)................... 50 FREN 1411, 1412 ....................Level I................................................. 44 FREN 2311, 2312 ....................Level II................................................ 55 GERM 1411, 1412 ...................Level I................................................. 44 GERM 2311, 2312 ...................Level II................................................ 58 GOVT 2305..............................American Government.................... 52 MATH 1314............................. Mathematics (College Algebra)...... 50 MATH 1316............................. Plane Trigonometry.......................... 49 MRKG 1311.............................Principles of Marketing................... 48 PSYC 2301...............................General Psychology.......................... 55 CHEMISTRY NOTE: Course and number of hours credited depend on exams successfully completed. May require chairperson’s evaluation of scores and student’s credentials, including high school transcript and record of laboratory work.

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ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT F. International Baccalaureate (IB) SL = Standard Level exam HL = Higher Level exam IB Examination Score Del Mar College Course(s) Biology (HL)...........................4,5,6,7...........................................................BIOL 1406 Business and Management...4,5,6,7................................... 3 hrs. credit in Business Chemistry (SL)........................ 4,5,6,7....................................... CHEM 1411 and 1412 Computer Science.................. 4,5,6,7...................3 hrs. credit in Computer Science Economics (SL)....................... 4,5,6,7....................................... ECON 2301 and 2302 Economics (HL)...................... 4,5,6,7....................................... ECON 2301 and 2302 English (SL) Language A1 or A2.............. 4,5,6,7........................................ ENGL 1301 and 2332 English (HL) Language A1 or A2 Extended Essay.....................4,5,6,7.............................. ENGL 1301, 1302 and 2332 Environmental Systems......... 4,5,6,7...................................... 4 hrs. credit in science Geography............................... 4,5,6,7................................3 hrs. credit in geography Greek , Classical.....................4,5,6,7...................14 hrs. credit in foreign language History Africa......................................4,5,6,7...................................... 3 hrs. credit in history Americas................................ 4,5,6,7...................................... 3 hrs. credit in history E, SE Asia and Oceania........ 4,5,6,7...................................... 3 hrs. credit in history Europe....................................4,5,6,7...................................... 3 hrs. credit in history S. Asia and Middle East......4,5,6,7...................................... 3 hrs. credit in history Islamic History..................... 4,5,6,7...................................... 3 hrs. credit in history Information Technology in a Global Society................4,5,6,7........................... 3 hrs. credit in social science Latin.........................................4,5,6,7...................14 hrs. of foreign language credit Math (HL) with further mathematics..............4,5,6,7..........................................6 hrs. credit in math Math (HL).............................. 4,5,6,7..........................................3 hrs. credit in math Math methods (SL)..............4,5,6,7..........................................3 hrs. credit in math Math Studies......................... 4,5,6,7..........................................3 hrs. credit in math Modern Languages Language A1 or A2 (SL) or (HL) French.................................... 4,5,6,7............................FREN 1411, 1412, 2311, 2312 German..................................4,5,6,7........................... GERM 1411,1412, 2311, 2312 Portuguese............................4,5,6,7...................14 hrs. of foreign language credit Russian................................... 4,5,6,7...................14 hrs. of foreign language credit Spanish..................................4,5,6,7...................14 hrs. of foreign language credit Other Languages..................4,5,6,7...................14 hrs. of foreign language credit Music........................................ 4,5,6,7..........................................................MUSI 1306 Philosophy.............................. 4,5,6,7...............................3 hrs. credit in philosophy Physics (SL) and (HL)............4,5,6,7.........................................PHYS 1401 and 1402 Psychology.............................. 4,5,6,7..........................................................PSYC 2301 Theatre Arts............................. 4,5,6,7....................................................... DRAM 1310 Visual Arts............................... 4,5,6,7..........................................................ARTS 1301 2. Departmental Exams Each department chairperson sets the requirements to meet in order to take a departmental examination for credit. Generally, you are eligible to apply for 80


ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT this exam if you earned predominantly “A” grades in the subject in high school and scored exceptionally high on a nationally-recognized test and/or if you can demonstrate to the department chairperson significant and relevant experience in the subject area. Departmental exams will not be given for developmental courses, nor for any course in which you are presently enrolled. Arrangements for testing are made through the department chairpersons.

Evaluation Of Credentials For Credit

You may earn credit by departmental evaluation of your credentials when such learning can be documented as substantially equivalent to a Del Mar course. Credit will be accepted and applied from the following: • Nontraditional transcripts (armed forces schools, real estate boards, American Institute of Banking, hospital schools, cosmetology schools) • State or national board exams (Vocational Nurse Education, Registered Nurse Education, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Therapy, Surgical Technology) • Experience in business, military administration and industry • High school programs or military training included in written articulation agreements with the College.

Policies And Procedures For Earning Credit

It’s important to understand the policies and procedures for credit by exam and evaluation of credentials.

Policies

1. Only if you are currently enrolled or are a former Del Mar College student are you eligible to apply for credit. Informal evaluation will be done free of charge. 2. Credit by exam - College Board Advance Placement (AP), College Board Achievement Exam (SAT II), College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and Defense Activity for Nontraditional Education Support (DANTES) will be accepted as “credit only” (CR) and will not affect your Grade Point Average (GPA). 3. Only an “A” or “B” grade receives credit for departmental exams. Grade points are given for a departmental exam and a footnote indicating that credit was obtained by examination will be indicated on your transcript. 4. Credit earned by evaluation of credentials will be determined by the pass/fail method. No grade other than “CR,” the number of credit hours, course number and title are recorded on your transcript. 5. Examinations offered at Del Mar College can be retaken only after six months have elapsed. Some departmental examinations cannot be retaken. 6. Credit by examination satisfies degree requirements in the same way as credit earned by passing courses, except that it cannot be used to satisfy the 25 percent of semester credit hours earned at Del Mar College, which is the residency requirement for graduation. 7. Credit may not be earned by examination for most performanceoriented courses, such as music ensembles, drama productions, dance 81


ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT performances, radio-television shows, speech competitions, physical activities, etc.

Procedures

1. Obtain a petition to record credit in the Registrar’s Office or the appropriate academic department. 2. Have the petition signed by the department chairperson. 3. Pay the required fee at the Business Office. 4. Take the test or present documentation for evaluation. If credit is granted, the results will be forwarded by the department chairperson, to the dean and to the Registrar’s Office. You can get more detailed information about testing procedures from the Registrar’s Office both on East and West Campus or the appropriate academic department.

Fees

A statement of testing fees and evaluation charges is available at the Business Office and additional information for the petitioning and recording of credit is available in the Registrar’s Office.

Advising

Academic advising is important. It is available to all who wish to talk about course prerequisites, graduation requirements, career opportunities and suggestions for doing well in class. If you are a declared major, you work closely with faculty members in your major department. If you are an undeclared or liberal arts major, you are advised by the Student Enrollment Center. Advising is required prior to online registration if you have earned 24 credits or fewer. If you have more than 24 credits, you are still encouraged to meet with an advisor.

Appointments

You need to call the department of your major to schedule an advising appointment. If you are using the Student Enrollment Center, walk-ins are welcome; no appointment is needed.

Your Responsibilities

• Prior to the appointment, think about your goals and reflect on previous academic progress. If you are currently enrolled, you should consider how you are doing in your classes. Think about your other commitments (work, family, etc.) and how those impact your time. Then, you and your advisor can discuss how to turn goals into reality by following your degree plan. A copy of the degree plan, given to you, will show the specific courses needed. • You are responsible for making sure that the courses selected meet degree requirements. Use the College Catalog to confirm which courses meet the requirements. Failure to obtain correct information will not exempt you from having to meet those requirements. You should bring a tentative list of classes you want to take to the advising appointment.

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ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT • Courses should be selected with attention to prerequisites and sequences. If you preregister for classes for which you lack the prerequisites, you can be dropped from those classes by the chairperson of the appropriate department in order to release those spaces to students who have satisfied the prerequisites. You will be protected from such removal only if you secure permission of the chairperson prior to registering. • It is your responsibility to know specific transfer requirements of the college or university to which you plan to transfer. This responsibility includes knowing course requirements, number of credit hours accepted and grade-point average required for admission. Bring a copy of the catalog of your transfer institution to your advising appointment. • You are expected to keep a copy of your degree plan, signed by both yourself and your advisor. Each time you meet with an advisor, you should bring your most recent degree plan for updating.

List of Advisors

Call for an advising appointment or more information. All numbers are area code 361. Advising assistance for the Virtual College of Texas is available at (361) 698-1110.

Degree/Certificate

Phone

Accounting ......................................................................................................698-1372 Addiction Studies............................................................................................698-2809 Administrative Assistant ..............................................................................698-1411 Advertising/Public Relations.......................................................................698-1939 Air Conditioning Applied Technology........................................................698-1701 American Sign Language and Interpreting.................................................698-2809 Architectural/Drafting Technology.............................................................698-1701 Art......................................................................................................................698-1216 Auto Body Applied Technology...................................................................698-1701 Automotive Applied Technology ................................................................698-1701 Aviation Maintenance ....................................................................................698-1701 Baking/Pastry Specialization........................................................................698-2809 Banking and Finance......................................................................................698-1372 Basic Peace Officer..........................................................................................698-1706 Biology..............................................................................................................698-1229 Biotechnology..................................................................................................698-1229 Building Maintenance Applied Technology...............................................698-1701 Business Administration................................................................................698-1372 Environmental/Petrochemical Lab Technology.........................................698-1701 Chemistry.........................................................................................................698-1229 Child Development/Early Childhood.........................................................698-2809 Child Dev./Early Childhood Education Assistant.....................................698-2809 Coding Specialist.............................................................................................698-2844 Computer Information Systems....................................................................698-1299 Computer Programming..............................................................................698-1299 Information Systems Security Associate....................................................698-1299 Geographic Information Systems...............................................................698-1299 Multimedia-Internet Developer..................................................................698-1299 Network Support Specialist.........................................................................698-1299

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ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT Computer-Network Electronic Technology................................................698-1799 Cosmetology....................................................................................................698-2809 Court Reporting..............................................................................................698-1372 Judicial Realtime/CART/Captioning........................................................698-1372 Criminal Justice...............................................................................................698-1706 Criminal Justice Technology..........................................................................698-1706 Culinary Arts...................................................................................................698-2809 Deaf Studies.....................................................................................................698-2809 Dental Assisting..............................................................................................698-2858 Dental Hygiene................................................................................................698-2858 Diagnostic Medical Sonography...................................................................698-2858 Diesel Applied Technology............................................................................698-1701 Digital Media...................................................................................................698-1508 Drama...............................................................................................................698-1216 Early Childhood, 6th-Grade Generalist.......................................................698-1534 Echocardiography...........................................................................................698-2858 Education Majors (Associate of Arts in Teaching Degrees) Art..................................................................................................................698-1216 EC-6………………………………………………………………………. 698-1534 English/Philosophy ...................................................................................698-1234 History/Social Studies...............................................................................698-1228 Journalism....................................................................................................698-1939 Mathematics.................................................................................................698-1238 Science...........................................................................................................698-1229 Special Education........................................................................................698-1534 Speech...........................................................................................................698-1534 Electrical Engineering 2+2.............................................................................698-1299 EMS Professions..............................................................................................698-1724 English..............................................................................................................698-1234 Engineering......................................................................................................698-1299 Engineering Technology................................................................................698-1299 Fire Science.......................................................................................................698-1724 Foreign Languages..........................................................................................698-1534 General Office Clerk.......................................................................................698-1372 Geography........................................................................................................698-1228 Geology.............................................................................................................698-1229 Health Information Technology....................................................................698-2844 History..............................................................................................................698-1228 Hotel/Motel Management............................................................................698-2809 Human Services..............................................................................................698-2809 Industrial Machining Applied Technology.................................................698-1701 Journalism........................................................................................................698-1534 Kinesiology......................................................................................................698-1334 Legal Secretarial Specialty.............................................................................698-1372 Liberal Arts......................................................................................................698-1290 Advising for Liberal Arts majors is on a walk-in basis in the Student Enrollment Center. No appointment is needed. Management Development...........................................................................698-1372 General Management Specialization..........................................................698-1372 Leadership Development.............................................................................698-1372 Logistics and Supply Chain Management................................................698-1372 84


ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT Marketing Specialization.............................................................................698-1372 Production and Logistics Management Specialization...........................698-1372 Professional Sales..........................................................................................698-1372 Small Business Management.......................................................................698-1372 Mathematics.....................................................................................................698-1238 Medical Laboratory Technology...................................................................698-2820 Medical Secretary............................................................................................698-1410 Mexican-American Studies............................................................................698-1218 Music.................................................................................................................698-1211 Nondestructive Testing..................................................................................698-1701 Nuclear Medicine Technology......................................................................698-2858 Nurse Education..............................................................................................698-2860 Occupational Safety and Health Technology..............................................698-1724 Occupational Therapy Assistant...................................................................698-2820 Paralegal Specialty..........................................................................................698-1372 Pharmacy Technology....................................................................................698-2820 Physical Therapist Assistant..........................................................................698-2820 Physics..............................................................................................................698-1229 Police Science...................................................................................................698-1706 Political Science...............................................................................................698-1228 Pre-Chiropractic..............................................................................................698-1229 Pre-Dental.........................................................................................................698-1229 Pre-Engineering...............................................................................................698-1299 Pre-Medical......................................................................................................698-1229 Pre-Medical Technology.................................................................................698-1107 Pre-Pharmacy..................................................................................................698-1229 Pre-Physical Therapy......................................................................................698-1229 Pre-Veterinary Medicine................................................................................698-1229 Process Technology.........................................................................................698-1701 Professional Electronics Avionics.................................................................698-1701 Psychology.......................................................................................................698-1228 Radio and Television......................................................................................698-1508 Radiologic Technology...................................................................................698-2858 Real Estate........................................................................................................698-1372 Registered Nurse Education..........................................................................698-2860 Respiratory Therapy.......................................................................................698-2820 Restaurant Management................................................................................698-2809 Social Work......................................................................................................698-1228 Sociology..........................................................................................................698-1228 Speech...............................................................................................................698-1534 Surgical Technology........................................................................................698-2820 Vocational Nurse Education..........................................................................698-2860 Undeclared.......................................................................................................698-1290 .Advising for Undeclared majors is on a walk-in basis in the Student Enrollment Center. No appointment is needed. Welding Applied Technology........................................................................698-1701

Summary

The College will help guide you in the right placement of courses. 85


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY

Your Rights, Responsibilities and Safety Here’s what you need to know about how to conduct yourself on campus. Data

Student Records

Your records pertaining to directory information and education are kept by the Registrar’s Office. According to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), education records are those records that relate directly to your academic progress maintained by the institution. If you want to review your records, you may do so by requesting and presenting your photo ID in the Registrar’s Office. If, upon review, you desire to challenge any portion of your records, you should contact the Registrar for additional information. School officials, who act in your educational interest within the limitations of their need to know, have access to your records without your prior written consent.

DEL MAR COLLEGE STUDENT RECORDS POLICY RELEASE OF STUDENT RECORDS All records submitted for a student’s file become the property of the College and a part of the student’s permanent record. High school transcripts, transcripts from other colleges, test scores, immunization records and other similar documents are not duplicated for any reason to any person and/or institution, including the student. Rights You have certain rights under FERPA with respect to your education records. They are: 1. The right to inspect and review your education records within 45 days of the day the College receives a request for access. You should submit to the registrar, dean, department chairperson, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) you wish to inspect. The College official will make arrangements for access and notify you of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the College official to whom the request was submitted, that official will advise you of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. 2. The right to request the amendment of your education records that you believe is inaccurate or misleading. If upon review you desire to challenge any portion of your records, you should contact the Registrar. 3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information 86


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY contained in your education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff). A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by Del Mar College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 600 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20202-4605.

Directory Information Directory information is considered public information unless you specifically request that any or all of the directory information not be released. Your consent is presumed, unless a written request to restrict the information is made by you in the Registrar’s Office- on the prescribed form no earlier than the first day of registration and no later than the 12th class day in a semester or fourth class day in a summer term. This restriction of consent remains in effect until revoked by you, or until you fail to register for a subsequent semester. In those cases where you file a request for restriction of information, such information is treated as confidential and in response to public inquiries, the College will verify only whether you are currently enrolled. Public Information • Your name • Permanent address • Telephone listing • Email address • Date and place of birth • Major field of study (including concentration) • Enrollment status • Classification • Participation in officially recognized activities and sports • Weight and height of members of athletic teams • Dates of attendance • Degrees and awards received • Most recent previous educational agency or institution attended

Rights And Responsibilities

Standards of Student Conduct

To maintain a positive learning environment, it is essential that you conduct yourself according to certain standards of behavior set by the College. It is your right in attending Del Mar College to retain your individualism, personal freedom, autonomy and dignity, while respecting, at the same time, the rights of others. All students are individuals and display different abilities, skills, 87


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY interests, appreciations, attitudes, beliefs and values. You also have a responsibility to yourself, to your fellow students, to your instructors, to College personnel, to the policies of the College and to the law of the land. These rights and responsibilities include: A. Your Rights • The right to expect an education of the highest quality. • The right to develop potential to the best of your abilities. • The right to inquire about and to recommend improvements in policies, regulations and procedures affecting the welfare of students. The right is best exercised through the Office of Student Leadership and Campus Life or other campus organizations. • The right to counsel, to a fair hearing and an appeal when a disciplinary action is applied to you as an individual or as a group member. B. Your Obligations and Responsibilities • The obligation to be fully acquainted with published rules, regulations and policies of the College and to comply with them in the interest of an orderly and productive college community. • The obligation to follow the tenets of common decency and acceptable behavior commensurate with the aspiration implied by a college education. • The obligation to respect the rights and property of others. A full description of the Student Standards of Conduct is available from the Dean of Student Engagement and Retention, Room 204, Harvin Student Center, Del Mar College East, or on the College Web site: www.delmar.edu/policymanual, Chapter 7, Policy B7.13.

Discipline

A. Breaches of Conduct The College regards the following as types of misconduct which, if established, will result in appropriate disciplinary action: • Academic cheating and plagiarism of any kind (See “Scholastic Dishonesty,” B7.13.6 of the Standards of Student Conduct Policy). • Furnishing false information to the College or filing or making known false charges against the College. • Destruction, damage, unauthorized possession or misuse of College property, including library and laboratory materials and equipment, or of private property on the campus. • Forgery, alteration, unauthorized possession, or misuse of College documents, records, or identification cards. • Physical or verbal abuse of another person in the College community. Any verbal threat or abuse or physical action against any College employee and/or student is considered sufficient grounds for immediate suspension from the College, subject to a disciplinary hearing. • Participation in hazing, in contravention of the Texas Education Code, Section 4.51 to 1.58, inclusive. • Use, distribution or possession of alcoholic beverages, dangerous drugs, or controlled substances while on College property or at any authorized activity sponsored by or for any College-related organization, whether on or off the campus. 88


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY • Disorderly conduct which inhibits or interferes with the educational responsibility of the College community or which disrupts the administrative or service functions of the College to include social-educational activities. • Actions which violate state or federal law or city or county ordinances. • Misconduct or misuse of elected or appointed office in a student organization, or endangering its members, or the welfare of the College community. • Incorrigible or persistently irresponsible behavior. • Gambling on campus or on College property. • Possession of any weapon or facsimile of weapons on campus or on College property, or at any activity sponsored by the College or in any vehicle owned by the College. • Personality problems which disrupt teaching with detrimental effect upon other students. • Any disruption of ongoing educational activities of the College which warrants disciplinary action.

B. Disciplinary Action Any one or more of the following disciplinary actions may be imposed by the College: • Admonition and warning. • Loss of privileges. • Removal from elective or appointive office. • Loss of such other privileges which may be consistent with the offense committed, and the rehabilitation of the student. • Disciplinary probation with or without loss of designated privileges, for a specified period of time. The violation of the terms of disciplinary probation or the infraction of any College rule during the disciplinary action will result in automatic suspension. • Suspension from the College for a definite period of time. • Expulsion from the College. Suspension or expulsion from the College will require that the student be afforded a hearing to present their side of the incident or action prior to the administrative suspension or expulsion decision. A student may be suspended or expelled prior to a hearing when there is imminent danger to the student or another individual on campus.

Student Complaints

Procedures for student complaints against the College have been set forth in writing and are included in the Board of Regents Policy Manual. The Dean of Student Engagement and Retention is responsible for coordinating the processing of student complaints. The Student Complaint Policy is based on the belief that such complaints are best resolved at the level closest to the issue that led to the complaint. Resolutions to such complaints must be reached through the participation of all parties involved in the issue that led to the complaint. All procedures developed in relation to this policy will be applied in an equitable and nondiscriminatory manner and will protect the rights of all parties.

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STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY •  Non-Academic Complaint - The Non-Academic Complaint is a complaint by a student which does not involve grades or any academic issues. •  General Academic (Non-Grade) Complaint - The General Academic Non-Grade Complaint is a complaint by a student who has any academic disagreement not directly related to the assignment of a grade(s). •  Grade Appeals - The evaluation of academic work is the prerogative of the instructor and the rules for determining final course grade should be established by the instructor and provided to the students in an electronic or printed course syllabus at the beginning of the semester. A student who believes grounds exist for the appeal of a final grade must first consult with the instructor. If the appeal cannot be resolved, a student may proceed to the grade appeal process. A student with a complaint against another student should consult with the Dean of Student Engagement and Retention on the proper procedure to follow.

Responsibility and Liability Insurance

It is your responsibility to carry personal health and/or minor medical insurance. The Office of the Dean of Student Engagement and Retention has several companies’ brochures available; however, the College does not promote one company’s product over another. Activities in occupational classes and programs may expose you to more than the usual degree of responsibility and liability. Del Mar College is not liable for injuries sustained on campus, according to state statute. Health sciences, cosmetology, criminal justice, law enforcement, fire science, emergency medical services and occupational safety and health students may be required to carry professional liability insurance in addition to personal medical insurance.

Policies

Major College policies can directly affect you. So, it’s important to become familiar with the following:

Discrimination and Harassment Policy for Students

Del Mar College, in its continuing effort to seek equity in education and in support of federal and state anti-discrimination legislation, provides a complaint procedure for the prompt and equitable investigation and resolution of complaints of unlawful discrimination or harassment of students based on their race, color, national origin, religion, age, sex, disability, or veteran or military status. This complaint procedure also constitutes the grievance procedure for complaints alleging unlawful sex discrimination required under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. The Discrimination and Harassment Complaint procedure provides a process through which the College may receive, respond to, and prevent incidents of alleged discrimination and/or harassment (includes sexual harassment). Students who wish to submit complaints of discrimination or harassment should contact the District Student Complaint Coordinator.

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STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY Point of Contact: District Student Complaint Coordinator for student complaints of discrimination or sexual harassment. Office of the Dean of Student Engagement and Retention Harvin Student Center, Room 204 (361) 698-1277 • Fax (361) 698-1599 101 Baldwin Blvd., Corpus Christi, TX 78404-3897

Smoking Policy

Del Mar College will comply with Board Policy B5.39 Smoking Control and subsequent local, state and federal requirements, which prohibits smoking of tobacco and other products in non-designated smoking areas within the College. In order to protect and promote the health, safety and welfare of employees, students and the public, Del Mar College will provide an environment free from exposure to tobacco smoke. Neither smoking nor the use of tobacco products is permitted in the following areas: College facilities, 20 feet from the entrance of a building or in College-owned or rented vehicles. All faculty, staff and students have the authority to enforce the College’s Smoking Policy.

Drug and Alcohol Policy

Del Mar College is committed to working to maintain a safe, healthy, lawful and productive working and educational environment for all employees and students. Studies have shown that use of illegal drugs and abuse of alcohol increases the potential for accidents, absenteeism, tardiness, unsatisfactory performance, inefficiency, poor employee morale and damage to the College’s reputation. The intent of this policy is to make Del Mar College a better place to study and work through upgrading the mental and physical health of the total College community. It acknowledges the freedom of choice for those individuals who require or seek information relative to Drug/Alcohol Abuse. A. Definition of Legal Drugs • A “legal drug” is a prescribed drug or over-the-counter drug which has been legally obtained and is being legally used for the purpose for which it was prescribed or manufactured. B. Definition of Illegal Drugs • An “illegal drug” is any drug or controlled substance which is (l) not legally obtainable or (2) is legally obtainable but was not legally obtained. The term “illegal drug” includes all illegal drugs, dangerous drugs and controlled substances defined and listed in Articles 4476-14 and 4476-15 (Texas Controlled Substances Act) Vernon’s Texas Civil Statutes. Marijuana, hashish, cocaine, PCP, LSD, heroin, Dilaudid, Quaaludes, steroids and methamphetamine are only a few of the dangerous drugs or controlled substances which are included within such terms. • This policy applies to all students and employees of Del Mar College, as well as College visitors, contractors and all other persons occupying space in/on conveyances, offices, buildings, facilities, or grounds over which Del Mar College has custody and control, including, but not limited to, rentals and leasing of auditorium and classroom spaces. • This policy does not cancel or supersede other laws, orders, instructions, or regulations which make the use, possession and/or distribution 91


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY of dangerous drugs and controlled substances illegal. • When personal or behavioral problems begin to affect a student’s academic performance, and this appears to be the result of drug or alcohol abuse, the individual may be referred to the College Counseling Center for information on drugs/alcohol and/or to local community professionals. The student shall be responsible for any cost and/or fees incurred for professional services. Information concerning diagnosis, treatment and medical records will be kept strictly confidential. • It is recognized that a person’s job performance or academic studies may be affected by persons in the employee’s or student’s family who have alcohol, drug, or other emotional or behavioral problems. Therefore, the College will offer information services to these family members, but accepts no further responsibility. • Use, distribution, or possession of alcoholic beverages, dangerous drugs, or controlled substances while on College property or at any authorized activity sponsored by or for any College-related organization, whether on or off campus, is subject to disciplinary action.

AIDS Policy

Del Mar College recognizes that Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and HIV-related conditions such as AIDS-Related Complex (ARC) pose significant issues in an academic setting. Because of the College’s commitment to maintaining a healthy and safe campus environment, the AIDS policy and other procedures emphasize the education of employees and students concerning AIDS and the management of each case of AIDS individually with sensitivity, flexibility and concern for the affected individual as well as other employees and students. You may obtain educational pamphlets on AIDS at the Office of the Dean of Student Engagement and Retention, or the Office of Student Leadership and Campus Life and the Student Enrollment Center in the Harvin Student Center (East Campus) or the Coleman Center (West Campus). These pamphlets were developed by the Texas Department of Health. Del Mar College, in accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of l974, shall not give specific or detailed information concerning complaints or diagnosis without the expressed written consent of the affected student or employee. You will not be denied enrollment or the right to attend classes or participate in College functions solely on the basis of diagnosis or suspicion of having HIV, AIDS, or ARC. If a physician’s evaluation demonstrates that you are unable to perform academically or that continued attendance presents a health or safety risk to yourself or others, the administration will make a decision solely on such medical evaluation about continuation of enrollment.

Immunization Policy

Meningitis Vaccination Requirement (SB 1107) Del Mar College is fully committed to providing our students with a safe and healthy learning environment in which to pursue their studies and attain their academic goals. Del Mar College also strives to ensure access and equity for each and every student wishing to attend Del Mar for their academic endeavors. 92


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY The 83rd Texas Legislature approved Texas Senate Bill 62 which requires all new Del Mar College students 21 years of age or younger to provide proof of immunization against meningitis starting January 1st, 2014. The proof of meningitis vaccination requirement applies to: • All first time freshmen • All first time transfer students • All returning DMC students who have experienced a break in DMC enrollment of at least one fall or spring term • All students enrolling in courses located on any DMC campus who may have been previously exempt due to having been solely enrolled in 1) online or other distance education courses; 2) a continuing education course or program that was less than 360 contact hours, or a continuing education corporate training; or 3) a dual credit course, which was taught at a public or private K-12 facility not located on any DMC campus. The proof of meningitis vaccination requirement does not apply to: • Students who are 22 years of age or older by the first day of the start of the semester; or • Students enrolled in a continuing education course or program that is less than 360 contact hours, or continuing education corporate training who are not otherwise enrolled in any other course located on any DMC campus; or • Students enrolled in a dual credit course, which is taught at a public or private K-12 facility not located on any DMC campus, who are not otherwise enrolled in any other course located on any DMC campus. Deadlines First time freshman and first time transfer students are required to provide proof of having received a meningitis vaccination within the five year period preceding enrollment and at least 10 calendar days prior to the first day of the first semester in which the student initially enrolls at the College. Returning students are required to provide proof of having received a meningitis vaccination within the five year period preceding enrollment and at least 10 calendar days prior to the first day of the first semester of enrollment following a break of at least one fall or spring term. Students must submit proof of meningitis vaccination prior to registering for classes. Students who fail to submit this documentation will have a registration hold, preventing them from registering. Documentation must be submitted to the Del Mar College Student Enrollment Center located in the Harvin Center 127 (DMC East). Proof of Meninigitis Vaccination A student shall submit any of the following forms of documentation listed below as proof of having received a meningitis vaccination during the prescribed time period preceding enrollment. 1. Signed certification from a physician, a physician’s designee or public health personnel that shows the month, day and year the meningitis vaccination was administered. 2. An immunization record from a state or local health authority or an official record received from school officials. 3. A completed, signed and dated copy of Del Mar Colleges Meningitis

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STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY Vaccination form available online at www.delmar.edu/meningitis. All documentation must be submitted to the DMC Student Enrollment Center. Students may submit their documentation by fax, mail or in person. Del Mar College Student Enrollment Center, Rm 127 101 Baldwin Blvd. Corpus Christi, Texas 78404-3897 Fax: (361) 698-1684 Failure to Provide Proof of Meningitis Vaccination Students who fail to provide proof of meningitis vaccination will not be allowed to register until documentation has been submitted to the Student Enrollment Center. Meningitis Vaccination Exemptions A student is not required to submit evidence of receiving the vaccination against bacterial meningitis if the student submits to the institution one of the following: 1. An affidavit of certificate signed by a physician who is duly registered and licensed to practice medicine in the United States, stating that in the physician’s opinion, the vaccination would be injurious to the health and well-being of the student. 2. An affidavit signed by the student stating that the student declines the vaccination for reasons of conscience, including a religious belief. A conscientious exemption form from the Texas Department of State Health Services(DSHS) must be used. 3. Confirmation that the student has completed the Internet-based Department of State Health Services form to claim an exemption for reasons of conscience. The form can be found on https://webds.dshs.state.tx.us/ immcojc/. Consultation with a Physician Students are advised of the importance of consulting with a physician about the need for the immunization against bacterial meningitis to prevent the disease. Additional Information For additional information please contact the Del Mar College Student Enrollment Center at (361) 698-1290, by email at enroll@delmar.edu or in person at the Student Enrollment Center located in Harvin Center Room 127. Students may also visit www.delmar.edu/meningitis to learn more about SB 62 and the meningitis requirement or to access exemption forms. Additional Immunizations Senate Bill 1517 (effective Fall 1991) gives Texas institutions of higher education the option of requiring you to prove that you have been adequately immunized for diphtheria, rubeola, rubella, mumps, tetanus and poliomyelitis prior to admission. The consequences of not being fully immunized are severe. An outbreak of any of these diseases can have a devastating impact on the campus community. Immunization is an integral part of preventive health care. Therefore, Del Mar College recommends that you be fully vaccinated prior to enrollment and that preventive vaccinations be taken when required. 94


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY If you are majoring in the health care fields, you must provide documented proof that you have been fully immunized. For additional immunization information, you are encouraged to contact your family physician, the county health department, or the Immunization Division of the Texas Department of Health. Health Care Students These requirements apply to students enrolled in the health care majors who have direct or will have direct patient contact. Immunizations and other requirements: • Tetanus/Diphtheria: must have one dose within past 10 years. • Measles: those born since January 1, 1957, must have two doses since 12 months of age. The two doses must be at least 30 days apart. • Mumps: those born since January 1, 1957, must have at least one dose since 12 months of age. • Rubella: at least one dose since 12 months of age is required. • Hepatitis B: a complete series is required prior to beginning direct patient care. • Tuberculosis test: must be performed annually. • Criminal background check

Bacterial Meningitis Information

This information is being provided to all college students in the state of Texas. Bacterial Meningitis is a serious, potentially deadly disease that can progress extremely fast - so take utmost caution. It is an inflammation of the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. The bacteria that causes meningitis can also infect the blood. This disease strikes about 3,000 Americans each year, including 100-125 on college campuses, leading to 5-15 deaths among college students every year. There is a treatment, but those who survive may develop severe health problems or disabilities. What are the symptoms? • High fever • Rash or purple patches on skin • Light sensitivity • Confusion and sleepiness • Lethargy • Severe headache • Vomiting • Stiff neck • Nausea • Seizures There may be a rash of tiny, red-purple spots caused by bleeding under the skin. These can occur anywhere on the body. The more symptoms, the higher the risk, so when these symptoms appear, seek immediate medical attention. How is bacterial meningitis diagnosed? • Diagnosis is made by a medical provider and is usually based on a combination of clinical symptoms and laboratory results from spinal fluid and blood tests. 95


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY • Early diagnosis and treatment can greatly improve the likelihood of recovery. How is the disease transmitted? • The disease is transmitted when people exchange saliva (such as by kissing, or by sharing drinking containers, utensils, cigarettes, toothbrushes, etc.) or come in contact with respiratory or throat secretions. How do you increase your risk of getting bacterial meningitis? • Exposure to saliva by sharing cigarettes, water bottles, eating utensils, food, kissing, etc. • Living in close conditions (such as sharing a room/suite in a dorm or group home). What are the possible consequences of the disease? • Death (in 8 to 24 hours) • Permanent brain damage • Kidney failure • Learning disability • Hearing loss, blindness • Limb damage (fingers, toes, arms, legs) that requires amputation • Gangrene • Coma • Convulsions Can the disease be treated? • Antibiotic treatment, if received early, can save lives and chances of recovery are increased. However permanent disability or death can still occur. • Vaccinations are available and should be considered for: • Those living in close quarters • College students 29 years old or younger • Vaccinations are effective against four of the five most common bacterial types that cause 70 percent of the disease in the U.S. (but does not protect against all types of meningitis). • Vaccinations take seven to 10 days to become effective, with protection lasting three to five years. • The cost of vaccine varies, so check with your health care provider. • Vaccination is very safe - most common side effects are redness and minor pain at injection site for up to two days. • Vaccination is available at your health care provider. How can I find out more information? • Contact your own health care provider. • Contact your local or regional health department.

Safety

Campus Security

Campus Security is a public service-oriented security operation that is responsible for protecting College students, faculty, staff and property. Campus Security is managed through the Environmental, Health, Safety and Risk Management Office and is comprised of 24-hour contracted security personnel. Uniformed Off-Duty CCPD Officers patrol the College’s properties during academic hours. 96


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY

Reports

All incidents, thefts, or other criminal offenses on College property should be reported to Campus Security. You can assist Campus Security by reporting: • Crime, no matter how insignificant it may seem; • Suspicious activity; • Suspicious persons on campus. • Ill or injured persons (you may call 911 for an ambulance and then notify Campus Security) Your report may prevent a crime.

Services

• Monitor and patrol the College’s properties 24-hours per day • Provide first aid to injured persons, • Safety escorts to vehicles, when requested; • Escorts to and from classes, depending on circumstances, when requested by College administrators; • Addressing classes or groups regarding crime prevention and safety awareness. Campus Security is located in the Physical Facilities Offices on the East Campus and in the Coleman Center on the West Campus. Individuals are encouraged to contact security 24 hours a day, seven days a week, as necessary.

Telephone Numbers

(361) 698-1199 - emergency (East and West Campuses, Del Mar College Center for Economic Development, Northwest Center) (361) 698-1946 - non-emergency (East and West Campuses, Del Mar College Center for Economic Development, Northwest Center)

DMC e-Tips

This is web page designed to assist you in submitting anonymous crime tips that are not life threatening and do not need immediate emergency assistance. The web page is located at: www.delmar.edu/submit_crime.aspx

Emergency and Assistance Call Boxes

Emergency and Assistance Call Boxes, mounted on light poles or in free-standing blue pedestals, may be used to request help during an emergency, to request personal escorts, or for any assistance or information needed. The call boxes are located on both the East and West Campuses, as well as the Del Mar College Center for Economic Development. When using a call box, be prepared to state your name, location and the nature of your emergency.

Crime Statistics

The Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990 requires educational institutions to keep and to report statistics of certain crimes occurring on campus which are reported to campus authorities during the most current year. These statistics are available in the Office of the Dean of Student Engagement and Retention in the Harvin Student Center on the East Campus, or in the Safety Office in the Maintenance Building on the East Campus. Information is also available at www.delmar.edu/Disclosure.aspx. 97


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY

Parking

Parking can be a challenge. This is true at other colleges as well. Del Mar College has developed regulations for the purposes of: •  proper identification of vehicles of persons who have legitimate business with the College, •  to ensure safety/notification of students/faculty and other persons in an emergency, •  to provide orderly parking, traffic and use of parking facilities, •  to provide for the purchase and issuance of vehicle identification permits, •  to ensure pedestrian safety, and •  to provide for enforcement in the event of violation. The operation of a motor vehicle on Del Mar College property is governed by College policies and regulations. The fact that a violation notice is not issued when a violation occurs does not imply that the regulation or rule is not in effect. Each operator is responsible for knowing and following the parking rules and regulations. Campus Security has been charged with the authority to enforce these regulations, including the right to tow vehicles for specific violations and repeat violators. The owner or operator of a towed vehicle is responsible for the cost of towing and storage fees in addition to any other fines. Proof that a parking or traffic control device, sign, signal, or marking was in place at any location on the campus shall constitute prima facie evidence that it was official and was installed under proper authority by College, city, state and federal guidelines. The College assumes no responsibility for any vehicle or its content while the vehicle is parked or operated on College property. All vehicle operators should lock or otherwise secure their vehicles when parked on any campus of Del Mar College.

Definitions

For the purpose of these parking and traffic regulations, the following terms are defined: Abandoned Vehicle - a motor vehicle, bicycle, or other conveyance parked on Del Mar College property for more than three days without being moved DMC - Del Mar College Campus - all property owned or controlled by Del Mar College College - Del Mar College Citation - Notification issued by a Corpus Christi police officer, which may be written to any vehicle found in violation of state law or city ordinances on DMC property Parking for Disabled Individuals - spaces or areas reserved for any disabled individual who has an appropriate (placard) hang tag or license plate from the County Tax Assessor’s Office Habitual Violator - any person who has received three or more violation notices within a twelve-month period Impound - towing and storage of vehicle at a towing facility 98


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY Marked space - space defined by two parallel lines Motor Vehicle - all automobiles, buses, trucks, motorcycles, motor scooters, motorbikes, mopeds, etc. Moving Violations - moving traffic law violations as enacted by the State of Texas No Parking Zones - all areas not specifically designated for parking, to include painted curbs, fire lanes, construction areas, loading zones, service delivery and bus zones. See “Vehicle Identification Permits� section. Parking Permit (Vehicle Identification Permit) - a temporary card or self-adhering decal issued by DMC, authorizing the motor vehicle properly displaying the permit to be lawfully parked within designated areas. The issuance and display of the permit serves as proper registration. Includes student permit, non-reserved permit and reserved permit. Reserved Parking - identified by signs and/or pavement markings; enforced at peak business hours of the day. New employees shall have the option of continuing the reserved space held by the former employee in that position so that performance of work in those offices requiring frequent trips between campuses and in the community may be facilitated. Restricted Parking - areas reserved for use by holders of designated permits Visitors - persons other than students, faculty members, staff members or employees of DMC Violation Notice - a notification issued by DMC Security for violations of parking and traffic regulations. These notifications are subject to College fines and a right of students to appeal within the College as defined in Appeals of Violation Notices or Impounds section. VIP - Vehicle Identification Permit, including: student permit, non-reserved permit and reserved permit

Parking Regulations

Registration of Vehicles All vehicles parked on campus at any time must display (on rear windshield, passenger side) a Vehicle Identification Permit except for vehicles belonging to visitors during registration periods or one-day visits. Students are not currently assessed a parking registration fee. The College retains the option to assess a parking registration fee for students in the future. Procurement of a Vehicle Identification Permit by students or employees with non-reserved parking does not guarantee a specified parking space. Each driver is responsible for finding a legal parking space. Inability to locate a parking space is not an excuse for violating parking regulations. A Vehicle Identification Permit will not be issued to any person having unpaid violation charges until full payment is made at the Business Office. A Vehicle Identification Permit may not be purchased for or displayed by an individual ineligible to receive the permit. The College may suspend for a period of one year the parking privileges of individuals who violate this regulation. Vehicle Identification Permits Any person attending Del Mar College who is not employed by the College is eligible for a student Vehicle Identification Permit. Student workers may receive only student Vehicle Identification Permit. 99


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY The process by which a student receives a Vehicle Identification Permit is as follows: 1.  The student completes the appropriate College parking registration card. 2.  The student submits the card to Campus Security. 3.  Campus Security issues a Vehicle Identification Permit to the student.

Parking for Disabled Persons Del Mar College will follow state law regarding parking for disabled persons. Students, faculty and staff who have qualified and obtained a license plate or placard reflecting disability from the County Tax Assessor’s Office will be issued a non-reserved Vehicle Identification Permit. Those individuals may park in any parking space for disabled persons as long as their license plate reflects disabled status or their placard reflecting disability is hanging in their vehicle and clearly visible.

Enforcement

Policy and Procedures All laws of the State of Texas, ordinances of the applicable municipality and rules and regulations of Del Mar College are in effect on the campuses 24 hours a day. The campus speed limit, on both the East and West Campus, is 10 miles per hour. Special temporary parking arrangements must be made through the Director of Environmental Health, Safety and Risk Management. Reserved spaces, whether by designated “Reserved” signs or reserved by Campus Security for special events, will be enforced. Traffic and Parking Notices Campus Security may issue two types of notification for violations of parking and traffic regulations. 1.  Del Mar College Violation Notices - subject to College fines and a right of students to appeal within the College as defined in the Appeals of Violations or Impound Notices section. 2.  Corpus Christi Police Department (CCPD) Citations - CCPD officers may write citations to any vehicle found in violation of state law or city ordinances on DMC property.

Penalties In addition to fees for parking or traffic violations, parking privileges may be suspended for a period of up to one year for habitual violators. The vehicles of habitual violators may also be towed without notice at the expense of the vehicle owner. Suspension of parking privileges will be decided by the Director of Environmental Health, Safety and Risk Management and/or the Dean of Student Engagement and Retention, after reviewing recommendations from Campus Security. A person in whose name an unpaid violation exists and no appeal is pending, shall be barred from enrollment in a subsequent semester until fines are paid. Transcripts and refunds shall also be withheld by the Business Office from any person in whose name an unpaid violation charge exists and no appeal is pending. In addition to the above-mentioned penalties, the Business Office will send a letter to students who receive a violation notice and no appeal is pending, to remind them to pay their fines. 100


STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY Parking Violations 1.  Parking in a “no parking” zone a.  parking where prohibited by signs, painted curbs or lines. b.  parking where no marked space exists, except for temporary areas created by Campus Security for emergencies or special events. c.  parking on grass, grounds, lawn, turf or any unapproved ground which has not been specifically designated for parking. d.  parking in a fire zone. e.  parking in loading zones. 2.  Parking in reserved space or area a.  parking illegally within a designated reserved space and/or area. b.  parking illegally within any barricaded or controlled space and/or area. c.  parking in a reserved space and/or area not authorized by the type permit displayed. d.  parking in a designated time space or loading zone beyond allotted time or without proper permit. 3.  Blocking drives, sidewalk, or exit a. parking in a manner that obstructs or impairs proper usage of sidewalks, driveways, streets, curbs, ramps, loading docks, marked crosswalks or disabled access. b.  parking in a manner to prevent, impair or obstruct other vehicles from entering or exiting parking lots, parking spaces or access streets that enter and exit the campus. 4.  Parallel parking on two-way streets and roadways a.  parking in a manner that obstructs two-way flow of traffic on any street or roadway on any campus b.  failure to park with right-hand wheels within eighteen (18) inches of the curb. 5.  Failure to park within a marked space (failure of one vehicle to park within the marked boundaries is not implied consent for others to park with any part of the vehicle over the line). 6.  Parking in a “double parked” fashion (stopping or parking a vehicle on the roadway side of any vehicle parked at the edge or curb of a street or parking lot). 7.  Failure to display parking permit (parking on any campus, at any time, without displaying a parking permit). 8.  Improper display of parking permit (parking permit not displayed in a manner where it can be seen from the outside of the vehicle). 9.  Parking illegally in a space for disabled individuals (parking in a space for disabled individuals without properly displaying a license plate or placard (hang tag) for disabled individuals issued by the County Tax Assessor). 10.  Displaying a parking permit that has been altered or forged. Violation Notices College violation notices described in these regulations will result in charges being assessed in accordance with the following schedule:

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STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY Warning..........................................................................................................$ 0 No Parking Permit Displayed...................................................................$ 10 Not a Designated Parking Area................................................................$ 10 Visitor Parking Only...................................................................................$ 10 Parking a Vehicle in Motorcycle Parking Only.......................................$ 10 Parking in a Loading Zone........................................................................$ 10 Unauthorized Parking in a Reserved Parking Space.............................$ 10 Exceeding Posted Speed Limit..................................................................$ 10 Reckless Operation of a Vehicle................................................................$ 50 Driving over Grounds or Sidewalks......................................................$ 100 Parking in a Fire Zone*...............................................................................$ 20 Blocking/Impeding Exits, Entrances or Driveways*.............................$ 20 Parking Illegally in Handicapped Parking Spaces*.............................$ 100 Parking on Grounds, Drives or Walkways*............................................$ 50 *For any violation marked with an asterisk (*), the vehicle may be immediately towed at owner’s expense. All charges are subject to change without notice. Receiving four tickets for any violation will result in vehicle being immediately towed at owner’s expense. Except as noted above, violation notices will be issued in cases where traffic can be rerouted or vehicle operators can be immediately located to move their vehicle. In all other cases, vehicles will be towed and ticketed. The fine rate is set by the College for administrative violations. However, citations issued by the Corpus Christi Police Department and/or Corpus Christi Fire Department will result in fines decreed by the courts. Multiple violations can be alleged on the same Violation Notice. Charges will be assessed for each violation. Violation Notice Payments Payments must be made within 30 days of the date the Violation Notice was issued. Payments may be made at the Business Office, Harvin Student Center at Del Mar College East or the Coleman Center at Del Mar College West during business hours. Payments not made within 30 days will result in a hold being placed against enrollment in a subsequent semester, transcripts or refunds. It may also result in suspension of parking privileges. Appeals by students must be filed with the Student Government Association within 10 working days of the date Violation Notice was issued. Students must file a written petition for a hearing in the Harvin Student Center - East Campus, Office of Student Leadership and Campus Life, Room 105; or Room 106 at the Coleman Center - West Campus. If the student has the same family name or home address as the registered owner of a vehicle for which a Violation Notice has been issued, the Violation Notice and accompanying violation charges will be recorded in the student’s name. Unpaid charges for parking violations are recorded in either: •  the name of the person who previously purchased a parking permit; or •  the name of the purchaser of the permit displayed; or •  the name of the person who has previously paid violation charges on the vehicle; or •  the name of the owner or driver.

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STUDENT RIGHTS, RESPONSIBILITIES, SAFETY Appeals of Violation Notices or Impounds A Student Judiciary Committee (SJC) appointed by the Dean of Student Engagement and Retention helps assure fairness in the issuance of parking Violation Notices and vehicle impounds. The findings of the SJC are final. A person who receives a Violation Notice, or whose vehicle has been impounded, may request an appeal. The appeal is handled through the Student Government Association (SGA). If the Student Judiciary Committee (SJC) finds a vehicle was improperly impounded, the Violation Notice/Citation and towing/impounding expenses incurred by the individual whose vehicle was impounded will be reimbursed by the College. All requests for appeal must be filed within 10 working days from the issuance of the Violation Notice. The Violation Notice or a copy of the notice must be attached to the appeal form. A person who fails to file the request within this time period waives the right to appeal. Appeals for which 10-day deadline falls within the winter break shall carry over into the beginning of the spring semester. The appeals committee may summon the individual who issued the Violation Notice or performed the vehicle impound if he/she is available to assist the committee. All appeals will be heard within 15 working days of the date an appeal is requested. Appeals for which the 15-working-day deadline falls within the winter break shall carry over into the beginning of the spring semester.

Motorcycle, Motor Scooter and Moped Parking Regulations

In accordance with Texas law, operators of motorcycles, motor scooters and mopeds shall be granted all the rights and shall be subject to all the laws and duties applicable to the driver of a motor vehicle while on any DMC campus. Motorcycles, motor scooters, or mopeds must park in legal, non-reserved parking spaces (unless authorized to do so) or within an area designated for these types of vehicles. Any of these vehicles found parked illegally and creating a potential safety hazard may be impounded or cited.

Bicycles/Skateboards and Other Non-Motorized Devices

The following requirements apply to bicycles, skateboards, roller skates, rollerblades, longboards and all other non-motorized transportation devices excluding disability-related (i.e., wheel chairs) or emergency response devices. The sidewalk is a pedestrian right of way and operators of all devices must yield to pedestrians when on or crossing a sidewalk. Non-motorized transportation devices may not be used inside any building, and parking of bicycles must be restricted to designated area or bicycles racks. Operators of all non-motorized transportation devices do so at their own risk and liability. Helmets and other personal safety equipment are strongly recommended for those using non-motorized transportation devices on campus. The use of non-motorized transportation device in an unsafe manner and/or trick riding is prohibited. This includes, but not limited to, riding on stairs, walls, rails, benches and other structures, as well as operating the device at an unsafe speed. Failure to follow these requirements may result in disciplinary actions in accordance with the Student Handbook.

Summary

Your conduct and safety are a priority at Del Mar. 103


PLANNING YOUR ACADEMIC FUTURE

Planning Your Academic Future Degrees and Certificates Awarded

Del Mar College offers transfer associate degrees designed for students planning to transfer to a four-year institution of higher education and complete a baccalaureate degree and career and technical associate degrees and certificates that prepare students for immediate entry into the workforce. Associate in Arts (AA) Degree – The AA Degree is designed to prepare the student to transfer to a four-year institution of higher education to complete a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree. Del Mar College offers AA Degrees in areas related to the business, arts, humanities, science and social sciences. Associate in Science (AS) Degree – The AS Degree is designed to prepare the student to transfer to a four-year institution of higher education to complete a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree. Del Mar College offers AS Degrees in areas related to science, mathematics, engineering, technology and computer science. Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) Degree – The AAT Degree is designed to help prepare community college students for entrance into the teaching profession. The College offers the AAT degree in three areas of concentration: Option 1: EC-Grade 6 Certification; Option 2: Grades 4-8, EC-12 Special Education Certification; Option 3: Grades 8-12, EC-12 Other than Special Education Certification. Responsibilities for Transfer Degrees • It is your responsibility to know the specific requirements of the college or university to which you plan to transfer. This responsibility includes knowing course requirements, number of credit hours accepted and grade-point average for admission. • You should consult with your academic advisor at the earliest opportunity after being admitted to Del Mar College and begin developing an education plan. Thereafter, you should confer with the advisor regularly each semester while completing the education plan toward the associate degree. • Where transferability permits, course substitution is permitted on recommendation of advisor and approval of both the dean of your major area and the dean over the course in question. Requirements for the AA, AS, and AAT Degrees: • Successfully complete the required credit hours for the AA, AS and AAT Degrees in the prescribed courses. • Complete the 42 credit hour core curriculum. • Maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average for all courses (unless the major/program requires a higher cumulative grade point average or requires minimum grades in individual courses). • Complete a minimum of 18 credit hours in sophomore-level courses. (MSCI 2371 and MSCI 2372 will not count toward fulfilling the 18 credit hour sophomore-level courses). • Demonstrate basic computer skills. Some disciplines offer courses that may be used to fulfill the computer literacy requirement. ITSC 1301, 1309 and COSC 1301 may also be used to demonstrate computer skills; however, these three courses are not intended as transfer courses that would apply toward a baccalaureate degree. Students should see an 104


PLANNING YOUR ACADEMIC FUTURE advisor for appropriate course identification. • Distance Learning Note: You may not take more than 50% of your cumulative credits towards your degree or certificate in online classes, unless you are enrolled in an approved on-line degree or certificate program. • Courses shown in the Suggested Transfer Plan areas of this Catalog fulfill all requirements for the indicated majors. However, because of various transfer requirements from senior institutions, other combinations of core and major-field courses may satisfy the requirements for Associate in Arts and Associate in Science degrees. • A minimum of 25 percent of degree-required classes must be earned at Del Mar College. Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degree – The AAS Degree is designed to prepare students to enter the workforce in one of the identified Del Mar College career and technical programs. Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degree with Enhanced Skills Option – This degree is awarded to students who successfully complete the prescribed courses listed in the Enhanced Skills Option education plan for their chosen Business, Professional and Technology Education program. Requirements for AAS Degree • Successfully complete the prescribed courses in the curriculum including the identified 15 general education credits. • Maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average for all courses (unless the major/program requires a higher cumulative grade point average or requires minimum grades in individual courses). • Certificate of Achievement – The Certificate of Achievement is awarded to students who successfully complete the prescribed courses in any one of the College’s approved certificate programs. • Marketable Skills Achievement Award – The Marketable Skills Achievement Award is awarded to students who successfully complete the prescribed 9 to 14 credit hours of courses in any one of the College’s approved business or industrial programs. • Institutional certificates – These certificates are issued in certain workforce areas for successful completion of a course or courses that make a student eligible for immediate employment or add to the student’s marketability to employers. • A minimum of 25 percent of degree-required classes must be earned at Del Mar College. Requirements for Certificates, Certificates of Achievement, and Marketable Skills Achievement Award • Successfully complete all courses required for the certificate or award. • Maintain a 2.0 cumulative grade point average for all courses (unless the certificate/award requires a higher cumulative grade point average or requires minimum grades in individual courses).

Student Right to Know Graduation and Transfer Rates

In accordance with the Student Right to Know Act, the College annually publishes the graduation and transfer-out rates for first-time, full-time, degree- or certificate-seeking students, which are available to all current and prospective students. Out of the first-time, full-time, degree- or certificate-seeking students 105


PLANNING YOUR ACADEMIC FUTURE - CORE CURRICULUM who entered Del Mar College in Fall 2008, 9.15 percent successfully completed a degree or certificate program at the College, and 13.14 percent transferred to other institutions within 150 percent of the normal completion time for their programs. For additional information about student completion and transfer rates, please contact the Office of Strategic Planning and Institutional Research at (361) 698-1207.

General Education and Core Curriculum Philosophy and Rationale General Education Competencies

The General Education Competencies at Del Mar College inform the educational experiences of all Associate Degree Graduates. All graduates will be able to demonstrate the following competencies: Critical Thinking, Communication, Empirical and Quantitative Skills, Teamwork, Personal Responsibility and Social Responsibility.

General Education Requirements

Support for the development of these competencies is located in the curriculum requirements for successful completion of the Associate in Arts (AA), Associate in Science (AS), Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) and the Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degrees. AA, AS, AAT The General Degree requirements for all transfer degrees at Del Mar College are prescribed by the core curriculum guidelines set forth by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Texas law requires that each public college and university identify and requires a core curriculum of at least 42 credits for its degrees designed to transfer. In addition, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has prescribed eight (8) Foundational Component Areas and a Component Area Option, with a specified number of credits for each. A student who completes 42-hour core curriculum at Del Mar College may transfer the block of courses to any other Texas public college. That college must count it for their core curriculum. Students who do not complete the entire 42-hour core, but complete the requirements for one or more Foundational Component Areas, may transfer those courses and will receive credit for each of the courses transferred. Only if the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has approved a larger core for the receiving institution can the student be required to take additional core curriculum courses. Students should consult with their advisors to ensure that the core curriculum courses they take are correct for their degree plan and for the major at the college or university to which they intend to transfer. The core curriculum supports the General Education Competencies of Del Mar College as it is structured to develop competencies in critical thinking, communication, empirical and quantitative skills, teamwork, personal responsibility and social responsibility. The core curriculum is further designed to give students breadth of knowledge in the liberal arts and to promote critical thinking skills that are fundamental to higher education. 106


CORE CURRICULUM NOTE: Core courses that have a four digit course number beginning with a number “2” are sophomore-level courses except for MSCI 2371 and MSCI 2372.

Core Curriculum Course Requirements (42 Credit Hours)

C O M M U N I C AT I O N S F O U N D AT I O N A L C O M P O N E N T A R E A (6 Credit Hours) Courses in this category focus on developing ideas and expressing them clearly, considering the effect of the message, fostering understanding, and building the skills needed to communicate persuasively. Courses involve the command of oral, aural, written, and visual literacy skills that enable people to exchange messages appropriate to the subject, occasion and audience. ENGL 1301 ENGL 1302 SPCH 1311 SPCH 1315 SPCH 1321

Composition I Composition II Introduction to Speech Communication Fundamentals of Public Speaking Business and Professional Communication

MATHEMATICS FOUNDATIONAL COMPONENT AREA (3 Credit Hours) Courses in this category focus on quantitative literacy in logic, patterns and relationships. Courses involve the understanding of key mathematical concepts and the application of appropriate quantitative tools to everyday experience. MATH 1314 MATH 1316 MATH 1324 MATH 1325 MATH 1342 MATH 2413

College Algebra Plane Trigonometry Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences I Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences II Elementary Statistical Methods Calculus I

LIFE AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES FOUNDATIONAL COMPONENT AREA (6 Credit Hours) Courses in this category focus on describing, explaining and predicting natural phenomena using the scientific method. Courses involve the understanding of interactions among natural phenomena and the implications of scientific principles on the physical world and on human experiences. BIOL 1308 BIOL 1309 BIOL 1406 BIOL 1407 BIOL 1408 BIOL 1409 BIOL 1414 BIOL 2401

General Biology: Fundamentals of Cell Biology General Biology: Diversity and Environment Biological Concepts I – Cellular and Molecular Biological Concepts II – Evolution, Diversity, Structure, Function and Environment General Biology: Fundamentals of Cell Biology (lab included) General Biology: Diversity and Environment (lab included) Introduction to Biotechnology Human Anatomy and Physiology I 107


CORE CURRICULUM BIOL 2402 CHEM 1405 CHEM 1406 CHEM 1407 CHEM 1411 CHEM 1412 GEOL 1301 GEOL 1303 GEOL 1304 GEOL 1345 GEOL 1404 PHYS 1303 PHYS 1305 PHYS 1401 PHYS 1402

Human Anatomy and Physiology II Introductory Chemistry Basic Chemistry Introductory Chemistry II General Inorganic Chemistry General Inorganic Chemistry II Earth Sciences Physical Geology Historical Geology Oceanography Historical Geology (with lab) Stars and Galaxies Introductory Physics College Physics I College Physics II

LANGUAGE, PHILOSOPHY AND CULTURE FOUNDATIONAL COMPONENT AREA (3 Credit Hours) Courses in this category focus on how ideas, values, beliefs and other aspects of culture express and affect human experience. Courses involve the exploration of ideas that foster aesthetic and intellectual creation in order to understand the human condition across cultures. ENGL 2321 ENGL 2322 ENGL 2323 ENGL 2326 ENGL 2327 ENGL 2328 ENGL 2332 ENGL 2333 ENGL 2341 ENGL 2351 PHIL 1301 PHIL 2306 PHIL 2307 PHIL 2318 PHIL 2321

British Literature British Literature I: Beginnings Through the 18th Century British Literature II: 19th and 20th Centuries American Literature American Literature I: Beginnings Through 1865 American Literature II: 1865 to the Present World Literature I World Literature II Forms of Literature Mexican-American Literature Introduction to Philosophy Introduction to Ethics Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy Contemporary Philosophy Philosophy of Religion

CREATIVE ARTS FOUNDATIONAL COMPONENT AREA (3 Credit Hours) Courses in this category focus on the appreciation and analysis of creative artifacts and works of the human imagination. Courses involve the synthesis and interpretation of artistic expression and enable critical, creative and innovative communication about works of art. DANC 2303 ARTS 1301 ARTS 1303 108

Dance Appreciation Art Appreciation Art History I


CORE CURRICULUM ARTS 1304 DRAM 1310 DRAM 2361 DRAM 2366 DRAM 2367 HUMA 1301 HUMA 1305 HUMA 1311 MUSI 1306 MUSI 1307 MUSI 1310

Art History II Introduction to Theatre History of Theatre I Development of the Motion Picture I Development of the Motion Picture II Introduction to the Humanities Introduction to Mexican-American Studies Mexican-American Fine Arts Appreciation Music Appreciation Music Literature American Music-History of Rock and Roll

AMERICAN HISTORY FOUNDATIONAL COMPONENT AREA (6 Credit Hours) Courses in this category focus on the consideration of past events and ideas relative to the United States, with the option of including Texas History for a portion of this component area. Courses involve the interaction among individuals, communities, states, the nation, and the world, considering how these interactions have contributed to the development of the United States and its global role. HIST 1301 HIST 1302 HIST 2327 HIST 2328

United States History I United States History II Mexican-American History I Mexican-American History II

GOVERNMENT/POLITICAL SCIENCE FOUNDATIONAL COMPONENT AREA (6 Credit Hours) Courses in this category focus on consideration of the Constitution of the United States and the constitutions of the states, with special emphasis on that of Texas. Courses involve the analysis of governmental institutions, political behavior, civic engagement, and their political and philosophical foundations. GOVT 2305 GOVT 2306

Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES FOUNDATIONAL COMPONENT AREA (3 Credit Hours) Courses in this category focus on the application of empirical and scientific methods that contribute to the understanding of what makes us human. Courses involve the exploration of behavior and interactions among individuals, groups, institutions and events, examining their impact on the individual, society and culture. ANTH 2302 ANTH 2346 COMM 1307

Introduction to Archaeology Introduction to Anthropology Introduction to Mass Communication 109


CORE CURRICULUM ECON 2301 ECON 2302 GEOG 1303 GOVT 2311 HIST 2311 HIST 2312 SOCI 1301 SOCI 1306 SOCI 2301 SOCI 2319 TECA 1354 PSYC 2301

Principles of Macroeconomics Principles of Microeconomics World Regional Geography Mexican-American Politics Western Civilization I Western Civilization II Introduction to Sociology Social Problems Marriage and the Family Minority Studies I Child Growth and Development General Psychology

COMPONENT AREA OPTION (6 Credit Hours) NOTE: At least 3 credits of Component Area Option must be chosen from the 8 Foundational Component Areas. Up to 3 credits may be chosen from Component Area Option list. Courses may count for Foundational Component Area hours or Component Area Option hours, but not both. KINE 1238 GEOL 1103 GEOL 1104

Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport Physical Geology Laboratory Historical Geology Laboratory

Core Curriculum Intellectual Objectives and Aspects through the Core Curriculum, students will gain a foundation of knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, develop principles of personal and social responsibility for living in a diverse world, and advance intellectual and practical skills that are essential for all learning. Through the Core Curriculum, students will prepare for contemporary challenges by developing and demonstrating the following core objectives. Critical Thinking Skills: To include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information Aspect 1: Creative Thinking - Be able to generate/demonstrate original ideas Aspect 2: Innovation - Be able to apply information in a novel way Aspect 3: Inquiry - Be able to ask relevant questions Aspect 4: Analysis - Be able to list/describe the components of information Aspect 5: Evaluation - Be able to judge the relevance of the components of information Aspect 6: Synthesis - Be able to integrate/organize information in its functional context

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CORE CURRICULUM Communication Skills: To include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication Aspect 1: Written - Be able to develop, interpret and express ideas effectively through written communication Aspect 2: Oral - Be able to develop, interpret and express ideas effectively through oral communication Aspect 3: Visual - Be able to develop, interpret and express ideas effectively through visual communication   Empirical and Quantitative Skills: To include the manipulation and analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions Aspect 1: Data Collection -Be able to collect data Aspect 2: Data Manipulation -Be able to manipulate data Aspect 3: Analysis -Be able to analyze data to draw informed conclusions Teamwork: To include the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal Aspect 1: Points of View - Be able to consider different points of view to support a shared purpose or goal Aspect 2: Work with others - Be able to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal Personal Responsibility: To include the ability to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making Aspect 1: Be able to connect choices, actions and consequences to ethical decision-making Social Responsibility: To include intercultural competence, knowledge of civic responsibility and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national and global communities Aspect 1: Intercultural Competence -Be able to demonstrate intercultural competence Aspect 2: Civic Responsibility -Be able to demonstrate knowledge of civic responsibility Aspect 3: Engagement - Be able to engage effectively in regional, national, and/or global communities

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CORE CURRICULUM AAS General Education competencies in the AAS are supported by the general education requirements for all AAS degrees. Students pursuing the Associate of Applied Science must select 15 credit hours of courses designed to offer students breadth of knowledge beyond the specific technical degree requirements. Some AAS degree plans specify particular courses. When a particular course is not specified, students are advised to select a core approved course from the corresponding component areas as those found in the AA, AS, AAT degree in the previous section. However, these courses can be selected from the listing in the component areas below. Students must earn 3 credits in each area. Students may choose from the following: WRITTEN COMMUNICATIONS (Complete 3 Credits) ENGL 1301 Composition I ENGL 1302 Composition II ORAL COMMUNICATIONS (Complete 3 Credits) All SPCH courses MATHEMATICS OR NATURAL SCIENCES (Complete 3 Credits) MATH 1314 College Algebra (and all higher MATH courses) All BIOL courses (except BIOL 1371) All CHEM courses All GEOL courses All PHYS courses HUMANITIES / VISUAL OR PERFORMING ARTS (Complete 3 Credits) All ENGL 2300+ Literature courses All ARTS courses All DRAM courses All PHIL courses All HUMA courses All MUSI courses DANC 2303. Dance Appreciation SOCIAL/BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE (Complete 3 Credits) All ECON courses All GEOG courses All GOVT courses All HIST courses All PSYC courses All SOCI courses

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SELECTING A PROGRAM

Selecting a Program Whether you are interested in transferring to another college or have specific career goals, Del Mar College has the programs and degrees that are right for you. Just be sure to check with the institution to which you plan to transfer for their degree and transfer requirements.

College Programs/Degrees

There are two major type of degrees offered at the College–transfer degrees and occupational degrees. Both typically take two (2) years to complete. There’s actually a third type, certificates, which aren’t degrees but can help you get a job.

Transfer Degrees

If you are planning to transfer to another college or university, check out these three degrees. 1. Associate of Arts Degree The Associate of Arts degree is available in the following majors: • Advertising/Public Relations • American Sign Language/Deaf Studies • Applied Music/Music Education – Instrumental • Applied Music/Music Education – Vocal • Architecture • Business Administration • Criminal Justice • Cultural Geography • Digital Media • Drama • English -Language -Literature -Philosophy • Foreign Language • History • Journalism • Kinesiology • Liberal Arts • Mexican-American Studies • Music Theory and Composition • Physical Geography • Political Science • Pre-Medical Technology • Psychology • Radio and Television • Registered Nurse Education • Social Work • Sociology • Speech • Studio Art

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SELECTING A PROGRAM Rapid Track Option Rapid Track offers you the option to complete the courses required for the Associate of Arts (AA) degree within one year instead of two years. This option is right for you if you are highly-motivated and can devote time to an accelerated program of study. You are advised not to hold a job while enrolled in the Rapid Track option. To complete the Rapid Track Associate of Arts Degree in one year, you enroll in seven consecutive terms - Fall I and II, Spring I and II, Maymester and Summer I and II. The traditional 16-week semester term is divided into two six-week terms. Fall I and II are offered between August and December, and Spring I and II are offered between January and May. Most classes meet four times a week, Monday through Thursday. Specifically, you will enroll in • at least four classes that meet for six weeks each Fall I and II and Spring I and II. • one class that meets for three weeks during Maymester and • at least two classes that meet for six weeks each Summer I and II. 2. Associate in Arts in Teaching Degree The Associate in Arts in Teaching (AAT) degree is intended for transfer to baccalaureate programs that lead to initial Texas teacher certification. Each of the three AAT specializations is designed to prepare teachers for the various certifications offered in Texas. The degree plan best suited to the desired certification should be followed and transferred to a university to complete Texas teacher certification requirements. • EC-6 • Grades 4-8, EC-12 Special Education • Grades 8-12, EC-12 Other Than Special Education 3. Associate in Science Degree The Associate of Science Degree is available in the following majors: • Biology (includes pre-Chiropractic, pre-Dental, pre-Medical, pre-Veterinary Medicine) • Chemistry (includes Chemical Engineering, pre-Physical Therapy, pre-Pharmacy) • Computer Information Systems • Computer Programming • Electrical Engineering (with Texas A&M University-Kingsville) • Mechanical Engineering • Geographical Information Systems • Geology • Mathematics • Physics

Transfer Agreements

2+2 Plans Del Mar College has agreements in a number of majors with four-year institutions in the state. These agreements are commonly referred to as 2+2 plans. If you have an associate degree in certain fields, you are assured of a minimum loss of 114


SELECTING A PROGRAM credit when transferring into a baccalaureate program. Contact your instructional deans for more information.

Occupational Degrees

If you are interested in getting a job, check out these two occupational degrees with options. Associate in Applied Science Degree If you are primarily interested in career training programs, check these out: • Accounting Specialist • Addiction Studies in Human Services • Air Conditioning Applied Technology • Architectural/Drafting Technology - Architectural Technology Specialization - Construction Technology Specialization - Technical Drafting Specialization • Auto Body Applied Technology • Automotive Applied Technology • Aviation Maintenance - Airframe Applied Technology • Aviation Maintenance - Power Plant Applied Technology • Baking/Pastry Specialization • Biotechnology • Building Maintenance Applied Technology • Child Development/Early Childhood • Child Development/Early Childhood Education Assistant • Computer Information Systems: - Computer Programming Specialization - Digital Media for Web Design and eLearning - Information Systems Specialization - Information Systems Security Associate Emphasis - Microcomputers for Business Specialization - Geographic Information Systems - Networking Technology Specialization: Network Support and Administration • Court Reporting • Criminal Justice Technology - Police Science Option • Culinary Arts (Chef Training) • Dental Assisting • Dental Hygiene • Diagnostic Medical Sonography • Diesel Applied Technology • Echocardiography • Electroplating Applied Technology • Emergency Medical Technician Paramedic • Engineering Technology • Environmental/Petrochemical Lab Technology • Fire Science: - Basic Firefighting Option • Generalist Studies in Human Services • Health Information Technology 115


SELECTING A PROGRAM • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Hospitality Management Industrial Machining Applied Technology Interpreter Preparation Management Development: - Administrative Specialization - Administrative – Legal Option - General Management Specialization - Production and Logistics Management Specialization Medical Laboratory Technology Nondestructive Testing Technology Nuclear Medicine Technology Occupational Safety and Health Occupational Therapy Assistant Paralegal Studies Pharmacy Technician Physical Therapist Assistant Process Technology Professional Electronics - Avionics Electronics Technology Specialty - Computer Network Electronics Technology Specialty Radiologic Technology Registered Nurse Education Registered Nurse Education LVN-RN Transition Respiratory Therapy Sound Recording Technology Surgical Technology Welding Applied Technology

Enhanced Skills Options Enhanced Skills Options have been developed for certain occupational program. The Enhanced Skills courses provide further specialization to enhance employment and promotion opportunities. These options are offered either concurrently or following the associate degree program. Successful completion of an option results in the awarding of an Enhanced Skills Certificate. Enhanced Skills programs have also been linked with baccalaureate degree programs. If you are planning to continue your educational program at a senior college, you should consult an advisor concerning specific degree requirements of the college to which a transfer is intended. a. Enhanced Skills Certificates Enhanced Skills Certificates are available if you complete all courses in the curriculum of a designated Associate Degree and the course requirements of the Enhanced Skills Certificate. • Accounting Specialist • Computer Programming • Environmental/Petrochemical Lab Technology • Fiber Optics • Judicial Realtime/CART/Captioning • LAN Technology 116


SELECTING A PROGRAM • Occupational Therapy Assistant • Physical Therapist Assistant • Radiologic Technology (Including Mammography Registry Preparation and Computed Tomography) • Respiratory Therapy

Certificates Of Achievement

If you are not planning to complete a college degree but want to learn a marketable skill and secure immediate employment, check out our Certificates of Achievement. Typically, these take one year to complete. Many of these can be used as the first step to an Associate of Applied Science degree. • Accounting Technician • Air Conditioning Applied Technology Level II • Auto Body Applied Technology - Auto Body Structural Collision/Refinishing Repair Specialist – Level II - Introduction to Non-Structural Collision Repair • Automotive Applied Technology - Automotive Applied Technology Level II - Suspension, Driveline, Brake Specialist • Aviation Maintenance: - Airframe Applied Technology - Power Plant Applied Technology • Basic Firefighter • Basic Peace Officer • Biotechnology • Building Maintenance Applied Technology Level II • Child Development/Early Childhood • Child Development/Early Childhood Administrator • Computer-Aided Drafting • Computer Network Electronic Technology • Computer Programming • Cook/Baker • Cosmetology • Court Reporting • Criminal Justice Technology: - Field of Study: Criminal Justice • Deaf Studies • Dental Assisting • Diesel Engine Specialist • Diesel Systems Specialist • Digital Media Essentials • Digital Media Advanced • Engineering Technology - Instrumentation - Specialization Advanced Engineering Technology - Specialization Essentials Engineering Technology • Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Analyst • Health Information Technology: Coding Specialist • Hospitality Management • Human Services 117


SELECTING A PROGRAM • Industrial Machining Applied Technology (Level II) • Information Reporting/Scoping • Information Technology - Information Technology Career Foundation Core - Information Technology Essentials: Computer Programming - Information Technology Essentials: Digital Media/Web Developer - Information Technology Essentials: Geographic Information Systems - Information Technology Essentials: Network Support • Interactive Game Technology and Simulation • Intermediate Peace Officer • Kitchen Supervisor • Legal Assistant • Long Term Care Nursing Home Administrator • Management Development: - Leadership Development - Logistics and Supply Chain Management - Small Business Management • Networking Technology-Cisco • Nondestructive Testing • Paramedic • Pharmacy Technician • Pipe Drafting Technology • Process Technology • Professional Electronics Ramp Tech • Professional Electronics Avionics Tech I (Certificate Level I) • Professional Electronics Avionics Tech II (Certificate Level II) • Sound Recording Business - Level I • Surgical Technology • Technical Drafting • Vocational Nurse Education • Welding Applied Technology: - Intermediate - Advanced

Occupational Awards

Marketable Skills Achievement Awards This award consists of 9-14 semester credit hours and makes you eligible for immediate employment or adds to your marketability to employers. • Accounting Clerk • Aviation Maintenance - Airframe Applied Technology • Computer Programming - Basic • Emergency Medical Technician • Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Information Technology Technician • Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Level I • Geographical Information Systems (GIS) Level II • Network Technician – Basic • Security Technician - Basic • Security Officer • Supply Chain Management 118


SELECTING A PROGRAM

Special Credit Programs

In addition to degrees and certificates, the College offers special credit programs geared toward high school students.

1. High School Programs

A. Articulation Agreements If you are an academically able high school student, Del Mar College has agreements in many subject fields with independent school districts. These partnerships allow you to study at the college level and to receive College credits while simultaneously completing requirements for high school graduation. If you meet the eligibility requirements, you can take courses on the College campus or at your high school. Please contact your Career and Technology Education (CTE) counselor on your campus for those programs offered under this partnership. B. Dual Credit If you have met certain criteria, you may take Dual Credit courses on site at your high school, at Del Mar College, or through distance education. You receive college course credit while simultaneously earning credit toward high school graduation. For more information, call the Dual Credit Office at Del Mar College or visit: www.delmar.edu/dualcredit. Dual Credit Courses • Accounting • Air Conditioning/Heating • American Sign Language • Arts • Automotive • Aviation • Biology • Biotechnology • Business • Chemistry • CISCO Network • Cosmetology • Court Reporting • Criminal Justice • Culinary Arts • Dance • Drafting • Drama • Economics • Education • Emergency Medical Technician • Engineering • English • Fire Science • Geographic Information Science and Cartography • Geology • Government • History 119


SELECTING A PROGRAM • Kinesiology • Management and Marketing • Mathematics • Media Technology • Medical Lab Technology • Music • Nondestructive Testing • Occupational Safety and Health • Occupational Therapy Assistant • Pastry • Physical Therapy Assistant • Process Technology • Psychology • Spanish • Speech • Welding Participating School Districts • Agua Dulce ISD • Aransas County ISD • Aransas Pass ISD • Banquete ISD • Bishop ISD • Calallen ISD • Corpus Christi Academy • Corpus Christi ISD • Flour Bluff ISD • Gregory-Portland ISD • Incarnate Word Academy • Ingleside ISD • John Paul II High School • Mathis ISD • Odem-Edroy ISD • Port Aransas ISD • Richard Milburn Academy • Rivera ISD • Rockport-Fulton ISD • Robstown ISD • Sinton ISD • Taft ISD • Tuloso-Midway ISD • West Oso ISD • Woodsboro ISD

2. International Baccalaureate Program (IB)

If you are an incoming freshmen and have earned the International Baccalaureate diploma, you will be awarded at least 24 semester hours of college credit for all IB exam scores of 4 or above. Fewer credits may be granted if you have scored less than 4 on any IB exam administered as part of the diploma program. The maximum credit that you can receive for the IB exams is 42 semester credit hours. You must apply for this credit as an entering freshman to the Registrar’s Office. 120


SELECTING A PROGRAM The following documents are required in order for the evaluation to be completed: 1. Application for admission 2. Official International Baccalaureate Transcript 3. Compliance with the Texas Success Initiative Once all documents are received, the IB transcript will be evaluated for the award of credit, and you will be notified regarding the amount of credit awarded by the college. If you have not received the IB Diploma but have scored a 4 or above on an IB exam, you may also apply for credit.

Continuing Education Programs

In addition to degrees, certificates and special credit programs, there are more options.

1. Workforce Courses

The Office of Career and Community Education offers training in a wide range of fields. From brushing up on current skills to a whole new occupation, Continuing Education offers short term training in areas such as OfficeAssistant, Food Manager, Certified Nurse Aide and Phlebotomy. All workforce courses are based on the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board’s Workforce Education Course Manual and award CEU’s (Continuing Education Units). Successful students are awarded 1 CEU for every ten hours in class. All successful students receive a Certificate of Completion. Del Mar College keeps a record of students’ accomplishments and that record is available upon request.

2. GED and Adult Basic Education Classes

Our comprehensive Adult Basic Education and GED classes can be the springboard to further education. All participants must complete an orientation which will determine the students’ educational path to success. Orientations are offered bi-monthly at various locations.

3. Personal Enrichment and Special Populations

The Office of Career and Community Education also offers personal enrichment programs to widen horizons. Courses include the areas of cooking, art and physical activity. The Office also has special programs for children and youth as well as Seniors (age 55+).

4. English as a Second Language

These classes are a part of the GED and Adult Basic Education classes. Students whose first language is not English will learn English to help with work, life and school. To enroll, call the ESL Hotline at (361) 698-1824. The message is recorded in Spanish.

Reaching Your Goals

You probably have two overall goals for attending Del Mar College, either getting a job or transferring to earn a bachelor’s degree.

1. Graduate Guarantee for Job Competency

Del Mar College guarantees that if you receive an Associate of Applied Science degree or Certificate of Achievement you will have job skills identified as “exit competencies” in the occupational field for which you have been trained. If you are judged by your employer to be lacking in specific technical job skills, you 121


SELECTING A PROGRAM will be provided up to nine credit hours of additional skills training by the College tuition-free. Specific conditions apply to this guarantee. You and your employer should contact the appropriate instructional dean for details.

2. Transferring for a Bachelor’s Degree

The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has developed a 42-semester credit hour Core Curriculum (discussed in detail in the following section) that is transferable among all accredited public institutions of higher learning in Texas. This ensures a smoother transfer process for you. If you plan to transfer, you should declare an Associate of Art or Associate of Science degree plan upon registering for the first semester at Del Mar. With proper planning, you can transfer 66 semester hours, or one-half of the degree requirements, whichever is less, to universities in the state.

Summary

Now you know – no matter what you want to study, we have you covered.

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Degree and Certificate

PROGRAMS

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DIVISION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

DIVISION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Department of Art and Drama Department of Communications, Languages and Reading Department of English and Philosophy Department of Kinesiology Department of Mathematics Department of Music Department of Natural Sciences Department of Social Sciences The primary function of the Division of Arts and Sciences is to provide two years of study leading to the associate degree and/or transferability to a university. Another function of this division is to provide developmental courses for students whose high school grades, admission test scores, placement test scores and counseling interviews show them to need help in obtaining proficiency in the basic skills of reading, English and mathematics before attempting standard college courses. Developmental courses are required when educational background and/ or test scores indicate a weakness in the basic skills of English, mathematics or reading.

Courses of Study

The curricula listed for the Division of Arts and Sciences are designed for students pursuing the associate degree and/or transfer to a university. On the Associate in Arts and Associate in Science degrees, there may be certain specializations in the division for which a package of courses is recommended. If the student has not selected a specialization or if a package of courses has not been recommended for the specialization the student has chosen, the general Associate in Arts plan should be followed.

Suggested Transfer Plans

The Suggested Transfer Plans reflect the most current information at publication. Additional details concerning course transfer to other institutions are available in the Student Enrollment Center or from academic advisors in the instructional departments. Authoritative information on course transferability should be obtained from the institution to which the student plans to transfer. Disputes concerning course transferability are addressed in the Transfer Disputes section of this Catalog.

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DIVISION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

DIVISION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Mexican-American Studies

DEPARTMENT OF ART AND DRAMA Studio Art Drama

Del Mar College is also an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and the National Association of Schools of Theatre. The Associate in Arts degree, with a specialization in either art education or studio art, is intended to prepare the student for continuing study toward a baccalaureate degree in art. As a charter member of the Texas Association of Schools of Art (TASA), Del Mar College subscribes to the transfer curriculum developed by TASA and approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The Department of Art and Drama provides students with opportunities for lifelong learning and personal enrichment based on a fine arts curriculum. The art and drama curriculum encourages the development of aesthetic awareness and opportunities to increase intellectual capacities. Department of Art and Drama activities, in cooperation with area school districts, include a dual credit program with the Corpus Christi Independent School District.

Exhibition Activities

A continuous art exhibition schedule is maintained from July through May. These exhibitions provide students and the public opportunities for cultural development and personal enrichment. Exhibitions include those of local art organizations, one-person and group shows by important local and regional artists, art faculty and student artists. The 1,750 square foot Joseph A. Cain Memorial Art Gallery is the main exhibition space for the Department of Art and Drama. Student exhibitions are also staged in the hallway galleries in the Fine Arts Building. The highlight of the exhibition year is the annual National Drawing and Small Sculpture Show in the Joseph A. Cain Memorial Art Gallery. Judged by a nationally known artist, the exhibit attracts entries from all over the country.

Courses of Study

A student who plans to obtain a higher degree in the art field should enroll in the core curriculum (ARTS 1303, 1304, 1311, 1312, 1316, 1317). These courses are the prerequisites for more advanced courses. Art majors enrolled in studio art courses are expected to spend one additional clock hour per week in art production for each semester hour of enrollment. Variations require the approval of the chairperson of the department. The student should consult an advisor concerning senior college requirements.

Drama Program Overview

The Del Mar Drama Program offers an Associate of Arts in Drama degree. Led by a professional faculty, the program strives to teach the art and craft of theatre through productions and live entertainment events in several different performance venues including the recently opened Sue Sellors Finley Theatre. The program offers five to seven productions annually. Drama students, through 125


DIVISION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES their Drama faculty advisor, can cater their experience by emphasizing in one of three program areas: Performance, Design and Technology, or General Education. The Drama Program offers a full range of lower division courses, from several levels of acting, movement, and voice, to scenery, costume, and makeup design and technology, and new courses including stage lighting, stage rigging and special effects. It is the goal of the Drama Program to provide a basic, general theatre education, preparing students for transfer to a four-year degree-granting institution, or entry-level position in the industry.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATIONS, LANGUAGES, AND READING Advertising/Public Relations Digital Media    Foreign Language Journalism Radio and Television Speech Associate in Arts in Teaching Degrees: • EC-6 • 4-8; EC-12 Special Education • 8-12; EC-12 Other Than Special Education

The curricula listed for the Division of Arts and Sciences are designed for students pursuing the associate degree and/or transfer to a university. The Department of Communications, Languages and Reading recommends that students adhere to the course plans provided. Regardless of the majoring discipline and/or areas of specialization chosen, a student should examine the requirements of the college or university he or she plans to attend. Any modification to the following degree plans need to be made in consultation with and approval of department advisor.

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND PHILOSOPHY English: Emphasis Language English: Emphasis Literature English: Emphasis Philosophy

The curricula listed for the Division of Arts and Sciences are designed for the student pursuing the associate degree and/or transfer to a university. The student who plans to transfer is ultimately responsible for knowing the requirements of the college he or she plans to attend.

DEPARTMENT OF KINESIOLOGY Kinesiology

The curricula listed for the Division of Arts and Sciences are designed for the student pursuing the associate degree and/or transfer to a university. On the Associate in Arts degree, there may be certain specializations in the Department of Kinesiology, for which a package of courses is recommended; these specializations include kinesiology, health studies and recreation leadership. 126


DIVISION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS Mathematics

The curricula listed for the Division of Arts and Sciences are designed for the student pursuing the associate degree and/or transfer to a university. There are, however, certain specializations in the department for which a package of courses is recommended. Examples of those course plans are outlined below. For many of these plans, students are assumed to have proficiency in algebra and plane trigonometry. If a deficiency exists in these areas, students are advised to take MATH 1314 — College Algebra, and MATH 1316 — Plane Trigonometry during the summer prior to enrollment the first year. Course plans beginning with MATH 2413 require that students have prior credit in MATH 1314 and 1316 either by course work or proficiency examination. Students majoring in areas represented in the Department of Mathematics should follow the suggested course plans to satisfy the Associate in Science degree requirements. Some variation of these plans may be necessary to meet baccalaureate requirements at a particular college or university. Regardless of the area of specialization, the student who plans to transfer should examine the requirements of the college he or she plans to attend. Various 2+2 degree plans exist with Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, The University of Texas at San Antonio and other state institutions.

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC

Applied Music/Music Education - Instrumental Applied Music/Music Education - Vocal Music Theory and Composition Certificate Sound Recording Business-Level I Associate in Applied Science Degree Sound Recording Technology

The Associate in Arts degree is offered with specializations in music education, applied music and theory/composition. These specialized programs of study meet all of the lower division requirements of the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) and the transfer curriculum of the State of Texas. Students majoring in areas outside of music may elect courses in music and may participate in music ensembles. Instruction in applied music is also provided for students in other divisions of the College. Opportunities are provided for interested adults and pre-college students to participate in various music courses, private lessons and College-sponsored performance groups.

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Scholarships

Scholarships in music are available for prospective music majors on all band and orchestral instruments, guitar, piano, voice, theory, composition and sound recording technology. Some participation awards are available to non-music majors who qualify for the Del Mar Concert Band, Choir, Orchestra or Mariachi. Awards are made on the basis of ability and need. All applicants for scholarship grants are expected to audition in person unless travel distance makes appearing in person impossible, in which case a recording may be presented. Music scholarship forms and additional financial aid are available in the music office (music building room FM 160) or on the music Web site (www.delmar.edu/ music).

Student Organizations

Del Mar College was the first community college in the United States to receive a chapter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, the national professional music fraternity. Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia is dedicated to the advancement of music and to brotherhood among its members engaged in music activities. Phi Sigma, an honorary professional music sorority, aims to foster excellence in music performance and scholarship and to provide a social outlet for its members. Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and Phi Sigma regularly serve as hosts for receptions and other musical events.

Ensembles

All music majors enrolled in degree-track applied lessons are required to enroll in the appropriate major ensemble. Appropriate ensembles are: Voice - MUEN 1141 Concert Choir Winds and Percussion - MUEN 1121 Concert Band Strings - MUEN 1122 Concert Orchestra Piano - MUEN 1136 Piano Accompanying Guitar - MUEN 1135 Classical Guitar Ensemble Exceptions and substitutions may be granted with the joint consent of the department chair, the ensemble director and the student’s applied instructor. Music major students are highly encouraged to further develop their solo and ensemble skills by enrollment in a chamber ensemble specific to their applied study (Percussion Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, Singer’s Theater, etc.). All ensemble courses grant one hour of credit each semester. Non-majors are invited to audition for any of the following ensembles: Concert Choir, Concert Band, Jazz Band, Concert Orchestra, Piano Accompanying, Percussion Ensemble, Brass Ensembles, Chamber Singers, Master Chorus, Singer’s Theater, Jazz Combo, String Ensembles, Classical Guitar Ensemble, Jazz Guitar Ensemble and Woodwind Ensembles.

Applied Music

All music majors shall enroll in applied music appropriate to their primary areas of performance each semester. The Applied Music curriculum is designed to foster maximum development of skill and insight in musical performance. Students have an opportunity to gain experience in performing before an audience through participation in weekly recital programs held throughout the school year. Entering students, on the basis of their musical background, results of auditions 128


DIVISION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES and tests, recommendations of previous teachers, and individual counseling, are classified in one of these two series: MUAP 1101-1199 and 2101-2199, 1201-1299 and 2201-2299. See course descriptions section under MUSIC, APPLIED. Upon beginning study, a student improperly classified will be reregistered at the proper level during the first week of the semester. Students must receive a grade of “C” or higher to progress to the next level. Students taking applied music at the 1201-1299 and 2201-2299 levels are required to attend a weekly performance lab or solo class recital and be currently enrolled in the appropriate large ensemble.

Applied Music Examinations

To receive credit, all majors taking applied music courses must appear for a jury examination by the faculty of each applied music area at the end of each semester. In order to be eligible for examination, a student must satisfy the recital attendance and public performance requirements and must have received a minimum of 12 one-hour lessons. Specific examination requirements for each classification are determined by the faculty of each applied music area in consultation with the chairperson, Department of Music. These requirements are subject to periodic review. Applied music credit may be earned for summer study only in the 1101-1199, 2101-2199 series. There are no set performance requirements.

Secondary Piano Requirements

All music majors, other than piano majors, are required to take four semesters of secondary piano. Class piano is recommended for students with no piano background (MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, 2182). Private lessons are recommended for students with previous piano experience. Students with special needs or with schedule conflicts may also study privately with the advice of the piano faculty or chairperson. All music majors, except piano majors, must pass all areas of the piano proficiency exam at the end of the fourth semester of keyboard study. Those students who do not pass the piano proficiency exam will receive the grade of Incomplete (I) for Piano IV.

Courses of Study

Students who plan to obtain a bachelor’s degree should arrange their programs to meet the requirements of the college to which they intend to transfer.

Grade Requirements

Students must receive a grade of “C” or better to progress to the next sequential course in the following areas: Applied Music, Sight Singing/Ear Training, Class Piano, Music Technology, Musical Composition and Music Theory.

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DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCES Biology – Associate in Science Degree Including specializations for the following Pre-Professional Programs Pre-Chiropractic Pre-Dental Pre-Medical Pre-Veterinary Medicine Other Pre-Professional Health programs Chemistry – Associate in Science Degree Including specializations for the following Pre-Professional Programs Pre-Pharmacy Pre-Physical Therapy Chemical Engineering Geology – Associate in Science Degree Physics – Associate in Science Degree Biotechnology – Associate in Applied Science Degree and Certificate The curricula listed for the Division of Arts and Sciences are designed for the student pursuing the associate in science degree and/or transfer to a university. On the Associate in Science degree, there may be certain specializations in the department for which a package of courses is recommended. For many of these plans, students are assumed to have proficiency in algebra and trigonometry. If a deficiency exists in these areas, students are advised to take MATH 1314 - College Algebra, and MATH 1316 - Plane Trigonometry during the summer prior to fall enrollment in the first year. Course plans beginning with MATH 2413 require that students have prior credit in MATH 1314 and 1316 either by course work or proficiency examination. Students majoring in areas listed above in the Department of Natural Sciences should follow the suggested course plans to satisfy the Associate in Science degree requirements. Some variation of these plans may be necessary to meet baccalaureate requirements at a particular college or university. Regardless of the area of specialization, the student who plans to transfer should examine the requirements of the college he or she plans to attend. Various 2+2 degree plans exist with Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, and other state institutions.

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DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCES Geography History Political Science Psychology Social Work Sociology

The curricula listed for the Division of Arts and Sciences are designed for the student pursuing the associate degree and/or transfer to a university. The Associate in Arts degree is offered in geography, history, political science, psychology, social work and sociology. All students preparing for professional training in law should select an academic major from among those offered by the Department of Social Sciences, follow the suggested transfer plan for the associate degree and plan to complete a baccalaureate degree in their major field. A broad liberal arts curriculum is the preferred preparation for law school. Such a broad liberal arts curriculum involves education for comprehension and written and oral expression in words, critical understanding of the human institutions and values with which the law deals and creative power in thinking. Most law schools require that the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) be taken during the first semester of the senior year. For specific information, consult the catalog of the law school(s) under consideration.

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DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION

Department of Allied Health Department of Business Administration Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology Department of Dental and Imaging Technology Department of Human Sciences and Education Department of Industrial Education Department of Nurse Education Department of Public Safety Education Department of Technology Education

The primary function of the Division of Business, Professional and Technology Education is to provide programs of study leading to an Associate in Arts degree and/or transferability to a university and to provide collegelevel occupational programs to meet the needs of students who wish to qualify for immediate employment upon graduation. Students who do plan to pursue the baccalaureate should consult an advisor concerning degree requirements of the university to which transfer is intended. A Certificate of Achievement is awarded to those students completing only the major requirements of an occupational curriculum. An Associate of Applied Science degree is awarded to those students completing all courses listed in the degree curriculum of an occupational curriculum. Various 2+2 degree plans exist with Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Texas A&M University-Kingsville and other institutions. Enhanced Skills Certificates are available to those students completing all courses in the degree curriculum of the designated Associate Degrees and the course requirements of an Enhanced Skills Option. Since entrance requirements for these programs may vary, prospective students should check specific entrance requirements in the departmental sections. For further information not found in this catalog, students should contact advisors in the department or counselors in the Student Enrollment Center.

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DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Developmental courses may be required when educational background and/or test scores indicate a weakness in the basic skill subjects of English, mathematics or reading.

Departments in the Health Sciences

Health sciences programs are organized into three Health Sciences Departments. Specific degree plan information is available by department. These programs are also responsible for closely related health sciences transfer degrees. The departments and their respective programs include:

DEPARTMENT OF ALLIED HEALTH Health Information Technology Program Medical Laboratory Technology Program Occupational Therapy Assistant Pharmacy Technology Program Physical Therapist Assistant Pre-Medical Technology (Transfer Plan) Respiratory Therapy Surgical Technology DEPARTMENT OF DENTAL AND IMAGING TECHNOLOGY Dental Assisting Dental Hygiene Diagnostic Medical Sonography Echocardiography Nuclear Medicine Radiologic Technology DEPARTMENT OF NURSE EDUCATION Registered Nurse Education (Transfer Plan) Registered Nurse Education Registered Nurse Education LVN-RN Transition Vocational Nurse Education The certification programs in health sciences are designed: • to provide educational opportunities to students who desire employment in health or health-related facilities upon attainment of a certificate; • to provide students the opportunity to build upon their earned certificate and complete an Associate in Applied Science degree. The Associate in Applied Science degree programs in the health sciences are designed • to provide educational opportunities to high school or General Education Development (GED) graduates who desire to enter health programs leading to the associate degree; • to provide the first two years of education leading to the bachelor’s degree in health fields. If students intend to continue education at another institution, they should carefully relate these programs to those at the college to which they plan 133


DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION to transfer. Prospective students should consult with program advisor for specific information.

Accreditation and Approval

Programs are accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools as listed earlier in this catalog, and all are approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Community College and Technical Institutes Division. Specific programs are approved by the professional accrediting agency of each area; advisory committees and boards assist each department in curricula and standards.

Liability

In accordance with clinical affiliation policies, all health sciences students are required to purchase professional liability insurance in order to continue their program of study. Students are responsible for their own health and accident insurance.

Grades and Reports

Health sciences program grades are recorded as “A” (100-90); “B” (89-83); “C” (82-75); “D” (74-70); “F” (below 70) failing; and “P” (all RNSG clinical courses). A final grade of “D” or “F” in any course in the student’s major in the health sciences programs will automatically remove a student from eligibility to continue in that program until the unsatisfactory grades are removed. Removal can be done only by readmission to the program. A minimum grade of “C” is required for all health sciences students in all courses to remain in good standing in all health sciences programs. A student may be recommended for dismissal for failing grades, cheating, inappropriate behavior or attitude, or unsatisfactory clinical performance in any and all health sciences programs. An evaluation of unsatisfactory (unsafe) clinical performance will supersede any classroom grade and will, therefore, mean failure for the semester.

DEPARTMENT OF ALLIED HEALTH Certificates of Achievement: Coding Specialist Pharmacy Technician Surgical Technology Associate in Arts Degree: Pre-Medical Technology (advisement only) Associate in Applied Science Degrees: Health Information Technology Medical Laboratory Technology Occupational Therapy Assistant Pharmacy Technician Physical Therapist Assistant Respiratory Therapy 134


DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Surgical Technology Enhanced Skills Certificates: Occupational Therapy Assistant Physical Therapist Assistant Respiratory Therapy

DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Certificates of Achievement: Accounting Accounting Technician Court Reporting Court Reporting Information Reporting/Scoping Management Development Leadership Development Legal Assistant Logistics and Supply Chain Management Legal Office Management Small Business Management Associate in Applied Science Degrees: Accounting Accounting Specialist Court Reporting Court Reporting Legal Professions Paralegal Studies Management Development General Management Specialization Administrative Office Specialization Administrative Office - Legal Specialization Production and Logistics Management Specialization Associate in Arts Degrees: Business Administration Enhanced Skills Certificate: Accounting Specialist Judicial Realtime/CART/Captioning Marketable Skills Achievement Award: Accounting Clerk Management Development Supply Chain Management

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DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY Marketable Skills Achievement Awards: Computer Programming - Basic Geographic Information Systems (GIS) - IT Technician Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Level I Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Level II Network Technician - Basic Security Technician - Basic Certificates of Achievement: Computer Programming Digital Media Essentials Digital Media Advanced Advanced Engineering Technology Essentials Engineering Technology Geographical Information Systems Analyst Information Technology Career Foundation Core Information Technology Essentials: Computer Programming Information Technology Essentials: Digital Media/Web Developer Information Technology Essentials: Geographic Information Systems Information Technology Essentials: Network Support Instrumentation Interactive Game Technology and Simulation Networking Technology - Cisco Instrumentation Associate in Science Degrees: Computer Information Systems (Suggested Transfer Plan) Computer Programming (Suggested Transfer Plan) Electrical Engineering 2+2 (with Texas A&M University-Kingsville) Geographical Information Systems (Suggested Transfer Plan) Mechanical Engineering (Suggested Transfer Plan) Associate in Applied Science Degrees: Computer Information Systems: Computer Programming Emphasis (Suggested Occupational Plan) Digital Media for Web Design and eLearning Emphasis (Suggested Occupational Plan) Geographic Information Systems Emphasis (Suggested Occupational Plan) Information Systems Security Associate (Suggested Occupational Plan) Network Administration and Information Security Emphasis Engineering Technology 136


DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Enhanced Skills Certificates: LAN Technology The Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology (CSE/AT) offers the student a variety of options to obtain specialized training and education to meet the needs of today’s Information Technology Specialist or Computer Science major. The curriculum for each uses extensive “hands on” experience, with contemporary computer workstations, adherence to latest information technology processes, industry standard programming languages, operating systems and software applications. Students will be introduced to a variety of computer platforms, including minicomputer, personal computers, client-server, networked computers, and relevant peripheral equipment technologies. Marketable Skills Achievement Award The marketable skills award adds to the student’s marketability or makes the student eligible for immediate employment various fields of computer or information related technologies. These awards are also designed as a stepping stone towards earning certificates or an associate in applied science degree in GIS. Certificates of Achievement Certificates of Achievement allow students to acquire the knowledge and skills to function as a technician at the entry level. Certificates are offered for the following: Computer Programming, Digital Media, Geographical Information Systems Analyst, Information Technology Career Foundation Core, Instrumentation, Interactive Game Technology and Simulation, Digital Media Essentials, Digital Media Advanced, Networking Technology–Cisco, and Essentials Engineering Technology. Associate in Science Degree The Associate in Science (AS) degree in Computer Programming, Computer Information Systems, or Geographic Information Systems is designed for graduates who will transfer to a four-year university to pursue a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science (CS) or Computer Information Systems (CIS) or Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Computer Science focuses on the development, evaluation, and integration of software systems. Computer Information Systems and Geographic Information Systems focuses on the development and maintenance of specialized information systems. Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering are also Associate in Science degree offerings. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. Associate in Applied Science Degree The Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree is designed to enable a student to acquire the knowledge and skills to succeed in a variety of information technology occupations. The AAS curriculum is based upon specific work performance indicators, technical knowledge, employability, and skill standards identified by the National Workforce Center for Emerging Technologies (NWCET). The department offers several specializations to meet the needs of industry: (1) Computer Programming (2) Computer Information Systems and (3) Network and Information Security, and (4) Engineering Technology.Some specializations have multiple options to select from. Students should consult the catalog and speak with a department advisor for details. 137


DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION The AAS may be accepted into the Bachelor of Arts in Applied Science (BAAS) degree, the Bachelor of Applied Science (BAS), the Bachelor of Arts in Technology (BAT) degree or Bachelor of Science in Information Technology offered by regional and area universities. Students wishing to pursue a specific AAS degree with plans to complete their bachelor’s degree at a university are strongly advised to contact a CSIT advisor and the university to which they plan to transfer. Enhanced Skills Certificate For additional training beyond the Associate of Applied Science Degree, two Enhanced Skills Certificates are offered: in the Network and and LAN Technology fields.

DEPARTMENT OF DENTAL AND IMAGING TECHNOLOGY Certificates of Achievement: Dental Assisting Associate in Applied Science Degrees: Dental Assisting Dental Hygiene Diagnostic Medical Sonography Echocardiography Nuclear Medicine Technology Radiologic Technology Enhanced Skills Certificates: Radiologic Technology (including Mammography Registry Preparation and Computed Tomography)

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SCIENCES AND EDUCATION Certificates of Achievement: Child Development/Early Childhood Child Development/Early Childhood Administrator Cook/Baker Cosmetology Deaf Studies Hospitality Management Human Services Kitchen Supervisor Long Term Care Nursing Home Administrator Associate in Arts Degree: American Sign Language/Deaf Studies Associate in Arts in Teaching Degrees: EC-6 4-8; EC-12 Special Education 8-12; EC-12 Other Than Special Education

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DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Associate in Applied Science Degrees: Addiction Studies/Human Services Baking/Pastry Specialization Child Development/Early Childhood Child Development/Early Childhood Education Assistant Culinary Arts (Chef Training) Hospitality Management Generalist Studies in Human Services Interpreter Preparation

DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION

Certificates of Achievement: Air Conditioning Applied Technology Level II Introduction to Non-structural Collision Repair Automotive Applied Technology Level II Automotive Suspension, Driveline, Brake Specialist Building Maintenance Applied Technology Level II Diesel Engine Specialist Diesel Systems Specialist Introduction to Non-structural Collision Repair Associate in Applied Science Degrees: Air Conditioning Applied Technology Auto Body Applied Technology Automotive Applied Technology Building Maintenance Applied Technology Diesel Applied Technology

Requirements for Certificate of Achievement

Students seeking Certificates of Achievement in an industrial program must satisfactorily complete the major requirements for that program which are listed in the courses of study in this section of the catalog.

Requirements for Degree

The associate degree programs are designed to be completed in a minimum of two years, including one or more summer sessions in some cases. The number of semester hours required varies from 63 to 72. Students seeking the associate degree must satisfactorily complete all major requirement courses, all general education courses, and all related requirements.

Special Requirements for COMG 1391 and TECM 1301

Students deficient in basic skills will be required to attend up to four additional hours per week of supervised study. These courses are required for Industrial Education Certificates, but do not count toward the AAS degrees.

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DEPARTMENT OF NURSE EDUCATION Associate in Applied Science Degrees: LVN-RN Transition Registered Nurse Education Certificate: Vocational Nurse Education Associate in Arts Degree: Registered Nurse Education The Department of Nurse Education (DNE) faculty values lifelong learning by offering multiple-entry points into the program (Multiple Entry/Exit Program, or MEEP). The DNE statement of purpose is to provide an accredited curriculum that facilitates students’ educational and career choices and encourages life-long learning and encourages progression to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Master of Science in Nursing. The DMC DNE faculty is committed to removing barriers to academic progression and making pathways seamless, building on previous knowledge and competencies already achieved. Upon successful completion of the program, students will meet educational requirements to sit for the specified National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN or NCLEX-PN). PROGRAM TRACKS Vocational Nurse Education Certificate Students can select the Vocational Nurse Education (VN) Certificate Plan that requires the completion of three (3) semesters. A graduate of the program that earns a Vocational Nurse Education Certificate is eligible to take the NCLEX-PN exam for licensure. Once the student receives their LVN license and completes the general education course required of the AAS degree plan if eligible can request continuation in the Nursing program to successfully complete the fourth semester (4) of the AAS‌ and be eligible to take the NCLEX-RN licensure exam. AAS Registered Nurse Education The Associate in Applied Science Degree plan requires the student to successfully complete all four (4) semesters of the education plan to be eligible to take the NCLEX-RN licensure exam. The student who follows the Associate in Applied Science Degree plan can take an LVN exit option. The student must successfully complete the third (3) semester with two (2) additional VNSG courses to be eligible to take the NCLEX-PN licensure exam. Pathway to Bachelor of Science in Nursing The completion of general education courses and approved nursing electives in the Associate of Arts Degree Plan (Registered Nurse Education) provide access and transfer to Bachelor of Science Nursing Programs. Currently the DNE has articulation agreements with several universities that agree to provide a seamless transfer to their Bachelor of Science Nursing programs (See list of universities 140


DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION on www.delmar.edu/rn. The participating universities will not require student to take anymore lower division general education courses (unless they are part of the 30 hours) if student meets the two items below • Completion of 54 general education hours of agreed curriculum • Transcript marked CORE COMPLETE LVN Transition to Professional Nursing RN Graduates from other vocational nursing programs who are licensed and complete the pre-requisite courses are eligible to apply for the LVN to RN Transition track. Students who completed the DMC Vocational Nurse Education Certificate degree plan prior to 2009 must apply to the LVN to RN Transition track. General Admission Guidelines Admission requirements and selection criteria for application to the nursing program can be found at www.delmar.edu/rn. Deadlines for all applicants are February 14 (for Fall Admission) and August 31 (for Spring Admission) The following are required prior to applying to the program: • Completion and minimum required scores on standardized HESI A2 Exam. (Refer to www.delmar.edu/rn for additional guidelines, schedules and fees). • A grade of C or higher is required in all general education courses • BIOL 2402 Anatomy and Physiology II must be completed within five (5) years of application to nursing program. • Completion of pre-requisites ENGL 1301, BIOL 2401, BIOL 2402 and PSYC 2301. • Any or all remaining general education courses in the curriculum may be taken prior to admission to the nursing program. • Program Grade Point Average (PGPA) of 2.5 • All applicants must meet general admission requirements of the College and submit a completed online application available at www.nursingCAS.org Upon conditional acceptance to program student must submit the following: • Current immunizations or titers including a complete Hepatitis B series • Satisfactory physical examination on program approved form • Final acceptance into the program is contingent upon satisfactory FBI background check (completed through the Texas Board of Nursing) • The Texas Board of Nursing may require an applicant to complete a declaratory order if the background check is not clear or there are questions surrounding a mental illness or chemical dependency. This process may take up to six months to a year, and students must have a clearance from the TBON before enrolling in nursing courses. • Prospective applicants who question their eligibility are encouraged to contact the Texas Board of Nursing or program to further discuss their situation at www.bon.state.tx.us or (512) 305-7400. 141


DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION • Evidence of healthcare provider CPR certification • A negative drug screen is required for clinical eligibility. Progression Requirements Students enrolled in the program must be in good standing: • Maintain a PGPA of 2.0 • Earn a grade of “C” or better in each nursing and general education course. • Successfully complete all concurrent nursing courses and general education co-requisites to advance to the next level of degree plans • Students will be required to take standardized comprehensive competency exams throughout and at the end of the nursing program. Failure to achieve satisfactory scores may affect progression in the program and graduation. • A student may be readmitted into the nursing program one time only. The program is approved by the Texas Board of Nursing (www.bon.state.tx.us). The Associate in Applied Science degrees are accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). Accredited information is available through ACEN 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326. Phone (404) 975-5000, www.ACEN.org

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY EDUCATION Certificates of Achievement: Basic Peace Officer Intermediate Peace Officer Field of Study Certificate: Criminal Justice Basic Firefighter Paramedic Associate in Arts Degrees: Criminal Justice Associate in Applied Science Degrees: Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Fire Science - Basic Firefighting Option Occupational Safety and Health Police Science Option Marketable Skills Achievement Award: Emergency Medical Technician Security Officer

DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Certificates of Achievement: Aviation Maintenance 142


DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Airframe Applied Technology Power Plant Applied Technology Computer Aided Drafting Industrial Machining Applied Technology Industrial Machining Applied Technology Certificate Level II Nondestructive Testing Technology Pipe Drafting Technology Process Technology Professional Electronics Computer Network Electronic Technology Ramp Tech Avionics Tech I Avionics Tech II Technical Drafting Welding Applied Technology Intermediate Advanced Associate in Arts Degree Architecture (Suggested Transfer Plan) Associate in Applied Science Degrees: Architectural Technology Specialization Aviation Maintenance Airframe Applied Technology Power Plant Applied Technology Construction Technology Specialization Electroplating Applied Technology Program Environmental/Petrochemical Lab Technology Industrial Machining Applied Technology Nondestructive Testing Technology Process Technology Professional Electronics Avionics Electronics Technology Specialty Computer Network Electronics Technology Specialty Technical Drafting Specialization Welding Applied Technology Marketable Skills Achievement Award: Aviation Maintenance-Airframe Applied Technology Enhanced Skills Certificates Environmental/Petrochemical Lab Technology Fiber Optics The Aviation Maintenance Program is certificated and accredited by the Federal Aviation Administration (www.faa.gov) under the Air Agency Certificate #D18T094K. The San Antonio Flight Standard District Office (FSDO) has direct oversight of the AM program. The San Antonio FDSO office is located at 10100 143


DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION Reunion Place, San Antonio, Texas 78216, www.faa.gov/about/office_org/field_offices/ fsdo/sat/. The Aviation Maintenance (AM) program curriculum is currently ONLY delivered in a traditional classroom environment on the West Campus of Del Mar College (DMC) and at the Corpus Christi International Airport (CCIA). All applicants must meet general admission requirements of the College and the AM program and submit a completed application for admission to the Registrar’s Office and AM application to the AM program director’s office. Information regarding the admission process is located at www.delmar.edu/stap. It is advised to complete the general education courses prior to enrollment into the program. Each applicant will receive written notification of acceptance into AM program three weeks after the submission deadline. Deadlines for all applicants are July 31st for fall and spring admission. Aviation is a highly specialized career field that requires acute execution of tasks from its professionals. The role of the Aviation Maintenance Technician (AMT) is to work as a recognized member (Airframe & Power Plant) within the broad aspect of the aviation field in a variety of venues and under the supervision of an AMT with an Inspection Authorization or lead technician. Del Mar College strives to provide the best AM education in South Texas, and in doing so, seeks the most qualified applicants for its program. Admission requirements and processes are set to provide the greatest possibility of success for students chosen for this program. Applicants are advised that this program uses the DMC Aviation Technology Advisory Board to determine the outcome of the competitive selection process based on the information proved in the application packet submitted to the AM director. The Practicum (Field Experience) course is evaluated as pass (satisfactory) or fail (unsatisfactory). AERM 2264 Practicum is taken concurrently with AM theory courses and must be repeated if accompanying theory courses are not successful. Opportunities for advanced placement either by tests or by evaluation of credentials are offered to persons experienced in the aviation field based upon the FAA approved Operations Manual. For more information, students should visit www.delmar.edu/stap. In these programs, college-level courses of a highly technical nature are designed to meet the needs of students who seek employment upon completion of the Certificate of Achievement, the Associate in Applied Science degree, or who intend to pursue the baccalaureate. All programs in this section are accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools as listed earlier in this catalog, and many of the programs are approved by the professional accrediting agency for those areas. All programs are approved by the Veterans Administration.

Requirements for Certificate of Achievement

Students seeking Certificates of Achievement in an industrial program must satisfactorily complete the major requirements for that program which are listed in the courses of study in this section of the catalog.

Requirements for Degree

The associate degree programs are designed to be completed in a minimum of two years, including one or more summer sessions in some cases. The number 144


DIVISION OF BUSINESS, PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION of semester hours required varies from 63 to 72. Students seeking the associate degree must satisfactorily complete all major requirement courses, all general education courses, and all related requirements.

Special Requirements for COMG 1391 and TECM 1301

Students deficient in basic skills will be required to attend up to four additional hours per week of supervised study. These courses are required for Industrial and Technology Education Certificates, but do not count toward the AAS degrees.

145


ACCOUNTING

Accounting Department of Business Administration....................................(361) 698-1372

The objective of the Paraprofessional Accountant curriculum is to prepare a person for an entry-level position as an accounting, bookkeeping, and/or auditing clerk in an accounting office or department. Students have the option of a certificate or AAS degree program. This curriculum is part of the Paraprofessional Accountant with some area high schools. Upon completion of the degree, students may continue working toward the Enhanced Skills Certificate to further enhance their opportunities for job placement. Students planning to continue at a senior college should consult an advisor concerning degree requirements of the college to which transfer is intended. CERTIFICATE: ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ACNT 1303. Introduction to Accounting I.........................3 0 3 48 POFT 1301. Business English..............................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1321. Business Math..................................................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I...............2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER BUSI 1301. Business Principles..........................................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1329. Payroll and Business Tax Accounting..........3 0 3 48 ACNT 1311. Introduction to Computerized Accounting.......................................................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1331. Federal Income Tax: Individual....................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1313. Computerized Accounting Applications.....3 0 3 48 ACNT 2268. Practicum-Accounting Technology/ Technician and Bookkeeping (Capstone)....0 18 2 288 ACNT 1178. Seminar.............................................................1 0 1 16 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 30

The Banking and Finance curriculum is designed to prepare students to work in a bank, credit union, or other financial institution. MARKETABLE SKILLS AWARD: ACCOUNTING CLERK (BOOKKEEPER) (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ACNT 1303. Introduction to Accounting I.........................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER ACNT 1311. Introduction to Computerized Accounting.......................................................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1313. Computerized Accounting Applications.....3 0 3 48 ACNT 1329. Payroll and Business Tax Accounting..........3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Award..................... 12

146


ACCOUNTING ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: ACCOUNTING SPECIALIST (Suggested Occupational Plan) Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ACNT 1303. Introduction to Accounting I.........................3 0 3 48 POFT 1301. Business English..............................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1321. Business Math..................................................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I...............2 4 3 96 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER BUSI 1301. Business Principles..........................................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1329. Payroll and Business Tax Accounting..........3 0 3 48 ACNT 1311. Introduction to Computerized Accounting.......................................................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1331. Federal Income Tax: Individual....................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER Mathematics/Life and Physical Science Core Elective...........3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER ACNT 1313. Computerized Accounting Applications.....3 0 3 48 ACCT 2301. Principles of Financial Accounting ..............3 0 3 48 ACNT 1347. Federal Income Tax for Partnerships and Corporations............................................3 0 3 48 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication..............................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER ACNT 1391. Special Topics in Accounting (Capstone)....3 0 3 48 ACCT 2302. Principles of Managerial Accounting ..........3 0 3 48 ACNT 2268. Practicum-Accounting Technology/Technician and Bookkeeping.............................................0 18 2 288 ACNT 1178. Seminar.............................................................1 0 1 16 Business Elective (Select courses from BMGT, BUSI, MRKG, ECON, and HRPO 1311)..................3 0 3 48 SIXTH SEMESTER Language, Philosophy, and Culture OR Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 48 American History, Government OR Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective......................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours足for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

ACNT 1347. POFT 2312. ITNW 1425. HRPO 1311. BMGT 1301.

ENHANCED SKILLS CERTIFICATE

Federal Income Tax for Partnerships and Corporations...........................................3 0 3 Business Correspondence and Communication OR Fundamentals of Networking Technologies-CISCO 1....................................3 0-3 3-4 Human Relations............................................3 0 3 Supervision (Capstone)..................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Certificate.............. 12-13

48 48-96 48 48

147


ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT - ADVERTISING

Administrative Assistant SEE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT

Advertising Department of Communications, Languages and Reading........(361) 698-1939 ALSO SEE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT-MARKETING SPECIALIZATION ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: ADVERTISING/PUBLIC RELATIONS (Suggested Transfer Plan)

. Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication..............................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 COMM 1307. Introduction to Mass Communication.......3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United History States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 COMM 2327. Principles of Advertising ..............................3 0 3 COMM 1316. Basic News Photography …………………..3 2 3 COMM 1336. Television Production I OR COMM 2331. Radio/Television Announcing OR COMM 2339. Writing for Radio/Television, Film..............3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER PHIL 2306. Introduction to Ethics....................................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 College-Level Mathematics Core Elective.................................3 0 3 COMM 2311. News Gathering and Writing I .....................3 3 3 COMM 2330. Introduction to Public Relations...................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Constitution: Texas Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..........................3 0 3 COMM 2305. Editing and Layout.........................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. *SPCH 1315 preferred. Completing COMM 1336 and 2311 meets requirements for basic computer skills. 148


ADVERTISING - AIR CONDITIONING APPLIED TECHNOLOGY Completing the following courses fulfill the field of study curriculum for Journalism: 6-9 hours from COMM 1307, 2327, 2330, and 3-9 hours from COMM 1336, 2305, 2311, 2339. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to attend. In consultation with a department advisor, a specific degree plan will be completed.

Air Conditioning Applied Technology Department of Industrial Education..........................................(361) 698-1701

ALSO SEE: BUILDING MAINTENANCE APPLIED TECHNOLOGY The Air Conditioning curriculum offers skill development in refrigeration and related electrical areas. Students have the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of related and technical information associated with air conditioning and refrigeration which may qualify them to pass Type I of EPA certification. Students planning to continue at a senior college should consult an advisor concerning degree requirements of the college to which transfer is intended. CERTIFICATE: AIR CONDITIONING APPLIED TECHNOLOGY LEVEL II (Suggested Occupational Plan)

. Sem. Clock Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours FIRST SEMESTER HART 1401. Basic Electricity for HVAC.............................3 2 4 80 HART 1407. Refrigeration Principles..................................3 2 4 80 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER HART 1403. A/C Control Principles..................................3 2 4 80 MAIR 1449. Refrigerators, Freezers and Window Air Conditioners..............................................3 2 4 80 HART 2338. Air Conditioning Installation and ...............2 4 3 96 Startup (Capstone) HART 2331. Advanced Electricity for HVAC....................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER HART 1441. Residential Air Conditioning........................3 2 4 80 HART 1445. Gas and Electric Heating................................3 2 4 80 HART 2345. Residential Air Conditioning Systems Design...............................................................3 0 3 48 HART 2349. Heat Pumps.....................................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER HART 2301. Air Conditioning and Refrigeration.............3 0 3 48 Codes.................................................................. HART 2341. Commercial Air Conditioning.......................3 1 3 64 HART 2342. Commercial Refrigeration (Capstone) ..... 3 1 3 64

149


AIR CONDITIONING - AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE HART 2434.

Advanced Air Conditioning Controls (Capstone) .................................................... 3 Total Semester Hours for Certificate

2

4 55

80

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: AIR CONDITIONING APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

. Sem. Clock Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours FIRST SEMESTER HART 1401. Basic Electricity for HVAC.............................3 2 4 80 HART 1407. Refrigeration Principles..................................3 2 4 80 POFI 1301. Computer Applications OR HRPO 1311. Human Relations............................................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER HART 1403. A/C Control Principles..................................3 2 4 80 MAIR 1449. Refrigerators, Freezers, and Window ....... 3 2 4 80 HART 2338. Air Conditioning Installation and Startup (Capstone)..........................................2 4 3 96 HART 2331. Advanced Electricity for HVAC....................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER HART 1441. Residential Air Conditioning........................3 2 4 80 HART 1445. Gas and Electric Heating................................3 2 4 80 HART 2345. Residential Air Conditioning Systems Design............................................................. 3 0 3 48 HART 2349. Heat Pumps.....................................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER HART 2341. Commercial Air Conditioning.......................3 1 3 64 HART 2342. Commercial Refrigeration (Capstone) ..... 3 1 3 64 HART 2434. Advanced Air Conditioning Controls ..... 3 2 4 80 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER HART 2301. Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Codes. 3 0 3 48 Mathematics or Natural Science Elective or COSC 1309........3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 67

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

American Sign Language and Interpreting Department of Human Sciences and Education ........................ (361) 698-2809

The American Sign Language and Interpreting Program curriculum is designed to prepare students for careers working with persons who are deaf or hard of hearing. This multiple-entry/multiple-exit program prepares students with workplacetransferable technical skills and academic, thinking, and communication skills.

150


AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE AND INTERPRETING The certificate program provides students who plan some other career with knowledge and skills to work with clients who are deaf and hard of hearing. The associate of arts degree is a transfer degree that prepares students for further education leading to a career as a teacher for students who are deaf and hard of hearing. The associate of applied science degree prepares students for careers as interpreters for the deaf. The interpreting program requires students to have demonstrated knowledge and skills in both English and American Sign Language and apply for admission to the program. Upon admission to the program, students will take courses that will prepare them for the Texas Board for Evaluation of Interpreters Basic Interpreting Certification exam. A minimum grade of “C” is required for ASL students in their major field. CERTIFICATE: DEAF STUDIES (Suggested Occupational Plan)

. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours SLNG 1215. Visual/Gestural Communication.................1 2 2 48 SLNG 1317. Introduction to the Deaf Community..........3 0 3 48 *SGNL 1301. American Sign Language (ASL) I OR SLNG 1304. American Sign Language (ASL) I.................2 2 3 64 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I...............2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER SLNG 1211. Fingerspelling and Numbers.........................1 2 2 48 SLNG 1321. Introduction to the Interpreting Profession.........................................................3 0 3 48 SLNG 1347. Deaf Culture.....................................................3 1 3 48 *SGNL 1302. American Sign Language (ASL) II OR SLNG 1305. American Sign Language (ASL) II................2 2 3 64 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking..............3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER *SLNG 1444. American Sign Language (ASL) III (Capstone) 2 4 4 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 32

* Bridge Courses

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE/DEAF STUDIES (Suggested Transfer Plan) . Sem. FIRST SEMESTER . Lec. Lab Hrs. SGNL 1301. American Sign Language (ASL) 1.................. 2 2 3 ENGL 1301. Composition I................................................... 3 0 3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business & Professional Communication... 3 0 3 HIST 1301 . United States History I.................................... 3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER SLNG 1215. Visual / Gestural Communication OR

151


AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE AND INTERPRETING SLNG 1211. Fingerspelling and Numbers .......................... 1 2 SLNG 1317. Introduction to the Deaf Community............ 3 0 SGNL 1302. American Sign Language (ASL) II.................. 2 2 ENGL 1302. Composition II.................................................. 3 0 HIST 1302 . United States History II ................................. 3 0 THIRD SEMESTER Social and Behavioral Science course (chosen from list below)* 3 0 Creative Arts Core Elective............................................................ 3 0 FOURTH SEMESTER SLNG 1347. Deaf Culture....................................................... 3 1 SLNG 1444. American Sign Language (ASL) III (Capstone).......................................................... 2 4 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective.................................... 3 0 SOCI 2319. Minority Studies.............................................. 3 0 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.......................................................... 3 0 FIFTH SEMESTER Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective.................................... 3 0 MATH 1314. College Algebra................................................ 3 0 PHIL 2306. Introduction to Ethics...................................... 3 0 GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.......................................................... 3 0 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

*Approved Social and Behavioral Science courses: PSYC 2301 General Psychology, SOCI 1301 Introduction to Sociology, SOCI 1306 Social Problems, or TECA 1354 Child Growth & Development Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: INTERPRETER PREPARATION (Suggested Occupational Plan)

. Sem. Clock PREREQUISITES Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours SGNL 1301. American Sign Language (ASL) I OR SLNG 1304. American Sign Language (ASL) I.................2 2 3 64 SGNL 1302. American Sign Language (ASL) II OR SLNG 1305. American Sign Language (ASL) II................2 2 3 64 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 48 FIRST SEMESTER SLNG 1444. American Sign Language (ASL) III (Capstone)........................................................2 4 4 96 SLNG 1321. Introduction to the Interpreting Profession.........................................................3 0 3 48 SLNG 1307. Intra-Lingual Skills Development for Interpreters.................................................3 1 3 64 SLNG 2301. Interpreting I....................................................3 1 3 64 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48

152


AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE - ARCHITECTURAL/DRAFTING SECOND SEMESTER SLNG 1317. Introduction to the Deaf Community..........3 0 3 SLNG 1445. American Sign Language (ASL) IV..............2 4 4 SLNG 2402. Interpreting II..................................................2 4 4 SLNG 1215. Visual/Gestural Communication.................1 2 2 SLNG 1211. Fingerspelling and Numbers.........................1 2 2 THIRD SEMESTER SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking..............3 0 3 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER SLNG 2434. American Sign Language (ASL) V................2 4 4 SLNG 1347. Deaf Culture.....................................................3 1 3 SLNG 2431. Interpreting III.................................................2 4 4 Mathematics or Natural Science Elective..................................3 0 3 FIFTH SEMESTER SLNG 2315. Interpreting in Educational Settings............3 1 3 SLNG 2286. Internship - Sign Language Interpretation and Transition..................................................0 6 2 SLNG 2287. Internship - Sign Language Interpretation and Transition (Capstone)..............................0 6 2 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 70

48 96 96 48 48 48 48 96 64 96 48 64 96 96

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

Architectural/Drafting Technology Department of Technology Education........................................(361) 698-1701 CERTIFICATE: COMPUTER-AIDED DRAFTING (Suggested Occupational Plan) The intent of the Computer-Aided Drafting Certificate program is to provide drafting technicians that have skills in a particular drafting discipline with the opportunity to upgrade their skills to include the productive use of computeraided drafting and design systems. This instruction includes two-dimensional drawings, three-dimensional models, rendering, and animation. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. DFTG 1309. Basic Computer-Aided Drafting...................2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER DFTG 2319. Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting ....2 4 3 96 Technical Major Elective..............................................................2-3 4 3-4 96-112 THIRD SEMESTER ARCH 1315. Architectural Computer Graphics ...............2 4 3 96 ARTV 1302. Intro to Technical Animation and Rendering.................................................2 4 3 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 15-16

153


ARCHITECTURAL/DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY CERTIFICATE: TECHNICAL DRAFTING (Suggested Occupational Plan) The Technical Drafting Certificate program provides the student with the ability to customize their studies by selecting electives in their desired drafting discipline. This program provides the opportunity to utilize computer applications to gain proficiency in the production of documents in a selected field of study as well as providing a foundation of math. Technical drafting certificate students may select from technical coursework in general building construction, structural systems, mechanical, electrical systems, industrial piping, machine design, residential design, and other allied areas. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. DFTG 1309. Basic Computer-Aided Drafting...................2 4 3 96 ARCH 2312. Architectural Technology I............................3 0 3 48 TECM 1317. Technical Trigonometry .................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER DFTG 2319. Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting ....2 4 3 96 ARCE 1342. Codes, Specifications, and Contract Docs...3 0 3 48 Technical Drafting Elective.........................................................2-3 4 3-4 96-112 THIRD SEMESTER Technical Major Elective..............................................................2-3 4 3-4 96-112 ARCH 1315. Architectural Computer Graphics................2 4 3 96

Total Semester Hours for Certificate

24-26

CERTIFICATE: PIPE DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY (SUGGESTED OCCUPATIONAL PLAN)

The intent of the Pipe Drafting Technology Certificate program is to provide drafting technicians that have skills in a particular industrial drafting discipline with the opportunity to upgrade their skills to include the productive use of computer-aided pipe drafting and pipe design. This instruction includes computer-aided two dimensional and three dimensional drafting; basic overview of the construction industry; all aspects of technical pipe drafting including fittings, system layouts, plans, elevations, and isometrics; and pipe design. This certificate also includes instruction in technical drafting and design of fabricated objects in industry. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. DFTG 1309 Basic Computer-Aided Drafting...................2 4 3 96 DFTG 2319 Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting ....2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER CNBT 1301 Introduction to the Construction Industry.. 3 DFTG 2323 Pipe Drafting ...................................................2 THIRD SEMESTER DFTG 2345 Advanced Pipe Drafting ...............................2

154

0

3

48

4

3

96

4

3

96


ARCHITECTURAL/DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY Technical Major Elective ................................................................3 4 4 112 (DFTG 2402 Machine Drafting or DFTG 2470 Digital Design and Fabrication) Total Semester Hours for Certificate 19

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: ARCHITECTURAL/DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY TECHNICAL DRAFTING SPECIALIZATION (Suggested Occupational Plan) The drafting technician is an essential member of the engineering team. A technical drafting career requires knowledge as well as the communication and productivity skills required to prepare and work with technical documents utilized in business and industry. This program provides the opportunity to utilize computer applications to gain proficiency in the production of construction, structural, mechanical, electrical, machine and pipe drafting. Graduates are trained to be employed as technicians in general building construction, structural systems, industrial piping, machine design, mechanical and electrical systems, and other allied areas. The student planning to continue at a university should consult an adviser concerning degree requirements of the school to which transfer is intended. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. DFTG 1309. Basic Computer-Aided Drafting...................2 4 3 96 ARCH 2312. Architectural Technology I............................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 MATH 1314. College Algebra..............................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER DFTG 2319. Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting ....2 4 3 96 CNBT 1346. Construction Estimating................................3 0 3 48 ARCE 1342. Codes, Specifications, and Contract Docs...3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER CNBT 2342. Construction Management I..........................3 0 3 48 DFTG 2402. Machine Drafting ...........................................3 4 4 112 MATH 1316. Plane Trigonometry.......................................3 0 3 48 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER ARCH 1315. Architectural Computer Graphics................2 4 3 96 DFTG 2323. Pipe Drafting ...................................................2 4 3 96 ARCE 2352. Mechanical and Electrical Systems...............3 0 3 48 CNBT 1359. Project Scheduling ..........................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER ARCE 1352. Structural Drafting..........................................2 4 3 96 ARTV 1302. Introduction to Technical Animation and Rendering.................................................2 4 3 96 ARCE 2344. Statics and Strength of Materials..................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 61

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. 155


ARCHITECTURAL/DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: ARCHITECTURAL/DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIZATION (Suggested Occupational Plan) The technical content of this program provides knowledge and skills in the diverse areas of applied architecture, building engineering and construction. Computer applications in drafting and design, project management and building systems provide the student with skills essential to a career in architectural technology. In the first year, the student should acquire a foundation in building materials, methods of construction and computer-aided drawing, along with training in mathematics and communication skills.

Then, in the second year, the student will build on this background and take up commercial building types in architecture and construction, building service systems and construction management as well as architectural drawing and rendering. The student planning to continue at a university should consult an adviser concerning degree requirements of the school to which transfer is intended. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. ARCH 1311. Introduction to Architecture..........................3 0 3 48 ARCH 2312. Architectural Technology I............................3 0 3 48 DFTG 1309. Basic Computer-Aided Drafting...................2 4 3 96 MATH 1314. College Algebra..............................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER DFTG 2319. Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting ....2 4 3 96 MATH 1316. Plane Trigonometry.......................................3 0 3 48 ARCE 1342. Codes, Specifications, and Contract Docs...3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER DFTG 1417. Architectural Drafting: Residential.............3 4 4 112 ARCH 2301. Architectural Freehand Drawing I ..............2 4 3 96 CNBT 2342. Construction Management I..........................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER ARCH 1315. Architectural Computer Graphics ...............2 4 3 96 ARCE 2352. Mechanical and Electrical Systems...............3 0 3 48 ARCH 1403. Architectural Design I ...................................3 3 4 96 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER ARCE 1352. Structural Drafting .........................................2 4 3 96 ARCE 2344. Statics and Strength of Materials..................3 0 3 48 ARTV 1302. Intro to Technical Animation and Rendering.................................................2 4 3 96 Technical Major Elective.................................................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 62

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

156


ARCHITECTURAL/DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: ARCHITECTURAL/DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIZATION (Suggested Occupational Plan) The Construction Manager is an essential member of the project team that participates in the planning, estimating, scheduling, and supervision of a construction project in a safe, timely, and quality manner. A construction science career requires the knowledge, leadership, and communication skills to effectively interact with other project team members to construct projects and resolve issues. This degree in construction technology provides the student with the skills to immediately enter the construction industry and become a construction manager or supervisor. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. DFTG 1309. Basic Computer-Aided Drafting ..................2 4 3 96 ARCH 2312. Architectural Technology I ...........................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I ................................................3 0 3 48 CNBT 1301. Introduction to the Construction Industry.. 3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER DFTG 2319. Intermediate Computer-Aided Drafting ....2 4 3 96 CNBT 2342. Construction Management I .........................3 0 3 48 ARCE 1342. Codes, Specifications and Contract Docs ...3 0 3 48 MATH 1314. College Algebra..............................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER CNBT 1346. Construction Estimating ...............................3 0 3 48 Technical Major Elective .............................................................2-3 4 3-4 96-112 (DFTG 1417 Residential Drafting, CNBT 2317 Green Building OR ...................... CBFM 1321 Industrial Scaffolding and Rigging) CNBT 2305. Building and Contracting..............................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER Social/Behavioral Science Elective ............................................3 0 3 48 OSHT 1405. OSHA Regulations Construction Industry.. 3 3 4 96 ARCE 2352. Mechanical and Electrical Systems ..............3 0 3 48 CNBT 1359. Project Scheduling ..........................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER ARCE 1352. Structural Drafting .........................................2 4 3 96 DFTG 2386. Internship (Capstone) ....................................0 15 3 240 CNBT 2370. Project Controls and Planning ......................2 4 3 96 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective .....................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 61-62

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

157


ARCHITECTURAL/DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE IN ARTS: ARCHITECTURE (Suggested Transfer Plan) This program is the suggested transfer plan to follow if a student wishes to seek a professional degree in the field of architecture and then go on to become an architect. This program consists of the first two years of architectural education offered at most schools of architecture. There is currently an articulation agreement with Texas Tech University for transfer. The student planning to continue at another university should consult an adviser concerning degree requirements of the school to which transfer is intended. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. ARCH 1311. Introduction to Architecture..........................3 0 3 48 ARCH 1301. Architectural History I .................................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 ARTS 1311. Design I.............................................................3 3 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 48 MATH 1316. Plane Trigonometry ......................................3 0 3 48 ARCH 1302. Architectural History II .................................3 0 3 48 ARTS 1312. Design II...........................................................3 3 3 96 THIRD SEMESTER ARCH 2312. Architectural Technology I............................3 0 3 48 MATH 2312. Precalculus Math.............................................3 0 3 48 Approved Speech Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 48 ARCH 2301. Architectural Freehand Drawing I ..............2 4 3 96 FOURTH SEMESTER HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 48 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics ................3 0 3 48 ARCH 1315. Architectural Computer Graphics................2 4 3 96 ARCH 1403. Architectural Design I ...................................3 3 4 96 FIFTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 48 GEOL 1303. Physical Geology............................................3 0 3 48 HIST 1302. United States History II................................3 0 3 48 ARCH 1404. Architectural Design II...................................3 3 4 96 SIXTH SEMESTER ARCH 2470. Architectural Design III..................................3 3 4 96 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 66 Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum.

158


ART

Art Department of Art and Drama...................................................(361) 698-1216 Del Mar College is also an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and the National Association of Schools of Theatre. The Associate in Arts degree, with a specialization in either art education or studio art, is intended to prepare the student for continuing study toward a baccalaureate degree in art. As a charter member of the Texas Association of Schools of Art (TASA), Del Mar College subscribes to the transfer curriculum developed by TASA and approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The Department of Art and Drama provides students with opportunities for lifelong learning and personal enrichment based on a fine arts curriculum. The art curriculum encourages the development of aesthetic awareness and opportunities to increase intellectual capacities. Department of Art and Drama activities, in cooperation with area school districts, include a dual credit program with the Corpus Christi Independent School District.

Exhibition Activities

A continuous art exhibition schedule is maintained from July through May. These exhibitions provide students and the public opportunities for cultural development and personal enrichment. Exhibitions include those of local art organizations, one-person and group shows by important local and regional artists, art faculty and student artists. The 1,750 square foot Joseph A. Cain Memorial Art Gallery is the main exhibition space for the Department of Art and Drama. Student exhibitions are also staged in the hallway galleries in the Fine Arts Building. The highlight of the exhibition year is the annual National Drawing and Small Sculpture Show in the Joseph A. Cain Memorial Art Gallery. Judged by a nationally known artist, the exhibit attracts entries from all over the country.

Courses of Study

The following suggested curricula lead to Associate in Arts degrees with the indicated specializations. A student who plans to obtain a higher degree in the art field should enroll in the core curriculum (ARTS 1303, 1304, 1311, 1312, 1316, 1317). These courses are the prerequisites for more advanced courses. Art majors enrolled in studio art courses are expected to spend one additional clock hour per week in art production for each semester hour of enrollment. Variations require the approval of the chairperson of the department. The student should consult an advisor concerning senior college requirements.

159


ART ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: STUDIO ART (Suggested Transfer Plan) This curriculum is recommended for students who plan to work toward the traditional Bachelor of Arts degree or the professional Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. It is also recommended for students who are undecided about majoring in art, but who would like to explore their artistic abilities. Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ARTS 1303. Art History I....................................................3 0 3 ARTS 1316. Drawing I.........................................................3 3 3 ARTS 1311. Design I.............................................................3 3 3 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ARTS 1304. Art History II...................................................3 0 3 ARTS 1312. Design II...........................................................3 3 3 ARTS 1317. Drawing II........................................................3 3 3 ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..........................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0-4 3 FOURTH SEMESTER Art Elective ...........................................................................3 3 3 Art Elective ...........................................................................3 3 3 Language, Philosophy, and Culture Core Elective..................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 Component Area Option Core Elective*...................................3 0-3 3 FIFTH SEMESTER MATH 1314. College Algebra (or higher core).................3 0 3 GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0-4 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. Completing ARTS 1303 and 1304 meets requirements for basic computer skills for art majors. ARTS 2311, 2348, and 2349 may also be taken to meet basic computer skills. *Choose from DANC 2303 or DRAM 2366.

160


AUTO BODY APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

Auto Body Applied Technology Department of Industrial Education..........................................(361) 698-1701

ALSO SEE: AUTOMOTIVE APPLIED TECHNOLOGY The Auto Body Applied Technology curriculum offers training in theory, diagnosis, and repair of the automobile. The student is provided the practical training necessary to function as an entry-level auto body repair person. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: AUTO BODY APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan ) Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ABDR 1331. Basic Refinishing.............................................1 7 3 128 ABDR 1419. Basic Metal Repair...........................................2 6 4 128 ABDR 1455. Non-Structural Metal Repair.........................2 6 4 128 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER ABDR 1458. Intermediate Refinishing................................2 6 4 128 AUMT 1405. Introduction to Automotive Technology.....2 6 4 128 Mathematics or Natural Science Elective or COSC 1309........3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 8 THIRD SEMESTER ABDR 2441. Major Collision Repair and Panel Replacement..........................................2 6 4 128 ABDR 2449. Advanced Refinishing (Capstone)................2 6 4 128 ABDR 1349. Automotive Plastic and Sheet Metal Compound Repair (Capstone)......................1 7 3 128 WLDG 1340. AWS Level I Certification Review................1 4 3 80 FOURTH SEMESTER ABDR 1311. Vehicle Measurement and Damage Repair Procedures...........................................1 7 3 128 ABDR 1441. Structural Analysis and Damage Repair I...2 6 4 128 AUMT 1407. Automotive Electrical Systems.....................2 6 4 128 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER AUMT 1445. Automotive Climate Control Systems.........2 6 4 128 AUMT 1316. Automotive Suspension and Steering Systems.............................................1 7 3 128 AUMT 2421. Automotive Electrical Diagnosis and Repair........................................................2 6 4 128 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 70

CERTIFICATE: INTRODUCTION TO NON-STRUCTURAL COLLISION REPAIR (Suggested Occupational Plan )

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ABDR 1331. Basic Refinishing.............................................1 7 3 ABDR 1419. Basic Metal Repair...........................................2 6 4

Clock Hours 128 128

161


AUTO BODY - AUTOMOTIVE APPLIED TECHNOLOGY ABDR 1455. Non-Structural Metal Repair.........................2 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 SECOND SEMESTER ABDR 1458. Intermediate Refinishing................................2 AUMT 1405. Introduction to Automotive Technology.....2 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 WLDG 1340. AWS Level I Certification Review................1

Total Semester Hours for Certificate

6 0

4 3

128 48

6 6

4 4

128 128

0 2 4

3 3 3

48 64 80

31

CERTIFICATE: AUTO BODY STRUCTURAL COLLISION/REFINISHING REPAIR SPECIALIST – LEVEL II (Suggested Occupational Plan )

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ABDR 1331. Basic Refinishing.............................................1 7 3 ABDR 1419. Basic Metal Repair...........................................2 6 4 ABDR 1455. Non-Structural Metal Repair.........................2 6 4 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ABDR 1458. Intermediate Refinishing................................2 6 4 AUMT 1405. Introduction to Automotive Technology... 2 6 4 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications,..............3 0 3 General THIRD SEMESTER ABDR 2441. Major Collision Repair and Panel.................2 6 4 Replacement ABDR 1349. Automotive Plastic and Sheet Molded........1 7 3 Compound Repair (Capstone) ABDR 2449. Advanced Refinishing (Capstone)................2 6 4 FOURTH SEMESTER ABDR 1311. Vehicle Measurement and Damage..............1 7 3 Repair Procedures ABDR 1441. Structural Analysis and Damage Repair I. 2 6 4 AUMT 1407. Automotive Electrical Systems.....................2 6 4 AUMT 1445. Automotive Climate Control Systems....... 2 6 4 FIFTH SEMESTER AUMT 1316. Automotive Suspension and Steering ....... 1 7 3 Systems AUMT 2421. Automotive Electrical Diagnosis and Repair........................................................2 6 4 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 58

Clock Hours 128 128 128 48 128 128 48 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128 128

Automotive Applied Technology Department of Industrial Education..........................................(361) 698-1701

ALSO SEE: AUTO BODY APPLIED TECHNOLOGY, DIESEL TECHNOLOGY The Automotive Applied Technology curriculum offers training in theory, diagnosis, and repair of the automobile. The student is provided the practical 162


AUTOMOTIVE APPLIED TECHNOLOGY training necessary to function as an entry-level automotive mechanic in some areas. Students planning to continue at a senior college should consult an advisor concerning degree requirements of the college to which transfer is intended. CERTIFICATE: SUSPENSION, DRIVELINE, BRAKE SPECIALIST (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours AUMT 1405. Introduction to Automotive Technology.....2 6 4 128 AUMT 2301. Automotive Management..............................3 0 3 48 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER AUMT 1407. Automotive Electrical Systems.....................2 6 4 128 AUMT 1410. Automotive Brake Systems...........................2 6 4 128 POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 2 3 64 WLDG 1340. AWS Level I Certification Review................1 4 3 80 THIRD SEMESTER AUMT 1316. Automotive Suspension and Steering Systems.............................................1 7 3 128 Total Semester Hours足for Certificate 30

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: AUTOMOTIVE APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours AUMT 1405. Introduction to Automotive Technology... 2 6 4 128 AUMT 1407. Automotive Electrical Systems.....................2 6 4 128 AUMT 1410. Automotive Brake Systems...........................2 6 4 128 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER AUMT 2417. Automotive Engine Performance Analysis I........................................................ 2 6 4 128 AUMT 2421. Automotive Electrical Diagnosis and Repair...................................................... 2 6 4 128 AUMT 2437. Automotive Electronics .................................2 6 4 128 Mathematics or Natural Science Elective or COSC 1309........3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER AUMT 1419. Automotive Engine Repair (Capstone)...... 2 6 4 128 AUMT 2301. Automotive Management..............................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER AUMT 1316. Automotive Suspension and Steering Systems........................................... 1 7 3 128 AUMT 1445. Automotive Climate Control Systems....... 2 6 4 128 POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 2 3 64 WLDG 1340. AWS Level I Certification Review................1 4 3 80

163


AUTOMOTIVE APPLIED TECHNOLOGY - AVIATION MAINTENANCE FIFTH SEMESTER AUMT 2413. Automotive Drive Train and Axles..............2 AUMT 2425. Automotive Automatic Transmission and Transaxle................................................. 2 AUMT 2434. Automotive Engine Performance Analysis II........................................................2 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective........................3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree

6

4

128

6

4

128

6 0

4 3 71

128 48

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. CERTIFICATE: AUTOMOTIVE APPLIED TECHNOLOGY LEVEL II (Suggested Occupational Plan )

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours AUMT 1405 Introduction to Automotive Technology.....2 6 4 48 AUMT 1407 Automotive Electrical Systems.....................2 6 4 128 AUMT 1410 Automotive Brake Systems...........................2 6 4 128 COMG 1391 Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER AUMT 2417 Automotive Engine Performance Analysis I..........................................................2 6 4 128 AUMT 2421 Automotive Electrical Diagnosis and Repair ......................................................2 6 4 128 AUMT 2437 Automotive Electronics .................................2 6 4 128 TECM 1301 Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER AUMT 1316 Automotive Suspension and Steering Systems.............................................1 7 3 128 AUMT 1445 Automotive Climate Control Systems.........2 6 4 128 AUMT 2413 Automotive Drive Train and Axles..............2 6 4 128 WLDG 1340 AWS Level I Certification Review................1 4 3 80 FOURTH SEMESTER AUMT 2425 Automotive Automatic Transmission and Transaxle...................................................2 6 4 128 AUMT 2434 Automotive Engine Performance Analysis II........................................................2 6 4 128 AUMT 2301 Automotive Management..............................3 0 3 48 AUMT 1419 Automotive Engine Repair (Capstone)........2 6 4 128 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 59

Aviation Maintenance Department of Technology Education........................................(361) 698-1701

Airframe Applied Technology

The curriculum in Airframe Applied Technology is designed to prepare students to service, check, inspect, troubleshoot and repair aircraft and related systems. 164


AVIATION MAINTENANCE The curriculum provides general education in mathematics, applied physical science, English, basic computer principles, and gives a practical approach under job shop performance conditions to the study of airframe maintenance. CERTIFICATE: AVIATION MAINTENANCE - AIRFRAME APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours FIRST SEMESTER AERM 1208. Federal Aviation Regulations........................1 4 2 80 AERM 1303. Shop Practices..................................................1 4 3 80 AERM 1315. Aviation Science..............................................2 4 3 96 AERM 1414. Basic Electricity................................................3 4 4 112 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER AERM 1205. Weight and Balance.........................................1 4 2 80 AERM 1310. Ground Operations.........................................1 4 3 80 AERM 1241. Wood, Fabric and Finishes.............................1 3 2 64 AERM 1445. Airframe Electrical Systems...........................3 4 4 112 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER AERM 1343. Instrument and Navigation/Communication........................1 4 3 80 AERM 2333. Assembly and Rigging...................................2 4 3 96 AERM 1253. Aircraft Welding..............................................1 3 2 64 FOURTH SEMESTER AERM 1350. Landing Gear Systems....................................2 3 3 80 AERM 1254. Aircraft Composites........................................1 4 2 80 AERM 1349. Hydraulic, Pneumatic and Fuel Systems.....2 4 3 96 AERM 1352. Aircraft Sheet Metal........................................1 6 3 112 FIFTH SEMESTER AERM 1347. Airframe Auxiliary..........................................2 3 3 80 AERM 2231. Airframe Inspection (Capstone)....................1 4 2 80 AERM 2264. Practicum (or Field Experience) Airframe Mechanics and Aircraft Maintenance Technology/ Technician.........................................................1 18 2 304 AERM 2359. Advanced Composite Repair........................1 4 3 80 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 58

Prior to registration each semester, all Aviation Maintenance students must make an appointment with an aviation program advisor to ensure proper course sequence.

165


AVIATION MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: AVIATION MAINTENANCE - AIRFRAME APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hours Hours AERM 1208. Federal Aviation Regulations........................1 4 2 80 AERM 1303. Shop Practices..................................................1 4 3 80 AERM 1315. Aviation Science..............................................2 4 3 96 AERM 1414. Basic Electricity................................................3 4 4 112 ENGL 1301. Composition I ................................................3 1 3 64 SECOND SEMESTER AERM 1205. Weight and Balance.........................................1 4 2 80 AERM 1310. Ground Operations.........................................1 4 3 80 AERM 1241. Wood, Fabric and Finishes ............................1 3 2 64 AERM 1445. Airframe Electrical Systems...........................3 4 4 112 THIRD SEMESTER AERM 1343. Instrument and Navigation/Communication .......................1 4 3 80 AERM 2333. Assembly and Rigging...................................2 4 3 96 AERM 1253. Aircraft Welding..............................................1 3 2 64 College-Level Math or Natural Science Elective.....................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER AERM 1350. Landing Gear Systems ...................................2 3 3 80 AERM 1254. Aircraft Composites........................................1 4 2 80 AERM 1349. Hydraulic, Pneumatic and Fuel Systems.....2 4 3 96 AERM 1352. Aircraft Sheet Metal........................................1 6 3 112 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER AERM 1347. Airframe Auxiliary .........................................2 3 3 80 AERM 2231. Airframe Inspection (Capstone)....................1 4 2 80 AERM 2264. Practicum (or Field Experience) Airframe Mechanics and Aircraft Maintenance Technology/Technician..................................1 18 2 304 AERM 2359. Advanced Composite Repair........................1 4 3 80 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 67

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Prior to registration each semester, all Aviation Maintenance students must make an appointment with an aviation program advisor to ensure proper course sequence. MARKETABLE SKILLS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: AVIATION MAINTENANCE –AIRFRAME APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours AERM 1491. Special Topics in Aircraft/Mechanic/ Technician Airframe........................................3 3 4 96

166


AVIATION MAINTENANCE AERM 1392. AERM 1492.

Special Topics in Aircraft/Mechanic/ Technician Powerplant...................................3 1 3 64 Special Topics in Aircraft/Mechanic/ Technician Powerplant...................................3 3 4 96 Total Semester Hours for Achievement Award 11

Power Plant Applied Technology

The curriculum for Power Plant Applied Technology offers the student an opportunity to receive theoretical knowledge and develop the skills necessary to function as an aviation power plant technician. The curriculum is designed to provide a practical approach under shop conditions and to the study of aviation power plant technology. CERTIFICATE: AVIATION MAINTENANCE - POWER PLANT APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. AERM 1208. Federal Aviation Regulations........................1 4 2 AERM 1303. Shop Practices..................................................1 4 3 AERM 1315. Aviation Science..............................................2 4 3 AERM 1414. Basic Electricity................................................3 4 4 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER AERM 1205. Weight and Balance ........................................1 4 2 AERM 1310. Ground Operations.........................................1 4 3 AERM 1444. Aircraft Reciprocating Engines.....................4 1 4 AERM 1357. Fuel Metering and Induction Systems.........2 4 3 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER AERM 2447. Aircraft Reciprocating Engine Overhaul.....2 6 4 AERM 1340. Aircraft Propellers...........................................2 4 3 AERM 1351. Aircraft Turbine Engine Theory....................3 1 3 AERM 1456. Aircraft Power Plant Electrical......................3 4 4 FOURTH SEMESTER AERM 2352. Aircraft Power Plant Inspection (Capstone)........................................................2 4 3 AERM 2351. Aircraft Turbine Engine Overhaul................2 4 3 AERM 2264. Practicum (Or Field Experience) Airframe Mechanics and Aircraft Maintenance Technology/Technician..................................1 18 2 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 52

Clock Hours 80 80 96 112 48 80 80 80 96 48 128 96 64 112 96 96

304

Prior to registration each semester, all Aviation Maintenance students must make an appointment with an aviation program advisor to ensure proper course sequence.

167


AVIATION MAINTENANCE - BANKING ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: AVIATION MAINTENANCE - POWER PLANT APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. AERM 1208. Federal Aviation Regulations........................1 4 2 AERM 1303. Shop Practices..................................................1 4 3 AERM 1315. Aviation Science..............................................2 4 3 AERM 1414. Basic Electricity................................................3 4 4 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER AERM 1205. Weight and Balance.........................................1 4 2 AERM 1310. Ground Operations.........................................1 4 3 AERM 1444. Aircraft Reciprocating Engines.....................4 1 4 AERM 1357. Fuel Metering and Induction Systems.........2 4 3 Speech Elective .......................................................................... 3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER College Level Math or Natural Science.....................................3 0 3 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER AERM 2447. Aircraft Reciprocating Engine Overhaul.....2 6 4 AERM 1340. Aircraft Propellers...........................................2 4 3 AERM 1351. Aircraft Turbine Engine Theory....................3 1 3 AERM 1456. Aircraft Power Plant Electrical......................3 4 4 Social/Behavioral Science.............................................................3 0 3 FIFTH SEMESTER AERM 2352. Aircraft Power Plant Inspection (Capstone)........................................................2 4 3 AERM 2351. Aircraft Turbine Engine Overhaul ..............2 4 3 AERM 2264. Practicum (or Field Experience) Airframe Mechanics and Aircraft Maintenance Technology/Technician..................................1 18 2 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 61

Clock Hours 80 80 96 112 48 80 80 80 96 48 48 48 128 96 64 112 48 96 96

304

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Prior to registration each semester, all Aviation Maintenance students must make an appointment with an aviation program advisor to ensure proper course sequence.

Avionics Electronics Technology SEE: PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS

Banking SEE: ACCOUNTING

168


BIOLOGY

Biology Department of Natural Sciences.................................................(361) 698-1229 ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE: BIOLOGY (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. BIOL 1406. Biological Concepts I: Cellular and Molecular .................................................. 3 3 4 CHEM 1411. General Inorganic Chemistry I.............................. 3 3 4 ENGL 1301. Composition I............................................................ 3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I................................... 3 0 3 MATH 1314. College Algebra........................................................ 3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER BIOL 1407. Biological Concepts II: Evolution, Diversity, Structure, Function and Environment................. 3 3 4 CHEM 1412. General Inorganic Chemistry II.............................. 3 3 4 ENGL 1302. Composition II.......................................................... 3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II................................. 3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective.................................................................. 3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Biology Elective (BIOL 2306/2106, 2416, 2421 or 2428)...................... 3 3 4 CHEM 2323/2123. Organic Chemistry I................................................ 3 4 4 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics........................... 3 0 3 Language, Philosophy, and Culture Core Elective............................ 3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER Biology Elective (BIOL 2306/2106, 2416, 2421 or 2428)...................... 3 3 4 CHEM 2325/2125. Organic Chemistry II.............................................. 3 4 4 GOVT 2306. Texas Constitution: Texas Constitution and Topics............................... 3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective...................................... 3 0 3 Total Hours 62 Total Semester Hours suggested for Associate in Science Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy the Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Minimum degree requirements: For the Associate in Science Degree, 60 hours chosen from the above plan to include the Core Curriculum, eight hours of 2000-level BIOL, and 18 sophomore hours. Students must demonstrate use of basic computer skills through ENGL 1301; CHEM 1411, 1412; BIOL 1406, 1407; or MATH 2342. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

169


BIOTECHNOLOGY

Biotechnology Department of Natural Sciences.................................................(361) 698-1229 The Biotechnology curriculum is designed to prepare students for a career in the biotechnology industry. There are various careers in the biotechnology industry including but not limited to: biomedical or laboratory technicians, biomaterials specialists, regulatory specialists, bio-manufacturing technicians, clinical research associate, forensic science specialists, environmental health specialists, and agricultural biotechnologists. The program is also designed to provide opportunities for job advancement and retention for individuals currently employed in the field. Coursework will emphasize the basic laboratory skills including sterile techniques, laboratory mathematics, spectrophotometry, flow cytometry, recombinant DNA techniques, electrophoresis, genomics, bioinformatics, polymerase chain reaction, chromatography, protein characterization, ELISA, enzymatic assays, and electrophoresis. CERTIFICATE: BIOTECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours BIOL 1414. Introduction to Biotechnology I 3 4 4 112 BIOL 1406. Biological Concepts I: Cellular and Molecular 3 3 4 96 ENGL 1301. Composition I 3 0 3 48 MATH 1314. College Algebra 3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER BIOL 1415. Introduction Biotechnology II 3 4 4 112 CHEM 1405. Introductory Chemistry I OR CHEM 1411. General Inorganic Chemistry I 3 3 4 96 BITC 1403. Principles of Biochemistry 3 4 4 112 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER BITC 2386. Internship - Biology Technician/ Biotechnology Laboratory Technician (Capstone) 0. 18 3 288 BITC 2431. Cell Culture Techniques OR BITC 2441. Molecular Biology Techniques OR BITC 2411. Biotechnology Lab Instrumentation 3. 4 4 112 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 36

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College.

170


BIOTECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: BIOTECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours BIOL 1414. Introduction to Biotechnology I....................3 4 4 112 BIOL 1406. Biological Concepts I: Cellular and Molecular.................................3 3 4 96 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 MATH 1314. College Algebra1.............................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER BIOL 1415. Introduction Biotechnology II.......................3 4 4 112 CHEM 1405. Introductory Chemistry I OR CHEM 1411. General Inorganic Chemistry I....................3 3 4 96 ENGL 1302. Composition II OR ENGL 2311. Technical and Business Writing2.............................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER CHEM 1407. Introductory Chemistry II OR CHEM 1412. General Inorganic Chemistry II..................3 3 4 96 BIOL 1407. Biological Concepts II: Evolution, Diversity, Structure, Function and Environment OR BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I....................................................3 3 4 96 BITC 2411. Biotechnology Laboratory Instrumentation...............................................3 4 4 112 Humanities/Fine Arts Elective3...................................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking6.........................................................3 0 3 48 BITC 1403. Principles of Biochemistry OR CHEM 2323. Organic Chemistry I AND CHEM 2123. Organic Chemistry Laboratory I.....................................................3 4 4 112 BIOL 2416. Genetics OR BIOL 2306. Environmental Biology AND BIOL 2106. Environmental Biology Lab OR BIOL 2421. Microbiology....................................................3 3 4 96 FIFTH SEMESTER PSYC 2301. General Psychology5......................................3 0 3 48 BITC 2441. Molecular Biology Techniques......................3 4 4 112 Science/Mathematics Technology Elective4.............................3-4 0–4 3-4 48-112 SIXTH SEMESTER BITC 2431. Cell Culture Techniques7 OR BITC 2445. Medical Biotechnology...................................3 3-4 4 96-112 BITC 2387. Internship - Biology Technician/Biotechnology Laboratory Technician (Capstone)................0 18 3 288 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 68-69

171


BIOTECHNOLOGY -BUILDING MAINTENANCE Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

1. Or any college level math. 2. Student should consult with a full-time biotechnology instructor before selecting course. 3. Select from Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts section of the Core Curriculum list. 4. Electives should reflect student’s area of concentration: PHYS 1401, any college level math, BIOL 2416, BIOL 2402. For transfer to a four-year college or university, students should take CHEM 2325 and CHEM 2125 (Organic Chemistry II). 5. May substitute, ECON 2301, ECON 2302, or SOCI 1301. 6. Students may select another Speech course upon consultation and approval with a full-time biotechnology instructor. 7. Students may take this course at any time after BITC 1414.

Building Maintenance Applied Technology Department of Industrial Education..........................................(361) 698-1701

ALSO SEE: AIR CONDITIONING APPLIED TECHNOLOGY This program will cover some of the knowledge and skills needed in the areas of electrical, mechanical, and maintenance of physical facilities. It will also cover handling and disposal of hazardous waste. CERTIFICATE: BUILDING MAINTENANCE APPLIED TECHNOLOGY LEVEL II (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours HART 1401. Basic Electricity for HVAC.............................3 2 4 80 HART 1407. Refrigeration Principles..................................3 2 4 80 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER HART 1403. A/C Control Principles..................................3 2 4 80 MAIR 1441. Domestic Cooking Equipment......................3 2 4 80 MAIR 1445. Dryers, Washers and Dishwashers...............3 2 4 80 MAIR 1449. Refrigerators, Freezers, Window..................3 2 4 80 Air Conditioners THIRD SEMESTER HART 2331. Advanced Electricity for HVAC....................3 0 3 48 HART 2341. Commercial Air Conditioning.......................3 1 3 64 HART 2342. Commercial Refrigeration (Capstone) ..... 3 1 3 64 CBFM 2317. Mechanical Maintenance...............................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER HART 1451. Energy Management.......................................3 2 4 80 HART 1441. Residential Air Conditioning........................3 2 4 80 HART 1445. Gas and Electric Heating................................3 2 4 80

172


BUILDING MAINTENANCE - BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION HART 2434.

Advanced Air Conditioning Controls (Capstone)........................................................3 Total Semester Hours足for Certificate

2

4 58

80

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: BUILDING MAINTENANCE APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours HART 1401. Basic Electricity for HVAC.............................3 2 4 80 HART 1407. Refrigeration Principles..................................3 2 4 80 POFI 1301. Computer Applications OR HRPO 1311. Human Relations............................................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER HART 1403. A/C Control Principles..................................3 2 4 80 MAIR 1449. Refrigerators, Freezers, Window Air Conditioners..............................................3 2 4 80 MAIR 1441. Domestic Cooking Equipment......................3 2 4 80 MAIR 1445. Dryers, Washers and Dishwashers...............3 2 4 80 THIRD SEMESTER HART 2341. Commercial Air Conditioning.......................3 1 3 64 HART 2342. Commercial Refrigeration (Capstone) ..... 3 1 3 64 CBFM 2317. Mechanical Maintenance...............................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER HART 1441. Residential Air Conditioning........................3 2 4 80 HART 1445. Gas and Electric Heating................................3 2 4 80 HART 2434. Advanced Air Conditioning Controls (Capstone)........................................................3 2 4 80 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER HART 2331. Advanced Electricity for HVAC....................3 0 3 48 HART 1451. Energy Management.......................................3 2 4 96 Mathematics or Natural Science Elective or COSC 1309 .....3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours足for Associate Degree 70

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

Business Administration

Department of Business Administration....................................(361) 698-1372 The curriculum prepares students to transfer into four-year bachelor degree programs with majors in Business Administration at upper level universities. The Core Curriculum and the business Field of Study components ensure transfer of specific courses as directed by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Upon completing this associate degree, students transfer to prepare for careers in business disciplines such as general business, accounting, marketing, management, economics, or finance. 173


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - BUSINESS AFFAIRS ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (Suggested Transfer Plan) NOTE: This degree is also offered as an online program.

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 BUSI 1301. Business Principles..........................................3 0 3 Speech Core Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315, or 1321).....................3 0 3 American History Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 MATH 1314. College Algebra OR MATH 1324. Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences I.........................................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 MATH 1325. Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences II........................................................3 0 3 ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.....................3 0 3 American History Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective....................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Language, Philosophy, and Culture Core Elective..................3 0 3 ACCT 2301. Principles of Financial Accounting...............3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 ECON 2302. Principles of Microeconomics.....................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective .................................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER ACCT 2302. Principles of Managerial Accounting ..........3 0 3 BUSI 2301. Business Law...................................................3 0 3 GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective .................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

Business Affairs and Continuing Education REFER TO THE “BUSINESS AFFAIRS AND CONTINUING EDUCATION” SECTION OF THIS CATALOG

174


CHEMICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY

Chemical Laboratory Technology Department of Technology Education........................................(361) 698-1701

ALSO SEE: PROCESS TECHNOLOGY This program is designed to prepare students for a career in the Chemical Process Industry (CPI) or related chemical laboratory-related careers. The program includes a strong background in the appropriate core subdisciplines of chemistry; laboratory training using state-of-the-art instruments, materials and techniques employed in the chemical industry; appropriate safety training; problem-solving skills, including statistical analysis of data; the skills and understanding necessary to work effectively as part of a team; effective oral and written communication skills and proper record keeping techniques. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: ENVIRONMENTAL/PETROCHEMICAL LAB TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. CTEC 1113 Introduction to Chemical Technology..........1 0 1 SCIT 1414 Applied General Chemistry I........................3 4 4 CTEC 1205 Chemical Calculations I..................................1 2 2 MATH 1314 College Algebra..................................... ...... .3 0 3 CPMT 2333 Computer Integration.....................................1 6 3 SECOND SEMESTER SCIT 1415 Applied General Chemistry II...................... 3 4 4 CTEC 1206 Chemical Calculations II...............................1 2 2 PTAC 1308 Safety, Health and Environment I................3 0 3 SCIT 1543 Applied Analytical Chemistry I...................3 6 5 ENGL 1301 Composition I............................................ .3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER CTEC 1441 Applied Instrumental Analysis I.................. 3 4 4 SCIT 2401 Applied Organic Chemistry I.......................3 4 4 Social/Behavioral Science Elective............................................ 3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER EPCT 1205 Environmental Regulations Overview........2 0 2 CTEC 2431 Applied Instrumental Analysis II.................3 4 4 CTEC 1349 Environmental Chemistry ………………….3 0 3 PTAC 1354 Industrial Processes ………………………...2 3 3 FIFTH SEMESTER CTEC 2286 Internship OR CTEC 2333 Comprehensive Studies on Chemical Technology (Capstone)...................................1 8 3 Speech Elective................................................................................3 0 3 SCIT 1418 or Physics Elective........................................................3 3 4 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective. ....................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 66

Clock Hours 16 112 48 48 112 112 48 48 144 48 112 112 48 32 112 48 80

144 48 96 48

Courses in bold type satisfy the Del Mar College Core Curriculum.

175


CHEMICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY - CHEMISTRY ENHANCED SKILLS CERTIFICATE: ENVIRONMENTAL/PETROCHEMICAL LAB TECHNOLOGY

Sem. Lec. Lab Hrs. PTAC 2314. Principles of Quality.......................................3 0 3 PTAC 2348 Safety, Health and Environment II...............3 0 3 OSHT 1313 Accident Prevention, Inspection and Investigation ...........................................................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 9

Clock Hours 48 48 48

Chemistry Department of Natural Sciences ................................................(361) 698-1229 ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE: CHEMISTRY (Suggested Transfer Plan)

. FIRST SEMESTER . Lec. Lab CHEM 1411. General Inorganic Chemistry I................................ 3 3 MATH 1314. College Algebra......................................................... 3 0 ENGL 1301. Composition I............................................................ 3 0 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History...................................... 3 0 Creative Arts Elective Core Elective....................................................... 3 0 SECOND SEMESTER CHEM 1412. General Inorganic Chemistry II.............................. 3 3 MATH 1316. PIane Trigonometry................................................... 3 0 HIST 1302. United History States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II.................................. 3 0 GEOL 1103 Physical Geology Lab............................................... 0 3 Communications Core Elective ………………...................................... 3 0 THIRD SEMESTER CHEM 2323/2123. Organic Chemistry I................................................ 3 4 MATH 2413. Calculus I.................................................................... 4 0 Mathematics, Science or Kinesiology Elective....................................... GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................................................................. 3 0 Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective.............................. 3 0 FOURTH SEMESTER CHEM 2325/2125. Organic Chemistry II.............................................. 3 4 Mathematics, Science or Communication Elective. ............................. GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics................................................................. 3 0 Social and Behavioral Science Core Elective........................................ 3 0 Total Semester Hours suggested for Associate of Science Degree 59-62

Courses in bold type satisfy the Del Mar College Core Curriculum.

176

Sem. Hrs. 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 3 1 3 4 4 2-4 3 3 4 3-4 3 3


CHEMISTRY - CHILD DEVELOPMENT/EARLY CHILDHOOD Minimum degree requirements: For the Associate in Science Degree, 60 hours chosen from the above plan to include the Core Curriculum; MATH 2413, CHEM 2323/2123, and (CHEM 2325/2125 or ENGR 2333); 18 sophomore hours. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. See advisor for assistance.

Child Development/Early Childhood Department of Human Sciences and Education.........................(361) 698-2809 The Child Development/Early Childhood curriculum is designed to prepare an individual to educate and care for young children from birth through age 12. The program is designed to provide performance-based training in the skills needed to be a competent teacher or administrator in child care centers, preschool programs, family day homes, Head Start programs, or other early childhood programs. As part of the training, students are required to work directly with young children in the model laboratory on campus and in community early childhood programs. Students must demonstrate performance skills which meet the specific needs of children and work with parents and other adults to nurture children’s physical, social, emotional, and intellectual growth. Prior to field site placement, students are required to have a criminal history check, record of a negative TB test, and a food handler’s card. Students have a choice of two AAS degrees or two certificate plans. Students interested in pursuing a bachelor’s degree with an early childhood specialization leading to teacher certification should consult with a Child Development/Early Childhood advisor (361-698-2809). Certification requirements may change according to state regulations. Students should see their advisor for current information. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. A minimum grade of “C” is required for all CDEC students in their major field CERTIFICATE: CHILD DEVELOPMENT/EARLY CHILDHOOD (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ENGL 1301. Composition I..................................................3 0 3 48 TECA 1311. Educating Young Children ...........................3 1 3 64 TECA 1318. Wellness of the Young Child..........................3 1 3 64 CDEC 1313. Curriculum Resources for Early Childhood Programs............................3 1 3 64 CDEC 1223. Observation and Assessment........................2 1 2 48 SECOND SEMESTER CDEC 1319. Child Guidance...............................................3 1 3 64 TECA 1354. Child Growth and Development..................3 0 3 48

177


CHILD DEVELOPMENT/EARLY CHILDHOOD CDEC 1356. Emergent Literacy for Early Childhood......3 CDEC 1358. Creative Arts for Early Childhood...............3 CDEC 2287. Internship I: Child Care Provider/Assistant.........................................0 THIRD SEMESTER CDEC 2288. Internship II (Capstone).................................0 TECA 1303. Family, School and the Community.............3 CDEC 2307. Math and Science for Early Childhood .......3 Total Semester Hours for Certificate

0 0

3 3

48 48

8

2

128

8 1 0

2 3 3 36

128 64 48

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: CHILD DEVELOPMENT/EARLY CHILDHOOD (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 TECA 1311. Educating Young Children............................3 1 3 64 TECA 1318. Wellness of the Young Child........................ 3 1 3 64 CDEC 1313. Curriculum Resources for Early Childhood Programs......................................3 1 3 64 CDEC 1223 Observation and Assessment……………....2 1 2 48 SECOND SEMESTER CDEC 2307. Math and Science for Early Childhood.........3 0 3 48 CDEC 1319. Child Guidance...............................................3 1 3 64 CDEC 1356. Emergent Literacy for Early Childhood.......3 0 3 48 CDEC 2287. Internship I: Child Care Provider/Assistant.........................................0 8 2 128 Computer Elective ……………………………………………….3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER Mathematics or Natural Science Elective..................................3 0 3 48 Speech 1311 or 1315 .......................................................................3 0 3 48 TECA 1354. Child Growth and Development..................3 0 3 48 CDEC 1358. Creative Arts for Early Childhood...............3 0 3 48 Approved Elective*.........................................................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER Social/Behavioral Science Core Elective**................................3 0 3 48 CDEC 1359. Children with Special Needs..........................3 1 3 64 TECA 1303. Family, School and the Community..............3 1 3 64 CDEC 2288. Internship II- Child Care Provider/Assistant (Capstone).....................0 8 2 128 Choose One: CDEC 2326. Administration of Programs for Children I OR...................................................3 1 3 64 CDEC 2328. Administration of Programs for Children II........................................................3 1 3 64 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College 178


CHILD DEVELOPMENT/EARLY CHILDHOOD Associate in Applied Science degrees. *Approved Electives: KINE 1304, 1306, SLNG 1317, CDEC 1321, 1394, 1396, 2341, 2326 or 2328 (if not previously taken) ** PSYC 2301, SOCI 1301, 1306, 2301 or 2319 CERTIFICATE: CHILD DEVELOPMENT/EARLY CHILDHOOD ADMINISTRATOR (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 TECA 1311. Educating Young Children............................3 1 3 64 CDEC 1313. Curriculum Resources for Early Childhood Programs............................................................3 1 3 64 CDEC 2326. Administration of Programs for Children I ...........................................................................3 1 3 64 CDEC 1223. Observation and Assessment........................2 1 2 48

SECOND SEMESTER

CDEC 2328. Administration of Programs for Children II..................................................3 TECA 1318. Wellness of the Young Child..........................3 CDEC 2287. Internship I: Child Care Provider/Assistant.........................................0 Choose two (2) of the following: CDEC 1356. Emergent Literacy for Early Childhood......3 CDEC 1358. Creative Arts for Early Childhood...............3 CDEC 2307 . Math and Science for Early Childhood........3

THIRD SEMESTER CDEC 2288. TECA 1354. TECA 1303.

Internship II- Child Care Provider/Assistant (Capstone).....................0 Child Growth and Development..................3 Family, School and the Community.............3

Total Semester Hours for Certificate

1 1

3 3

64 64

8

2

128

0 0 0

3 3 3

48 48 48

8 0 1

2 3 3

128 48 64

36

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: CHILD DEVELOPMENT/EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION ASSISTANT (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 American History Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 48 TECA 1303. Family, School and the Community.............3 1 3 64 TECA 1318. Wellness of the Young Child..........................3 1 3 64 CDEC 1223. Observation and Assessment........................2 1 2 48 SECOND SEMESTER Computer Elective..........................................................................3 1 3 64 SPCH 1311 or 1315..........................................................................3 0 3 48

179


CHILD DEVELOPMENT - COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY TECA 1311. Educating Young Children............................3 CDEC 1356. Emergent Literacy for Early Childhood......3 CDEC 2307. Math and Science for Early Childhood........3 THIRD SEMESTER Social/Behavioral Science Core Elective*..................................3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 EDUC 1301. Introduction to the Teaching Profession......3 TECA 1354. Child Growth and Development..................3 CDEC 1319. Child Guidance...............................................3 CDEC 2287. Internship I: Child Care Provider/Assistant.........................................0 FIFTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 Humanities/Creative Arts Elective.............................................3 Mathematics or Natural Science Elective..................................3 CDEC 1359. Children with Special Needs.........................3 CDEC 2288. Internship II- Child Care Provider/Assistant (Capstone).....................0 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree

1 0 0

3 3 3

64 48 48

0

3

48

0 1 0 1

3 3 3 3

48 48 48 64

8

2

128

0 0 0 1

3 3 3 3

48 48 48 48

8

2 60

128

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. ** PSYC 2301, SOCI 1301, 1306, 2301 or 2319

Chiropractic PRE-CHIROPRACTIC – SEE: PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH

Cisco Certification SEE: NETWORKING TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIZATION

CNC (Computerized Numerical Control) SEE: INDUSTRIAL MACHINING APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

College for Kids (Kids Camps) SEE: CONTINUING EDUCATION AND NONCREDIT PROGRAMS

Computed Tomography SEE: NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY, RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY

180


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Computer Information Systems Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology................................................................ (361) 698-1299

ALSO SEE: ENGINEERING DIGITAL MEDIA/INTERNET DEVELOPER GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS INFORMATION SYSTEMS SPECIALIZATION INTERACTIVE GAME TECHNOLOGY AND SIMULATION NETWORKING TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIZATION PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS CONTINUING EDUCATION AND NONCREDIT PROGRAMS – COMPUTER TRAINING ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE: COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. COSC 1436. Programming Fundamentals I......................3 3 4 MATH 2413. Calculus I.........................................................4 0 4 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER COSC 1437. Programming Fundamentals II.....................3 3 4 ITSE 2309. Database Programming..................................2 3 3 MATH 2342. Statistical Methods and Probability...........3 0 3 ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER ITSE 2445. Network Defense and Countermeasures....3 3 4 COSC 2325. Computer Organization and Machine Language..........................................2 3 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective...................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.....................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 3 4 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60 Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should demonstrate basic computer skills. Consult an advisor for appropriate courses.

181


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (Suggested Transfer Plan) Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. COSC 1436. Programming Fundamentals I......................3 3 4 MATH 2413. Calculus I.........................................................4 0 4 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ITSE 2309. Database Programming..................................2 3 3 COSC 2436. Programming Fundamentals II.....................3 3 4 MATH 2414. Calculus II.......................................................4 0 4 HIST 1302. United States History II................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 ITSE 2445. Network Defense and Countermeasures....3 3 4 MATH 2320. Differential Equations.....................................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 Language, Philosophy, and Culture Core Elective..................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 3 4 COSC 2325. Computer Organization and Machine Language..........................................................2 3 3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking..............3 0 3 GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.....................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should demonstrate basic computer skills. Consult an advisor for appropriate courses. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. COMPUTER PROGRAMMING SPECIALIZATION The Computer Programming Specialization curriculum offers the student the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to function as a computer programmer at the entry level. “Hands on” experience with emphasis on structured programming and systems design is provided. The Computer Programming Specialization offers the student the option to gain a specialty in database, Object-oriented robotics or gaming simulation. Students are strongly advised to contact a Computer Science and Information Technology programming advisor. 182


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS CERTIFICATE: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (Suggested Occupational Plan) There is a limit on the number of certificates which may be earned by a student. Check with the Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology for allowable combinations of certificates and AAS degrees.

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers............................3 1 3 64 COSC 1309. Logic Design....................................................2 3 3 80 ITSC 1405. Introduction to PC Operating Systems........3 3 4 96 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER . ITSE 1402. Computer Programming OR COSC 1436. Programming Fundamentals I......................3 3 4 96 Intermediate Programming Elective*...........................................3 3 4 96 ITSW 1407. Introduction to Database................................3 3 4 96 ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER ITSE 1432. Introduction to Visual Basic.Net Programming...................................................3 3 4 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 32

*GAME 1304, ITSE 1492 (Special Topics) or other pre-approved programming course. Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College. * Bridge Courses Students must demonstrate proficiency in basic keyboarding skills by successfully completing a CSIT departmental keyboarding test, or by successful completion of POFT 1329. FSEM 0101 is required for any first-year student enrolled in English 0307 and is strongly recommended for any student needing a developmental course. MARKETABLE SKILLS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING – BASIC (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Lec. Lab Hrs. ITSC 1305. Introduction to PC Operating Systems……………………..........2 3 3 ITSE 1329. Programming Logic and Design..……….....2 3 3 ITSE 1391. Special Topics in Computer Programming...................................................2 4 3 ITSE 1491. Special Topics in Computer Programming...................................................3 3 4 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 13

Clock Hours 80 80 96 96

183


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS Computer Programming Emphasis (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers OR COSC 1301. Introduction to Computing...........................3 1 3 64 COSC 1309. Logic Design....................................................2 3 3 80 ITSC 1405. Introduction to PC Operating Systems........3 3 4 96 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER ITSE 1402. Computer Programming OR COSC 1436. Programming Fundamentals I......................3 3 4 96 ITSW 1407. Introduction to Database................................3 3 4 96 Intermediate Programming Elective*...........................................3 3 4 96 ENGL 1302. Composition II.................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER ITSE 1432. Introduction to Visual Basic. Net Programming...........................................3 3 4 96 ITNW 1425. Fundamentals of Networking Technologies.....................................................3 3 4 96 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communications............................................3 0 3 48 MATH 1314. College Algebra..............................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER ITSE 2431. Advanced C++ Programming OR COSC 1437. Programming Fundamentals II.....................3 3 4 96 ITSE 1350. Systems Analysis and Design........................2 4 3 96 Intermediate/Advanced Programming Elective**....................3 3 4 96 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER ITSE 2445. Data Structures OR COSC 2436. Programming Fundamentals III...................3 3 4 96 IMED 1301. Introduction to Digital Media.......................2 4 3 96 Advanced Programming Elective.................................................3 3 4 96 ITSC 2286. Internship - Computer and Information Science, General (Capstone)..........................0 10 2 160 ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.....................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 72

*Database Emphasis: ITSE 1447, 2417, other pre-approved programming course. Database Emphasis: ITSE 2409, 2447, other pre-approved programming course. Game Emphasis: GAME 1304, ITSE 1447, other pre-approved programming course. Robotics Emphasis: ITSE 1492 (Special Topics), ITSE 2417, other preapproved programming course.

184


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS - CONTINUING EDUCATION **Object-oriented Emphasis: ITSE 1447 AND ITSE 2437 or COSC 2425, or other pre-approved programming course. Database Emphasis: ITSE 2447 AND ITSE 1447 or ITSE 2437 or COSC 2425, or other pre-approved programming course. Game Emphasis: COSC 2430 or other pre-approved programming course. Robotics Emphasis: ITSE 1492 (Special Topics) AND ITSE 2437 or COSC 2425, or other pre-approved programming course. Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Students must demonstrate proficiency in basic keyboarding skills by successfully completing a CSE/AT departmental keyboarding test, or by successful completion of POFT 1329. FSEM 0101 is required for any first-year student enrolled in English 0307 and is strongly recommended for any student needing a developmental course.

Computer Network Electronic Technology SEE: PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS

Continuing Education and Workforce Programs Career and Community Education.................................................(361) 698-2122

The Career and Community Education offers a comprehensive range of courses to meet the community’s educational and personal enrichment needs. The Office is committed to providing educational opportunities in various tracks and providing enrichment for all citizens.

185


CONTINUING EDUCATION - COSMETOLOGY The following is just a portion of what Career and Community Education provides: • Art • Health Care • Business Technology • I n d u s t r i a l / B u i l d i n g Tr a d e s including HVAC and Machining • Career Training • Mexican-American studies • Children and Youth • Personal Enrichment • Computer Training • Welding • GED Instruction

The Office of Corporate Services.....................................................(361) 698-2408 Corporate Services offers a wide range of programs to build and enhance a skilled workforce. THe Office works with companies and organizations in the Del Mar College service area to help companies improve performance, retain personnel and become more competitive. Some of their services include: • • • •

Assessment and Consulting Customized Training - individual classes and entire training programs Workforce Skills Awards Transportation Training

Cooking SEE: CULINARY ARTS

Cosmetology Department of Human Sciences and Education.........................(361) 698-2809

The Cosmetology program trains the student in all phases of cosmetology. The Cosmetology program is under the curriculum guidelines of the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. The Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation also offers the student a shampoo apprentice certificate in partnership with business salon owners. Upon successful completion of the cosmetology courses, the student will earn a certificate from Del Mar College and will be eligible to take a written and practical exam given by the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. A Cosmetology Advisory Committee assists the college officials in the implementation of the program curriculum and job entry level needs in the industry. Students must complete all required Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation practical skills and 1500 clock hours in three semesters. Students entering the Cosmetology Certificate Program must comply with the sequential order of course listing.

186


COSMETOLOGY - COURT REPORTING CERTIFICATE: COSMETOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CSME 1443. Manicuring and Related Theory...................2 8 4 160 CSME 1405. Fundamentals of Cosmetology.....................2 8 4 160 CSME 1310. Introduction to Haircutting Related Theory................................................1 8 3 144 CSME 1244. Introduction to Salon Development.............1 3 2 64 SECOND SEMESTER CSME 1248. Principles of Skin Care...................................1 4 2 80 CSME 1354. Artistry of Hair Design I................................1 8 3 144 CSME 1453. Chemical Reformation and Related Theory.........................................2 8 4 160 CSME 2401. The Principles of Hair Coloring and Related Theory.........................................2 8 4 160 THIRD SEMESTER CSME 2439. Advanced Hair Design...................................2 8 4 160 CSME 2310. Advanced Haircutting and Related Theory.........................................1 8 3 144 CSME 2337. Advanced Cosmetology Techniques............2 4 3 96 CSME 2441. Preparation for the State Licensing Examination (Capstone).................................2 8 4 160 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 40

Court Reporting Department of Business Administration....................................(361) 698-1372 The Court Reporting curriculum is designed to offer education and skills to prepare the student to pass the Certified Shorthand Reporting (CSR) Examination of Texas and the National Registered Professional Reporter (RPR) Examination. In addition to the general admission requirements of the College, keyboarding proficiency of 35 words per minute on a five-minute timing with at least 95 percent accuracy is recommended. Grade requirements in all Court Reporting course work must be met to fulfill graduation requirements. CERTIFICATE: COURT REPORTING (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CRTR 1304. Machine Shorthand I......................................2 4 3 96 CRTR 1308. Realtime Court Reporting I...........................2 4 3 96 CRTR 2313. Court Reporting Technology II.....................2 4 3 96 CRTR 1312. Court Reporting Communications I ............2 3 3 80 CRTR 2206. Medical Court Reporting...............................2 1 2 48 SECOND SEMESTER CRTR 1207. Machine Shorthand Speedbuilding..............1 4 2 80 CRTR 1210. Realtime Court Reporting II..........................1 4 2 80 CRTR 2341. Court Reporting Technology III (Capstone)........................................................2 4 3 96

187


COURT REPORTING CRTR 1202. Law and Legal Terminology..........................2 1 2 48 CRTR 2218. Testimony Dictation I.....................................1 4 2 80 CRTR 1257. Literary/Jury Charge Dictation I .................1 4 2 80 THIRD SEMESTER CRTR 2301. Intermediate Machine Shorthand.................2 4 3 96 CRTR 2310. Realtime Court Reporting III ........................2 4 3 96 FOURTH SEMESTER CRTR 2303. Advanced Machine Shorthand.....................2 4 3 96 CRTR 2337. Realtime Court Reporting IV.........................2 4 3 96 FIFTH SEMESTER CRTR 2319. Testimony Dictation II ...................................2 4 3 96 CRTR 1359. Literary/Jury Charge Dictation II................2 4 3 96 CRTR 2312. Court Reporting Procedures..........................2 3 3 80 CRTR 2435. Accelerated Machine Shorthand...................3 4 4 112 CRTR 2331. Certified Shorthand Reporter (CSR) and Registered Professional Reporter (RPR)......2 4 3 96 SIXTH SEMESTER CRTR 2186. Internship-Court Reporting/ Court Reporter (Capstone)............................0 6 1 96 CRTR 1191. Special Topics in Court Reporting/ Court Reporter.................................................1 0 1 16 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 57

CERTIFICATE: INFORMATION REPORTING/SCOPING (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CRTR 1304. Machine Shorthand I .................................... 2 4 3 96 CRTR 1308. Realtime Court Reporting I.......................... 2 4 3 96 CRTR 2313. Court Reporting Technology II.................... 2 4 3 96 CRTR 1312. Court Reporting Communications I ........... 2 3 3 80 CRTR 2206. Medical Court Reporting ............................. 2 1 2 48 SECOND SEMESTER CRTR 1207. Machine Shorthand Speedbuilding............. 1 4 2 80 CRTR 1210. Realtime Court Reporting II......................... 1 4 2 80 CRTR 2341. Court Reporting Technology III (Capstone).... 2 4 3 96 CRTR 1202. Law and Legal Terminology......................... 2 1 2 48 CRTR 2218. Testimony Dictation I.................................... 1 4 2 80 CRTR 1257. Literary/Jury Charge Dictation I................. 1 4 2 80 THIRD SEMESTER CRTR 2301. Intermediate Machine Shorthand................ 2 4 3 96 CRTR 2310. Realtime Court Reporting III........................ 2 4 3 96 Total Semester Hours足for Certificate 33

Students who pass the complete Texas Certified Shorthand Reporting Examination during their time as students may have the additional machine shorthand class or classes waived; graduation requirements must be met.

188


COURT REPORTING ENHANCED SKILLS CERTIFICATE: Judicial Realtime/CART/Captioning

Sem. Clock Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CRTR 1201. Introduction to Captioning/CART..............2 1 2 48 CRTR 1241. Captioning Technology I ...............................1 4 2 80 CRTR 1348. Captioning Speed Building ..........................2 4 3 96 CRTR 1242. Captioning Technology II..............................1 4 2 80 CRTR 2343. Simulated Courtroom Proceedings (Capstone)........................................................2 4 3 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 12

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: COURT REPORTING (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CRTR 1304. Machine Shorthand I .................................... 2 4 3 96 CRTR 1308. Realtime Court Reporting I.......................... 2 4 3 96 CRTR 2313. Court Reporting Technology II.................... 2 4 3 96 CRTR 1312. Court Reporting Communications I ........... 2 3 3 80 CRTR 2206. Medical Court Reporting ............................. 2 1 2 48 SECOND SEMESTER CRTR 1207. Machine Shorthand Speedbuilding..............1 4 2 80 CRTR 1210. Realtime Court Reporting II......................... 1 4 2 80 CRTR 2341. Court Reporting Technology III (Capstone)....................................................... 2 4 3 96 CRTR 1202. Law and Legal Terminology......................... 2 1 2 48 CRTR 2218. Testimony Dictation I.................................... 1 4 2 80 CRTR 1257. Literary/Jury Charge Dictation I................. 1 4 2 80 THIRD SEMESTER CRTR 2301. Intermediate Machine Shorthand................ 2 4 3 96 CRTR 2310. Realtime Court Reporting III........................ 2 4 3 96 FOURTH SEMESTER CRTR 2303. Advanced Machine Shorthand.................... 2 4 3 96 CRTR 2337. Realtime Court Reporting IV........................ 2 4 3 96 FIFTH SEMESTER ENGL 1301. Composition I................................................ 3 0 3 48 SPCH Oral Communications Elective ............... 3 0 3 48 MATH/SCI Math/Natural Science Elective ...................3 0 3 48 CRTR 2319. Testimony Dictation II................................... 2 4 3 96 CRTR 1359. Literary/Jury Charge Dictation II............... 2 4 3 96 SIXTH SEMESTER Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective ................... 3 0 3 48 Social/Behavioral Science Elective ........................................... 3 0 3 48 CRTR 2312. Court Reporting Procedures......................... 2 3 3 80 CRTR 2435. Accelerated Machine Shorthand.................. 3 4 4 112 CRTR 2331. Certified Shorthand Reporter (CSR) and Registered Professional Reporter (RPR)... 2 4 3 96 SEVENTH SEMESTER CRTR 2186. Internship, Court Reporting/ Court Reporter (Capstone)........................... 0 6 1 96

189


COURT REPORTING - CRIMINAL JUSTICE CRTR 1191.

Special Topics in Court Reporting/ Court Reporter................................................ 1 Total Semester Hours­for Associate Degree

0

1 72

16

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Students who pass the complete Texas Certified Shorthand Reporting Examination during their time as students may have the additional machine shorthand class or classes waived; graduation requirements must be met.

Criminal Justice Department of Public Safety Education.....................................(361) 698-1724 The purpose of the Criminal Justice program is twofold: (1) to offer educational opportunities to the student who intends to seek employment in the field of criminal justice, including both law enforcement and corrections, upon completion of the associate degree; (2) to offer the transfer student the equivalent of the first two years in a bachelor’s degree program at a university. To fulfill senior college requirements, the student should consult an advisor. FSEM 0101 is required for any first-year student enrolled in English 0307 and is strongly recommended for any student needing a developmental course. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: CRIMINAL JUSTICE NOTE: This degree is also offered as on online program.

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. CRIJ 1301. Introduction to Criminal Justice...................3 0 3 CRIJ 1306. Court Systems and Practices.........................3 0 3 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 American History Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER CRIJ 1310. Fundamentals of Criminal Law....................3 0 3 CRIJ Elective* ...........................................................................3 0 3 ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 American History Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER CRIJ 2328. Police Systems and Practices.........................3 0 3 CRIJ Elective* ...........................................................................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 MATH 1342. Elementary Statistical Methods..................3 0 3 Language, Philosophy, and Culture Core Elective...................................................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER CRIJ 2313. Correctional Systems and Practices (Capstone)........................................3 0 3

190


CRIMINAL JUSTICE GOVT 2306. Texas Constitution: Texas Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 Speech Core Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315, or 1321)............................3 0 3 Sociology Core Elective+..............................................................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 63

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students seeking transfer should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. *CRIJ Electives: CRIJ 1313 Juvenile Justice System; CRIJ 2314 Criminal Investigation; CRIJ 2323 Legal Aspects of Law Enforcement. +Approved Sociology Core Electives: SOCI 1301, 1306, 2301, 2319. FIELD OF STUDY CERTIFICATE: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Sem. Clock FIELD OF STUDY REQUIREMENTS Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CRIJ 1301. Introduction to Criminal Justice...................3 0 3 48 CRIJ 1306. Court Systems & Practices (Capstone).........3 0 3 48 CRIJ 1310. Fundamentals of Criminal Law....................3 0 3 48 CRIJ 2313. Correctional Systems & Practices.................3 0 3 48 CRIJ 2328. Police Systems & Practices.............................3 0 3 48 CRIJ ____ Elective 1313, 2323, 2314.................................3 0 3 48 CRIJ ____. Elective 1313, 2323, 2314.................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 21

CERTIFICATE: BASIC PEACE OFFICER (Suggested Occupational Plan) The Del Mar Regional Police Academy is a semester-length, intensive certificate program for individuals who have been accepted and sponsored by a law enforcement agency and meet minimum physical fitness guidelines. The course work encompasses the competencies required for basic peace officers. Upon successful completion of the certificate, the candidate will be eligible for the TCLEOSE Basic Peace Officers Examination. Sem. Lec. Lab Hrs. FIRST SEMESTER CJLE 1506. Basic Peace Officer I .......................................3 8 5 CJLE 1512. Basic Peace Officer II.......................................3 8 5 CJLE 1518. Basic Peace Officer III.....................................3 8 5 CJLE 1524. Basic Peace Officer IV (Capstone).................3 8 5 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 20

Clock Hours 176 176 176 176

• Eligible to apply for Basic Peace Officer Exam (TCLEOSE)

191


CRIMINAL JUSTICE CERTIFICATE: INTERMEDIATE PEACE OFFICER

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CJLE 1506. Basic Peace Officer I .......................................3 8 5 176 CJLE 1512. Basic Peace Officer II.......................................3 8 5 176 CJLE 1518. Basic Peace Officer III.....................................3 8 5 176 CJLE 1524. Basic Peace Officer IV (Capstone).................3 8 5 176 SECOND SEMESTER CJSA 2331. Child Abuse: Prevention and Investigation........................3 0 3 48 CJLE 1249. Intermediate Arrest, Search and Seizure.......................................................2 0 2 32 CJSA 1251. Use of Force......................................................2 0 2 32 THIRD SEMESTER CJLE 1245. Intermediate Crime Scene Investigation (Capstone)................................2 0 2 32 CJLE 1259. Intermediate Spanish for Law Enforcement......................................2 0 2 32 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 31

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: CRIMINAL JUSTICE TECHNOLOGY POLICE SCIENCE OPTION (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Students should note requirements for entrance to Basic Peace Officer I, Basic Peace Officer II, Basic Peace Officer III, and Basic Peace Officer IV. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CJLE 1506. Basic Peace Officer I........................................3 8 5 176 CJLE 1512. Basic Peace Officer II.......................................3 8 5 176 CJLE 1518. Basic Peace Officer III.....................................3 8 5 176 CJLE 1524. Basic Peace Officer IV.....................................3 8 5 176 SECOND SEMESTER CJSA 2331. Child Abuse: Prevention and Investigation........................3 0 3 48 Approved Speech Elective............................................................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 CJLE 1249. Intermediate Arrest, Search and Seizure....... 2 0 2 32 CJSA 1251. Use of Force......................................................2 0 2 32 CRIJ 1301. Introduction to Criminal Justice...................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER CJLE 1245. Intermediate Crime Scene Investigation (Capstone)........................................................2 0 2 32 Approved Social/Behavioral Science Elective..........................3 0 3 48 CJLE 1259. Intermediate Spanish for Law Enforcement......................................2 0 2 32 Approved Math or Natural Science Elective............................3 0 3 48 CRIJ 1310. Fundamentals of Criminal Law ...................3 0 3 48 CRIJ 1313. Juvenile Justice System ..................................3 0 3 48

192


CRIMINAL JUSTICE - CULINARY ARTS FOURTH SEMESTER Approved Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I............2 4 3 64 CRIJ 2314. Criminal Investigation ...................................3 CRIJ 2328. Police Systems and Practices (Capstone).....3 Total Semester Hours for Associate in Applied Science Degree

0 0

3 3 64

48 48

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. . MARKETABLE SKILLS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: SECURITY OFFICER Security Officers are employed by industry, government, and security agencies to protect property, assets, and people. Security officers may also be involved in traffic control, emergency response, investigation, and surveillance. Sem. Clock Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours FIRST SEMESTER CJSA 1302. Private Security Officer Training..................3 0 3 48 SLPS 1313. Security and Special Officer...........................3 0 3 48 SLPS 2331. Methods of Security (Capstone)....................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 9

Culinary Arts Department of Human Sciences and Education.........................(361) 698-2809

ALSO SEE: RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT Culinary Arts at Del Mar College is a comprehensive training program designed to prepare the student to enter an exciting career in the fast-paced workplaces of the food industry. The program includes off-campus experience as well as on-campus course work leading to the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Culinary Arts (Chef Training) or Baking/Pastry Specialization. Certificate programs are also offered. The student planning to continue at a senior college should consult an advisor concerning degree requirements of the college to which transfer is intended. The Culinary Arts and Baking/Pastry Specialization are accredited by the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation Accrediting Commission, 180 Center Place Way, St. Augustine, Florida 32095.

193


CULINARY ARTS CERTIFICATE: COOK/BAKER (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. CHEF 1301. Basic Food Preparation ..................................2 3 3 CHEF 1305. Sanitation and Safety .....................................3 0 3 RSTO 1313. Hospitality Supervision ................................3 0 3 POFT 1321. Business Math .................................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER IFWA 1427. Food Preparation II (Capstone) ....................2 6 4 CHEF 1380. Cooperative Education Culinary Arts/ Chef Training ..................................................1 20 3 CHEF 1410. Garde Manger .................................................3 3 4 PSTR 1301. Fundamentals of Baking ...............................2 3 3 IFWA 1318. Nutrition for the Food Service Professional .....................................................3 0 3

Total Semester Hours for Certificate

29

Clock Hours 80 48 48 48 128 336 96 80 48

CERTIFICATE: KITCHEN SUPERVISOR (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CHEF 1301. Basic Food Preparation...................................2 3 3 80 CHEF 1305. Sanitation and Safety......................................3 0 3 48 RSTO 1313. Hospitality Supervision.................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1321. Business Math..................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER IFWA 1427. Food Preparation II (Capstone).....................2 6 4 128 CHEF 1380. Cooperation Education Culinary Arts/Chef Training ........................................1 20 3 336 CHEF 1410. Garde Manager................................................3 3 4 96 PSTR 1301. Fundamentals of Baking................................2 3 3 80 IFWA 1318. Nutrition for the Food Service Professional......................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER CHEF 1345. International Cuisine OR PSTR 2331. Advanced Pastry Shop (Capstone)...............2 3 3 80 RSTO 2301. Principles of Food and Beverage Controls............................................................2 3 3 80 RSTO 2431. Food Service Management............................3 3 4 96

Total Semester Hours for Certificate

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: CULINARY ARTS (CHEF TRAINING) (Suggested Occupational Plan)

39

. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CHEF 1301. Basic Food Preparation...................................2 3 3 80 CHEF 1305. Sanitation and Safety......................................3 0 3 48 RSTO 1313. Hospitality Supervision.................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1321. Business Math..................................................3 0 3 48

194


CULINARY ARTS SECOND SEMESTER RSTO 1325. Purchasing for Hospitatlity Operations.......3 0 3 48 PSTR 1301. Fundamentals of Baking................................2 3 3 80 CHEF 1410. Garde Manger..................................................3 3 4 96 CHEF 1380. Cooperative Education - Culinary Arts/ Chef Training...................................................1 20 3 336 IFWA 1318. Nutrition for the Food Service Professional......................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER IFWA 1427. Food Preparation II.........................................2 6 4 128 CHEF 1314. A La Carte Cooking........................................2 3 3 80 CHEF 2302. Saucier...............................................................2 3 3 80 PSTR 2331. Advanced Pastry Shop (Capstone)...............2 3 3 80 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER RSTO 1304. Dining Room Service......................................2 3 3 80 CHEF 1341 American Regional Cuisine OR CHEF 1345 International Cuisine......................................2 3 3 80 CHEF 2380. Cooperative Education II - Culinary Arts/ Chef Training...................................................1 20 3 336 Mathematics/Natural Science Elective.......................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 RSTO 1301. Beverage Management...................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours足for Associate Degree 68

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Hospitality electives may be chosen from CHEF, HAMG, PSTR, and RSTO course prefixes. Total hours for AAS degree are exclusive of developmental and noncredit college courses. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: BAKING/PASTRY SPECIALIZATION (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CHEF 1301. Basic Food Preparation...................................2 3 3 80 CHEF 1305. Sanitation and Safety......................................3 0 3 48 RSTO 1313. Hospitality Supervision.................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1321. Business Math..................................................3 0 3 48 PSTR 1301. Fundamentals of Baking................................2 3 3 80 SECOND SEMESTER RSTO 1325. Purchasing for Hospitality Operations........3 0 3 48 CHEF 1380. Cooperative Education Culinary Arts/Chef Training.........................1 20 3 336 PSTR 1310. Pies, Tarts, Teacakes and Cookies.................2 3 3 80 PSTR 1305. Breads and Rolls..............................................2 3 3 80

195


CULINARY ARTS - DEAF STUDIES IFWA 1318. Nutrition for the Food Service Professional......................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER IFWA 1427. Food Preparation II (Capstone).....................2 6 4 128 CHEF 2380. Cooperative Education – Culinary Arts/Chef Training.........................1 20 3 336 PSTR 1306. Cake Decorating I............................................2 3 3 80 PSTR 2331. Advanced Pastry Shop (Capstone)...............2 3 3 80 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER Pastry Elective (PSTR 1391 or PSTR 2307)...................................2 3 3 80 Mathematics or Natural Science Elective .................................3 0 3 48 PSTR 1442. Quantity Bakeshop Production.....................3 3 4 96 PSTR 1440. Plated Desserts (Capstone)............................3 3 4 96 FIFTH SEMESTER Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 RSTO 1301. Beverage Management...................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours­for Associate Degree

72

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Hospitality electives may be chosen from CHEF, HAMG, PSTR, and RSTO course prefixes. Total hours for AAS Degree are exclusive of developmental and noncredit college courses.

Customized Training (Corporate) Services SEE: BUSINESS AFFAIRS AND CONTINUING EDUCATION

Dance SEE: KINESIOLOGY

Deaf Studies SEE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE AND INTERPRETING

196


DENTAL

Dental Deparment of Dental and Imaging Technology..........................(361) 698-2858 FOR PRE-DENTAL, SEE: PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH

Dental Assisting

This program trains the student in all phases of dental assisting. It was established under the guidelines of the Council on Dental Education of the American Dental Association in cooperation with the Nueces Valley District Dental Society. The program in dental assisting is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60611, (312) 440-4653, www.ada.org. A Dental Advisory Committee assists College officials in the implementation of the curriculum under the standards established by the Commission. The program is offered in cooperation with local dental offices. These offices provide clinical education in association with the Joint Review Committee and the Commission on American Dental Association Accreditation. Upon successful completion of the Dental Assisting courses, the student will earn a Certificate of Achievement and is eligible to take the certification examination that is given by the Dental Assisting National Board and the Registered Dental Assistant (RDA) exam administered by the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners (TSBDE). To earn an associate degree, the student must complete the additional education requirements. In addition to the admission requirements of the College, applicants must submit: •  a Dental Assisting data sheet to the Dental Assisting Program office before July 15 of the year of admission •  to College Registrar, official high school or GED transcripts and unofficial transcripts to the Dental Assisting program office •  to College Registrar official college transcripts and unofficial transcripts to the Dental Assisting program office •  official ACT, SAT, COMPASS, THEA or TSI college entrance examination scores to College Registrar and unofficial examination scores to the Dental Assisting program office Applicants will be invited to an orientation and tour of the facilities. The Dental Assisting program begins only in the fall semester and continues through both summer sessions of the academic year of enrollment. Any or all of the general education courses in the curriculum can be taken prior to admission to the program. CERTIFICATE: DENTAL ASSISTING (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours DNTA 1311. Dental Science..................................................2 3 3 80 DNTA 1401. Dental Materials..............................................2 6 4 128 DNTA 1315. Chairside Assisting.........................................2 4 3 96 DNTA 1345. Preventive Dentistry.......................................2 4 3 96

197


DENTAL DNTA 1202. Communication and Behavior in the Dental Office.........................................2 DNTA 1305. Dental Radiology............................................2 SECOND SEMESTER DNTA 1341. Dental Laboratory Procedures......................2 DNTA 1353. Dental Assisting Applications.......................2 DNTA 1166. Practicum Dental Assistant............................0 DNTA 1347. Advanced Dental Science..............................2 DNTA 1349. Dental Radiology in the Clinic......................2 THIRD SEMESTER DNTA 2250. Advanced Dental Assisting Applications (Capstone)........................................................1 DNTA 2252. Advanced Dental Radiology.........................1 DNTA 1167. Practicum Dental Assistant............................0 FOURTH SEMESTER DNTA 2166. Practicum Dental Assistant ...........................0 DNTA 1251. Dental Office Management............................2 Total Semester Hours for Certificate足

1 4

2 3

48 96

3 3 9 3 3

3 3 1 3 3

80 80 144 80 80

2 2 9

2 2 1

48 48 144

9 1

1 2 39

144 48

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: DENTAL ASSISTING (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours DNTA 1311. Dental Science..................................................2 3 3 80 DNTA 1401. Dental Materials..............................................2 6 4 128 DNTA 1315. Chairside Assisting.........................................2 4 3 96 DNTA 1345. Preventive Dentistry.......................................2 4 3 96 DNTA 1202. Communication and Behavior in the Dental Office.........................................2 1 2 48 DNTA 1305. Dental Radiology............................................2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER DNTA 1341. Dental Laboratory Procedures......................2 3 3 80 DNTA 1353. Dental Assisting Applications.......................2 3 3 80 DNTA 1166. Practicum Dental Assistant............................0 9 1 144 DNTA 1347. Advanced Dental Science..............................2 3 3 80 DNTA 1349. Dental Radiology in the Clinic......................2 3 3 80 THIRD SEMESTER DNTA 2250. Advanced Dental Assisting Applications (Capstone)........................................................1 2 2 48 DNTA 2252. Advanced Dental Radiology.........................1 2 2 48 DNTA 1167. Practicum Dental Assistant............................0 9 1 144 FOURTH SEMESTER DNTA 2166. Practicum Dental Assistant ...........................0 9 1 144 DNTA 1251. Dental Office Management............................2 1 2 48 FIFTH SEMESTER ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I...............2 4 3 96 Psychology Elective.......................................................................3 0 3 48 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I.............3 3 4 96 SIXTH SEMESTER Business/College Level Mathematics Elective.........................3 0 3 48

198


DENTAL ENGL 1302. Composition II.................................................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree­ 64

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

Dental Hygiene

This program prepares the student to be a dental hygienist, whose primary duties are to provide patients with regular oral prophylaxis, dental x-rays, dental sealants, and dental health care instruction for the control of oral diseases and the promotion of oral health. Graduates will receive an Associate in Applied Science degree and are eligible to take national, regional, and state board licensing examinations. After passing these examinations, the graduate is licensed to practice dental hygiene under the general supervision of a licensed dentist. The Dental Hygiene program is accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Ave., Chicago, IL 60611, (312) 440-4653, www.ada.org. A Dental Advisory Committee assists College officials in the implementation of the curriculum under the standards established by the Commission. In addition to the admission requirements of the College, applicants must provide the following information to the Dental Hygiene program office before March 1 of the year admission is desired: •  Completed Dental Hygiene program data sheet/application •  supply the Registrar’s Office with official copies of high school or GED transcripts and college transcripts •  also, supply the Dental Hygiene program office with copies of official college transcripts. •  placement test scores •  three recommendation forms •  have an overall 2.0 GPA in college courses •  be eligible to make application to take the Dental Hygiene National Board Examination, Western Regional Board Exam and to make application for licensure by the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners. •  If applicable, supply documentation of graduation from a Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA), dental assisting program or CDA certificate. (Note: Dental Assisting experience is not an admission requirement.) Note: The general education and science courses in the curriculum should be taken prior to admission to the program. All science courses completed must be within a five-year period prior to enrollment in the Dental Hygiene program. This criteria is weighted to arrive at a score for each applicant. The committee selects the 24 highest scoring as primary candidates and the others are alternates ranked also by their scores. If a primary candidate withdraws his/her application, the vacancy is filled by an alternate with the highest score on the alternate list. This process continues until the class of 24 is filled. Successful applicants will receive written notification of an admission review 199


DENTAL orientation. The selection committee, consisting of the program director, department faculty, and advisory committee members, meets in May to select the next class. All applicants are notified by letter of the selection committee’s decisions. Applicants not selected are advised to contact the Student Enrollment Center or Dental Hygiene program director for advice concerning their academic goals. Additional Requirements: If admitted into the program, students must submit proof of physical, visual, and dental examinations prior to the first day of class. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: DENTAL HYGIENE (Suggested Occupational Plan) Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 CHEM 1406. Basic Chemistry ..............................................3 3 4 96 DHYG 1301. Orofacial Anatomy, Histology and Embryology .............................................2 3 3 80 DHYG 1431. Preclinical Dental Hygiene ...........................2 7 4 144 DHYG 1304. Dental Radiology ...........................................2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II ...........3 3 4 96 BIOL 2420. Microbiology and Clinical Pathology..........3 3 4 96 DHYG 1219. Dental Materials..............................................1 4 2 80 DHYG 1227. Preventive Dental Hygiene Care..................2 0 2 32 DHYG 1361. Clinical Dental Hygienist...............................0 15 3 240 DHYG 1311. Periodontology ...............................................2 2 3 64 DHYG 1239. General and Oral Pathology .........................2 0 2 32 THIRD SEMESTER ENGL 1301. Composition I ................................................3 0 3 48 DHYG 1207. General and Dental Nutrition ......................2 0 2 32 DHYG 2201. Contemporary Dental Hygiene Care I ........2 0 2 32 DHYG 2362. Clinical Dental Hygienist...............................0 15 3 240 DHYG 1335. Pharmacology for the Dental Hygienist .....3 0 3 48 DHYG 1315. Community Dentistry ...................................2 3 3 80 FOURTH SEMESTER Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective .....................3 0 3 48 SOCI 1301. Introduction to Sociology ............................3 0 3 48 PSYC 2301. General Psychology .......................................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 DHYG 2231. Contemporary Dental Hygiene Care II .......2 0 2 32 DHYG 2363. Clinical Dental Hygienist (Capstone) .........0 15 3 240 DHYG 2153. Dental Hygiene Practice (Capstone) .......................................................1 0 1 16 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 72

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Dental Hygiene students’ computer competency skills are ensured through assessment, utilization of WebCT, MyDMC, word processing of assignments, WebQuest and performing Internet-based searches. 200


DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY

Diagnostic Medical Sonography Department of Dental and Imaging Technology........................(361) 698-2858

This program provides the course work to meet the educational requirements for Echocardiography as certified by the Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), 1361 Park Street, Clearwater, FL 33756, (727) 210-2350; and the Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography, 6021 University Boulevard, Suite 500, Ellicott City, MD 21043, (443) 973-3251. The program is designed so that it may be taken as an Associate of Applied Science degree after completing 32 semester hours in general education. Deadline to apply is March 1. Students will receive written notification of acceptance to the program. Students applying to the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program must: • be eligible and applied for admission to Del Mar College • supply the Registrar’s Office with official copies of college transcripts • supply the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program office with copies of official transcripts • have completed a Diagnostic Medical Sonography Program data sheet/ application • You must have completed a CNA (Certified Nurse Aid) certificate program or show proof of one of the following exemptions: • CNA certification is NOT required if you have completed one or more of the following direct patient care programs: EMT- Basic, Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN), Nuclear Medicine Technologist, Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA), Paramedic, Physical Therapy Assistant (PTA), Radiologic Technologist (RT-R), Registered Nurse (RN), Respiratory Therapist, and Surgical Technologist. • Active status CNA certification is NOT required. • have a minimum of 2.5 GPA • present all college transcripts showing completion of prerequisites • have an advising session with the program director, for information call (361) 698-2858 • be selected on an individual basis by Admissions Committee If admitted into the program, a background check and drug testing is required as mandated by our accrediting agency and clinical affiliates. A physical exam and current CPR card must be submitted prior to the first day of class. *Certified Nurse’s Aide (CNA) courses can be acquired through the Del Mar College Continuing Education Health Care Programs at 698-2122 (NURA 1001 and NURA 1060).

201


DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY - DIESEL TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock Prerequisites: Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II............3 3 4 96 MATH 1314. College Algebra...............................................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I...............2 4 3 96 General Physics (PHYS 1305 or SCIT 1420).................................3 0-3 3-4 48-96 FIRST SEMESTER DMSO 2101. Ultrasound Instrumentation..........................1 0 1 16 DMSO 1110. Introduction to Sonography..........................1 1 1 32 SECOND SEMESTER DMSO 1405. Sonography of Abdominopelvic Cavity......3 3 4 96 DMSO 1302. Basic Ultrasound Physics...............................3 1 3 64 DMSO 1360. Clinical–Diagnostic Medical Sonography/ Sonographer and Ultrasound Technician....0 16 3 256 DMSO 1351. Sonographic Sectional Anatomy...................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER DMSO 1342. Intermediate Ultrasound Physics.................3 1 3 64 DMSO 2405. Sonography of Obstetrics/Gynecology.......3 3 4 96 DMSO 1366. Practicum I–Diagnostic Medical Sonography/ Sonographer and Ultrasound Technician ...0 24 3 384 FOURTH SEMESTER DSVT 1300. Principles of Vascular Technology................3 1 3 64 DMSO 2266. Practicum II–Diagnostic Medical Sonography/ Sonographer and Ultrasound Technician....0 18 2 288 DMSO 2353. Sonography of Superficial Structures...........2 2 3 64 FIFTH SEMESTER DMSO 2357. Advanced Ultrasound Professionalism and Registry Review.......................................2 2 3 64 DMSO 2366. Practicum III–Diagnostic Medical Sonography/ Sonographer and Ultrasound Technician....0 24 3 384 DSVT 2200. Vascular Technology Applications ..............2 1 2 48 Total Semester Hours­for Associate Degree 70-71

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. *Additional required courses: (NURA 1001 and NURA 1060).

Diesel Applied Technology

Department of Industrial Education..........................................(361) 698-1701

ALSO SEE: AUTOMOTIVE APPLIED TECHNOLOGY The Diesel Applied Technology curriculum offers an opportunity to receive theoretical knowledge and develop skills necessary to function as a diesel mechanic. The curriculum is designed to give a practical approach, under job 202


DIESEL APPLIED TECHNOLOGY shop performance conditions, to the study of diesel mechanics. CERTIFICATE: DIESEL ENGINE SPECIALIST (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours DEMR 1301. Shop Safety and Procedures..........................2 4 3 96 DEMR 1405. Basic Electrical Systems..................................2 6 4 128 DEMR 1406. Diesel Engine I.................................................2 6 4 128 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER DEMR 1449. Diesel Engine II...............................................2 6 4 128 DEMR 1313. Fuel Systems....................................................1 7 3 128 HEMR 1304. Natural Gas Compression..............................1 7 3 128 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER DEMR 1229. Preventative Maintenance.............................1 3 2 64 DEMR 2334. Advanced Diesel Tune-Up and Troubleshooting (Capstone)..................1 7 3 128 DEMR 2432. Electronic Controls..........................................2 6 4 128 AUMT 1445. Automotive Climate Control Systems.........2 6 4 128 Total Semester Hours足for Certificate 40

CERTIFICATE: DIESEL SYSTEMS SPECIALIST (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours DEMR 1301. Shop Safety and Procedures..........................2 4 3 96 DEMR 1405. Basic Electrical Systems..................................2 6 4 128 HEMR 1304. Natural Gas Compression..............................1 7 3 128 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER DEMR 1416. Basic Hydraulics..............................................2 6 4 128 DEMR 1421. Power Train I....................................................2 6 4 128 DEMR 1317. Basic Brake Systems........................................1 7 3 128 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER DEMR 1230. Steering and Suspension I..............................1 4 2 64 DEMR 1327. Tractor Trailer Service and Repair................1 7 3 128 HEMR 1401. Tracks and Undercarriages............................2 6 4 128 POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 2 3 64 WLDG 1340. AWS Level I Certification Review................1 4 3 80 Total Semester Hours足for Certificate 42

203


DIESEL APPLIED TECHNOLOGY - DIGITAL MEDIA ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: DIESEL APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. DEMR 1301. Shop Safety and Procedures..........................2 4 3 DEMR 1405. Basic Electrical Systems..................................2 6 4 DEMR 1406. Diesel Engine I.................................................2 6 4 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER DEMR 1327. Tractor Trailer Service and Repair................1 7 3 DEMR 1449. Diesel Engine II...............................................2 6 4 DEMR 1416. Basic Hydraulics..............................................2 6 4 Mathematics or Natural Science Elective or COSC 1309........3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER DEMR 1229. Preventative Maintenance.............................1 3 2 DEMR 1313. Fuel Systems....................................................1 7 3 DEMR 1421. Power Train I....................................................2 6 4 WLDG 1340. AWS Level I Certification Review................1 4 3 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER DEMR 2334. Advanced Diesel Tune-Up and Troubleshooting (Capstone)..........................1 7 3 DEMR 2432. Electronic Controls..........................................2 6 4 HEMR 1304. Natural Gas Compression..............................1 7 3 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 FIFTH SEMESTER DEMR 1230. Steering and Suspension I..............................1 4 2 DEMR 1317. Basic Brake Systems........................................1 7 3 HEMR 1401. Tracks and Undercarriages............................2 6 4 AUMT 1445. Automotive Climate Control Systems....... 2 6 4 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours足for Associate Degree 72

Clock Hours 96 128 128 48 128 128 128 48 64 128 128 80 48 128 128 128 48 80 128 128 128 48

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

Digital Media/Internet Developer Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology..........................................................(361) 698-1299 The Microcomputers for Business Specialization Interactive Digital Media and Web Development curriculum prepares the student with the skills necessary to pursue a career in visual communications, interactive multimedia technology, instructional designer, information architect, multimedia developer, media specialist, multimedia marketing/advertising, or Web media developer. The program focuses on the creation, production, and organization of visual information for digital, electronic, Web, and new media productions. Students receive training in the development of interactive computer-based training 204


DIGITAL MEDIA modules, simulations, multimedia presentations, instructional design as well as dynamic Web delivery. CERTIFICATE: DIGITAL MEDIA ESSENTIALS (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours IMED 1301. ITSC 1301. ITSC 1305. COSC 1309. ITSE 2313. IMED 1316. IMED 1341.

Introduction to Digital Media.......................2 4 3 Introduction to Computers............................3 1 3 Introduction to PC Operating Systems........2 4 3 Logic Design....................................................2 3 3 Web Authoring................................................2 4 3 Web Design I....................................................2 4 3 Interface Design...............................................2 4 3 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 21

96 64 96 80 96 96 96

CERTIFICATE: DIGITAL MEDIA ADVANCED (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours IMED 2305. Digital Media Courseware Development II................................................2 4 3 96 IMED 2349. Internet Server Management.........................2 4 3 96 ITSW 1307. Introduction to Database................................2 2 3 64 IMED 1305. Multimedia Courseware Development I.....2 4 3 96 ITSE 2302. Intermediate Web Programming..................2 4 3 96 IMED 2309. Internet Commerce.........................................2 4 3 96 IMED 1191. Special Topics in Educational/Instructional Media Design...................................................1 0 1 16 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 19

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS Digital Media for Web Design and eLearning (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers............................3 1 3 64 IMED 1301. Introduction to Digital Media.......................2 4 3 96 ITSC 1305. Introduction to PC Operating Systems........2 4 3 96 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER ITSE 1329. Programming Logic and Design OR COSC 1309. Logic and Design.............................................2 3-4 3 96 IMED 1316. Web Page Design I..........................................2 4 3 96 ITSE 2313. Web Authoring................................................2 4 3 96 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER IMED 1341. Interface Design...............................................2 4 3 96 ITSW 1307. Introduction to Database................................2 2 3 64

205


DIGITAL MEDIA SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication..............................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER IMED 1305. Multimedia Courseware Development I.................................................2 4 3 96 IMED 2349. Internet Server Management.........................2 4 3 96 ITSE 2302. Intermediate Web Programming .................2 4 3 96 FIFTH SEMESTER IMED 2305. Digital Media Courseware Development II.........................2 4 3 96 IMED 2309. Internet Commerce.........................................2 4 3 96 IMED 1191. Special Topics in Digital Media.....................1 0 1 16 Math Core Elective (Select from MATH 1314, 1324.................3 0 3 48 or 1342) SIXTH SEMESTER ITSE 1350. Systems Analysis and Design........................2 4 3 96 ITSC 2286. Internship - Computer and Information Science, General (Capstone)..........................0 10 2 160 ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.....................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology careers require proficiency in basic keyboarding skills. Students are personally responsible for insuring that they currently possess, or will acquire, the necessary keyboarding skills to successfully complete the chosen degree or certificate program. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: DIGITAL MEDIA (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers............................3 1 3 ARTS 1311. Design I............................................................3 3 3 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II................................3 0 3 COMM 1336. Television Production I...................................3 1 3 ARTS 2311. Design III – Computer Applications In Art.................................................................3 1 3 THIRD SEMESTER Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..........................3 0 3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication..............................................3 0 3 COMM 1337. Television Production II.................................3 3 3 IMED 1301. Introduction to Digital Media.......................2 4 3 FOURTH SEMESTER Language, Philosophy, and Culture Core Elective..................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3

206


DIGITAL MEDIA - DRAMA College-Level Mathematics Core Elective.................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 FIFTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective w/lab.......................3 0 4 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport.2 1 2 ARTS 2348. Digital Art OR COMM 2324/2325 Practicum in Electronic Media OR IMED 1345. Interactive Digital Media I..........................2-3 0-4 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. The suggested degree plan can be started at any time, but some courses are offered only on a yearly basis. All computer courses meet requirement for basic computer skills. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. In consultation with a department advisor, a specific degree plan will be completed.

Drafting

SEE: ARCHITECTURAL/DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY

Drama Department of Art and Drama...................................................(361) 698-2255

Drama Performance Opportunities Del Mar Drama presents a season of plays and instructional activities in a facility consisting of a proscenium and studio theatre, scene shop, costume shop, acting studio, dressing rooms, and offices. Scholarships Drama scholarships are available for majors. Contact Drama faculty for more information. Awards are made to incoming freshmen and sophomores on the basis of application, audition and interview with Drama faculty. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: DRAMA (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 DRAM 1120/1121 2120/2121 Theatre Practicum I/II/III/IV (Technical)........0 3 1 Drama Elective .................................................................................. 3 DRAM 1341. Makeup.................................................................2 2 3

207


DRAMA - ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY Component Area Option Core Elective*...................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 DRAM 1120/1121 2120/2121 Theatre Practicum I/II/III/IV (Technical)........0 3 1 Drama 1351. Acting I.................................................................3 0 3 Mathematics Core Elective...........................................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Language, Philosophy, and Culture Core Elective..................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 DRAM 1120/1121 2120/2121 Theatre Practicum I/II/III/IV (Technical)........0 3 1 Sophomore Drama Elective................................................................... 3 Component Area Option Core Elective*...................................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 Sophomore Drama Elective................................................................... 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective*.........................................................3 0 3 FIFTH SEMESTER Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..........................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60 *Choose from DRAM 1310, 2361 or DANC 2303. DRAMA ELECTIVES CHOOSE THREE FROM THE FOLLOWING (TWO MUST BE SOPHOMORE LEVEL) DRAM 1322. Stage Movement..............................................2 2 3 DRAM 1323. Basic Theatre Practice - Stage Lighting........2 3 3 DRAM 1330. Stage Craft I: Introduction to Technical Theatre........................................2 3 3 DRAM 1342. Introduction to Costume................................2 2 3 DRAM 1352. Acting II............................................................3 0 3 DRAM 2331. Stage Craft II: Intro to Stage Design.............2 3 3 DRAM 2336. Voice for the Theatre.......................................3 0 3 DRAM 2363. History of Musical Theatre............................3 0 3

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

Echocardiography Department of Dental and Imaging Technology........................(361) 698-2858 ALSO SEE: DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY

This program provides the course work to meet the educational requirements 208


ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY for Echocardiography as certified by the Committee on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), 1361 Park Street, Clearwater, FL 33756, (727) 210-2350; and the Joint Review Committee on Education in Diagnostic Medical Sonography, 6021 University Boulevard, Suite 500, Ellicott City, MD 21043, (443) 973-3251. The program is designed so that it may be taken as an Associate of Applied Science degree after completing 32 semester hours in general education. Deadline to apply is March 1. Students will receive written notification of acceptance to the program. Students applying to the Echocardiography program must: • be eligible and applied for admission to Del Mar College • supply the Registrar’s Office with official copies of college transcripts • supply the Echocardiography program office with copies of official transcripts • have completed a Echocardiography Program data sheet/application • You must have completed a CNA (Certified Nurse Aid) certificate program or show proof of one of the following exemptions: • CNA certification is NOT required if you have completed one or more of the following direct patient care programs: EMT- Basic, Licensed Vocational Nurse (LVN), Nuclear Medicine Technologist, Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA), Paramedic, Physical Therapy Assistant (PTA), Radiologic Technologist (RT-R), Registered Nurse (RN), Respiratory Therapist, and Surgical Technologist. • Active status CNA certification is NOT required. • have a minimum of 2.5 GPA • present all college transcripts showing completion of prerequisites • have an advising session with the program director, for information call (361) 698-2832 • be selected on an individual basis by Admissions Committee If admitted into the program, a background check and drug testing is required as mandated by our accrediting agency and clinical affiliates. A physical exam and current CPR card must be submitted prior to the first day of class. *Certified Nurse’s Aide (CNA) courses can be acquired through the Del Mar College Continuing Education Health Care Programs at 698-2122 (NURA 1001 and NURA 1060). ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock PREREQUISITES Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II..........3 3 4 96 MATH 1314. College Algebra..............................................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 Social or Behavioral Science Elective.........................................3 0 3 48

209


ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY -ELECTROPLATING APPLIED TECHNOLOGY General Physics Elective (PHYS 1305 or SCIT 1420)..................3 0-3 3-4 48-96 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I...............2 4 3 96 FIRST SEMESTER DMSO 2101. Ultrasound Instrumentation..........................1 0 1 16 DMSO 1110. Introduction to Sonography..........................1 1 1 32 SECOND SEMESTER DSAE 1303. Introduction to Echocardiography Techniques........................................................3 1 3 64 DMSO 1302. Basic Ultrasound Physics...............................3 1 3 64 DSAE 1260. Clinical..............................................................0 8 2 128 DSAE 1415. Principles of Adult Echocardiography.........3 2 4 80 THIRD SEMESTER DMSO 1342. Intermediate Ultrasound Physics.................3 1 3 64 DSAE 2404. Echocardiographic Evaluation of Pathology I.......................................................3 2 4 80 DSAE 1264. Practicum I.......................................................0 16 2 256 FOURTH SEMESTER DSVT 1300. Principles of Vascular Technology................3 1 3 64 DSAE 2261. Clinical II..........................................................0 12 2 192 DSAE 2337. Echocardiographic Evaluation of Pathology II......................................................2 3 3 80 FIFTH SEMESTER DSAE 2355. Echocardiography Professionalism and Registry Review.......................................2 2 3 64 DSAE 2268. Practicum II......................................................0 16 2 256 DSVT 2200. Vascular Technology Applications...............2 1 2 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 67-68

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. *Additional required courses: (NURA 1001 and NURA 1060).

Electroplating Applied Technology Department of Technology Education........................................(361) 698-1701 ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: ELECTROPLATING APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours METL 1301. Introduction to Metallurgy............................3 0 3 48 CETT 1303. DC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 AERM 1303. Shop Practices..................................................1 4 3 80 Mathematics Elective.....................................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER MCHN 1338. Basic Machine Shop I......................................1 4 3 80 SCIT 1414. Applied General Chemistry I........................3 4 4 112 CTEC 1205. Chemical Calculations I.................................1 2 2 48 CETT 1305. AC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112

210


ELECTROPLATING - EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES THIRD SEMESTER METL 1313. Introduction to Corrosion..............................2 4 3 96 CETT 1329. Solid State Devices..........................................1 6 3 112 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER METL 2305. Atmospheric Corrosion Control...................2 4 3 96 PTAC 1308. Safety, Health, and Environment I................3 0 3 48 SCIT 1415. Applied General Chemistry II.......................3 4 4 112 Humanities /Visual or Performing Arts Elective.....................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER CPMT 2333. Computer Integration.....................................1 6 3 112 SCIT 1543. Applied Analytical Chemistry I....................3 6 5 144 Speech Elective...............................................................................3 0 3 48 INMT 2388. Internship- Manufacturing Technology/Technician (Capstone) ............1 8 3 144 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 62

Courses in bold type satisfy the Del Mar College Core Curriculum.

Emergency Medical Services Department of Public Safety Education.....................................(361) 698-1724

ALSO SEE: FIRE SCIENCE The Emergency Medical Services Professions program is based upon the National Standard Curricula promulgated by the United States Department of Transportation as specified by the Texas Department of State Health Services and the current demands of the Emergency Medical Services industry for certification of persons at the Emergency Care Attendant, Emergency Medical TechnicianBasic, EMT-Intermediate, and EMT-Paramedic levels. Additionally, the Emergency Medical Services Professions program offers an Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree that meets the requirements of the Texas Department of State Health Services for designation as a Licensed Paramedic. Paramedic coursework (either Certificate or Associate Degree level) is only begun in the Fall (for daytime classes) and the Spring (for evening classes). Students must apply to be accepted into either the day or evening paramedic programs. Students should contact the Emergency Medical Services Professions program office to begin the application process, to confirm due dates for applications, and to check on schedules. All applicants must meet the specific admission requirements of the EMS program, as well as those for a regularly enrolled student, including assessments. Clinical Rotations: Students in the program will perform clinical rotations at area hospitals and field internships with local Emergency Medical Services. Hospitals are accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO). JCAHO requires the following of all students in clinical rotations: current criminal history, drug screen (at most 30 days prior to beginning clinical rotations), Hepatitis “B� vaccination, TB testing, Measles Mumps Rubella (MMR) vaccination, and Diphtheria Pertussis Tetanus (DPT) vaccination. Students are also required to purchase certain uniforms and equipment prior to 211


EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES beginning clinical rotations and field internships. Students should contact the program Clinical Coordinator for a complete listing of requirements and where JCAHO requirements can be met. Course Completion: Students who successfully complete the course(s) of study required by the Texas Department of State Health Services will be allowed to take the appropriate National Registry certification exam as developed by The National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians. NOTE: The Texas Department of State Health Services may not allow persons to test to receive certification or licensure if they have been convicted of certain crimes above the level of a Class “C” misdemeanor. Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) or Driving Under the Influence (DUI) arrests or convictions may preclude the candidate from certification, no matter the level of arrest or conviction. Students who have convictions of this nature should contact the program director prior to enrollment. Students planning to continue toward an AAS degree, or continue their education, should consult with an advisor concerning degree requirements of the program or college to which transfer is intended. MARKETABLE SKILLS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours EMSP 1501. Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (Capstone)...................................................... 3 8 5 176 EMSP 2160. Clinical................................................... 0 6 1 96 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I.. 3 3 4 96 HPRS 1206. Essentials of Medical Terminology...............2 0 2 32 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 12

CERTIFICATE: PARAMEDIC (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock PREREQUISITES Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours EMSP 1501. Emergency Medical Technician-Basic..........3 8 5 176 EMSP 2160. Clinical............................................................. 0 6 1 96 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I.. 3 3 4 96 HPRS 1206. Essentials of Medical Terminology...............2 0 2 32 FIRST SEMESTER EMSP 1438. Introduction to Advanced Practices.............3 2 4 80 EMSP 1456. Patient Assessment and Airway Management....................................................3 2 4 80 EMSP 1355. Trauma Management......................................2 3 3 80 SECOND SEMESTER EMSP 2348. Emergency Pharmacology.............................2 2 3 64 EMSP 2444. Cardiology........................................................3 3 4 96 EMSP 2460. Clinical (Capstone)..........................................0 15 4 240 THIRD SEMESTER EMSP 2434. Medical Emergencies......................................3 3 4 96 EMSP 2330. Special Populations.........................................2 3 3 80 EMSP 2262. Clinical..............................................................0 7 2 112

212


EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES FOURTH SEMESTER EMSP 2243. Assessment Based Management (Capstone)........................................................1 4 2 80 EMSP 2338. EMS Operations..............................................2 3 3 80 EMSP 2263. Clinical..............................................................0 11 2 160 EMSP 1147. Pediatric Life Support....................................1 0 1 16 EMSP 1149. Trauma Life Support.......................................1 0 1 16 EMSP 2135. Advanced Cardiac Life Support...................1 0 1 16 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 53

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN PARAMEDIC (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock PREREQUISITES Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours EMSP 1501. Emergency Medical Technician-Basic..........3 8 5 176 EMSP 2160. Clinical..............................................................0 6 1 96 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I.............3 3 4 96 HPRS 1206. Essentials of Medical Terminology...............2 0 2 32 FIRST SEMESTER EMSP 1438. Introduction to Advanced Practices.............3 2 4 80 EMSP 1456. Patient Assessment and Airway Management....................................................3 2 4 80 EMSP 1355. Trauma Management......................................2 3 3 80 BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II............3 3 4 96 SECOND SEMESTER EMSP 2348. Emergency Pharmacology.............................2 2 3 64 EMSP 2444. Cardiology........................................................3 3 4 96 EMSP 2460. Clinical (Capstone)..........................................0 15 4 240 POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 2 3 64 THIRD SEMESTER EMSP 2434. Medical Emergencies......................................3 3 4 96 EMSP 2330. Special Populations.........................................2 3 3 80 EMSP 2262. Clinical..............................................................0 7 2 112 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER EMSP 2243. Assessment Based Management (Capstone)........................................................1 4 2 80 EMSP 2338. EMS Operations..............................................2 3 3 80 EMSP 2263. Clinical..............................................................0 11 2 160 EMSP 2135. Advanced Cardiac Life Support...................1 0 1 16 EMSP 1147. Pediatric Life Support....................................1 0 1 16 EMSP 1149. Trauma Life Support.......................................1 0 1 16 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 72

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

213


ENGINEERING

Engineering

Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology ‌............................................................(361) 698-1299 ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE: ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 2+2 Transfer Plan to Texas A&M University-Kingsville

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGR 1201. Introduction to Engineering (accepted for EEEN 1201-Introduction to Electrical Engineering)...................................2 0 2 CHEM 1411. General Inorganic Chemistry I....................3 3 4 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 MATH 2413. Calculus I.........................................................4 0 4 SECOND SEMESTER ENGR 2304. Programming for Engineers (accepted for CSEN 2304, Introduction To Computer Science).....................................2 3 3 ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II................................3 0 3 MATH 2414. Calculus II........................................................4 0 4 PHYS 2425. University Physics I........................................3 3 4 THIRD SEMESTER ENGR 2305. Electrical Circuits (accepted for EEEN 2323, Network Analysis I)........................................................3 1 3 ENGT 1407. Digital Fundamentals (accepted for EEEN 2340, Digital Logic Design)...................................................3 3 4 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 MATH 2320. Differential Equations.....................................3 0 3 PHYS 2426. University Physics II.......................................3 3 4 FOURTH SEMESTER COSC 2325. Computer Organization and Machine Language (accepted for EEEN 3449)............2 3 3 ENGR 2107. Fundamentals of Circuit Analysis Laboratory........................................................1 2 1 ENGR 2307. Fundamentals of Circuit Analysis (accepted for EEEN 3321)...............................3 0 3 GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking..............3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 66

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. This plan does not fit Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering programs at all universities. Students must check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. 214


ENGINEERING ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE: MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs ENGR 1201. Introduction to Engineering..........................2 0 2 CHEM 1411. General Inorganic Chemistry I....................3 3 4 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 MATH 2413. Calculus I.........................................................4 0 4 SECOND SEMESTER ENGR 1304. Engineering Graphics I...................................2 3 3 ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II................................3 0 3 MATH 2414. Calculus II........................................................4 0 4 PHYS 2425. University Physics I.......................................3 3 4 THIRD SEMESTER ENGR 2301. Engineering Mechanics - Statics...................3 1 3 ENGR 2304. Programming for Engineers..........................2 3 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 MATH 2320. Differential Equations.....................................3 0 3 PHYS 2426. University Physics II.......................................3 3 4 FOURTH SEMESTER ENGR 2105 Electrical Circuits I Laboratory.....................0 2 1 ENGR 2302. Engineering Mechanics - Dynamics.............3 1 3 ENGR 2305 Electrical Circuits I..........................................3 0 3 GOVT 2306. Texas Constitution: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 Social and Behavior Sciences Core Elective.............................3 0 3 MATH 2415. Calculus III.......................................................4 0 4 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 66

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College core curriculum. This plan does not fit Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering programs at all universities. Students must check specific requirements of the college or university for which they plan to transfer. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs CETT 1303. DC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 COSC 1309. Logic Design....................................................2 3 3 ENGR 1201. Introduction to Engineering..........................2 0 2 RBTC 1305. Robotic Fundamentals....................................2 4 3 SCIT 1418. Applied Physics ..............................................3 3 4 SECOND SEMESTER CETT 1305. AC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 CETT 1415. Digital Applications........................................3 4 4 ELMT 1301. Programmable Logic Controllers..................1 5 3

215


ENGINEERING INTC 1341. Principles of Automatic Control...................2 3 3 MATH 1314. College Algebra..............................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.....................3 0 3 Emphasis Elective............................................................................. 2 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 ENGR 1304. Engineering Graphics I...................................2 3 3 INTC 1357. AC/DC Motor Control...................................2 4 3 FOURTH SEMESTER EECT 1307. Convergence Technologies (Capstone)…....1 6 3 Or Emphasis Elective........................................................................ 3 ELMT 1305. Basic Fluid Power............................................2 3 3 Emphasis Elective............................................................................. 3 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking..............3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type meet general education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Mechatronics Emphasis Electives CPMT 2337. Microcomputer Interfacing............................1 6 3 ELMT 2333. Industrial Electronics……………………….. 2 4 3 ELMT 2339. Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers .......................................................1 5 3 ELPT 2231. AC/DC Drives................................................1 4 2 INMT 1319. Manufacturing Processes...............................2 4 3 Instrumentation Emphasis Electives ELMT 2339. Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers........................................................1 5 3 INTC 1307. Instrumentation Test Equipment..................2 3 3 INTC 1312. Instrumentation and Safety...........................2 3 3 INTC 2230. Instrumentation Systems Troubleshooting.1 4 2 Alternative Energy Emphasis Electives FCEL 1305. Fuel Cell and Alt./Renewable Energy.........2 4 3 HART 1311. Solar Fundamentals........................................2 4 3 WIND 1200. Introduction to Wind Energy........................1 4 2

CERTIFICATE: INSTRUMENTATION (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CETT 1415. Digital Applications………………………....3 4 4 112 or ENGT 1407. Digital Fundamentals……………………….3 3 4 96 INTC 1307.* Instrumentation Test Equipment…………..2 3 3 80 INTC 1312.* Instrumentation and Safety………………...2 3 3 80 INTC 1341. Principles of Automatic Control…………...2 3 3 80 SECOND SEMESTER ELMT 1301. Programmable Logic Controllers………….. 1 5 3 112 or RBTC 1305. Robotic Fundamentals……………………....2 4 3 96 INTC 1343.* Application of Industrial Automatic Controls…………….....................2 3 3 80 INTC 1357. AC/DC Motor Control………………….......2 4 3 96

216


ENGINEERING ELMT 1305. Basic Fluid Power……………………….…...2 or INMT 1319. Manufacturing Processes…………………...2 INTC 2230.* Instrumentation Systems Troubleshooting……………….......................1 Total Semester Hours for Certificate

3 4

3 3

80 80

4

2 27

80

CERTIFICATE: ADVANCED ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. INTC 1341. Principles of Automatic Control…………...2 3 3 INTC 1357. AC/DC Motor Control……………………...2 4 3 ELMT 1305. Basic Fluid Power……………………….…...2 3 3 or ELMT 2333. Industrial Electronics……………………….. 2 4 3 INMT 1319. Manufacturing Processes…………………...2 4 3 or FCEL 1305. Fuel Cell and Alternative/ Renewable Energy…………….….................2 4 3 HART 1311. Solar Fundamentals………………………....2 4 3 or CPMT 2337. Microcomputer Interfacing………………....1 6 3 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 15

Clock Hours 80 96 80 96 80 96 96 96

CERTIFICATE: ESSENTIALS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours COSC 1309. Logic Design………………………………....2 3 3 80 or ENGR 2304. Programming for Engineers………………..2 3 3 80 ENGR 1201. Introduction to Engineering...........………...2 0 2 32 ENGT 1407. Digital Fundamentals……………………….3 3 4 96 or CETT 1415. Digital Applications………………………....3 4 4 112 or ENGR 2406. Introduction to Digital Systems…………….3 3 4 96 MATH 1314. College Algebra……………………………...3 0 3 48 or MATH 1316. Plane Trigonometry………………………….3 0 3 48 RBTC 1305. Robotic Fundamentals……………………....2 4 3 96 or ELMT 1301. Programmable Logic Controllers………….. 1 5 3 96 or ENGR 1304. Engineering Graphics I……………………...2 3 3 80

Total Semester Hours for Certificate

15

Alternative Energy Emphasis Electives WIND 1200. Introduction to Wind Energy........................1 4 2 FCEL 1305. Fuel Cell and Alternative/ Renewable Energy..........................................2 4 3 HART 1311. Solar Fundamentals........................................2 4 3 Mechatronics Emphasis Electives ELPT 2231. AC/DC Drives................................................1 4 2 INMT 1319. Manufacturing Processes...............................2 4 3 CPMT 2337. Microcomputer Interfacing............................1 6 3

217


ENGINEERING - ENGLISH

Pre-Engineering Requirements

Del Mar College offers many courses which transfer to colleges of engineering in Texas and other states. Requirements vary substantially from one university to another, which diversity even in the different areas represented in a particular college of engineering. While a student in the department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology at Del Mar College, students should consult an advisor to develop a degree plan in Electrical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering. Students interested in other areas of engineering can take additional coursework at Del Mar College in their planned future majors. For example, Chemical Engineering majors could take: CHEM 2323/2123 and CHEM 2325/2125. Petroleum Engineering majors could take GEOL 1103, 1303, and 1404. Civil Engineering majors could take GEOL 1103 and 1303.

English Department of English and Philosophy......................................(361) 698-1234 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: ENGLISH with emphasis in Language (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 American History Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 College-Level Mathematics Core Elective.................................3 0 3 Social/Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective w/lab.......................3 1 4 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 American History Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 Speech Core Elective.....................................................................3 0 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport..........................................................2 1 2 Foreign Language Elective............................................................4 0 4 THIRD SEMESTER Sophomore Literature...................................................................3 0 3 Sophomore Literature.....................................................................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Foreign Language Elective............................................................4 0 4 FOURTH SEMESTER Sophomore Literature.....................................................................3 0 3 Sophomore Literature.....................................................................3 0 3 HIST 2311. Western Civilization I OR HIST 2312. Western Civilization II....................................3 0 3 GOVT 2306. Texas Constitution: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3

218


ENGLISH

Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree

62

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: ENGLISH with emphasis in Literature (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 American History Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 College-Level Mathematics Core Elective.................................3 0 3 Social/Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective w/lab.......................3 1 4 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 American History Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 Speech Core Elective.....................................................................3 0 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport..........................................................2 1 2 Life and Physical Sciences Elective............................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Sophomore Literature Core Elective..........................................3 0 3 Sophomore Literature.....................................................................3 0 3 HIST 2311. Western Civilization I OR HIST 2312. Western Civilization II....................................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective.............................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER Sophomore Literature.....................................................................3 0 3 Sophomore Literature.....................................................................3 0 3 Sophomore Literature.....................................................................3 0 3 GOVT 2306. Texas Constitution: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: ENGLISH with emphasis in Philosophy (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 American History Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 College-Level Mathematics Core Elective.................................3 0 3 Social/Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective w/lab.......................3 1 4 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3

219


ENGLISH - FIRE SCIENCE American History Core Elective..................................................3 0 3 Philosophy Elective........................................................................3 0 3 Speech Core Elective.....................................................................3 0 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport..........................................................2 1 2 THIRD SEMESTER Sophomore Literature Core Elective..........................................3 0 3 HIST 2311. Western Civilization I OR HIST 2312. Western Civilization II....................................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Philosophy Elective........................................................................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER Sophomore Literature.....................................................................3 0 3 Sophomore Literature.....................................................................3 0 3 Philosophy Elective........................................................................3 0 3 GOVT 2306. Texas Constitution: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum.

Fire Science Department of Public Safety Education.....................................(361) 698-1724

ALSO SEE: EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES The general objective of the curriculum is to offer professional-level education to meet personnel needs in the field of modern fire science and fire prevention. Fire Science Technology is offered in cooperation with the Corpus Christi Fire Department under the rules and regulations approved by the Texas Commission on Fire Protection (TCFP) Personnel Standards and Education. The student planning to continue at a senior college should consult an advisor concerning degree requirements of the college to which transfer is intended. CERTIFICATE: BASIC FIREFIGHTER (Suggested Occupational Plan) For all individuals who are interested in a career as a fire fighter, this program prepares the student to take the Basic Fire Fighter examination with the TCFP. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours FIRS 1301. Firefighter Certification I................................2 3 3 80 FIRS 1407. Firefighter Certification II..............................2 6 4 128 FIRS 1413. Firefighter Certification III.............................2 4 4 96 FIRS 1319. Firefighter Certification IV.............................2 3 3 80 FIRS 1423. Firefighter Certification V..............................3 4 4 112 FIRS 1103. Firefighter Agility/Fitness Preparation.......1 1 1 32 SECOND SEMESTER EMSP 1501. Emergency Medical Technician-Basic..........3 8 5 176

220


FIRE SCIENCE EMSP 2160. FIRS 1429. FIRS 1433.

Clinical..............................................................0 6 Firefighter Certification VI.............................4 1 Firefighter Certification VII (Capstone).......2 6 Total Semester Hours for Certificate

1 4 4 33

96 80 128

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: FIRE SCIENCE Basic Firefighting Option (Suggested Occupational Plan) For individuals who are interested in a career as a fire fighter, this program prepares the student to take the Basic Fire Fighter examination with the Texas Commission on Fire Protection (TCFP). Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 FIRT 1333. Fire Chemistry I...............................................3 0 3 48 FIRT 1301. Fundamentals of Fire Protection...................3 0 3 48 FIRT 1319. Firefighter Health and Safety........................3 0 3 48 FIRT 1338. Fire Protection Systems..................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER FIRT or FIRS Elective......................................................................3 0 3 48 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking.............3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 POFI 1301. Computer Applications I..............................2 2 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER FIRT 1307. Fire Prevention Codes and Inspections.......3 0 3 48 MATH 1332. Contemporary Mathematics I......................3 0 3 48 FIRT 1329. Building Codes and Construction................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER EMSP 1501. Emergency Medical Technician-Basic..........3 8 5 176 EMSP 2160. Clinical..............................................................0 6 1 96 FIRS 1301. Fire Certification I...........................................2 3 3 80 FIRS 1407. Fire Certification II..........................................2 6 4 128 FIRS 1413. Fire Certification III.........................................2 4 4 96 FIRS 1319. Fire Certification IV........................................2 3 3 80 FIFTH SEMESTER FIRS 1103. Firefighter Agility/Fitness Preparation.......1 1 1 32 FIRS 1423. Fire Certification V..........................................3 4 4 112 FIRS 1429. Fire Certification VI........................................4 1 4 80 FIRS 1433. Fire Certification VII (Capstone)...................2 6 4 128 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 72

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

221


FOREIGN LANGUAGE - GENERALIST

Foreign Language Department of Communications, Languages and Reading........(361) 698-1534 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: FOREIGN LANGUAGE (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 Mathematics Core Elective...........................................................3 0 3 Speech Core Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315 or 1321)......................3 0 3 SPAN, FREN or GERM 1411..........................................................3 2 4 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United History States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective .................................3 0-3 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport..........................................................2 1 2 SPAN, FREN or GERM 1412..........................................................3 2 4 THIRD SEMESTER Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective...................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..........................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective w/lab.......................3 4 4 SPAN, FREN or GERM 2311..........................................................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 SPAN, FREN or GERM 2312..........................................................3 0 3 Elective (Sophomore Level)...........................................................3 0 3 Kinesiology (Sophomore Level)....................................................1 0 1 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum.

Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to attend. In consultation with a department advisor, a specific degree plan will be completed.

GED Instruction SEE: CONTINUING EDUCATION AND NONCREDIT PROGRAMS

Generalist SEE: TEACHING 222


GENERAL MANAGEMENT - GEOGRAPHICAL SYSTEMS

General Management SEE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT

Geographical Information Systems Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology..........................................................(361) 698-1299 ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE: GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS) (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I...................................3 0 3 PSYC 2301. General Psychology........................................3 0 3 GISC 1311. Introduction to GIS.........................................2 4 3 Select one from KINE/DANC 1100-1299 or KINE 2100-2299 ...........................................................................1 2 1 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II..................................3 0 3 MATH 2413. Calculus I..........................................................4 0 4 COSC 1436. Programming Fundamentals I......................3 3 4 THIRD SEMESTER GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics...................3 0 3 PHYS 2425. University Physics I........................................3 3 4 ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.......................3 0 3 Sophomore Literature or Philosophy Elective............................3 0 3 Select one from KINE/DANC 1100-1299 or KINE 2100-2299 ...........................................................................1 2 1 FOURTH SEMESTER MATH 2414. Calculus II........................................................4 0 4 GOVT 2306. Texas Constitution: Texas Constitution and Topics......................3 0 3 PHYS 2426. University Physics II.......................................3 3 4 SPCH 1311, 1315 or 1321................................................................3 0 3 Visual or Performing Arts Elective...............................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 58

GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS EMPHASIS This curriculum prepares the student with the skills necessary to pursue a career in the field of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). This program uses up-to-date technology and affords students a wide variety of employment opportunities in the corporate world and both local and state government agencies. Students will learn to acquire, analyze, and manage spatial data and information. GIS Specialists work with digital maps, graphics, and databases to derive management data. 223


GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS Geographic Information Systems Emphasis (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers............................3 1 3 64 ITSC 1405. Introduction to PC Operating Systems........3 3 4 96 GISC 1311. Introduction to GIS OR GISC 1302. Understanding Geographic Information Systems.......................................2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER MATH 1314. College Algebra..............................................3 0 3 48 GISC 2420. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems (GIS)...................................................3 3 4 96 ITSE 1402. Computer Programming OR COSC 1436. Programming Fundamentals I......................3 3 4 96 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective........................3 0 3 48 GEOL 1103. Physical Geology Laboratory........................0 3 1 16 THIRD SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 48 GISC 1421. Introduction to Raster-Based GIS.................3 3 4 96 ITSW 1407. Introduction to Database................................3 3 4 96 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication..............................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER GISC 2301. Data Acquisition and Analysis in GIS..........2 4 3 96 GISC 1491. Special Topics in Cartography.......................3 3 4 96 ITSE 1432. Introduction to Visual Basic.Net Programming...................................................3 3 4 96 GISC 2435. Programming for Geographic Information Systems (GIS).............................3 3 4 96 FIFTH SEMESTER GISC 2131. Advanced Problems in Geographic Information Systems (GIS).............................0 2 1 32 ITSC 2286. Internship - Computer and Information Science, General (Capstone)..........................0 10 2 160 ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.....................3 0 3 48 MATH 1342. Elementary Statistical Methods..................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 66

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Students must demonstrate proficiency in basic keyboarding skills by successfully completing a CSE/AT Departmental keyboarding test, or by successful completion of POFT 1329. FSEM 0101 is required for any first-year student enrolled in English 0307 and is strongly recommended for any student needing a developmental course.

224


GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS CERTIFICATE: GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS ANALYST (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ENGL 1301. Composition I..................................................3 0 3 48 GISC 1311. Introduction to GIS.........................................2 4 3 96 ITSE 1402. Computer Programming OR COSC 1436. Programming Fundamentals I......................3 3 4 96 ITSW 1407. Introduction to Database................................3 3 4 96 SECOND SEMESTER GISC 2420. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems.............................................................3 3 4 96 GISC 1421. Introduction to Raster-Based GIS.................3 3 4 96 GISC 1491. Special Topics in Cartography.......................3 3 4 96 ITSE 1432. Introduction to Visual Basic.Net Programming...................................................3 3 4 96 GEOL 1103. Physical Geology Laboratory........................0 3 1 48 THIRD SEMESTER GISC 2435. Programming for Geographic Information Systems (GIS).............................3 3 4 96 GISC 2301. Data Acquisition and Analysis in GIS..........2 4 3 96 GISC 2131. Advanced Problems in Geographic Information Systems (GIS).............................0 2 1 32 MATH 1314. College Algebra...............................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 42

Students pursuing this award program are required to meet Texas Success Initiative (TSI) standards and course requirements. MARKETABLE SKILLS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD - GIS-IT TECHNICIAN (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers............................3 1 3 64 ITSC 1305. Introduction to PC Operating Systems........2 3 3 80 ITSE 1329. Programming Logic and Design...................2 3 3 80 ITSW 1307. Introduction to Database................................2 2 3 64 GISC 1105. Introduction to ArcView/ArcGIS.................1 1 1 32 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 13

MARKETABLE SKILLS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD - GIS LEVEL I (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours GISC 1311. Introduction to GIS.........................................2 4 3 96 GISC 2420. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems.............................................................3 3 4 96 GISC 1421. Introduction to Raster-Based Geographic Information Systems (GIS).............................3 3 4 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 11

225


GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS - GEOGRAPHY MARKETABLE SKILLS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD - GIS LEVEL II (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours GISC 1491. Special Topics in Cartography.......................3 3 4 96 GISC 2301. Data Acquisition and Analysis in Geographic Information Systems (GIS).......2 4 3 96 GISC 2131. Advanced Problems in Geographic Information Systems (GIS).............................0 2 1 32 GISC 2435. Programming for Geographic Information Systems (GIS).............................3 3 4 96

Total Semester Hours for Certificate

12

Geography Department of Social Sciences...................................................... (361) 698-1228 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I ......................................................... 3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I................................. 3 0 3 Mathematics Core Elective............................................................. 3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective .................................... 3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective…………………………………….......... 3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II ....................................................... 3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II................................ 3 0 3 GEOG 1302. Cultural Geography.................................................. 3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................... 3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Lab............................................ 0 3 1 Speech Core Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315 or 1321)........................ 3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Language, Philosophy and Cultural Core Elective...................... 3 0 3 GEOG 1303. World Regional Geography................................... 3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics........................... 3 0 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport............................................................ 2 1 2 Approved Computer Course (COSC 1301, ITSC 1301 or 1309).... 3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics............................... 3 0 3

226


GEOGRAPHY GEOG 2312. Economic Geography OR GEOG 1305. Geography of North America.......................... 3 0 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective............................. 3 0 Approved Electives .......................................................................... 6 0

Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree

3 3 6

60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. COSC 1301 Introduction to Computing; ITSC 1301; Introduction to Computers; or ITSC 1309 Integrated Software Applications I Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL1301. Composition I.......................................................... 3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I................................. 3 0 3 MATH 1314. College Algebra........................................................ 3 0 3 GEOG 1301. Earth Sciences I.................................................. 3 0 3 GEOL 1303. Physical Geology....................................................... 3 0 3 GEOL 1103. Physical Geology Lab.............................................. 0 3 1 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL1302. Composition II.......................................................... 3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-History II................................................... 3 0 3 MATH 1316. Plane Trigonometry................................................... 3 0 3 GEOG 2312. Economic Geography................................................ 3 0 3 Speech Core Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315 or 1321).............................. 3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective……………………………………............ 3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective ........................... 3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences. PHYS 1401. College Physics I.............. 3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences. PHYS 1401 Lab......................................... 0 3 1 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics........................... 3 0 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport............................................................ 2 1 2 FOURTH SEMESTER GEOL 1404. Earth History.............................................................. 3 3 4 Social/Behavioral Sciences Core Elective............................................. 3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences. PHYS 1402. College Physics II............. 3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences. PHYS 1402 Lab....................................... 0 3 1 GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics............................... 3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. 227


GEOLOGY

Geology Department of Natural Sciences.................................................(361) 698-1229 ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE: GEOLOGY (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. GEOL 1303. Physical Geology............................................3 0 3 GEOL 1103. Physical Geology Lab....................................0 3 1 MATH 1314. College Algebra..............................................3 0 3 ENGL 1301. Composition I..................................................3 0 3 Social/Behavioral Sciences Core Elective*................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER GEOL 1304. Earth History (Historical Geology).............3 0 3 GEOL 1104. Earth History (Historical Geology) Lab.....0 3 1 CHEM 1411. General Inorganic Chemistry I......................3 3 4 MATH 1316. Plane Trigonometry.........................................3 0 3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking..............3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER MATH 2413. Calculus I.........................................................4 0 4 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective*.................3 0 3 CHEM 1412. General Inorganic Chemistry II.....................3 3 4 GEOL 2107 Geology Field Methods Lab Elective............0 3 1 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective*......................................................... 3 0 3 PHYS 2425. University Physics I OR PHYS 1401. College Physics................................................3 3 4 HIST 1302. United States History II................................3 0 3 *Elective (GISC 1311, KINE 1238, PHIL 2306, ECON 2301, MATH 2414, others)‌.............2 0 2 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60 Total Semester Hours suggested for Associate Degree 60 -62

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Minimum degree requirements: For the AS Geology Degree, 60- 62 hours chosen from the above plan to include the 42 hour DMC Core Curriculum and 18 sophomore hours. Students must demonstrate use of basic computer skills through ENGL 1303, CHEM 1411, and all GEOL classes.

228


GEOLOGY - HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY *Students should see an Advisor for selecting recommended core electives and other electives. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

Health Care Continuing Education Programs SEE: CONTINUING EDUCATION AND NONCREDIT PROGRAMS

Health Information Technology Department of Allied Health......................................................(361) 698-2820

This program provides the course work to meet the educational requirements for certification in Health Information Technology and Medical Coding. The Health Information Technology Program offers a Coding Specialist Certificate, a 43-credit hour certificate program designed to prepare students to understand medical concepts, terminology and accurately code medical records for hospitals, physician offices, clinics and other health care providers. Accurate coding is critical to health care providers due to its affects on reimbursement, compliance requirements and other federal and state regulations. Upon successful completion of the Coding Specialist Certificate program, students are eligible to take the Certified Coding Associate exam (CCA) offered by theAmerican Health Information ManagementAssociation (AHIMA) with opportunities for advanced certification. The Health Information Technology Program also offers a 70-credit hour Associate in Applied Science Degree in which students receive extensive training in medical records management in hospitals, clinics, government facilities, and other medical facilities. Graduates are eligible to take the national registry examinations for certification as a Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT) and a Certified Coding Associate (CCA) given by theAmerican Health Information ManagementAssociation (AHIMA). Individuals with the RHIT and CCA credentials are in great demand in this area and surrounding areas due to the growing number of health care facilities. Graduates of the program may be able to transfer some acquired credit hours to a baccalaureate degree curriculum. The number of transferable credit hours can be maximized with appropriate faculty advisement prior to and during the student’s enrollment. The Health Information Technology program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information Management Education (CAHIIM), 233 N. Michigan Ave, 21st Floor, Chicago, IL 60601-5800. In addition to the standard College admission process, students planning to enter the Health Information Technology programs must complete the following: • attend an advising session with the program director • submit a completed application for admission by July 15th • submit all college transcripts showing evidence of completion of prerequisites • or current enrollment • have a minimum grade point average of 2.5 229


HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Nursing students or graduates, or any graduates or students from the Health Science programs who have completed the pre-requisites of the Health Information Technology Program (Coding Specialist Certificate of Associate Degree) may apply in the spring semester and be permitted to start in the second semester. Candidates selected for enrollment will be notified by mail. Upon enrollment, the student must pass a background check and drug screen test at student’s expense for security clearance and continued enrollment in the program. Contact the Health Information Technology Program Director at (361) 698-2844. CERTIFICATE: HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CODING SPECIALIST

Sem. Clock PREREQUISITES Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers............................3 1 3 64 HITT 1305. Medical Terminology I...................................3 0 3 48 FIRST SEMESTER (Fall) HITT 1301. Health Data Content and Structure..............2 2 3 64 BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II..........3 3 4 96 HITT 1349. Pharmacology..................................................3 0 3 48 ITSW 1407. Introduction to Database................................3 3 4 96 SECOND SEMESTER (Spring) HITT 1341. Coding and Classification Systems..............3 1 3 64 HPRS 2301. Pathophysiology.............................................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER (Summer) HITT 1342. Ambulatory Coding........................................3 1 3 64 HITT 2335. Coding and Reimbursement Methodologies (Capstone).............................3 1 3 64 FOURTH SEMESTER (Fall) POFM 1327. Medical Insurance...........................................2 2 3 64 HITT 1261. Clinical I (Capstone).......................................0 8 2 128 Total Semester Hours­for Certificate 44

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Sufficient high school or college science background required to enroll in BIOL 2401; otherwise, students must enroll in BIOL 1371. Sem. Clock PREREQUISITES Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I.............3 3 4 96 ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers............................3 1 3 64 HITT 1305 Medical Terminology I...................................3 0 3 48 FIRST SEMESTER (Fall) HITT 1301. Health Data Content and Structure..............2 2 1 64 BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II............3 3 4 96 HITT 1349. Pharmacology..................................................3 0 3 48

230


HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY - HISTORY ITSW 1407. Introduction to Database................................3 3 4 96 SECOND SEMESTER (Spring) HITT 1341. Coding and Classification Systems..............3 1 3 64 HITT 1353. Legal/Ethical Aspects of Health Information.........................................3 0 3 48 HITT 1345. Healthcare Delivery Systems........................3 0 3 48 HPRS 2301. Pathophysiology.............................................3 0 3 48 HITT 1191. Special Topics in Health Information Technology/Technician..................................0 3 1 48 THIRD SEMESTER (Summer) ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 MATH 1342. Elementary Statistical Methods..................3 0 3 48 HITT 1342. Ambulatory Coding........................................3 1 3 64 HITT 2335. Coding and Reimbursement Methodologies (Capstone).............................3 1 3 64 FOURTH SEMESTER (Fall) HITT 1261. Clinical I (Capstone).......................................0 8 2 128 HITT 2339. Health Information Organization and Supervision...............................................3 0 3 48 HITT 1355. Healthcare Statistics........................................3 1 3 64 HITT 2343. Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement...................................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER (Spring) HITT 2260. Clinical-Health Information/Medical Records Technology/Technician..................................0 8 2 128 PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................3 0 3 48 Speech Core Elective.....................................................................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 HITT 2149. RHIT Competence Review............................0 3 1 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 72

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

History Department of Social Sciences....................................................(361) 698-1228 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: HISTORY (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec Lab . Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I...........................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I...................................3 0 3 Mathematics Core Elective...........................................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II........................................................ 3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History II History..................3 0 3 GEOG 1303. World Regional Geography....................................3 0 3

231


HISTORY - HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective .................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Lab..........................................0 3 1 Speech Core Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315, or 1321).....................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective...................3 0 3 HIST 2311. Western Civilization I.................................................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................................................3 0 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport.........2 1 2 Foreign Language Elective............................................................3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..........................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................................................3 0 3 HIST 2312. Western Civilization II...............................................3 0 3 HIST 2389. Academic Cooperative...............................................3 0 3 History elective from the approved list of courses....................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

Hospitality Management Department of Human Sciences and Education.........................(361) 698-2809

ALSO SEE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT The Hospitality Program is designed to prepare students to enter into the hospitality industry. The program provides a quality education that incorporates theory and practice through one certificate program and one Associate in Applied Science degree. The Hospitality Management Certificate prepares students to work in the lodging industry. The Associate in Applied Science in Hospitality Management provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to become leaders in the industry. Students planning on continuing their education should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. CERTIFICATE: HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. HAMG 1321. Introduction to Hospitality Industry..........3 0 3 48 CHEF 1305. Sanitation and Safety......................................3 0 3 48 CHEF 1301. Basic Food Preparation...................................2 3 3 80 RSTO 1313. Hospitality Supervision.................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1321 Business Math or Computer Elective...........3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER HAMG 1313 Front Office Procedures..................................3 1 3 64 HAMG 1340. Hospitality Legal Issues.................................3 0 3 48

232


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT RSTO 1325. Purchasing for Hospitality Operations........3 HAMG 2381. Hospitality Administration and Management Cooperative Education (Capstone)......................1 *Approved Hospitality Elective....................................................3 Total Hours for Certificate

0

3

48

20 0

3 3 30

336 48

*Approved Hospitality Electives: IFWA 1318, IFWA 1427 or RSTO 1301

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. HAMG 1321. Introduction to Hospitality Industry...........3 0 3 48 CHEF 1305. Sanitation and Safety......................................3 0 3 48 CHEF 1301. Basic Food Preparation...................................2 3 3 80 RSTO 1313. Hospitality Supervision.................................3 0 3 48 Computer Elective or POFT 1321 Business Math.......................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER RSTO 1325. Purchasing for Hospitality Operations........3 0 3 48 HAMG 1313. Front Office Procedures .................................3 1 3 64 HAMG 1340. Hospitality Legal Issues.................................3 0 3 48 HAMG 2381. Hospitality Administration and Management Cooperative Education..........................................1 20 3 336 *Approved Hospitality Elective....................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER ENGL 1301 Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 Social and Behavioral Science Elective**..................................3 0 3 48 RSTO 2301 Principles of Food and Beverage Controls............................................................2 3 3 80 RSTO 1304. Dining Room Service .....................................2 3 3 80 HAMG 2307. Hospitality Marketing and Sales..................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER SPCH 1311 or SPCH 1315..............................................................3 0 3 48 Math or Natural Sciences Elective..............................................3 0 3 48 Humanities Elective***.................................................................3 0 3 48 HAMG 2332. Hospitality Financial Management (Capstone).......................................................... 3 0 3 48 *Approved Hospitality Elective....................................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

*Approved Hospitality Electives: IFWA 1318, IFWA 1427, RSTO 1301 **Approved Social and Behavioral Sciences Electives: Choose one - ECON 2301, GOVT 2305, GOVT 2306, HIST 1301, HIST 1302 ***Humanities Electives: Choose one - PHIL 1301 or PHIL 2306 Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

233


HUMAN SERVICES

Human Services Department of Human Sciences and Education.........................(361) 698-2809

The Human Services curriculum offers a program of study that approaches the objective of meeting human needs through an interdisciplinary knowledge base. The program introduces the student to educational practicum and internship experiences as well as theoretical models and ethical standards of the human services field. Courses in the Human Services program may be applied to a certificate or an Associate of Applied Science degree. Through clinical and agency affiliations students have the opportunity to receive clinical experiences in the areas of substance abuse, counseling, gerontology, intergenerational practices, as well as mental illness and mental retardation. A minimum grade of “C” is required for Human Services students in their major field. CERTIFICATE: HUMAN SERVICES (Suggested Occupational Plan) Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours SCWK 1321. Orientation to Social Services........................3 0 3 48 DAAC 2354 . Dynamics of Group Counseling...................3 0 3 48 DAAC 1311. Counseling Theories.......................................3 0 3 48 PMHS 1166. or DAAC 1166. Practicum.......................................0 7 1 112 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER CMSW 1323. The Exceptional Person OR DAAC 1304. The Pharmacology of Addiction...................3 0 3 48 DAAC 1317. Basic Counseling Skills...................................3 0 3 48 PMHS 2166. or DAAC 2166. Practicum.......................................0 7 1 112 CMSW 1341. Behavioral Modification and Cognitive Disorders .....................................3 0 3 48 Major Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER DAAC 2363. Clinical - Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling (Capstone)...................................0 9 3 144 DAAC 1305. Co-Occurring Disorders.................................3 0 3 48 DAAC 1309. Assessment Skills of Alcohol and Other Drug Addictions..................................3 1 3 64 DAAC 2307. Addicted Family Intervention.......................3 1 3 64 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 38

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College. Electives must be approved. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: GENERALIST STUDIES IN HUMAN SERVICES (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours SCWK 1321. Orientation to Social Services........................3 0 3 48

234


HUMAN SERVICES DAAC 2354. Dynamics of Group Counseling...................3 0 3 48 DAAC 1311. Counseling Theories.......................................3 0 3 48 FMLD 1301. Introduction to Intergenerational Professions.......................................................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER CMSW 1323. The Exceptional Person..................................3 0 3 48 DAAC 1317. Basic Counseling Skills...................................3 0 3 48 PMHS 1166. Practicum..........................................................0 7 1 112 ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER DAAC 1309. Assessment Skills of Alcohol and Other Drug Addictions..................................3 1 3 64 DAAC 1305. Co-Occurring Disorders.................................3 0 3 48 PMHS 2166. Practicum..........................................................0 7 1 112 GERS 1301. Introduction to Gerontology.........................3 0 3 48 Social/Behavioral Sciences Elective...........................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER CMSW 1341. Behavioral Modification and Cognitive Disorders .............................3 0 3 48 CDEC 2326. Admin of Programs for Children I...............3 1 3 96 TECA 1354. Child Growth and Development..................3 0 3 48 POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 2 3 48 Mathematics or Natural Sciences Elective................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER PMHS 2363. Clinical-Psychiatric/Mental Health Services Technician (Capstone)........0 9 3 144 DAAC 2307. Addicted Family Intervention.......................3 1 3 64 TECA 1303. Family, School and Community....................3 1 3 64 Speech Elective...............................................................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 68

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Electives must be approved. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: ADDICTION STUDIES IN HUMAN SERVICES (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours SCWK 1321. Orientation to Social Studies.........................3 0 3 48 DAAC 2354. Dynamics of Group Counseling...................3 0 3 48 DAAC 1311. Counseling Theories.......................................3 0 3 48 DAAC 1319. Intro to Alcohol and Other Drug Addictions..................................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER DAAC 1304. Pharmacology of Addiction...........................3 0 3 48 DAAC 1317. Basic Counseling Skills...................................3 0 3 48 DAAC 1166. Practicum-Substance Abuse/Addiction

235


HUMAN SERVICES Counseling.......................................................0 ENGL 1302. Composition II ...............................................3 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 THIRD SEMESTER DAAC 2301. Therapeutic Communities in Criminal Justice Settings................................3 DAAC 1305. Co-Occurring Disorders.................................3 DAAC 2166. Practicum-Substance Abuse/Addiction Counseling.......................................................0 DAAC 2341. Counseling Alcohol and Other Drug Addictions..................................3 Social/Behavioral Sciences Elective...........................................3 FOURTH SEMESTER DAAC 1309. Assessment Skills of Alcohol and Other Drug Addictions...........................3 CMSW 1341. Behavioral Modification and Cognitive Disorders................................3 POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 Mathematics or Natural Sciences Elective................................3 FIFTH SEMESTER DAAC 2363. Clinical - Substance Abuse/ Addiction Counseling (Capstone)................0 DAAC 2307. Addicted Family Intervention.......................3 DAAC 2343. Current Issues..................................................3 Speech Elective...............................................................................3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree

7 0 0

1 3 3

112 48 48

0 0

3 3

48 48

7

1

112

1 0

3 3

64 48

1

3

64

0 2 0

3 3 3

48 48 48

3 3 3 3 65

144 64 48 48

9 1 0 0

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Electives must be approved. CERTIFICATE: LONG TERM CARE NURSING HOME ADMINISTRATOR (Suggested Occupational Plan) NOTE: This certification is only for individuals with a bachelor’s degree. . Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. LTCA 1311. Introduction to Long Term Care Administration................................................3 0 3 LTCA 1312. Resident Care in the Long Term Care Facility.....................................................3 0 3 LTCA 1313. Organization and Management of Long Term Care Facilities..............................2 4 3 LTCA 2315. Financial Management of Long Term Care Facilities..............................3 0 3 LTCA 2314. Long Term Care Law......................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER LTCA 2588. Internship - Hospital and Health Care Facilities Administration/Management .....................0 30 5 LTCA 2689. Internship - Hospital and Health Care Facilities Administration/Management (Capstone)........................................................0 33 6

236

Clock Hours 48 48 96 48 48

480

528


HUMAN SERVICES - INDUSTRIAL MACHINING TECHNOLOGY

Total Semester Hours for Certificate

26

Industrial Machining Applied Technology Department of Technology Education........................................(361) 698-1701

The Industrial Machining curriculum is designed to offer a practical approach to the study of metal machining, machine tools, procedures, theoretical knowledge, skill development, and training in Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) operations. Students planning to continue at a senior college should consult an advisor concerning degree requirements of the college to which transfer is intended. CERTIFICATE: INDUSTRIAL MACHINING APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (LEVEL II) (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. MCHN 1301. Beginning Machine Shop...............................3 0 3 MCHN 1338. Basic Machine Shop I......................................1 4 3 MCHN 1341. Basic Machine Shop II....................................1 4 3 MCHN 1308. Basic Lathe.......................................................1 8 3 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER MCHN 1302. Print Reading for Machining Trades.......... 3 0 3 MCHN 1313. Basic Milling Operations................................1 7 3 MCHN 1358. Intermediate Lathe Operations.....................1 4 3 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communication, General............................................................ 3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER MCHN 1343. Machine Shop Mathematics..........................3 0 3 MCHN 1335. Grinders, Outside, Internal, Surface.............1 4 3 MCHN 2302. Intermediate Milling Operations..................1 7 3 MCHN 2344. Computerized Numerical Control Programming...................................................3 1 3 MCHN 2331. Operation of CNC Turning Centers.............1 7 3 FOURTH SEMESTER MCHN 2341. Advanced Machining I...................................3 1 3 MCHN 1352. Intermediate Machining I..............................1 4 3 MCHN 2334. Operation of CNC Machining Centers...... 1 7 3 MCHN 2345. Advanced Machining Operations II.............1 8 3 INMT 2388. Internship – Manufacturing Technology/ Technician (Capstone)....................................1 8 3 Total Semester Hours­for Certificate 57

Clock Hours 48 80 80 144 48 48 128 80 48 48 80 128 64 128 64 80 128 144 144

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: INDUSTRIAL MACHINING APPLIED TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours MCHN 1301. Beginning Machine Shop...............................3 0 3 48 MCHN 1338. Basic Machine Shop I......................................1 4 3 80

237


INDUSTRIAL MACHINING -INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MCHN 1341. Basic Machine Shop II....................................1 MCHN 1308. Basic Lathe.......................................................1 Mathematics or Natural Sciences Elective or COSC 1309......3 SECOND SEMESTER MCHN 1302. Print Reading for Machining Trades............3 MCHN 1313. Basic Milling Operations................................1 MCHN 1358. Intermediate Lathe Operations.....................1 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 THIRD SEMESTER MCHN 1343. Machine Shop Mathematics..........................3 MCHN 1335. Grinders, Outside, Internal, Surface.............1 MCHN 2302. Intermediate Milling Operations..................1 MCHN 2344. Computerized Numerical Control Programming...................................................3 MCHN 2331. Operation of CNC Turning Centers.............1 FOURTH SEMESTER MCHN 2341. Advanced Machining I...................................3 MCHN 1352. Intermediate Machining I..............................1 MCHN 2334. Operation of CNC Machining Centers...... 1 MCHN 2345. Advanced Machining Operations II.............1 INMT 2388. Internship – Manufacturing Technology/ Technician (Capstone)....................................1 FIFTH SEMESTER Social/Behavioral Sciences Elective...........................................3 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 Total Semester Hours­for Associate Degree

4 8 0

3 3 3

80 144 48

0 7 4 0

3 3 3 3

48 128 80 48

0 4 7

3 3 3

48 80 128

1 7

3 3

64 128

1 4 7 8

3 3 3 3

64 80 128 144

8

3

144

0 0 0

3 3 3 66

48 48 48

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

Information Technology Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology..........................................................(361) 698-1299

The Information Technology Career Foundation Certificate (ITCFC) represents the core knowledge for the Information Technology field. Today’s students are very mobile, and the ITCFC is a statewide recognized certificate with a network of articulation agreements that establishes the transferability between institutions. With this certificate, students would be able to start at one institution and then transfer to another institution that offers a specialized technical degree, such as biotechnology, bioinformatics, etc.to complete their education. Contact a CSE/ AT advisor for more information. CERTIFICATE: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CAREER FOUNDATION CORE (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers OR COSC 1301. Introduction to Computing...........................3 1 3 64

238


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ITSC 1405. Introduction to PC Operating Systems........3 ITSE 1402. Computer Programming OR COSC 1436. Programming Fundamentals I......................3 ENGL 1301. Composition I .................................................3 SECOND SEMESTER ITNW 1425. Fundamentals of Networking Technologies.....................................................3 ITSW 1407. Introduction to Database................................3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication.............................................. 3 ENGL 1302. Composition II.................................................3 THIRD SEMESTER ITSC 1325. Personal Computer Hardware......................2 ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.......................3 MATH 1314. College Algebra...............................................3 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective........................3 Total Semester Hours for Certificate

3

4

96

3 0

4 3

96 48

3 3

4 4

96 96

0 0

3 3

48 48

4 0 0 0

3 3 3 3 40

96 48 48 48

CERTIFICATE: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ESSENTIALS: NETWORK SUPPORT (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITSC 1191. Special Topics in Computer Information Sciences, General.......................1 0 1 16 ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers OR COSC 1301. Introduction to Computing...........................3 1 3 64 ITSC 1405. Introduction to PC Operating Systems........3 3 4 96 COSC 1309. Logic and Design.............................................2 3 3 80 ITCC 1401. Cisco Exploration I Network Fundamentals.................................3 3 4 96 SECOND SEMESTER ITSW 1407. Introduction to Database................................3 3 4 96 ITNW 2313. Networking Hardware...................................2 4 3 96 ITSC 1325. PC Hardware...................................................2 4 3 96 ITCC 1304. Cisco Exploration 2 - Routing Protocols and Concepts...................................................2 4 3 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 28

CERTIFICATE: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ESSENTIALS: DIGITAL MEDIA/WEB DEVELOPER (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITSC 1191. Special Topics in Computer Information Sciences, General.......................1 0 1 16 ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers OR COSC 1301. Introduction to Computing...........................3 1 3 64 ITSC 1405. Introduction to PC Operating Systems........3 3 4 96 COSC 1309. Logic and Design.............................................2 3 3 80

239


INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IMED 1301. Introduction to Digital Medial......................2 SECOND SEMESTER ITSE 2313. Web Authoring................................................2 IMED 1316. Web Design I....................................................2 ITSC 1325. PC Hardware...................................................2 IMED 1341. Interface Design...............................................2 Total Semester Hours for Certificate

4

3

96

4 4 4 4

3 3 3 3 26

96 96 96 96

CERTIFICATE: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ESSENTIALS: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITSC 1191. Special Topics in Computer Information Sciences, General.......................1 0 1 16 ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers OR COSC 1301. Introduction to Computing...........................3 1 3 64 ITSC 1405. Introduction to PC Operating Systems........3 3 4 96 COSC 1309. Logic and Design.............................................2 3 3 80 ITSC 1325. PC Hardware...................................................2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER ITSW 1407. Introduction to Database................................3 3 4 96 ITSE 1402. Computer Programming OR COSC 1436. Programming Fundamentals I......................3 3 4 96 ITSE 1432. Introduction to Visual Basic Net Programming...........................................3 3 4 96 MATH 1314. College Algebra...............................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 29

CERTIFICATE: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ESSENTIALS: GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITSC 1191. Special Topics in Computer Information Sciences, General.......................1 0 1 16 ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers OR COSC 1301. Introduction to Computing...........................3 1 3 64 ITSC 1405. Introduction to PC Operating Systems........3 3 4 96 COSC 1309. Logic and Design.............................................2 3 3 80 GISC 1311. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems.......................................2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER ITSW 1407. Introduction to Database................................3 3 4 96 GISC 1421. Introduction to Raster-based Geographic Information Systems.......................................3 3 4 96 ITSC 1325. PC Hardware...................................................2 4 3 96 GISC 2420. Intermediate Geographic Information Systems.......................................3 3 4 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 29

240


INTERACTIVE GAME TECHNOLOGY

Interactive Game Technology and Simulation Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology..........................................................(361) 698-1299 CERTIFICATE: INTERACTIVE GAME TECHNOLOGY AND SIMULATION (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec Lab Hrs. Hours COSC 1301. Introduction to Computing OR ITSC 1301. Introduction to Computers............................ 3 1 3 64 COSC 1309. Logic Design....................................................2 3 3 80 GAME 1304. Level Design....................................................2 4 3 96 IMED 1301. Introduction to Digital Media ......................2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER ARTV 1345. 3-D Modeling and Rendering I.....................2 4 3 96 GAME 1406. Design and Creation of Games.....................3 3 4 96 COSC 1436. Programming Fundamentals I OR ITSE 1402. Computer Programming.................................3 3 4 96 GAME or Simulation Elective*..................................................2-3 3-4 3-4 96 THIRD SEMESTER ENGL 1301. Composition I...................................................3 0 3 48 GAME or Simulation Elective*..................................................2-3 3-4 3-4 96 GAME 2459. Game/Simulation Group Project (Capstone)........................................................3 3 4 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 36-38

* Select one from the following: GAME 1494, 2341, 2402; 2433; RBTC 1305; COSC 2430; IMED 1491; ARTV 1351; or a programming course approved by the CSE/ AT department chair.

241


INTERNET DEVELOPER - JOURNALISM

Internet Developer SEE: DIGITAL MEDIA/INTERNET DEVELOPER

Interpreter Preparation SEE: AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE AND INTERPRETING

Journalism Department of Communications, Languages and Reading........(361) 698-1241 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: JOURNALISM (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication..............................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 COMM 1307. Introduction to Mass Communication.......3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 (Choose One of the Following:) COMM 2327. Principles of Advertising OR COMM 2330. Introduction to Public Relations...................3 0 3 (Choose One of the Following:) COMM 1336. Television Production I OR COMM 2331. Radio/Television Announcing OR COMM 2339. Writing for Radio,Television and Film.........3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER PHIL 2306. Introduction to Ethics....................................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 College-Level Mathematics Core Elective.................................3 0 3 COMM 2311. News Gathering and Writing I......................3 3 3 COMM 1129. News Publications I........................................0 3 1 COMM 1130. News Publications II.......................................0 3 1 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Constitution: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..........................3 0 3 COMM 2305. Editing and Layout ........................................3 0 3

242


JOURNALISM - KINESIOLOGY COMM 1316. COMM 2129. COMM 2130.

Basic News Photography...............................3 0 3 News Publications III OR News Publications IV.....................................0 3 1 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. * SPCH 1315 preferred. Completing the following courses fulfill the field of study curriculum for Journalism: 6-9 hours from COMM 1307, 2311, 2327 and 3-9 hours from COMM 1316, 2305, 2311, 2339. Completing COMM 1129, 1336, 2129 and 2311 meets requirements for basic computer skills. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to attend. In consultation with a department advisor, a specific degree plan will be completed.

Kinesiology Department of Kinesiology............................................................... (361) 698-1334 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: KINESIOLOGY (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 KINE 1306. First Aid............................................................3 0 3 KINE 1301. Foundations of Kinesiology...........................3 0 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport..........................................................2 1 2 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 College-Level Mathematics Core Elective.................................3 0 3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking..............3 0 3 KINE 1125. Recreational Activities....................................1 2 1 KINE 1304, 1308, 1337, 1346 or 2371 (select one)........................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective...................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 BIOL 1308. General Biology: Fundamentals of Cell Biology.....................3 0 3 KINE 2375. Nutrition and Health......................................3 0 3

243


KINESIOLOGY - LIBERAL ARTS KINE 1120 or 2120 Volleyball/Basketball, Beginning or Intermediate.............................1 2 1 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..........................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 DANC 2303. Dance Appreciation.......................................3 0 3 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 KINE 1304, 1308, 1321, 1337, 1346 or 2371 (select one).................................3 0 3 DANC/Yoga DANC 1141/1142, 1145/1146, 1147/1148, or 1151/1152, KINE 1115/2115, or KINE 1127/2127 (select one)........................................................1 2 1 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should demonstrate basic computer skills. Consult an advisor for appropriate courses. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

Law Enforcement SEE: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Legal Professions SEE: PARALEGAL

Liberal Arts Advising done by the Student Enrollment Center.....................(361) 698-1290 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE (Suggested Transfer Plan) Liberal Arts or Undeclared

. Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I ................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 Mathematics Core Elective ..........................................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..........................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective......................................................... 3 0 3

244


LIBERAL ARTS - MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective Lab..........................0 3 1 Speech Core Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315 or 1321)......................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective...................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport..........................................................2 1 2 Approved Electives........................................................................... 6 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 Approved Electives........................................................................... 12

Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree

60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

Machining SEE: INDUSTRIAL MACHINING APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

Management Development Department of Business Administration....................................(361) 698-1372

ALSO SEE: HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT Students have a choice of four AAS degree plans or four certificate plans. The programs incorporate education and training to prepare individuals for career paths with business, nonprofit organizations, governmental agencies, and academic institutions. MARKETABLE SKILLS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT: Supervision

. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours BMGT 1327. Principles of Management.............................3 0 3 48 HRPO 1311. Human Relations............................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1301. Supervision (Capstone)..................................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1303. Introduction to Accounting I.........................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Award 12

245


MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT CERTIFICATE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT Leadership Development (Suggested Occupational Plan) NOTE: This certificate is also offered as an online program. This certificate provides targeted training for individuals desiring to strengthen their leadership skills and may be credited toward AAS: General Management Specialization, AAS: Marketing Specialization, and AAS: Production and Logistics Management Specialization. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours BMGT 2305. Advanced Communications .........................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1327. Principles of Management.............................3 0 3 48 HRPO 1311. Human Relations............................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER BMGT 2303. Problem Solving and Decision Making (Capstone).........................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1341. Business Ethics................................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 2309. Leadership (Capstone)...................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 18

CERTIFICATE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT Small Business Management (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours BUSG 2309. Small Business Management/ Entrepreneurship............................................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1303. Introduction to Accounting I.........................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I...............2 4 3 96 HRPO 1311. Human Relations............................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER BMGT 1301. Supervision (Capstone)..................................3 0 3 48 BUSG 1341. Small Business Financing...............................3 0 3 48 Elective Select from BMGT, MRKG, or BUSI courses....................................................3 0 3 48 MRKG 1311. Principles of Marketing (Capstone)..............3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 24

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT General Management Specialization (Suggested Occupational Plan) This degree is designed to provide the skills and knowledge needed to enter the job market or advance in management positions. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1327. Principles of Management.............................3 0 3 48

246


MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT BMGT 2305. Advanced Communications .........................3 0 3 48 BUSI 1301. Business Principles..........................................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I...............2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 48 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication..............................................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1303. Introduction to Accounting I.........................3 0 3 48 HRPO 1311. Human Relations............................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1341. Business Ethics................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.....................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1301. Supervision......................................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1321. Business Math..................................................3 0 3 48 MRKG 1311. Principles of Marketing..................................3 0 3 48 Elective Mathematics or Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective...................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER Elective Creative Arts or Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective.............................3 0 3 48 Business Elective (ECON 2302 Microeconomics OR IBUS 1305 Introduction to International Business)...................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 2309. Leadership (Capstone)...................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1174. Seminar.............................................................1 0 1 16 BMGT 1264. Practicum-Operations Management and Supervision (Capstone)..........................0 18 2 288 BMGT 2341. Strategic Management (Capstone)...............3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours足for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. CERTIFICATE: LEGAL ASSISTANT (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec Lab Hrs. Hours POFI 2301. Word Processing..............................................2 2 3 80 POFI 1349. Spreadsheets....................................................3 0 3 48 LGLA 1311. Introduction to Law .......................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1301. Business English..............................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER . POFT 1319. Records and Information Management (Fall Only)................................3 0 3 48 LGLA 1317. Law Office Technology...................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 2305. Advanced Communications..........................3 0 3 48 POFT 1309. Administrative Office Procedures I..............3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER......................................................................... LGLA 2307. Law Office Management................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1174. Seminar.............................................................1 0 1 16 POFT 1264 Practicum-Administrative Assistant/ Secretarial Science, General (Capstone).......0 14 2 224 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 30

247


MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT: Administrative-Legal Option (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem Clock. FIRST SEMESTER Lec Lab Hrs. Hours LGLA 1317. Law Office Technology...................................3 0 3 48 POFI 2301. Word Processing ...........................................2 3 3 64 HRPO 1311. Human Relations............................................3 0 3 48 LGLA 1311. Introduction to Law........................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1301. Business English..............................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER..................................................................... POFI 1349. Spreadsheets....................................................2 2 3 64 BUSI 1301. Business Principles..........................................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 2305. Advanced Communications .........................3 0 3 48 Mathematics/Natural Science Elective.......................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER......................................................................... POFT 1309. Administrative Office Procedures I..............3 0 3 48 POFI 2350. Databases..........................................................2 2 3 64 LGLA 2307. Law Office Management................................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1311. Introduction to Computerized Accounting.......................................................3 0 3 48 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication..............................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER..................................................................... POFT 1349. Administrative Office Procedures II (Fall Only)................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1319. Records and Information Management I (Fall Only)..............................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1174. Seminar.............................................................1 0 1 16 POFT 2264. Practicum-Administrative Assistant/ Secretarial Science, General (Capstone).......0 20 2 320 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 60

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT Administrative Specialization (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours POFI 2301. Word Processing..............................................2 2 3 64 POFT 1301. Business English..............................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1309. Administrative Office Procedures I .............3 0 3 48 POFI 1349. Spreadsheets....................................................2 2 3 64 POFT 1321. Business Math..................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER POFI 2350. Databases..........................................................2 2 3 64 POFT 1349. Administrative Office Procedures II (Fall Only)................................3 0 3 48

248


MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT BMGT 2305. Advanced Communications In Management...............................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1319. Records and Information Management I (Fall Only)..............................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1311. Introduction to Computerized Accounting.......................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 BUSI 1301. Business Principles..........................................3 0 3 48 HRPO 1311. Human Relations............................................3 0 3 48 Creative Arts or Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective....................................3 0 3 48 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication..............................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER Mathematics or Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective...................................................3 0 3 48 American History or Government or Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..............3 0 3 48 BMGT 1341. Business Ethics................................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1174. Seminar.............................................................1 0 1 16 POFT 2264. Practicum - Administrative Assistant/ Secretarial Science, General (Capstone).......0 20 2 320 BMGT 2341. Strategic Management (Capstone)...............3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

CERTIFICATE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT Logistics and Supply Chain Management (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours POFT 1321. Business Math..................................................3 0 3 48 LMGT 1319. Introduction to Business Logistics................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1327. Principles of Management.............................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I...............2 4 3 96 LMGT 1321. Introduction to Materials Handling.............3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER POFT 1301. Business English..............................................3 0 3 48 LMGT 1325. Warehouse and Distribution Center Management....................................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1331. Production and Operations Management...3 0 3 48 LMGT 1349. Materials Requirement Planning..................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1174. Seminar.............................................................1 0 1 16 BMGT 1264. Practicum-Operations Management and Supervision (Capstone)..........................0 18 2 288 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 30

MARKETABLE SKILLS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours LMGT 1319. Introduction to Business Logistics................3 0 3 48 LMGT 1321. Introduction to Materials Handling.............3 0 3 48

249


MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT LMGT 1325. Warehouse and Distribution Center Management....................................................3 LMGT 1349. Materials Requirement Planning..................3 Total Semester Hours for Award

0 0

3 3 12

48 48

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT Production and Logistics Management Specialization (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 POFT 1321. Business Math..................................................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I...............2 4 3 96 BMGT 1327. Principles of Management.............................3 0 3 48 LMGT 1319. Introduction to Business Logistics................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 48 Math Elective (Select from College-level Math)......................3 0 3 48 ACNT 1303. Introduction to Accounting I.........................3 0 3 48 LMGT 1321. Introduction to Materials Handling.............3 0 3 48 HRPO 2301. Human Resources Management OR HRPO 1311. Human Relations............................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication..............................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER BMGT 1309. Information and Project Management.........3 0 3 48 LMGT 1325. Warehouse and Distribution Center Management ...................................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 1331. Production and Operations Management...3 0 3 48 BMGT 1264. Practicum-Operations Management and Supervision......................................................0 18 2 288 BMGT 1174. Seminar.............................................................1 0 1 16 Humanities/Visual and Performing Arts Elective...................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER LMGT 1349. Materials Requirement Planning..................3 0 3 48 BMGT 2309. Leadership (Capstone)...................................3 0 3 48 ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.....................3 0 3 48 BMGT 2268. Practicum-Business Administration and Management, General....................................0 18 2 288 Elective (Select from POFT 1301, MRKG 1311, BMGT 1301, BUSI 1301 )................................3 0 3 48 BMGT 2303. Problem Solving and Decision Making (Capstone)........................................................3 0 3 48

Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree

65

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. 250


MARKETING - MATHEMATICS

Marketing SEE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT

Mathematics Department of Mathematics.......................................................(361) 698-1238 ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE: MATHEMATICS (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. MATH 1314. College Algebra 3 0 3 MATH 1316. Plane Trigonometry.......................................3 0 3 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective .................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER MATH 2413. Calculus I..........................................................4 0 4 MATH 1324. Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences I OR MATH 1342. Elementary Statistical Methods..................3 0 3 ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United History States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective (3 hour course)......3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER MATH 2414. Calculus II........................................................4 0 4 Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective, (Sophomore Level).........................................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics OR Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective (3 hour course)................................................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER MATH 2415. Calculus III.......................................................4 0 4 MATH 2320. Differential Equations.....................................3 0 3 GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 Electives to total 3 hours: Natural Science Lab, Speech, ENGR 2304 Programming for Engineers, Computer Science, KINE 2375 Nutrition and Health.....................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60 Minimum 60 semester hours required for AS Degree.

Courses in bold type satisfy the Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which 251


MATHEMATICS - MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY they plan to transfer. Students are encouraged to take College Algebra, MATH 1314 and Plane Trigonometry, MATH 1316 while in high school as dual credit courses or during the summer prior to their Fall enrollment.

Medical PRE-MEDICAL: SEE PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH

Medical Laboratory Technology Department of Allied Health......................................................(361) 698-2820

The Medical Laboratory Technology curriculum leads to the Associate in Applied Science degree. Program objectives are: • to educate medical laboratory technicians to perform routine clinical laboratory tests as the primary analyst making specimen oriented decisions and predetermined criteria, including a working knowledge of critical values, and • to educate medical laboratory technicians in accordance with the standards of the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, 5600 N. River Road Suite 720, Rosemont, IL 60018, (773) 714-8880. The Medical Laboratory Technology program is offered in cooperation with local pathologists, hospitals, the Community Blood Bank, and other health service agencies. A committee made up of members representing the above agencies and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi functions as advisors for the program. Any or all of the general education courses listed in the curriculum may be taken prior to admission to the program. However, MATH 1314 and either ENGL 1301, BIOL 1406, or BIOL 2401 must be completed prior to the fall semester in which the student enters the program. If an applicant elects to complete BIOL 2401 or BIOL 1406 first, the applicant must be eligible for ENGL 1301 prior to enrolling in the program. Students who have failed any Medical Laboratory Technology course will be permitted to re-enter the program, if space is available, one additional time. In addition to the general admission requirements of the College and the health sciences programs, in order to be considered for admission into the Medical Laboratory Technology Program, the applicant must complete the following: • submit a Medical Laboratory Technology Application and all required admission documentation by July 15. •  submit all college transcripts showing evidence of completion or of current enrollment in prerequisite courses •  have a minimum grade point average of 2.0 overall •  must be on college level in Reading, English, and Math •  must schedule an interview with the program director Students who are able to complete prerequisite courses during the second summer semester may be eligible for conditional acceptance. Students will be notified of their admission status by August 1. 252


MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY After program acceptance and prior to the first class day, the student must submit a completed physical examination which includes the complete Hepatitis B series, a current college transcript and a current card of completion in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for Health Care Providers which must be maintained throughout the program. Prior to beginning clinicals, the student must pass a background check and drug screen test, at student’s expense, for security clearance and continued enrollment in the program. Opportunities for Certified Laboratory Assistants and Medical Laboratory Technicians who wish to register for continuing education purposes may be accepted on a space-available basis for MLT non-clinical courses. Interested students should contact the MLT faculty for additional information. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock PREREQUISITES: Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours HPRS 1106. Essentials of Medical Terminology...............1 1 1 32 HPRS 1204. Basic Health Profession Skills.......................1 3 2 64 MATH 1314. College Algebra..............................................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 FIRST SEMESTER MLAB 1201. Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science..........................................1 4 2 80 MLAB 1415. Hematology.....................................................3 4 4 112 CHEM 1411. General Inorganic Chemistry I......................3 3 4 96 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I.............3 3 4 96 SECOND SEMESTER MLAB 2434. Microbiology....................................................3 4 4 112 PLAB 1223. Phlebotomy......................................................1 4 2 80 MLAB 1227. Coagulation......................................................1 4 2 80 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 MLAB 1335. Immunology/Serology..................................2 4 3 96 THIRD SEMESTER MLAB 2260. Clinical–Medical Laboratory Technician.....0 9 2 144 MLAB 2261. Clinical–Medical Laboratory Technician.....0 9 2 144 MLAB 2331. Immunohematology.......................................2 4 3 96 FOURTH SEMESTER MLAB 1211. Urinalysis and Body Fluids...........................1 4 2 80 MLAB 1231. Parasitology/Mycology.................................1 4 2 80 MLAB 2401. Clinical Chemistry..........................................3 4 4 112 MLAB 2362. Clinical–Medical Laboratory Technician.....0 18 3 288 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 MLAB 2271. Instrumental Analysis....................................1 4 2 80 MLAB 2363. Clinical–Medical Laboratory Technician.....0 18 3 288 MLAB 2338. Advanced Topics in Medical Laboratory Technician.........................................................3 0 3 48 ® POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 2 3 48 Total Semester Hours­for Associate Degree 72

253


MEDICAL LABORATORY - MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES ® Bridge Courses Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

Medical Technology SEE: PRE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY

Mexican-American Studies

Division of Arts and Sciences.....................................................(361) 698-1218 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: MEXICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. SPAN 2311. Intermediate Spanish I...................................3 0 3 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 HUMA 1305. Introduction to Mexican-American Studies............................3 0 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport..........................................................2 1 2 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 Mathematics Core Elective...........................................................3 0 3 HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I…………….....3 0 3 SPAN 2312. Intermediate Spanish II..................................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective .........................................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 GOVT 2311. Mexican-American Politics............................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 HUMA 1311. Mexican-American Fine Arts Appreciation...................................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 ENGL 2351. Mexican-American Literature......................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective Lab……………......0 3 1 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..........................3 0 3 Speech Core Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315, or 1321).....................3 0 3

Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree

60

Courses in bold type satisfy the Del Mar College Core Curriculum. 254


MULTIMEDIA/INTERNET DEVELOPER - MUSIC

Multimedia/Internet Developer SEE: DIGITAL MEDIA/MULTIMEDIA DEVELOPER

Music Department of Music..................................................................(361) 698-1211 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: APPLIED MUSIC/MUSIC EDUCATION — INSTRUMENTAL (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 MUAP 1200s. Principal Instrument.......................................0 2 2 MUSI 1181. Piano I...............................................................1 1 1 MUSI 1211. Music Theory I.................................................3 0 2 MUSI 1216. Sight Singing/Ear Training I.........................3 0 2 *MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 Music or Core Elective...............................................................0-3 1/2-6 1-3 SECOND SEMESTER Communications ..........................................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 MUAP 1200s. Principal Instrument.......................................0 2 2 MUSI 1182. Piano II..............................................................1 1 1 MUSI 1212. Music Theory II...............................................3 0 2 MUSI 1217. Sight Singing/Ear Training II........................3 0 2 *MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 +Music or Core Elective.............................................................0-3 1⁄2-6 1-3 THIRD SEMESTER MATH 1314. College Algebra OR MATH 1342. Elementary Statistical Methods..................3 0 3 MUAP 2200s. Principal Instrument.......................................0 2 2 MUSI 2181. Piano III............................................................1 1 1 MUSI 2211. Music Theory III..............................................3 0 2 MUSI 2216. Sight Singing/Ear Training III......................3 0 2 *MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 MUSI 1307. Music Literature.............................................3 0 3 +Music or Core Elective.............................................................0-3 1⁄2- 6 1-3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 Core Elective ...........................................................................6 0-4 6 MUAP 2200s. Principal Instrument.......................................0 2 2 MUSI 2182. Piano IV............................................................1 1 1 MUSI 2212. Music Theory IV..............................................3 0 2 MUSI 2217. Sight Singing/Ear Training IV......................3 0 2 *MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 +Music or Core Elective.............................................................0-3 1⁄2-6 1-3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60-68

255


MUSIC Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students must demonstrate use of basic computer skills through MUSI 1216, 1217, 2216, and 2217. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. Students who have piano as their major instrument may omit MUSI 1181, 1182, 2181, and 2182. Keyboard majors should be continuously enrolled in MUEN 1136 (piano accompanying). +MUAP 1100 series, MUSI 1162, 1163, 1186, 1187, 1304; MUEN 1128-1134, 11371139 or 1151-1152. ++ ENGL 1302, SPCH 1311, 1315, or 1321 * Guitar majors may substitute MUEN 1135 for the Major Ensemble requirement. Piano majors may substitute MUEN 1136 for the Major Ensemble requirement. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: APPLIED MUSIC/MUSIC EDUCATION - VOCAL (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 MUAP 1281. Voice I................................................................0 2 2 MUSI 1181. Piano I...............................................................1 1 1 MUSI 1211. Music Theory I.................................................3 0 2 MUSI 1216. Sight Singing/Ear Training I.........................3 0 2 MUSI 1162. Diction..............................................................2 0 1 *MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 SECOND SEMESTER Communications ...........................................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 MUAP 1282. Voice II..............................................................0 2 2 MUSI 1182. Piano II..............................................................1 1 1 MUSI 1212. Music Theory II...............................................3 0 2 MUSI 1217. Sight Singing/Ear Training II........................3 0 2 MUSI 1165. Diction..............................................................2 0 1 *MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 +Music or Core Elective.............................................................0-3 1â „2- 6 1-3 THIRD SEMESTER GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 MATH 1314. College Algebra OR MATH 1342. Elementary Statistical Methods..................3 0 3 MUAP 2281. Voice III.............................................................0 2 2 MUSI 2181. Piano III............................................................1 1 1 MUSI 2211. Music Theory III..............................................3 0 2 MUSI 2216. Sight Singing/Ear Training III......................3 0 2 *MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 MUSI 1307. Music Literature.............................................3 0 3

256


MUSIC FOURTH SEMESTER Core Elective ...........................................................................3 0-4 3-4 MUAP 2282. Voice IV.............................................................0 2 2 MUSI 2182. Piano IV............................................................1 1 1 MUSI 2212. Music Theory IV..............................................3 0 2 MUSI 2217. Sight Singing/Ear Training IV......................3 0 2 *MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 +Music or Core Elective.............................................................0-3 1⁄2- 6 1-3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60-65

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students must demonstrate use of basic computer skills through MUSI 1216, 1217, 2216, and 2217. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. +MUAP 1100 series, MUSI 1162, 1163, 1186, 1187, 1304; MUEN 1128-1134, 11371139 or 1151-1152. * Guitar majors may substitute MUEN 1135 for the Major Ensemble requirement. Piano majors may substitute MUEN 1136 for the Major Ensemble requirement. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: MUSIC THEORY AND COMPOSITION (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 MUAP 1200s. Principal Instrument or Voice........................0 2 2 MUSI 1181. Piano I...............................................................0 1 1 MUSI 1186. Composition.....................................................0 1⁄2 1 MUSI 1211. Music Theory I.................................................3 0 2 MUSI 1216. Sight Singing/Ear Training I.........................3 0 2 *MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 SECOND SEMESTER Communications ..........................................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 MUAP 1200s. Principal Instrument or Voice........................0 2 2 MUSI 1182. Piano II..............................................................1 1 1 MUSI 1187. Composition.....................................................0 1⁄2 1 MUSI 1212. Music Theory II...............................................3 0 2 MUSI 1217. Sight Singing/Ear Training II........................3 0 2 * MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 THIRD SEMESTER Core Elective ...........................................................................3 0-4 3-4 MATH 1314. College Algebra OR MATH 1342. Elementary Statistical Methods..................3 0 3 MUAP 2200s. Principal Instrument or Voice........................0 2 2 MUSI 2181. Piano III............................................................1 1 1 MUSI 2211. Music Theory III..............................................3 0 2 MUSI 2216. Sight Singing/Ear Training III......................3 0 2

257


MUSIC *MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 MUSI 1307. Music Literature.............................................3 0 3 +Music or Core Elective.............................................................0-3 1⁄2 - 6 1-3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 MUAP 2200s. Principal Instrument or Voice........................0 2 2 MUSI 2182. Piano IV............................................................1 1 1 MUSI 2212. Music Theory IV..............................................3 0 2 MUSI 2217. Sight Singing/Ear Training IV......................3 0 2 *MUEN Ensemble..........................................................0 5-6 1 +Music or Core Elective.............................................................0-3 1⁄2- 6 1-3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60-65

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students must demonstrate use of basic computer skills through MUSI 1216, 1217, 2216, and 2217. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. +MUAP 1100 series, MUSI 1162, 1163, 1186, 1187, 1304; MUEN 1128-1134, 11371139 or 1151-1152. * Guitar majors may substitute MUEN 1135 for the Major Ensemble requirement. Piano majors may substitute MUEN 1136 for the Major Ensemble requirement.

Sound Recording Technology

The Associate in Applied Science degree in Sound Recording Technology (SRT) prepares students for jobs that intersect the skills used in audio recording, live sound, film/video and post-production, music retail and small business ownership. This includes the operation of equipment and software used in studio recording and mixing, live venue console operation and sound reinforcement systems, non-linear video editing and skills needed to operate a personal business related to the aforementioned fields. Strong emphasis is placed on technical ability and knowledge, aural skills and listening, creative problem solving and musical understanding. All SRT students must complete courses in music theory, piano, ear training, directed business electives and an applied instrument (or voice) in addition to the music technology specific classes. Students must pass all MUSI and MUSC classes with a ‘C’ or better to advance to the next level or count as a prerequisite. The objectives for the Certificate in Sound Recording Business are more focused than the full AAS and the coursework is streamlined. The curriculum for the certificate directs the education of the student toward a small business ownership in music; primarily a project-oriented recording studio or for knowledge relevant for music retail.

258


MUSIC ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: SOUND RECORDING TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I ................................................3 0 3 MATH 1314. College Algebra .............................................3 0 3 Choose from MUAP 1200 series Principal Instrument or Voice* .....................................................0 1 2 **** MUSI 1181. Piano I...................................................................1 1 1 MUSI 1211. Music Theory I ................................................3 0 2 MUSI 1216. Sight Singing/Ear Training I ........................3 0 2 MUSC 1327. Audio Engineering I ......................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER Choose from MUAP 1200 series Principal Instrument or Voice* .....................................................0 1 2 **** MUSI 1182. Piano II.................................................................1 1 1 MUSI 1212. Music Theory II ..............................................3 0 2 MUSI 1217. Sight Singing/Ear Training II .......................3 0 2 MUSC 2327. Audio Engineering II .....................................2 3 3 MUSC 1331. MIDI I ...............................................................3 1 3 THIRD SEMESTER ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics ....................3 0 3 MUSB 2355. Legal Aspects -Entertainment Ind. ..............3 0 3 Choose from MUAP 2200 series Principal Instrument or Voice* .....................................................0 1 2 MUSC 1213. Commercial Music Theory I..........................2 0 2 MUSI 1306. Music Appreciation ......................................3 0 3 MUSC 1405. Live Sound ......................................................3 2 4 FOURTH SEMESTER SPCH 1318. Interpersonal Communication ...................3 0 3 Choose from MUAP 2200 series Principal Instrument or Voice*......................................................0 1 2 MUSC 2351. Audio for Video ..............................................3 1 3 Business Elective ** ......................................................................3 0 3 MUSC 2347. Audio Engineering III (Capstone)*** ...........2 4 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Clock Hrs. 48 48 16 32 48 48 48 16 32 48 48 80 64 48 48 16 32 48 80 48 16 64 48 96

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. * Students are required to register for 2 sections of MUAP per semester. ** BUSG 1341, 2309, BMGT 2309 or MRKG 1311 *** Audio Engineering III is denoted as the capstone course for the degree. **** Students with advanced piano skills who choose to have piano count as their MUAP instrument may be exempt from Piano I, II, and/or III. This is dependent upon successfully passing a live audition with the piano faculty and must take place at the beginning of the student’s degree. Students who are exempted from Piano I, II, and/or III will substitute a 3 credit hour elective approved by their advisor and the Department Chair.

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MUSIC - NETWORKING ADMINISTRATION CERTIFICATE: SOUND RECORDING BUSINESS - LEVEL I (Suggested Occupational Plan)

. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. SPCH 1318. Interpersonal Communication .....................3 Directed Business Elective ** ........................................................3 Choose from MUAP 1100 series - Principal Instrument or Voice* ...........................................................................0 *** MUSI 1181. Piano I ..............................................................1 MUSI 1211. Music Theory I ................................................3 MUSC 1327. Audio Engineering I ......................................3 MUSC 1331. MIDI I ...............................................................3 SECOND SEMESTER MUSB 2355. Legal Aspects -Entertainment Industry ......3 MUSI 1306. Music Appreciation ........................................3 MUSC 2327. Audio Engineering II .....................................2 Choose from MUAP 1100 series Principal Instrument or Voice* .....................................................0 *** MUSI 1182 Piano II .............................................................1 MUSI 1212 Music Theory II ..............................................3 Total Semester Hours for Certificate:

Sem. Lab Hrs. 0 3 0 3

Clock Hrs. 48 48

1 1 0 0 1

2 1 2 3 3

16 32 48 48 64

0 0 3

3 3 3

48 48 80

1 1 0

2 1 2 31

16 32 48

* Students are required to register for two (2) sections of MUAP 1100s per semester ** BUSG 1341, 2309, BMGT 2309 or MRKG 1311 *** Students with advanced piano skills who choose to have piano count as their MUAP instrument may be exempt from Piano I, II, and/or III. This is dependent upon successfully passing a live audition with the piano faculty and must take place at the beginning of the student’s degree. Students who are exempted from Piano I, II, and/or III will substitute a 3 credit hour elective approved by their advisor and the Department Chair.

Networking Administration and Informations Security Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology..........................................................(361) 698-1299

ALSO SEE: PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS The Network Support and Administration Emphasis offers the student the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to perform as a network administrator or as a networking support specialist in a networked business environment. “Hands on” experience in hardware, network operating system, systems administration, and protocol labs are emphasized. A firm foundation in networking/telecommunication theory is also provided.

260


NETWORKING ADMINISTRATION CERTIFICATE: NETWORKING TECHNOLOGYCISCO (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITSC 1405. Introduction to PC Operating Systems........3 3 4 96 ITCC 1401. Cisco Exploration I – Network Fundamentals..................................................3 3 4 96 ITNW 2313. Networking Hardware...................................2 4 3 96 ITCC 1304. Cisco Exploration 2 – Routing Protocols and Concepts..................................2 4 3 96 ITCC 2308. Cisco Exploration 3 – LAN Switching and Wireless..................................2 4 3 96 ITCC 2310. Cisco Exploration 4 – Accessing the WAN...........................................................2 4 3 96 ITSC 1358. UNIX System Administration I.....................2 4 3 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 23

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS Networking Technology Specialization: Network Administration and Information Security Emphasis

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITCC 1401. Exploration I-Network Fundamentals.........3 3 4 96 ITSC 1358. UNIX System Administration I.....................2 4 3 96 ITSY 1300. Fundamentals of Information Security........2 4 3 96 ITSE 1359 Introduction to Scripting Languages...........2 4 3 96 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 1 3 64 SECOND SEMESTER ITCC 1304. Cisco Exploration 2 – Routing Protocols and Concepts..................................2 4 3 96 ITSY 2301 Firewalls and Network Security...................2 4 3 96 ITNW 1354. Implementing and Supporting Servers.......2 4 3 96 ITNW 2313. Networking Hardware...................................2 4 3 96 MATH 1314. College Algebra...............................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER ITCC 2308 Cisco Exploration 3 - Lan Switching and Wireless.............................................................2 4 3 96 ITCC 2310 Cisco Exploration 4 - Accessing the WAN...2 4 3 96 ITSE 1303 Introduction to MySQL..................................2 3 3 80 ITNW 1313 Computer Virtualization................................2 4 3 96 SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communications............................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER ITSY 2330 Intrusion Detection.........................................2 4 3 96 ITSE 1350. Systems Analysis and Design........................2 4 3 96 ITSC 2286. Internship - Computer and Information Science, General (Capstone)..........................0 10 2 160 ECON 2301. Principles of Macroeconomics.....................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree.. 60

261


NETWORKING ADMINISTRATION Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Students enrolled in Computer Information Systems and Advanced Technology certificates and/or AAS degree programs should complete the CIS Foundations (MSA) award or have documented evidence of college-level course work or industry experience including basic keyboarding skills. Courses in CIS Foundations (MSA) award provide foundational knowledge and skills necessary for student success in Level I or higher certificates and Associate in Applied Science degrees. ENHANCED SKILLS CERTIFICATE: LAN TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan) There is a limit on the number of certificates which may be earned by a student. Check with the Chairperson of the Department of Computer Science, Engineering and Advanced Technology for allowable combinations of certificates and AAS degrees. ITSC 1358. UNIX System Administration I.....................2 ITNW 2313. Networking Hardware...................................2 ITNW 1425. Fundamentals of Networking Technologies.....................................................3 ITNW 1454. Implementing and Supporting Servers.......3 Total Semester Hours for Certificate

4 4

3 3

96 96

3 3

4 4 14

96 96

MARKETABLE SKILLS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD – NETWORK TECHNICIAN – BASIC (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours ITSC 1305. Intro to PC Operating Systems…………….. 2 3 3 80 ITSC 1325. PC Hardware.………………………………..2 4 3 96 ITNW 1425. Fundamentals of Networking Technologies…….............................................3 3 4 96 ITNW 1454. Implementing and Supporting Servers…...3 3 4 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 14

MARKETABLE SKILLS ACHIEVEMENT AWARD – SECURITY TECHNICIAN – BASIC (Suggested Occupational Plan)

. .Lec. Lab ITSC 1305 PC Operating Systems……………………....2 3 ITSY 1300 Fundamentals of Information Security …...2 4 ITSY 1342 Information Technology Security………….2 3 ITNW 1425 Fundamentals of Networking Technologies…….............................................3 3 Total Semester Hours for Certificate

262

Sem. Hrs. 3 3 3

Clock Hours 80 96 80

4 13

96


NONCREDIT - NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING TECHNOLOGY

Noncredit Programs SEE: CONTINUING EDUCATION AND NONCREDIT PROGRAMS

Nondestructive Testing Technology Department of Technology Education........................................(361) 698-1701 CERTIFICATE: NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours NDTE 1471. Introduction to NDT/Codes and Standards..................................................4 0 4 64 NDTE 1410. Liquid Penetrant/Mag Particle (MT/PT Level I)..............................................2 6 4 128 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER NDTE 2571. Advanced Liquid Penetrant/Mag Particle (MT/PT Level II).............................................3 6 5 144 NDTE 1405. Introduction to Ultrasonic Testing (UT Level I)......................................................2 6 4 128 THIRD SEMESTER NDTE 1340. Eddy Current Testing (ET Level I)................2 4 3 96 NDTE 1371. Introduction to Radiation Safety (Industrial Radiation Safety).........................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER NDTE 2401. Advanced Ultrasonics Testing (UT Level II).....................................................2 6 4 128 NDTE 2572. Advanced Eddy Current Testing (ET Level II)......................................................3 5 5 128 NDTE 2473. Advanced Radiography (RT Level I)...........2 7 4 144 FIFTH SEMESTER NDTE 2474. Industrial Radiography Testing (RT Level II).....................................................2 7 4 144 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 46

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours METL 1301. Introduction to Metallurgy............................3 0 3 48 NDTE 1471. Introduction to NDT/Codes and Standards..................................................4 0 4 64 NDTE 1410. Liquid Penetrant/Mag Particle (MT/PT Level I)..............................................2 6 4 128 NDTE 2311. Preparation for Welding Inspection.............3 0 3 48

263


NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING TECHNOLOGY - NUCLEAR MEDICINE SECOND SEMESTER NDTE 2571. Advanced Liquid Penetrant/Mag Particle (MT/PT Level II).............................................3 6 5 144 NDTE 1405. Introduction to Ultrasonic Testing (UT Level I)......................................................2 6 4 128 CPMT 2333. Computer Integration.....................................1 6 3 112 THIRD SEMESTER NDTE 1340. Eddy Current Testing (ET Level I)................2 4 3 96 NDTE 2401. Advanced Ultrasonic (UT Level II)..............2 6 4 128 Mathematics Elective.....................................................................3 0 3 48 NDTE 1371. Introduction to Radiation Safety (Industrial Radiation Safety).........................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER NDTE 2572. Advanced Eddy Current Testing (ET Level II)......................................................3 5 5 128 NDTE 2473. Advanced Radiography (RT Level I)...........2 7 4 144 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 NDTE 2474. Industrial Radiography Testing (RT Level II).....................................................2 7 4 144 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 64

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum.

Nuclear Medicine Department of Dental and Imaging Technology........................(361) 698-2858

The Nuclear Medicine Technology Program combines academic study with clinical laboratory experience at affiliated hospitals. Graduates of the program may find employment in the areas of nuclear imaging, nuclear cardiology, radiopharmacy, and radiation quality control. A Nuclear Medicine Technologist, skilled in the diagnostic and therapeutic use of radiopharmaceuticals, is a health care professional who either gives these materials to a patient orally or who injects these materials into a patient’s bloodstream so the materials will concentrate in a specific organ or system of the individual. The technologist measures the structure and function of an organ in the body through photography with scintillation cameras and computers. Del Mar College is an open admissions college; however, acceptance into the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program is by selection. Positions in this program are limited, so program faculty are not able to accept all applicants into the program who meet basic admission requirements. Admissions decisions will be made on the applicant’s ranking through a point system. A student seeking entry into Nuclear Medicine Technology Program must file a specific program application form and complete additional admission procedures as required. Students may not take any of the major NMTT courses until accepted into the program. A graduate of the Program who earns an Associate in Applied Science Degree 264


NUCLEAR MEDICINE is eligible to take the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Examination and/or the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) exam. To practice in Texas, a Nuclear Medicine Technologist must be certified by the Texas Department of Health. A graduate of the program is eligible to receive a 1-year temporary certificate from the state. Eligibility for certification by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) includes the following: Candidates must comply with the Rules of Ethics contained in the ARRT Standards of Ethics. One issue addressed by the Rules of Ethics is the conviction of a crime, including a felony, a gross misdemeanor or a misdemeanor with the sole exception of speeding and parking violations. For additional information, contact ARRT, 1255 Northland Drive, St.Paul, MN 55120-1155; (651) 687-0048. In addition to the requirements of the College, applicants must provide the following information to the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program office before March 1 of the year admission is desired, and meet the following requirements: •  completed Nuclear Medicine Technology Program application portfolio; •  supply the Nuclear Medicine Technology Program and the Registrar’s Office with official copies of high school or GED transcripts and college transcripts; •  have a minimum grade point average of 2.0 •  Hospital Site Visit documentation form properly signed and dated •  be eligible to make application to take the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board exam and/or the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist (Nuclear) exam If admitted into the program, a background check and drug testing is required as mandated by our accrediting agency and clinical affiliates. A physical exam and current CPR card must be submitted prior to the first day of class. Contact the program office for further information at (361) 698-2830. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock Prerequisites: Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. HPRS 1106. Essentials of Medical Terminology...............1 1 1 32 HPRS 1204. Basic Health Profession Skills.......................1 3 2 64 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 ENG 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 SCIT 1420. Physics for Allied Health OR........................3 3 4 96 PHYS 1305 Introductory Physics I AND.........................3 0 3 48 PHYS 1105 Laboratory for Physics I.................................0 3 1 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 Mathematics Elective (Level 3)....................................................3 0 3 48 Visual or Performing Arts Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 FIRST SEMESTER NMTT 1301. Introduction to Nuclear Medicine................2 3 3 80 NMTT 1313. Nuclear Medicine Physics..............................2 3 3 80

265


NUCLEAR MEDICINE - NURSING NMTT 1266. Nuclear Medicine Technology Practicum I.......................................................0 16 2 256 CHEM 1406. Basic Chemistry...............................................3 3 4 96 SECOND SEMESTER NMTT 2301. Radiochemistry and Radiopharmacy..........2 3 3 80 NMTT 2309. Nuclear Medicine and Methodology II.......2 3 3 80 NMTT 1267. Nuclear Medicine Technology Practicum II......................................................0 16 2 256 BIOL 2402. Anatomy and Physiology II.........................3 3 4 96 THIRD SEMESTER NMTT 1309. Nuclear Medicine Instrumentation..............2 3 3 80 NMTT 2266. Nuclear Medicine Technology Practicum III....................................................0 16 2 256 FOURTH SEMESTER NMTT 2313. Nuclear Medicine Methodology III..............2 3 3 80 NMTT 2366. Nuclear Medicine Technology Practicum IV....................................................0 24 3 384 FIFTH SEMESTER NMTT 2235. Nuclear Medicine Technology Seminar (Capstone).........................................1 4 2 80 NMTT 2367. Nuclear Medicine Technology Practicum V......................................................0 24 3 384 NMTT 2333. Advanced PET and Fusion Technology.......2 3 3 80 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 69

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

Nursing Department of Nurse Education.................................................(361) 698-2860

ALSO SEE: CONTINUING EDUCATION AND NONCREDIT PROGRAMS - HEALTH CARE The Department of Nurse Education (DNE) faculty values lifelong learning by offering multiple-entry points into the program (Multiple Entry/Exit Program, or MEEP). The DNE statement of purpose is to provide an accredited curriculum that facilitates students’ educational and career choices and encourages life-long learning and encourages progression to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Master of Science in Nursing. The DMC DNE faculty is committed to removing barriers to academic progression and making pathways seamless, building on previous knowledge and competencies already achieved. Upon successful completion of the program, students will meet educational requirements to sit for the specified National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN or NCLEX-PN). PROGRAM TRACKS Vocational Nurse Education Certificate Students can select the Vocational Nurse Education (VN) Certificate Degree Plan that requires the completion of 3 semesters. A graduate of the program that earns a 266


NURSING Vocational Nurse Certificate is eligible to take the NCLEX-PN exam for licensure. Once the student receives their LVN license and completes the general education course required of the AAS degree plan if eligible can request continuation in the Nursing program to successfully complete the fourth semester (4) of the AAS… and be eligible to take the NCLEX-RN licensure exam. AAS Registered Nurse Education The Associate in Applied Science Degree plan requires the student to successfully complete all 4 semesters of the education plan to be eligible to take the NCLEXRN licensure exam. The student who follows the Associate in Applied Science Degree plan can take an LVN exit option. The student must successfully complete the third (3) semester with two (2) additional VNSG courses to be eligible to take the NCLEX-PN licensure exam Pathway to Bachelor of Science in Nursing The completion of general education courses and approved nursing electives in the Associate of Arts Degree Plan (Registered Nurse Education) provide access and transfer to Bachelor of Science Nursing Programs. Currently the DNE has articulation agreements with several universities that agree to provide a seamless transfer to their Bachelor of Science Nursing programs (See list of universities on website www.delmar.edu/rn. The participating universities will not require student to take anymore lower division general education courses (unless they are part of the 30 hours) if student meets the 2 items below • Completion of 54 general education hours of agreed curriculum • Transcript marked CORE COMPLETE LVN Transition to Professional Nursing RN Graduates from other vocational nursing programs who are licensed and complete the pre-requisite courses are eligible to apply for the LVN to RN Transition track. Students who completed the DMC Vocational Nurse Education Certificate degree plan prior to 2009 must apply to the LVN to RN Transition track. General Admission Guidelines Admission requirements and selection criteria for application to the nursing program can be found on the program website at www.delmar.edu/rn. Deadlines for all applicants are February 14 (for Fall Admission) and August 31 (for Spring Admission) The following are required prior to applying to the program: • Completion and minimum required scores on standardized HESI A2 Exam. (Refer to website www.delmar.edu/rn for additional guidelines, schedules and fees). • A grade of C or higher is required in all general education courses • BIOL 2402 Anatomy & Physiology II must be completed within five (5) years of application to nursing program. • Completion of pre-requisites ENGL 1301, BIOL 2401, BIOL 2402, and PSYC 2301. • Any or all remaining general education courses in the curriculum may be taken prior to admission to the nursing program. • Program Grade Point Average (PGPA) of 2.5 • All applicants must meet general admission requirements of the 267


NURSING College and the and submit a completed on online application available at www.nursingCAS.org Upon conditional acceptance to program student must submit the following: • Current immunizations or titers including a complete Hepatitis B series • Satisfactory physical examination on program approved form • Final acceptance into the program is contingent upon satisfactory FBI background check (completed through the Texas Board of Nursing) • The Texas Board of Nursing may require an applicant to complete a declaratory order if the background check is not clear or there are questions surrounding a mental illness or chemical dependency. This process may take up to six months to a year and students must have a clearance from the TBON before enrolling in nursing courses. • Prospective applicants who question their eligibility are encouraged to contact the Texas Board of Nursing or program to further discuss their situation at www.bon.state.tx.us or 512-305-7400. • Evidence of healthcare provider CPR certification • A negative drug screen is required for clinical eligibility. Progression Requirements Students enrolled in the program must be in good standing: • Maintain a PGPA of 2.0 • Earn a grade of “C” or better in each nursing and general education course. • Successfully complete all concurrent nursing courses and general education co-requisites to advance to the next level of degree plans • Students will be required to take standardized comprehensive competency exams throughout and at the end of the nursing program. Failure to achieve satisfactory scores may affect progression in the program and graduation. • A student may be readmitted into the nursing program one time only. The program is approved by the Texas Board of Nursing (www.bon.state.tx.us). The Associate in Applied Science degrees are accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN). Accredited information is available through ACEN 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, GA 30326. Phone 404-975-5000, www.ACEN.org ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: REGISTERED NURSE EDUCATION

SUMMER Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours *BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96

268


NURSING *ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 *BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II ...........3 3 4 96 *PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER CHEM 1406. Basic Chemistry...............................................3 3 4 96 RNSG 1170. Introduction to Health Care Concepts ........1 0 1 16 RNSG 1171. Professional Nursing Concepts I..................1 0 1 16 RNSG 1271. Professional Nursing Competencies............0 8 2 128 RNSG 1471. Health Care Concepts I..................................3 4 4 112 RNSG 1161. Clinical I............................................................0 4 1 64 THIRD SEMESTER BIOL 2420. Microbiology and Clinical Pathology..........3 3 4 96 Speech Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315 or 1321)................................3 0 3 48 RNSG 2172. Professional Nursing Concepts II.................1 0 1 16 RNSG 2572. Health Care Concepts II.................................4 4 5 128 RNSG 2362. Clinical II..........................................................0 12 3 192 FOURTH SEMESTER PHIL 2306. Introduction to Ethics....................................3 0 3 48 RNSG 2173. Professional Nursing Concepts III................1 0 1 16 RNSG 2573. Health Care Concepts III................................4 4 5 128 RNSG 2363. Clinical III.........................................................0 12 3 192 FIFTH SEMESTER RNSG 2174. Professional Nursing Concepts IV................1 1 1 32 RNSG 2574. Health Care Concepts IV (Capstone)...........3 6 5 144 RNSG 2360. Clinical IV ........................................................0 12 3 192 Total Semester Hours足for Associate Degree 64 * Prerequisites Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

CERTIFICATE: VOCATIONAL NURSE EDUCATION

SUMMER Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours *BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 *ENGL 1301. Composition I ................................................3 0 3 48 *BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II ...........3 3 4 96 *PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER RNSG 1170. Introduction to Health Care Concepts.........1 0 1 16 RNSG 1171. Professional Nursing Concepts I..................1 0 1 16 RNSG 1271. Professional Nursing Competencies............0 8 2 128 RNSG 1471. Health Care Concepts I..................................3 4 4 112 RNSG 1161. Clinical I............................................................0 4 1 64 THIRD SEMESTER Speech Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315 or 1321)................................3 0 3 48 RNSG 2172. Professional Nursing Concepts II.................1 0 1 16 RNSG 2572. Health Care Concepts II.................................4 4 5 128 RNSG 2362. Clinical II..........................................................0 12 3 192 FOURTH SEMESTER RNSG 2173. Professional Nursing Concepts III................1 0 1 16 RNSG 2573. Health Care Concepts III................................4 4 5 128 RNSG 2363. Clinical III.........................................................0 12 3 192 VNSG 1105. NCLEX-PN Review (Capstone)....................1 0 1 16 VNSG 1219. Leadership and Professional Development (Capstone)...............................2 0 2 32

269


NURSING PHIL 2306. Introduction to Ethics....................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours­for Certificate 50 * Prerequisites Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Certificate programs.

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: REGISTERED NURSE EDUCATION LVN-RN TRANSITION (Suggested Occupational Plan)

SUMMER Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours *BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 *ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 *BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II ...........3 3 4 96 *PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER CHEM 1406. Basic Chemistry...............................................3 3 4 96 Speech Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315 or 1321)................................3 0 3 48 RNSG 1170. Introduction to Health Care Concepts ........1 0 1 16 RNSG 1172. Professional Nursing Competencies (Transition) ......................................................0 4 1 64 RNSG 2371. Transition to Professional Nursing Practice .............................................3 4 3 112 THIRD SEMESTER BIOL 2420. Microbiology and Clinical Pathology..........3 3 4 96 PHIL 2306. Introduction to Ethics....................................3 0 3 48 RNSG 2573 Health Care Concepts III ...............................4 4 5 128 RNSG 2173. Professional Nursing Concepts III ...............1 0 1 16 RNSG 1262. Clinical LVN to RN Transition .....................0 12 2 192 FOURTH SEMESTER RNSG 2174. Professional Nursing Concepts IV................1 1 1 32 RNSG 2574. Health Care Concepts IV (Capstone)...........3 6 5 144 RNSG 2360. Clinical IV ........................................................0 12 3 192 Total Semester Hours­for Associate Degree 50 * Prerequisites

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Upon completion of RNSG 1170, 1172, 2371, the student will enter the 2nd year of the Associate in Applied Science degree plan. Fourteen (14) semester credit hours of VNSG electives are also required for graduation. LVN’s may apply for credit by evaluation of credentials. ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: REGISTERED NURSE EDUCATION (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. Clock Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours *ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48

270


NURSING - OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 48 PHIL 2306. Introduction to Ethics....................................3 0 3 48 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 48 GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics................................3 0 3 48 HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 48 HIST 1302. United States History II................................3 0 3 48 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport..........................................................2 1 2 32 MATH 1342. Elementary Statistical Methods..................3 0 3 48 *BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 *BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II..........3 3 4 96 CHEM 1406. Basic Chemistry ..............................................3 3 4 96 *PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315 or 1321)................................3 0 3 48 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 48 +BIOL 2420. Microbiologyand Clinical Pathology...........3 3 4 96 +PSYC 2314. Lifespan Growth and Development.............3 0 3 48 ++Other RNSG Electives.................................................................. 9 368 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 63 *Prerequisites +Approved Electives: BIOL 2420, PSYC 2314 ++Other RNSG Electives: Approved by Nurse Education Program Director or Department Chairperson.

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Completion of the education plan as presented allows a student to graduate with an Associate of Arts Degree of Registered Nurse Education and enter into an articulation agreement with participating universities. The Articulation Agreement requires an additional 30 upper division nursing hours towards a Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree at the participating university.

Nursing Home Administrator SEE: HUMAN SERVICES

Occupational Safety and Health Department of Public Safety Education.....................................(361) 698-1724

The Occupational Safety and Health Program is committed to preparing students for a career in the profession of Safety Specialist. The professional curriculum is designed to provide opportunities to assimilate knowledge, develop skills, and acquire competencies which prepare the student for job entry, economic independence, occupational advancement, and career development as an Occupational Safety Technician or Industrial Hygiene Technician.

271


OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH (Suggested Occupational Plan)

. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours OSHT 2309. Safety Program Management........................3. 0 3 48 OSHT 2401. OSHA Regulations - General Industry........3. 3 4 96 POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2. 2 3 64 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3. 0 3 48 MATH 1314. College Algebra..............................................3. 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER OSHT 1309. Physical Hazards Control..............................3. 0 3 48 OSHT 1313. Accident Prevention, Inspection, and Investigation.............................................3. 0 3 48 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking..............3. 0 3 48 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3. 0 3 48 CHEM 1405.* Introductory Chemistry I..............................3. 3 4 96 THIRD SEMESTER CBFM 1321. Industrial Scaffolding and Rigging..............3. 1 3 64 CVOP 2201. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations......................................................2. 0 2 32 EPCT 1401. Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response Training (HAZWOPER).................................................3. 3 4 96 Fire Science Elective (FIRT)............................................................3. 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER CNSE 1311. Craning Principles..........................................3. 1 3 64 EPCT 2333. Environmental Toxicology.............................3. 0 3 48 OSHT 1405. OSHA Regulations Construction Industry....................................3. 3 4 96 EPCT 1341. Principles of Industrial Hygiene...................3. 1 3 64 PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................3. 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER INSR 2311. Worker’s Compensation and Medical Aspects of Claims............................................3. 0 3 48 OSHT 2388. Internship - Occupational Safety and Health Technology/Technician (Capstone)........................................................0. 9 3 144 EPCT 2331. Industrial Hygiene Applications..................3. 1 3 64 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree.. 69 *Alternate option for CHEM 1405: SCIT 1414. Applied General Chemistry I........................3. AND CTEC 1205. Chemical Calculations I.................................1.

4

4

112

2

2

48

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

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OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT

Occupational Therapy Assistant Department of Allied Health......................................................(361) 698-2820

The Occupational Therapy Assistant program curriculum is designed to prepare an individual as an Occupational Therapy Assistant; a health care professional who works directly under the supervision of a Licensed Occupational Therapist. The Occupational Therapy Assistant provides the rehabilitative service of those individuals whose abilities to cope with tasks of living are threatened or impaired by physical injury or illness, developmental deficits, the aging process, poverty and cultural differences, or psychological and social disabilities. The Occupational Therapy Assistant collaborates occupational therapy services with appropriate supervision to prevent deficits and to maintain or improve function in activities of daily living, work, play, leisure, and in the underlying components such as sensorimotor, cognitive, and psychosocial. The Occupational Therapy Assistant may implement treatment programs developed by the Licensed Occupational Therapist which may include therapeutic exercises; therapeutic activities; activities of daily living training; living skills training; splint design and construction; measuring joint motion and muscle function to upper extremities; cognitive and perceptual motor skills training and patient and family education. Graduates will be eligible to take the examination for certification to become a licensed Occupational Therapy Assistant by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy, Inc. In addition to the standard College admission process, students are accepted into the Occupational Therapy program based on a ranking point system. In order to be considered for admission into the program, the student must: •  submit the completed application for admission and all required admission documentation by July 15. •  complete all prerequisite course requirements •  furnish two letters of reference from medical and/or teaching professionals •  have a minimum grade point average of 2.5. •  have completed a minimum of 10 hours of observation in the occupational therapy field by the application deadline After program acceptance, the student must submit a completed physical examination which includes the complete Hepatitis B series, a current college transcript and a current card of completion in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for Health Care Providers which must be maintained throughout the program. Upon enrollment, the student must pass a background check and drug screen test, at student’s expense, for security clearance and continued enrollment in the program. Contact the program director for further information at (361) 698-1845. The Del Mar College Occupational Therapy Assistant program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220. AOTA’s phone number is (301) 652-AOTA. Satisfactory completion of the program entitles the student to an Associate in Applied Science Degree. The student is eligible to sit 273


OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT for the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). Most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. All OTA students must complete Level II Fieldwork within 18 months following completion of academic preparation. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT ENHANCED SKILLS OPTION (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock PREREQUISITES: Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 HPRS 1106. Essentials of Medical Terminology...............1 1 1 32 HPRS 1204. Basic Health Profession Skills.......................1 3 2 64 FIRST SEMESTER BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II............3 3 4 96 OTHA 1405. Principles of Occupational Therapy.............3 3 4 96 OTHA 2301. Pathophysiology in Occupational Therapy....................................3 0 3 48 OTHA 1309. Human Structure and Function in Occupational Therapy....................................2 4 3 96 * POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 2 3 64 SECOND SEMESTER PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................3 0 3 48 OTHA 1211. Occupational Performance Throughout the Lifespan...............................2 1 2 48 OTHA 1319. Therapeutic Interventions I...........................2 4 3 96 OTHA 2309. Mental Health in Occupational Therapy.....2 4 3 96 THIRD SEMESTER PSYC 2314. Lifespan Growth and Development...........3 0 3 48 OTHA 1315. Therapeutic Use of Occupations or Activities I....................................................2 4 3 96 OTHA 1262. Clinical - Occupational Therapy Assistant...........................................................0 8 2 128 OTHA 2302. Therapeutic Use of Occupations or Activities II..................................................2 4 3 96 FOURTH SEMESTER OTHA 2360. Clinical - Occupational Therapy Assistant...........................................................0 16 3 256 OTHA 2235. Health Care Management in Occupational Therapy....................................2 1 2 48 OTHA 2331. Physical Function in Occupational Therapy.............................................................2 4 3 96 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER OTHA 2466. Practicum - Occupational Therapy

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OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT - PARALEGAL OTHA 2330.

Assistant (Capstone).......................................0 32 4 512 Workplace Skills for the Occupational Therapy Assistant...........................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 70

* Bridge Courses Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. ENHANCED SKILLS CERTIFICATE

OTHA 2204. Neurology in Occupational Therapy...........2 0 2 32 Select one of the courses below: OTHA 1353. Occupational Performance for Elders..........3 0 3 48 OTHA 1341. Occupational Performance from Birth through Adolescence......................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Certificate

5

Paralegal Department of Business Administration....................................(361) 698-1372

The Paralegal Studies degree prepares students to work in law offices or other related entities as paralegals or legal assistants. The innovative technology that attorneys, courts at law and District Clerk offices utilize is taught through a variety of courses and reinforced throughout the curriculum. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: PARALEGAL STUDIES (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec Lab Hrs. Hours LGLA 1317. Law Office Technology...................................3 0 3 48 HRPO 1311. Human Relations............................................3 0 3 48 LGLA 1313. Introduction to Paralegal Studies.................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 American History/Government/Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Course....................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER LGLA 1401. Legal Research and Writing...........................3 3 4 96 LGLA 1311. Introduction to Law........................................3 0 3 48 MATH 1314 College Algebra..............................................3 0 3 48 SPCH Core Course (SPCH 1311, 1315, or 1321)........................3 0 3 48 Creative Arts or Language, Philopshpy and Culture Core Course.....................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER LGLA 1345. Civil Litigation.................................................3 0 3 48 LGLA 1355. Family Law......................................................3 0 3 48 LGLA 2305. Interviewing and Investigating.....................3 0 3 48 LGLA Elective. ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 Life and Physical Sciences Core Course....................................3 0 3 48

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PARALEGAL - PHARMACY FOURTH SEMESTER LGLA 2307. Law Office Management................................3 0 3 LGLA 2313. Criminal Law and Procedure........................3 0 3 LGLA 2333. Advanced Legal Document Preparation.....3 0 3 LGLA Elective. ...........................................................................3 0 3 LGLA 2266. Practicum-Legal Assistant/Paralegal (Capstone)........................................................0 14 2 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree.. 60

48 48 48 48 224

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

Paramedic SEE: EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES

Peace Officer Training SEE: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Pharmacy

Department of Allied Health......................................................(361) 698-2820

ALSO SEE: PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH The Pharmacy Technology Program curriculum is designed to prepare students for a career as a Certified Pharmacy Technician, a health care professional who works directly under the supervision of a Registered Pharmacist in providing health care and medications to patients in institutional (hospital) and retail settings. The responsibilities of a Certified Pharmacy Technician include the ability to order, stock, package, prepare medications, operate computerized dispensing systems, prepare insurance claim forms and maintain written or computerized patient medication records. Accreditation Del Mar College Pharmacy Technology program has received Accredited status from the Accreditation Services Division of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, 7272 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814. In addition to the standard College admission process, in order to be considered for admission into the Pharmacy Technician program the student must: • submit a completed Pharmacy Technology application and all required admission documentation by July 15. •  submit all college transcripts showing evidence of completion of prerequisites or current enrollment. •  have a minimum grade point average of 2.0. •  be on college level in Reading, English and Math Please contact the program director for more information at (361) 698-2822. After acceptance into the program, the student must submit a completed physical examination which includes the complete Hepatitis B series, a current college 276


PHARMACY transcript and a current card of completion in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for Health Care Providers which must be maintained throughout the program. Upon enrollment, the student must pass a background check and drug screen test, at student’s expense, for security clearance and continued enrollment in the program. CERTIFICATE: PHARMACY TECHNICIAN (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock PREREQUISITES Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 HPRS 1106. Essentials of Medical Terminology...............1 1 1 32 HPRS 1204. Basic Health Profession Skills.......................1 3 2 64 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 PHIL 2306. Introduction to Ethics....................................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I OR........2 4 3 96 POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 2 3 48 FIRST SEMESTER PHRA 1301. Introduction to Pharmacy..............................3 1 3 64 PHRA 1305. Drug Classification.........................................2 3 3 80 PHRA 1313. Community Pharmacy Practice....................2 4 3 96 PHRA 1349. Institutional Pharmacy Practice....................2 4 3 96 PHRA 1266. Practicum– Pharmacy Technician I..............0 16 2 256 SECOND SEMESTER PHRA 1441. Pharmacy Drug Therapy and Treatment.....3 2 4 80 PHRA 1304. Pharmacotherapy and Disease Process.......3 0 3 48 PHRA 1309. Pharmaceutical Mathematics I......................2 2 3 64 PHRA 1267. Practicum– Pharmacy Technician II.............0 16 2 256 PHRA 1445. Compounding Sterile Preparations and Aseptic Technique...................................2 6 4 128 THIRD SEMESTER PHRA 2266. Practicum– Pharmacy Technician III............0 16 2 256 PHRA 1306. Computerized Drug Delivery Systems........1 5 3 96 FOURTH SEMESTER PHRA 1243. Pharmacy Technology Certification Review (Capstone)..........................................2 1 2 48 PHRA 1202. Pharmacy Law.................................................2 0 2 32 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 55

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: PHARMACY TECHNICIAN (Suggested Occupational Plan)

. Sem. Clock PREREQUISITES .Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 HPRS 1106. Essentials of Medical Terminology...............1 1 1 32 HPRS 1204. Basic Health Profession Skills.......................1 3 2 64 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96

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PHARMACY - PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT PHIL 2306. Introduction to Ethics....................................3 0 3 48 ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications OR..........2 4 3 96 POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 2 3 48 FIRST SEMESTER PHRA 1301. Introduction to Pharmacy..............................3 1 3 64 PHRA 1305. Drug Classification.........................................2 3 3 80 PHRA 1313. Community Pharmacy Practice....................2 4 3 96 PHRA 1349. Institutional Pharmacy Practice....................2 4 3 96 PHRA 1266. Practicum - Pharmacy Technician I..............0 16 2 256 SECOND SEMESTER PHRA 1441. Pharmacy Drug Therapy and Treatment.....3 2 4 80 PHRA 1304. Pharmacotherapy and Disease Process.......3 0 3 48 PHRA 1309. Pharmaceutical Mathematics I......................2 2 3 64 PHRA 1267. Practicum - Pharmacy Technician II............0 16 2 256 PHRA 1445. Compounding Sterile Preparations and Aseptic Technique...................................2 6 4 128 THIRD SEMESTER PHRA 2266. Practicum - Pharmacy Technician III...........0 16 2 256 PHRA 1306. Computerized Drug Delivery Systems........1 5 3 96 FOURTH SEMESTER PHRA 1243. Pharmacy Technology Certification Review (Capstone)..........................................2 1 2 48 PHRA 1202. Pharmacy Law.................................................2 0 2 32 FIFTH SEMESTER Speech Core Elective.....................................................................3 0 3 48 PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................3 0 3 48 BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II............3 3 4 96 CHEM 1406. Basic Chemistry...............................................3 3 4 96 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 69

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science Degrees.

Physical Therapist Assistant Department of Allied Health......................................................(361) 698-2820

SEE ALSO: PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH The Physical Therapist Assistant is a health care professional who works under the supervision of a Licensed Physical Therapist. The responsibilities of a Physical Therapist Assistant include a variety of services such as cardiac rehabilitation, neurological rehabilitation, orthopedics, geriatrics, pediatrics, wound care, sports medicine, home health, and wellness. The Physical Therapist Assistant may implement treatment programs developed by the Physical Therapist which may include therapeutic exercises; gait training and assisting with prosthetics and brace training; administering various hot/ cold/electrical modalities and traction; application of various external bandages, supports and dressings; measuring joint motion and muscle function; and, educating other health care providers, patients, and families. Program graduates are required to pass an exit mock state board exam before graduation. Students who pass this exam will be prepared to sit for the National Physical Therapy Exam (NPTE) which is administered by the Texas Board of 278


PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT Physical Therapy Examiners. Graduates cannot work in the field as a Physical Therapist Assistant without passing the NPTE. Accreditation The Del Mar College Physical Therapist Assistant Program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-1488; (703) 706-3245 or 1-800-999-2782; accreditation@apta.org; www.capteonline.org/home.aspx In addition to the standard College admission process, students planning to enter the Physical Therapist Assistant program must submit the following to the Physical Therapist Assistant program office by July 15: • Physical Therapist Assistant program application form • All college transcripts from Del Mar College and other schools • Evidence of 30 hours (total) of observation in three different settings • Evidence of a minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA Please contact the program director for more information at (361) 698-1848 or go online to www.delmar.edu/ptap for all program admission information and required forms. After the Physical Therapist Assistant program office receives all of the above items, the applicants will be notified of admissions to the program within 30 days of the application deadline. After program acceptance, the student must submit a completed physical examination, proof of Hepatitis B series, all required immunizations, college transcripts, a current card of completion in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for Health Care Providers and HPRS 1204 Competency Form. Upon enrollment, the student must pass a background check and drug screen test, at student’s expense, for security clearance and continued enrollment in the program. Please contact program director if you have questions about any of these requirements. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT ENHANCED SKILLS OPTION

. Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hrs. PTHA 1201. The Profession of Physical Therapy.............1 2 2 48 PTHA 1513. Functional Anatomy.......................................3 5 5 128 PTHA 1229. Applied Physical Principles...........................1 4 2 80 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 HPRS 1106. Essentials of Medical Terminology...............1 1 1 32 HPRS 1204. Basic Health Profession Skills.......................1 3 2 64 SECOND SEMESTER PTHA 1321. Pathophysiology for the PTA........................3 0 3 48 PTHA 2509. Therapeutic Exercise.......................................3 5 5 128 PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................3 0 3 48 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II..........3 3 4 96

279


PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT - PHYSICS THIRD SEMESTER PTHA 2217. Issues in Health Care......................................2 0 2 32 PTHA 1531. Physical Agents...............................................3 5 5 128 PTHA 1166. Practicum - Physical Therapist Assistant....0 7.5 1 120 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER PTHA 2435. Rehabilitation Techniques..............................3 4 4 112 PTHA 2305. Neurology........................................................3 0 3 48 PTHA 2266. Practicum - Physical Therapist Assistant....0 15 2 240 * POFI 1301. Computer Applications I..............................2 2 3 64 Mathematics Elective.....................................................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER PTHA 2431. Management of Neurological Disorders.....3 4 4 112 PTHA 2239. Professional Issues (Capstone)......................2 0 2 32 PTHA 2366. Practicum - Physical Therapist Assistant....0 22.5 3 360 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 72

* Bridge Courses

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. ENHANCED SKILLS CERTIFICATE PTHA 1191. Special Topics in Physical Therapist Assistant - Specialty Internship....................0 7 1 112 PTHA 1391. Special Topics in Physical Therapist Assistant - Documentation/Reporting........2 3 3 80 Select two of the following: PTHA 1391. Special Topics in Physical Therapist Assistant - Cardiopulmonary........................2 3 3 80 PTHA 1391. Special Topics in Physical Therapist Assistant - Musculoskeletal...........................2 3 3 80 PTHA 1391. Special Topics in Physical Therapist Assistant - Neuromuscular............................2 3 3 80 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 10

Physics Department of Natural Sciences.................................................(361) 698-1229 ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE: PHYSICS (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. MATH 2413. Calculus I ……................................................4 0 4 ENGL 1301. Composition I ………....................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 CHEM 1411. General Inorganic Chemistry I ................... 3 3 4 ENGR 2304. Programming for Engineering……………..2 3 3

280


PHYSICS - POLITICAL SCIENCE SECOND SEMESTER MATH 2414. Calculus II ……...............................................4 0 4 ENGL 1302. Composition II ………...................................3 0 3 PHYS 2425. University Physics I........................................3 3 4 CHEM 1412. General Inorganic Chemistry II .................3 3 4 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective*........................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER MATH 2415. Calculus III.......................................................4 0 4 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United History States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 PHYS 2426. University Physics II.......................................3 3 4 Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective* ……….....3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER MATH 2320. Differential Equations…………………..…...3 0 3 GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 SPCH 1311. Introduction to Speech Communication...3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective* ………............................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours suggested for Associate Degree 64

Courses in bold type satisfy the Del Mar College Core Curriculum for Physics. Minimum degree requirements: For the AS PHYSICS Degree, 60 hours chosen from the above plan to include the 42 hour DMC Core Curriculum and 18 sophomore hours. Students must demonstrate use of basic computer skills through ENGR 2304. *Students should see an Advisor for selecting recommended core electives and other electives. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

Police Science SEE: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Political Science Department of Social Sciences....................................................(361) 698-1228 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: POLITICAL SCIENCE (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3

281


POLITICAL SCIENCE - PRE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I.........................3 0 3 College-Level Mathematics Core Elective.................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective w/lab.......................3 3 4 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 GOVT 2304. Introduction to Political Science...................3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective..........................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective....................... ..........3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 GOVT 2311. Mexican-American Politics............................3 0 3 Speech Core Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315 or 1321)......................3 0 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport..........................................................2 1 2 HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I.........................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective...................3 0 3 GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics..................... 3 0 3 PSYC 2317. Statistical Methods in Psychology.................3 0 3 GEOG 1303. World Regional Geography...........................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II.......................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

Pre-Medical Technology Department of Allied Health......................................................(361) 698-2820

Students planning to continue work in medical technology at an upper level institution should verify the applicability of this curriculum at the institution to which the transfer is intended and make any needed changes in consultation with an advisor in these programs at Del Mar College. The sequence of the mathematics courses given in this program requires that the student demonstrate proficiency in MATH 1314, College Algebra, and MATH 1316, Plane Trigonometry, either by course work or by examination. Students are expected to follow all rules and regulations of the assigned affiliating agency.

282


PRE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY - PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: PRE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 BIOL 1406. Biological Concepts I.....................................3 3 4 MATH 1314. College Algebra..............................................3 0 3 CHEM 1411. General Inorganic Chemistry I....................3 3 4 SECOND SEMESTER HIST 1302. United States History II................................3 0 3 ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 CHEM 1412. General Inorganic Chemistry II....................3 3 4 MATH 2342. Statistical Methods and Probability OR MATH 1342. Elementary Statistical Methods....................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective...................3 0 3 BIOL 2420. Microbiology and Clinical Pathology..........3 3 4 CHEM 2323 Organic Chemistry I.......................................3 0 3 CHEM 2123 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory...................0 4 1 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Constitution: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................3 0 3 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours足for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum.

Pre-Professional Health Pre-Chiropractic, Pre-Dental, Pre-Medical, Pre-Pharmacy, Pre-Physical Therapy, Pre-Veterinary Medicine, and Other Pre-Professional Health ALSO SEE: NURSING, PRE-MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY Pre-professional requirements vary among the professional programs and may change. Please consult with the various professional programs regarding their current admissions requirements. The requirements listed in this section do not constitute degree plans and are given for informational purposes only to assist in preparing to meet requirements for application to professional programs. Students preparing for these programs 283


PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH and also seeking an Associate in Science degree will usually major in chemistry or biology and should plan their course selections carefully to avoid accumulating excessive hours before transferring to a senior university. All students preparing for professional training in dentistry, medicine, or veterinary medicine should select an academic major and plan to complete a baccalaureate degree in the field of their choice before entering professional school, since the number of students admitted without a degree is very small. Pre-Chiropractic Requirements Sixty or more hours of coursework are required for admission to most chiropractic programs. Recommended courses include: • Biological Science (BIOL 1406, 2401, 2402) • General Inorganic Chemistry (CHEM 1411, 1412) • Organic Chemistry (CHEM 2323/2123, 2325/2125) • General Physics (PHYS 1401, 1402) • English/Composition (ENGL 1301, 1302) • General Psychology (PSYC 2301) • Social Sciences (HIST 1301, 1302; GOVT 2305, 2306, Literature) • Mathematics as required for chemistry and physics (MATH 1314, 1316) Certain course substitutions may be possible. See your advisor for details. Pre-Dental Requirements All applicants to dental schools should plan to take the Dental Admission Test (DAT) sometime after their sophomore year and should submit applications to the schools approximately one year in advance of planned entrance. For specific admission requirements, students should consult the most recent edition of Admissions Requirements of United States and Canadian Dental Schools and dental school catalogs. The minimum admissions requirements for most American dental schools which could be taken at the lower division include: • Two years of biological science including two semesters of formal laboratory work (select from BIOL 1406, 1407, 2416, 2421, and 2428) • One year of general chemistry (CHEM 1411, 1412) • One year of organic chemistry (CHEM 2323/2123, 2325/2125) • One year of English (ENGL 1301, 1302) • One year of physics (PHYS 1401, 1402) Certain course substitutions are permitted. See advisor for details. Students planning to complete an associate degree at Del Mar College should work closely with an advisor to avoid accumulating excessive hours. It may be necessary to defer some of the pre-professional courses listed to a university if an associate degree is desired. Pre-Medical Requirements Students planning to make application to medical schools must take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) sometime after their sophomore year. For specific admission requirements, students should consult the most recent edition of Medical School Admission Requirements and medical school catalogs. 284


PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH The minimum admission requirements for most American medical schools include the following lower division courses: • Two years of biological science with two semesters of formal laboratory work (BIOL 1406, 1407, and two of BIOL 2416, 2421, or 2428 recommended) • One-half year of calculus (MATH 2413) or statistics (MATH 2342) • One year of general chemistry (CHEM 1411, 1412) • One year of organic chemistry (CHEM 2323/2123, 2325/2125) • One year of English (ENGL 1301, 1302) • One year of physics (PHYS 1401, 1402 or 2425, 2426) Certain course substitutions are permitted. See advisor for details. Students planning to complete an associate degree at Del Mar College should work closely with an advisor to avoid accumulating excessive hours. It may be necessary to defer some of the pre-professional courses listed to a university if an associate degree is desired. Pre-Pharmacy Requirements Admission to most pharmacy programs requires 90 or more hours of coursework. Students will usually be required to take the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) prior to admission to the professional program. Students should consult a pre-pharmacy advisor at Del Mar to plan class schedules. Courses which could be completed at the lower division include: • English/Composition (ENGL 1301, 1302) • Sophomore literature or philosophy — 3 semester hours • One year of major’s track biology with laboratory (BIOL 1406 plus 1407 • BIOL 2401 (suggested for Texas A&M University-Kingsville) • Microbiology (BIOL 2421) •  Genetics (BIOL 2416) for some schools • One year of general chemistry (CHEM 1411, 1412) • One year of organic chemistry (CHEM 2323/2123, 2325/2125) • Six hours of mathematics (University of Texas system, MATH 2413, 2414; University of Houston system, MATH 1324, 1325). • Three semester hours of statistics (MATH 2342) • Visual/Performing Arts core courses — 3 semester hours • PHYS 1401 (and PHYS 1402 for some schools) • United States History (HIST 1301, 1302) • Federal and Texas Government (GOVT 2305, 2306) • Approved social/behavioral science elective — 3 semester hours Certain course substitutions are permitted. See advisor for details. Students planning to complete an associate degree at Del Mar College should work closely with an advisor to avoid accumulating excessive hours. It may be necessary to defer some of the pre-professional courses listed to a university if an associate degree is desired.

285


PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH Pre-Physical Therapy Requirements Most physical therapy programs require 90 or more hours of coursework; some programs require a baccalaureate degree prior to admission. Some programs also require the Graduate Record Exam (GRE). Previous work as an aide or volunteer in physical therapy is often required for admission. Specific course requirements vary considerably among the programs; consult your advisor to develop an education plan and class schedule at Del Mar College. Courses which are required at most schools include: • English/Composition (ENGL 1301, 1302) • Sophomore literature or philosophy — 3 semester hours • One year of anatomy and physiology (BIOL 2401, 2402 or BIOL 2428 plus mammalian physiology) • One year of introductory majors’ track biology (BIOL 1406 plus 1407) • Algebra and trigonometry (MATH 1314, 1316) • Statistics (MATH 2342) • One year of general chemistry (CHEM 1411, 1412) • Eight semester hours of physics (PHYS 1401, 1402) • Two, or more, semesters of psychology (PSYC 2301, 2314) • One semester of speech (SPCH 1315) • One year of United States History (HIST 1301, 1302) • One year of Federal and Texas Government (GOVT 2305, 2306) Certain course substitutions are permitted. See advisor for details. Students planning to complete an associate degree at Del Mar College should work closely with an advisor to avoid accumulating excessive hours. It may be necessary to defer some of the pre-professional courses listed to a university if an associate degree is desired. Pre-Veterinary Medicine Requirements All applicants to schools of veterinary medicine must take a nationally standardized test and submit their applications six to 12 months before planned entrance. Some schools require the Veterinary Aptitude Test (VAT), others the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). Minimum admissions requirements which can be fulfilled at the lower division include the following courses: • One year of biological science (BIOL 1406, 1407) •  Genetics (BIOL 2416) • Microbiology (BIOL 2421) • One year of general chemistry (CHEM 1411, 1412) • One year of organic chemistry (CHEM 2323/2123, 2325/2125) • Six semester hours of English (ENGL 1301 and 1302) • Three semester hours of technical writing (ENGL 2311) • One semester of calculus (MATH 2413) or one semester of statistics (MATH 2342) • One year of physics (PHYS 1401, 1402) 286


PRE-PROFESSIONAL HEALTH - PROCESS TECHNOLOGY • Speech (SPCH 1311, 1315, or 1321) • One semester each of animal nutrition and biochemistry (not available at Del Mar College) Certain course substitutions are permitted. See advisor for details. Students planning to complete an associate degree at Del Mar College should work closely with an advisor to avoid accumulating excessive hours. It may be necessary to defer some of the pre-professional courses listed to a university if an associate degree is desired. Other Pre-Professional Health Requirements The Department of Natural Sciences also offers courses appropriate for students in pre-occupational therapy, pre-podiatric medicine, pre-physician assistant, pre-optometry, and others. Consult the department office for more information.

Process Technology Department of Technology Education........................................(361) 698-1701

ALSO SEE: CHEMICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY The curriculum in Process Technology is designed for the purpose of preparing graduates to work as process operators in the petrochemical industry. The curriculum provides general education in mathematics, applied physical science, English, basic computer principles and operation; process operating procedures; fundamentals of process instrumentation, statistical quality control, process equipment, reactions, reactors, distillation process, safety, and problem solving/ troubleshooting. Students planning to continue at a senior college should consult an advisor concerning degree requirements of the college to which transfer is intended. CERTIFICATE: PROCESS TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CPMT 2333. Computer Integration.....................................1 6 3 112 *PTAC 1302. Introduction to Process Technology.............3 0 3 48 *PTAC 1432. Process Instrumentation I..............................3 3 4 96 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER PTAC 1308. Safety, Health and Environment I.................3 0 3 48 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 PTAC 1410. Process Technology I - Equipment...............3 3 4 96 THIRD SEMESTER PTAC 2348. Safety, Health and Environment II...............3 0 3 48 PTAC 2436. Process Instrumentation II.............................3 3 4 96 PTAC 2420. Process Technology II - Systems...................3 3 4 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 34

* Bridge Courses

287


PROCESS TECHNOLOGY - PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: PROCESS TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CPMT 2333. Computer Integration.....................................1 6 3 112 *PTAC 1302. Introduction to Process Technology.............3 0 3 48 PTAC 1410. Process Technology I - Equipment...............3 3 4 96 PTAC 1308. Safety, Health and Environment I.................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER *PTAC 1432. Process Instrumentation I..............................3 3 4 96 PTAC 2348. Safety, Health and Environment II...............3 0 3 48 TECM 1317. Technical Trigonometry..................................3 0 3 48 PTAC 2420. Process Technology II - Systems...................3 3 4 96 THIRD SEMESTER SCIT 1414. Applied General Chemistry I........................3 4 4 112 ENGL 1301. Composition I............................................... 3 0 3 48 PTAC 2436. Process Instrumentation II.............................3 3 4 96 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER SCIT 1418. Applied Physics...............................................3 3 4 96 PTAC 2438. Process Technology III - Operations.............3 2 4 80 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 Mathematics or Natural Science Elective..................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER PTAC 2314. Principles of Quality.......................................3 0 3 48 CTEC 2287. Internship-Chemical Technology/Technician..................................1 6 2 112 PTAC 1354. Industrial Processes........................................2 3 3 80 PTAC 2346. Process Troubleshooting (Capstone)............2 3 3 80 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 69

* Bridge Courses Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees. Total hours for AAS degree are exclusive of developmental and noncredit college courses.

Professional Electronics Department of Technology Education........................................(361) 698-1701

Professional Electronics - Avionics Electronics Technology Specialty The Avionics Program is designed to prepare students for employment in general aviation avionics repair stations. The goal of the Program is to provide a comprehensive training in circuit analysis, laboratory techniques, and the use of modern testing equipment in the avionics electronics industry. Specifically, the curriculum emphasizes the inspection, troubleshooting, service, repair and maintenance of communications and navigation systems. 288


PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS CERTIFICATE: PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS RAMP TECH

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CETT 1304. High-Reliability Soldering.............................2 4 3 112 CETT 1303. DC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 AVNC 1306. FAA Regulations for Avionics Certified Repair Station..................................................3 0 3 48 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER CETT 1305. AC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 AVNC 1303. Introduction to Aviation Electronic Systems.............................................................2 4 3 96 AVNC 1453. Operational Testing of Aviation Electronic Systems..........................................3 4 4 112 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER CETT 1329. Solid State Devices..........................................1 6 3 112 AVNC 1343. Aviation Electrical and Electronic Systems Installation........................................2 4 3 96 AVNC 2357. Aviation Communication Component Level Repair.....................................................2 4 3 96 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 34

CERTIFICATE LEVEL I: PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS: AVIONICS TECH I

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CETT 1304. High-Reliability Soldering.............................2 4 3 112 CETT 1303. DC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 AVNC 1306. FAA Regulations for Avionics Certified Repair Station..................................................3 0 3 48 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER CETT 1305. AC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 AVNC 1303. Introduction to Aviation Electronic Systems.............................................................2 4 3 96 AVNC 1325. Emerging Technologies in Aviation Electronic Systems..........................................3 0 3 48 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER CETT 1329. Solid State Devices..........................................1 6 3 112 AVNC 1343. Aviation Electrical and Electronic Systems Installation........................................2 4 3 96 AVNC 2345. Aviation Navigation Equipment Component Level Repair...............................2 4 3 96 AVNC 2357. Aviation Communication Component Level Repair...............................2 4 3 96

289


PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS AVNC 2350.

Aviation Pulsed RF Equipment Component Level Repair...............................2 Total Semester Hours for Certificate

4 3 39

96

CERTIFICATE LEVEL II: PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS AVIONICS TECH II

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours AVNC 1303. Introduction to Aviation Electronic Systems.............................................................2 4 3 96 AVNC 1306. FAA Regulations for Avionics Certified Repair Station..................................................3 0 3 48 CETT 1304. High-Reliability Soldering.............................2 4 3 112 CETT 1303. DC Curcuits.....................................................1 6 3 112 SECOND SEMESTER AVNC 1343. Aviation Electrical and Electronic Systems Installation........................................................2 4 3 96 CETT 1305. AC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER AVNC 1325. Emerging Technologies in Aviation Electronic Systems..........................................3 0 3 48 AVNC 2345. Aviation Navigation Equipment Component Level Repair...............................2 4 3 96 AVNC 2350. Aviations Pulsed RF Equipment Component Level Repair...............................2 4 3 96 AVNC 2357. Aviation Communication Component Level Repair...............................2 4 3 96 CETT 1329. Solid State Devices..........................................1 6 3 112 FOURTH SEMESTER AVNC 1453. Operational Testing of Aviation Electronic Systems..........................................3 4 4 112 AVNC 2304. Foundations in Avionics Equipment Component Level Repairs.............................2 4 3 96 CETT 1415. Digital Applications........................................3 4 4 112 CETT 1341. Solid State Circuits..........................................1 6 3 112 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 53

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS AVIONICS ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY SPECIALTY

Sem Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CETT 1304. High-Reliability Soldering.............................2 4 3 112 CETT 1303. DC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 CETT 1415. Digital Applications........................................3 4 4 112 Mathematics/Natural Science Elective.......................................3 0 3 48

290


PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS SECOND SEMESTER AVNC 1303. Introduction to Aviation Electronics Systems.........................................2 4 3 96 AVNC 1306. FAA Regulations for Avionics Certified Repair Stations................................3 0 3 48 CETT 1305. AC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER AVNC 1343. Aviation Electrical and Electronic Systems Installation........................................2 4 3 96 CETT 1329. Solid State Devices..........................................1 6 3 112 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 AVNC 2304. Foundations in Avionics Equipment Component Level Repair...............................2 4 3 96 FOURTH SEMESTER CETT 1341. Solid State Circuits..........................................1 6 3 112 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 AVNC 2345. Aviation Navigational Equipment Component Level Repair...............................2 4 3 96 AVNC 2357. Aviation Communication Component Level Repair...............................2 4 3 96 FIFTH SEMESTER Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 AVNC 1453. Operational Testing of Aviation Electronic Systems.............................................................3 4 4 112 AVNC 2355. Advanced Aviation Electronics Troubleshooting (Capstone)..........................2 4 3 96 AVNC 2350. Aviations Pulsed RF Equipment Component Level Repair...............................2 4 3 96 AVNC 1325. Emerging Technologies in Aviation Electronic Systems..........................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 65

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science Degrees.

Professional Electronics - Computer Network Electronic Technology Specialty

The Computer Network Electronic Technology (CNET) Specialty is designed to offer training for an entry-level computer/electronic technician in the field of computer repair, networking, and fiber optics. The curriculum prepares the students for various industry certifications. CERTIFICATE: COMPUTER NETWORK ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CETT 1304. High-Reliability Soldering.............................2 4 3 112 *CETT 1303. DC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 *CETT 1415. Digital Applications........................................3 4 4 112 TECM 1301. Industrial Mathematics..................................3 0 3 48

291


PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS SECOND SEMESTER *CETT 1305. AC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 CPMT 1345. Computer Systems Maintenance..................1 6 3 112 CPMT 1349. Computer Networking Technology.............1 6 3 112 COMG 1391. Special Topics in Communications, General..............................................................3 0 3 48 THIRD SEMESTER CETT 1329. Solid State Devices..........................................1 6 3 112 LOTT 1401. Introduction to Fiber Optics..........................3 4 4 112 CSIR 1303. Telecommunications System Installer..........1 6 3 112 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 35

* Bridge Courses

ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: PROFESSIONAL ELECTRONICS COMPUTER NETWORK ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY SPECIALTY Sem Clock FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours CETT 1304. High-Reliability Soldering.............................2 4 3 112 CETT 1303. DC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 CETT 1415. Digital Applications........................................3 4 4 112 TECM 1317. Technical Trigonometry..................................3 0 3 48 Mathematics / Natural Science Elective.....................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER CETT 1305. AC Circuits.......................................................1 6 3 112 CPMT 1345. Computer Systems Maintenance..................1 6 3 112 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 CSIR 1303. Telecommunications System Installer..........1 6 3 112 THIRD SEMESTER CETT 1329. Solid State Devices..........................................1 6 3 112 CPMT 1343. Microcomputer Architecture.........................1 6 3 112 SCIT 1418. Applied Physics..............................................3 3 4 96 Speech Elective ...........................................................................3 0 3 48 FOURTH SEMESTER CETT 1341. Solid State Circuits..........................................1 6 3 112 CPMT 1349. Computer Networking Technology.............1 6 3 112 CPMT 2333. Computer Integration.....................................1 6 3 112 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 FIFTH SEMESTER CPMT 2349. Advanced Computer Networking Technology.......................................................1 6 3 112 CETT 2388. Internship Computer Engineering Technology/Technician OR CSIR 1355. Industry Certifications...................................1 6 3 112 ITNW 1351. Fundamentals of Wireless LANS..................1 6 3 112 CPMT 2337. Microcomputer Interfacing............................1 6 3 112 CSIR 1359. Digital Data Communications.......................1 6 3 112 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 71

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science Degrees. 292


PUBLIC RELATIONS - PSYCHOLOGY

Public Relations SEE: ADVERTISING

Psychology Department of Social Sciences....................................................(361) 698-1228 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: PSYCHOLOGY (Suggested Transfer Plan)

Sem. FIRST SEMESTER . Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I................................................... 3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I.................................... 3 0 3 College-Level Mathematics Core Elective................................... 3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective w/lab......................... 3 3-4 4 Speech Core Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315, or 1321)....................... 3 0 3 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II.................................................. 3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II.................................. 3 0 3 * Approved course providing basic computer skills.................... 3 0 3 PSYC 2301. General Psychology.......................................... 3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective ................................... 3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective..................... 3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics................... 3 0 3 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport............................................................ 2 1 2 PSYC 2314. Lifespan Growth and Development............... 3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective............................................................ 3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics....................... 3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective (outside major field)........................................................................ 3 0 3 PSYC 2317. Statistical Methods in Psychology ................. 3 0 3 PSYC 2319. Social Psychology.............................................. 3 0 3 Approved Electives........................................................................... 3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. * COSC 1301 Introduction to Computing; ITSC 1301 Introduction to Computers; or ITSC 1309 Integrated Software Applications I. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

293


RADIO/TELEVISION

Radio/Television Department of Communications, Languages and Reading........(361) 698-1508 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: RADIO AND TELEVISION (Suggested Transfer Plan) Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1301. United States History I..................................3 0 3 COMM 1307. Introduction to Mass Communication.......3 0 3 COMM 1336. Television Production I...................................3 1 3 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II................................3 0 3 COMM 2331. Radio/Television Announcing......................3 0 3 COMM 1337. Television Production II.................................3 3 3 THIRD SEMESTER SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communication..............................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective w/lab ......................3 3-4 4 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport……..................................................2 1 2 COMM 2303. Audio/Radio Production...............................3 1 3 FOURTH SEMESTER Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective ..................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 Mathematics Core Elective...........................................................3 0 3 COMM 2339. Writing for Radio, TV and Film....................3 0 3 FIFTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Constitution: Texas Constitution and Topics.....................3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective..................................3 0 3 COMM 2324. Practicum in Electronic Media OR COMM 2327. Principles of Advertising...............................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. Completing Communication Courses (1336, 1337, 2303, 2324, 2331, 2339) will meet the requirement for basic computer skills. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer. In consultation with a department advisor, a specific degree plan will be completed.

294


RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY

Radiologic Technology Department of Dental and Imaging Technology........................(361) 698-2858 SEE ALSO: NUCLEAR MEDICINE TECHNOLOGY

Radiologic Technology is a general program offering preparation for students who want to work in radiology departments of hospitals, offices of private physicians, clinics, or other health facilities that utilize radiographic procedures. The curriculum leads to the Associate in Applied Science degree, and graduates are eligible to apply for the national registry examination. Upon successful completion of the program and the registry examination, students may practice as registered radiologic technologists and are eligible to continue their education for a bachelor’s degree. The program is offered in cooperation with local hospitals. Hospital facilities provide clinical education required by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. A copy of Standards on Education in Radiologic Technology programs is available on request. The program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, 20 N. Wacker Dr., Ste. 900, Chicago, IL, 60606. The program has state-of-the-art lab equipment and is offered in cooperation with local hospitals. An advisory committee assists College officials in the implementation of the Radiologic Technology curriculum under the standards established by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology and the American Medical Association. In addition to the general admission requirements of the College and the health sciences programs, the Bureau of Radiologic Health and Safety requires applicants to be within three months of being 18 years of age or older. Students planning to enter the Radiologic Technology program must submit the following to the Radiologic Technology program office by March 1: • Radiologic Technology Application Form • all official college transcripts • have a minimum 2.0 GPA • completion or current enrollment of all prerequisites. Any or all of the general education courses listed in the curriculum may be taken prior to admission into the Radiologic Technology program. Completion of the general education courses enhances a student’s selection to the program. • BIOL 2401 must have been taken within 5 years from the semester applying for admission. • HPRS 1106 and 1204 must have been taken within 2 years from the semester applying for admission.

295


RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY

Sem. Clock Prerequisites: Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours HPRS 1106. Essentials of Medical Terminology...............1 1 1 32 HPRS 1204. Basic Health Profession Skills.......................1 3 2 64 FIRST SEMESTER RADR 1309. Introduction to Radiology and Patient Care (Summer II only)......................2 4 3 96 RADR 1311. Basic Radiographic Procedures.....................2 4 3 96 SECOND SEMESTER RADR 2309. Radiographic Imaging Equipment...............3 1 3 64 BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 RADR 2301. Immediate Radiographic Procedures...........2 4 3 96 RADR 1260. Clinical-Radiologic Technology/ Science Radiographer.....................................0 12 2 156 THIRD SEMESTER Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 RADR 1313. Principles of Radiographic Imaging I..........3 1 3 64 RADR 2431. Advanced Radiographic Procedures............3 3 4 96 RADR 1261. Clinical-Radiologic Technology/Science Radiographer...................................................0 12 2 156 FOURTH SEMESTER RADR 1262. Clinical-Radiologic Technology/Science Radiographer...................................................0 12 2 192 RADR 2217. Radiographic Pathology.................................2 1 2 48 RADR 2260. Clinical-Radiologic Technology/Science Radiographer...................................................0 12 2 192 FIFTH SEMESTER RADR 2305. Principles of Radiographic Imaging II.........3 0 3 48 RADR 2333. Advanced Medical Imaging..........................2 2 3 96 RADR 2361. Clinical-Radiologic Technology/Science Radiographer...................................................0 18 3 288 Mathematics Elective (MATH 1314 or higher).........................3 0 3 48 SIXTH SEMESTER RADR 2313. Radiation Biology and Protection.................3 1 3 64 RADR 2362. Clinical-Radiologic Technology/Science Radiographer...................................................0 18 3 288 RADR 2335. Radiologic Technology Seminar (Capstone)........................................................3 0 3 48 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR SPCH 1318. Interpersonal Communication....................3 0 3 48 * POFI 1301. Computer Applications I OR ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I............3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours足for Associate Degree 72

* Bridge Courses Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

296


RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED SKILLS CERTIFICATE RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY

BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II............3 3 4 96 PHIL 2306. Introduction to Ethics.....................................3 0 3 48 Choose ONE from the following: SPAN 1411. Beginning Spanish I........................................3 2 4 96 SLNG 1304. American Sign Language (ASL): I................2 2 3 64 Choose ONE from the following: DMSO 1166. Practicum - Diagnostic Medical Sonography/Sonagrapher and Ultrasound Technician...................................0 7 1 112 MRIT 2164. Practicum - Magnetic Resonance Imaging.............................................................0 7 1 112 CTMT 2164. Practicum - Computed Tomography Technology.......................................................0 7 1 112 MAMT 2164. Practicum - Mammography..........................0 7 1 112 RADR 2167 Practicum – Radiologic Technology/ Science-Radiographer.....................................0 7 1 112

Total Semester Hours for Certificate

12

ENHANCED SKILLS CERTIFICATE RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY (Mammography Registry Preparation) These courses will prepare a Registered Radiographer for advanced imaging of the breast and prepare for the advanced practice exam in mammography. Individuals must be a Registered Radiographer to qualify for these courses. MAMT 2164. Practicum - Mammography..........................0 7 1 112 MAMT 2330. Quality Assurance...........................................3 0 3 32 MAMT 2233. Anatomy/Positioning and Patient Assessment.......................................................2 0 2 32 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 6

ENHANCED SKILLS CERTIFICATE RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY (Computed Tomography) These courses will prepare a Registered Radiographer, Radiation Therapist, or Nuclear Medicine Technologist for advanced medical imaging in computed tomography and prepare for the advanced certification exam in computed tomography. Individuals must be a graduate of a 2-year accredited program in ionizing radiation and possess a current ARRT certification in Radiography, Radiation Therapy, or Nuclear Medicine. CTMT 2232. Principles of Computed Tomography..........2 0 2 32 CTMT 2460. Clinical-Radiologic Technology/ Science-Radiographer.....................................0 12 4 192 CTMT 2236. Computed Tomography Equipment and Methodology............................................2 0 2 32 CTMT 2563. Clinical-Radiologic Technology/ Science-Radiographer.....................................0 15 5 240 RADR 2240. Sectional Anatomy for Medical Imaging.....2 0 2 32

Total Semester Hours for Certificate

15

297


REAL ESTATE SALES - RESPIRATORY THERAPY

Real Estate Sales SEE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT

Registered Nursing SEE: NURSING

Respiratory Therapy Department of Allied Health......................................................(361) 698-2820

Respiratory Therapy is a health sciences specialty employed in the diagnosis and treatment of individuals with breathing disorders. Respiratory Therapists provide therapeutic and diagnostic services for pediatric and adult clients within hospitals and in the home care setting. Del Mar College offers a 67 credit hour Associate in Applied Science degree in Respiratory Therapy; a 21-month program accredited by the Committee of Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC), 1248 Harwood Rd., Bedford, TX 76021-4244, (817) 283-2835, American Medical Association (AMA), and Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Programs (CAAHEP) 35 East Wacker Drive, Ste. 1970, Chicago, IL 60601-2208, (312) 464-4623. In addition to meeting the general College admission requirements, the applicant must be at least 17 years of age and must submit an application for admission to the Respiratory Therapy program. Applications can be downloaded from the Respiratory Therapy Web page at www.delmar.edu/rt/training.html or may be obtained by calling (361)698-2820. The program accepts 18 students per year. In order to be eligible to be considered for admission into the program, the student must: • submit the completed application for admission and all required admission documentation by July 15 • complete all prerequisite course requirements • have a grade point average of 2.0 • must be on college level in Reading, English, and Math After program acceptance, the student must submit a completed physical examination which includes the complete Hepatitis B series, a current college transcript and a current card of completion in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) for Health Care Providers which must be maintained throughout the program. Upon enrollment, the student must pass a background check and drug screen test, at student’s expense, for security clearance and continued enrollment in the program. Graduates of the program are eligible to apply to the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC) to take board examinations; Certified Respiratory Therapist (CRT) and Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT). Graduates must pass the CRT examination before applying for the RRT examination. Graduates of the program may be able to transfer some acquired credit hours 298


RESPIRATORY THERAPY to a baccalaureate degree curriculum. The number of transferable credit hours can be maximized with appropriate faculty advisement prior to and during the student’s enrollment. ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE DEGREE: RESPIRATORY THERAPY ENHANCED SKILLS OPTION (Suggested Occupational Plan)

Sem. Clock Lec. Lab Hrs. Hours PREREQUISITES BIOL 2401. Human Anatomy and Physiology I............3 3 4 96 ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 48 * ITSC 1309. Integrated Software Applications I OR POFI 1301. Computer Applications I...............................2 2-4 3 64-96 HPRS 1106. Essentials of Medical Terminology...............1 1 1 32 HPRS 1204. Basic Health Profession Skills.......................1 3 2 64 Social/Behavioral Science Elective.............................................3 0 3 48 Humanities/Visual or Performing Arts Elective......................3 0 3 48 SPCH 1321. Business and Professional Communications OR SPCH 1315. Fundamentals of Public Speaking..............3 0 3 48 BIOL 2402. Human Anatomy and Physiology II............3 3 4 96 FIRST SEMESTER RSPT 1329. Respiratory Care Fundamentals I.................2 4 3 96 RSPT 1260. Clinical..............................................................0 12 2 192 RSPT 1213. Basic Respiratory Care Pharmacology.........2 0 2 32 ENGL 1302. Composition II................................................3 0 3 48 SECOND SEMESTER RSPT 1331. Respiratory Care Fundamentals II...............2 4 3 96 RSPT 2210. Cardiopulmonary Disease.............................2 0 2 32 CHEM 1406. Basic Chemistry...............................................3 3 4 96 RSPT 1261. Clinical..............................................................0 12 2 192 THIRD SEMESTER RSPT 2314. Mechanical Ventilation...................................2 4 3 96 RSPT 2161. Clinical..............................................................0 6 1 96 FOURTH SEMESTER RSPT 2260. Clinical..............................................................0 12 2 192 RSPT 2353. Neonatal/Pediatric C/P Care.......................3 0 3 48 BIOL 2420. Microbiology and Clinical Pathology..........3 3 4 96 FIFTH SEMESTER RSPT 2261. Clinical..............................................................0 12 2 192 RSPT 2230. Respiratory Care Examination Prep (Capstone)...............................................2 0 2 32 Mathematics Elective......................................................................3 0 3 48 Total Semester Hours­for Associate Degree 67 * Bridge Courses

Courses in bold type meet General Education requirements for Del Mar College Associate in Applied Science degrees.

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RESPIRATORY THERAPY -SOCIAL WORK

PHIL 2306. RNSG 1193.

ENHANCED SKILLS CERTIFICATE RESPIRATORY THERAPY

Introduction to Ethics.....................................3 0 3 48 Special Topics in Nursing..............................1 0 1 16 Total Semester Hours for Certificate 4

Restaurant Management SEE: HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

Safety SEE: OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH

Secretary, General SEE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT

Secretary, Legal SEE: LEGAL PROFESSIONS

Security

SEE: CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Small Business Management SEE: MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT

Social Studies SEE: TEACHING

Social Work Department of Social Sciences....................................................(361) 698-1228 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: SOCIAL WORK (Suggested Transfer Plan) Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3

300


RESPIRATORY THERAPY -SOCIAL WORK HIST 1301. United States History I OR HIST 2327. Mexican-American History I........................3 0 3 College-Level Mathematics Core Elective ................................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective w/lab.......................3 3-4 4 KINE 1238. Introduction to Physical Fitness and Sport..........................................................2 1 2 SECOND SEMESTER ENGL 1302. Composition II.................................................3 0 3 HIST 1302. United States History II OR HIST 2328. Mexican-American History II......................3 0 3 Life and Physical Sciences Core Elective...................................3 0 3 SOCI 1301. Introduction Sociology...................................3 0 3 Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Elective (outside major field)......................................3 0 3 THIRD SEMESTER Language, Philosophy and Culture Core Elective.....................3 0 3 GOVT 2305. Federal Government: Federal Constitution and Topics.................3 0 3 SOCI 1306. Social Problems................................................3 0 3 Speech Core Elective (SPCH 1311, 1315 or 1321) …………….3 0 3 Creative Arts Core Elective..........................................................3 0 3 FOURTH SEMESTER GOVT 2306. Texas Government: Texas Constitution and Topics......................3 0 3 PSYC 2317. Statistical Methods in Psychology................3 0 3 SOCI 2361. Introduction to Social Work...........................3 0 3 *Approved course providing basic computer skills..................3 0 3 Approved Electives.........................................................................3 0 3 Total Semester Hours for Associate Degree 60

Courses in bold type satisfy Del Mar College Core Curriculum. * COSC 1301 Introduction to Computing; ITSC 1301 Introduction to Computers; or ITSC 1309 Integrated Software Applications I. Students should check specific requirements of the college or university to which they plan to transfer.

Sociology Department of Social Sciences....................................................(361) 698-1228 ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE: SOCIOLOGY (Suggested Transfer Plan) Sem. FIRST SEMESTER Lec. Lab Hrs. ENGL 1301. Composition I.................................................3 0 3 HIST