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NATIONAL ARE SCHOOLS PREPARING BLACK BOYS FOR PRISON? P4

Houston’s Leading Black Information Source Volume 80 | Number 46

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WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22, 2011 | FREE

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BUFFALO SOLDIERS on Wheels

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TROY DAVIS

dies despite doubt

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Multitalented & growing

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1,0ċƫ!..5ƫ.%!. hosts meetings

Deion Sanders starts schools

The Houston  Independent  School  District   wants  to  know  what  residents  think, and  is  holding  a  series  of  meetings  with   Superintendent  Dr.  Terry  Grier.  The  six “Community  Conversations”  take  place   in  October  in  different  parts  of  the  city. Topics  of  discussion  include  the  district’s   Strategic  Direction,  a  set  of  goals adopted  last  year.

Former NFL  and  Major  League  Baseball   star  Deion  Sanders  is  not  content  to  work as  a  sports  analyst  and  star  in   commercials.  He  was  recently  given   the  go-­ahead  to  open  two  charter   schools  in  the  Metroplex  area.  Sanders   plans  to  locate  both  in  traditionally   underserved  areas.  The  schools  will   serve  at  least  650  students  each.

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P6 CHAG’S PLACE

Carl Richie, Kelli Rod and LaRence Snowden at the U.S. Rep. Barbara Jordan stamp unveiling.

P16


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Food Stepping up Your ‘Grilling Game

Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America

What’s influencing popular flavors on the grill this season? Big spice profiles, regional American twists, adventurous global inspirations and new tart-sweet combinations will be stoking the fires for a delicious grilling season.

by Melissa V. Harris-Perry “This book is concerned with understanding the emotional realities of black women’s lives in order to answer a political, not a personal, question: What does it mean to be a black woman and an American citizen?”

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WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011 | DEFENDER

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with superintendent Houston  Independent   School  District  resi-­ dents  are  invited  to   attend  a  series  of   “Community  Con-­ versations�  with   Superintendent   Dr.  Terry  Grier   during  October. The  meet-­ ings  will  address   the  district’s   progress  toward   accomplishing  the   goals  established  last   year  when  the  Board  of   Education  adopted  its  Strategic   Direction. The  town  hall  format  will  allow   for  an  unscripted  two-­way  conversation   in  which  community  members  can  ask   questions  (in  person  or  via  e-­mail)  and   participate  in  the  discussion. Developed  over  a  six-­month  period  

in  partnership  with  the   community,  HISD’s   Strategic  Direc-­ WLRQLGHQWL¿HV¿YH core  initiatives   designed  to  help   make  it  the  best   public  school   system  in   America.  Those   initiatives  are: 1  Effective   teacher  in  every   classroom 2  Effective  principal  in   every  school 3  Data-­driven  accountability 4  Rigorous  instructional  standards  and   supports 5  Culture  of  trust  through  action Grier  is  asking  HISD  residents  to  begin   the  dialogue  about  the  district’s  direc-­ tion  by  submitting  questions  via  e-­mail   to  contactus@houstonisd.org.  

D.A. says no charges for Jolanda Jones

$! 1(! ĆŤ !!0%*#/ 0ċƍąƍĢƍ)ĆŤ+1/0+*ĆŤ ĆŤ%#$ĆŤ $++(ÄŒĆŤÄŠÄ…Ä€Ä€ĆŤ .2%*#0+* Ä‘ĆŤ0ÝƍÄ?ĆŤÄ…Ä?ÄƒÄ€ĆŤ,Ä‹)Ä‹ĆŤ0+ƍćƍ,Ä‹)Ä‹ Ä‘ĆŤ+))1*%05Ä?ƍćÄ?ÄƒÄ€ĆŤ,Ä‹)Ä‹ĆŤ0+ƍĉƍ,Ä‹)Ä‹ 0ċƍćƍĢƍ$2!6ĆŤ%#$ĆŤ$++(ÄŒĆŤÄ‰Ä†Ä€Ä ĆŤ Howard Ä‘ĆŤ0ÝƍÄ?ĆŤÄ…Ä?ÄƒÄ€ĆŤ,Ä‹)Ä‹ĆŤ0+ƍćƍ,Ä‹)Ä‹ Ä‘ĆŤ+))1*%05Ä?ƍćÄ?ÄƒÄ€ĆŤ,Ä‹)Ä‹ĆŤ0+ƍĉƍ,Ä‹)Ä‹ 0Ä‹ĆŤÄ Ä ĆŤÄ˘ĆŤ$.,/0+3*ĆŤ%#$ĆŤ$++(ÄŒĆŤÄˆÄ†Ä€Ä…ĆŤ Bissonnet Ä‘ĆŤ0ÝƍÄ?ĆŤÄ…Ä?ÄƒÄ€ĆŤ,Ä‹)Ä‹ĆŤ0+ƍćƍ,Ä‹)Ä‹ Ä‘ĆŤ+))1*%05Ä?ƍćÄ?ÄƒÄ€ĆŤ,Ä‹)Ä‹ĆŤ0+ƍĉƍ,Ä‹)Ä‹ 0Ä‹ĆŤÄ Ä‰ĆŤÄ˘ĆŤ$!0(!5ĆŤ%#$ĆŤ$++(ÄŒĆŤÄ…Ä‰Ä€Ä ĆŤ .+2% !*! Ä‘ĆŤ0ÝƍÄ?ĆŤÄ…Ä?ÄƒÄ€ĆŤ,Ä‹)Ä‹ĆŤ0+ƍćƍ,Ä‹)Ä‹ Ä‘ĆŤ+))1*%05Ä?ƍćÄ?ÄƒÄ€ĆŤ,Ä‹)Ä‹ĆŤ0+ƍĉƍ,Ä‹)Ä‹ 0ċƍĂĀƍĢƍ+.0$%*#ĆŤ%#$ĆŤ$++(ÄŒĆŤÄŠÄ‚Ä Ä†ĆŤ Scott Ä‘ĆŤ0ÝƍÄ?ĆŤÄ…Ä?ÄƒÄ€ĆŤ,Ä‹)Ä‹ĆŤ0+ƍćƍ,Ä‹)Ä‹ Ä‘ĆŤ+))1*%05Ä?ƍćÄ?ÄƒÄ€ĆŤ,Ä‹)Ä‹ĆŤ0+ƍĉƍ,Ä‹)Ä‹ 0ċƍĂąƍĢƍ00%!ĆŤ !ĆŤ$%0!ĆŤ 10%+*(ĆŤ 1,,+.0ĆŤ!*0!.ÄŒĆŤÄ…Ä…Ä€Ä€ĆŤÄ‹ĆŤÄ Ä‰0$ĆŤ0.!!0

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Justice Dept. rules redistricting plan illegal Defender  News  Services The  U.S.  Department  of  Justice  recently   ruled  that  a  redistricting  plan  passed  by  the   Texas  legislature  is  illegal.  The  ruling  sets   the  stage  for  a  legal  showdown  to  determine   how  Texas  will  select  its  representatives  to   Congress. The  Justice  Department  said  that  the   proposed  map  does  not  “maintain  or  increase   the  ability  of  minority  voters  to  elect  their   candidate  of  choice.� Attorneys  for  the  state  had  defended  the  

new  election  districts  drawn  by  the  Republi-­ can-­led  legislature,  saying  they  were  designed   within  the  law. 'HPRFUDWLFDQGPLQRULW\JURXSV¿OHGD lawsuit  over  the  redistricting  maps,  alleging   new  voting  district  lines  are  illegally  discrimi-­ QDWRU\EHFDXVHWKH\FDPRXÀDJHWKHVWDWHœV Hispanic  growth  during  the  past  decade.   The  plan  approved  by  the  legislature   does  not  contain  a  single  majority  Hispanic   district  in  the  Dallas-­Fort  Worth  area,  despite   the  fact  that  the  area  has  one  of  the  largest   Hispanic  populations  in  the  country.

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Houston  U.S.  Reps.  Sheila  Jackson   Lee  and  Gene  Green,  both  Democrats,  were   among  those  who  were  critical  of  the  plan,   especially  with  its  lack  of  representation  for   Hispanics.     Prior  to  the  ruling,  lawyers  wrapped  up   a  two-­week  trial  over  the  plan,  which  was   argued  before  a  three-­judge  federal  panel  in   San  Antonio.   The  judges  indicated  before  adjourning   that  they  would  wait  for  a  Justice  Department   decision  on  the  redistricting  maps  before  issu-­ ing  a  ruling.

After reviewing ethic complaints against Houston City Councilwoman Jolanda Jones, Harris County prosecutors concluded that criminal prosecution is not warranted. City Attorney David Feldman and the O∞ce of Inspector General had accused Jones of using city resources to promote her private law practice. Jones, who maintained her innocence, said she never used her role to benefit anything or anyone other than her constituents. “From the start, I have maintained that when the facts came to light, I would have acted within the acceptable standards of conduct and was always confident that the District Attorney would come to the same conclusion,� she said.

Texas Tea Party members want another special session Members of the Texas Tea Party want Gov. Rick Perry to call another special legislative session to ban sanctuary cities that protect illegant immigrants. “Gov. Perry needs to clarify his position on illegal immigration, and he needs to come back to Texas and to finish the people’s unfinished business,� said JoAnn Fleming, chair of the Tea Party Caucus Advisory Committee of the Texas Legislature. “The ball is in Gov. Perry’s court.� Legislation to ban sanctuary cities failed during the regular session and special session. A spokesperson for Perry said, “The governor already made this a priority, and the Legislature didn’t pick it up.�

1Ýƍ(+ĆŤ+( %!./ĆŤ+*ĆŤ$!!(/ An  exhibit  highlighting  the  untold   story  of  the  history  and  culture  of  African   Americans  and  motorcycles  was  held  at  the   Crowne  Plaza  Hotel.  Shown  at  the  event  are   (l.  to  r.)    Kenneth  “Dream  Makerâ€?  Thomas,   national  president,  Buffalo  Soldiers  Motor   Cycle  Club;Íž  Captain  Paul  Matthew,  founder,   Buffalo  Soldier  National  Museum,  and  Burl  

Washington,  artist.  The  exhibit  featured  the   XQYHLOLQJRI³7KH%ULH¿QJ´DQRULJLQDO watercolor  painting  by  Washington.  He  is   known  for  capturing  the  history  of  Black  sol-­ diers,  cowboys  and  cowgirls,  and  aviators.   Washington  is  a  native  of  Somerville  and  an   art  graduate  of  the  University  of  Texas  at  Ar-­ lington  and  Texas  State  Technical  Institute.

Photo credit: NewsWireHouston

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DEFENDER | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011

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NAACP says there was too much doubt Defender News Services The  NAACP  continued  to  insist   there  were  too  many  holes  in  the  Troy   Davis  case  to  proceed  with  his  execution. The  civil  rights  organization  con-­ demned  the  Georgia  State  Board  of  Pa-­ roles  and  Pardons  for  its  decision  to  deny   clemency  to  Davis  and  to  move  forward   with  the  execution  on  Sept.  21.   “We  are  appalled  and  outraged  by   the  Parole  Board’s  erroneous  deci-­ sion  to  uphold  the  state’s  death   sentence  to  murder  an   innocent  man,�  said   NAACP  President   and  CEO  Benjamin   Todd  Jealous.  “There  is  too   much  doubt  to   proceed  with  an   execution.  No   amount  of  delib-­ eration  will  change   the  fact  that  the  case   against  Mr.  Davis   has  too  many   holes.� Jealous   added  that  the   case  does  not  

bode  well  for  the  justice  system. “In  moments  of  immense  sadness,   moments  that  shake  the  foundation  of   our  faith  in  the  justice  system  and  in   mankind,  there  are  often  no  words  that   can  adequately  express  one’s  grief  and   outrage,â€?  said  Jealous.    In  a  case  that  garnered  national   attention,  seven  of  the  nine  witnesses   against  Davis  have  since  recanted  their   statements  incriminating  him,  several   citing  police  pressure  to  fabricate  state-­ ments.   At  least  three  of  the  jurors   from  Davis’s  trial  called  for   Davis  to  be  granted  clem-­ ency,  one  saying  that  if   she  knew  at  trial  what  she   knows  now,  Troy  Davis   would  have  been  found   not  guilty.   The  NAACP   Georgia  State  Confer-­ ence  had  been  at  the   forefront  of  calling  for   justice  on  behalf  of  Davis,   and  also  condemned  the   scheduled  execution,   citing  major  weak-­ nesses  in  the  case.     Âł:HÂżQGLW

unconscionable  that  the  Board  would   allow  this  execution  given  its  prior   ruling  and  despite  the  nearly  1,000,000   voices  calling  for  justice  –  including   40,000  from  Georgia  and  over  10,000   from  Savannah,  3,300  members  of  the   clergy  and  1,500  legal  professionals  –   in  support  of  Mr.  Davis,â€?  said  Edward   O.  Dubose,  president,  Georgia  State   Conference,  NAACP.     “To  allow  this  execution  to  go   forward  without  a  re-­examination  of   the  facts  and  the  alternate  suspect  is  an   injustice  to  both  families,  to  the  jurors   who  sentenced  Davis  to  death  and  to   the  people  of  Chatham  County.â€? On  the  evening  of  Aug.  19,  1989,   6DYDQQDKSROLFHRIÂżFHU0DUN$OOHQ MacPhail  was  gunned  down  while  he   worked  as  a  part-­time  security  guard.   To  date,  there  is  no  physical  evidence   connecting  Davis  to  the  crime  and   some  individuals  pointed  to  an  alter-­ nate  suspect  as  the  real  killer. “Troy’s  family  has  been  moved   by  the  efforts  of  the  NAACP  and   supporters  around  the  world,  and   our  thoughts  and  prayers  are  with   them  now  as  they  turn  to  look  into   the  face  of  the  cruelest  kind  of  injus-­ tice,â€?  he  said.  

Are schools preparing Black boys for prison? By STARLA MUHAMMAD Special to NNPA

$&KLFDJRPRWKHUUHFHQWO\ÂżOHGDODZ-­ suit  against  the  Chicago  Board  of  Education   alleging  a  public  school  security  guard   handcuffed  her  young  son  while  he  was   a  student  at  George  Washington  Carver   Primary  School  on  the  city’s  far  south  side.     The  attorney  representing  LaShanda   Smith  says  the  youngster  was  among  sev-­ eral  six  and  seven-­year-­olds  handcuffed  by   the  guard  for  allegedly  “talking  in  class.â€?    In  New  Orleans,  Sebastian  and   Robin  Weston  were  plaintiffs  in  a  2010   class-­  action  lawsuit  alleging  their  then  six-­ year-­old  son  was  handcuffed  and  shackled   to  a  chair  by  an  armed  security  guard  after   the  boy  argued  with  another  student  over   a  chair.   Are  these  incidents,  in  which  young   Black  boys  are  treated  like  common  crimi-­

nals  in  America’s  schools,  subconsciously   preparing  them  instead  for  life  behind  bars   in  the  criminal  justice  system?   “The  school  system  has  been  trans-­ formed  into  nothing  more  than  a  prison   preparation  industry,â€?  says  Umar  Abdullah   Johnson,  president  of  National  Movement   to  Save  Black  Boys.   “The  job  of  the  school  district  is  to   prep  the  children  for  prison  just  like  a  chef   preps  his  food  before  he  actually  cooks  it,â€?   -RKQVRQDQDWLRQDOO\FHUWLÂżHGSV\FKROR-­ gist,  told  the  Final  Call.   “Yes  We  Can:  The  2010  Schott  50   State  Report  on  Black  Males  in  Public   Education,â€?  states  that  Black  male  students   are  punished  more  severely  for  similar   infractions  than  their  white  peers.   Johnson  says  a  false  image  has  been   created  that  suggests  Black  boys  are  not   interested  in  being  educated.    

The  emotional  and  psychological   effects  on  children  from  unfair  and  out-­of-­ control  disciplinary  action  like  handcuff-­ ing  is  setting  them  up  for  criminality  he   explains.   Âł7KHÂżUVWWKLQJWKDWW\SHRIEHKDYLRU does  is  it  socializes  the  boy  at  a  very  young   age  into  criminal  consciousness,â€?  Johnson   said.  “He  is  nurtured  by  the  school  into  an   understanding  that  his  role  in  society  is  that   of  a  criminal.â€? Schools  are  the  number  one  referral   source  to  jail  and  juvenile  hall  for  Black   children  and  teens.    Therefore,  Johnson   urges  parents  to  meet  and  establish  a  rela-­ tionship  with  their  child’s  teacher.   “Once  you  meet  with  a  teacher,  just   the  vibration  from  that  teacher  [will]  let   you  know  whether  they’re  there  to  get  a   paycheck  or  whether  they’re  there  to  teach   your  child,â€?  he  said.

U.S.briefs Cornel West joins group looking for Obama challenger After accompanying Tavis Smiley on a poverty tour across the country, scholar Cornel West has turned his attention elsewhere. West has joined forces with consumer advocate Ralph Nader and the New Progressive Alliance. It is described as a grassroots campaign conceptualized to oppose President Barack Obama by endorsing an independent or third-party candidate. The group faults Obama for his actions during the recent debt ceiling negotiations, the military escalation in Afghanistan and Pakistan, and for extending tax cuts first enacted by former President George W. Bush. The group said it is seeking “recognizable, articulate� candidates to debate Obama’s policies.

First Lady and restaurant chain promote good health Michelle Obama recently visited a restaurant in Maryland for an announcement in the quest for healthier food choices. Mrs. Obama unveiled a Partnership for Healthier America with Darden Restaurants, the company that operates Red Lobster, Olive Garden and other establishments. Darden has committed to a variety of changes designed to increase healthy meal content and decrease calories and sodium. Fruits or vegetables, for example, will become the default side dishes on children’s meals. “This is a breakthrough moment in the restaurant industry,� Obama said. “The changes [made] could impact the health and well-being of the entire generation of young people.�

Reports vary on alleged tryst between Palin and Rice Did former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin really have a fling with former NBA player Glen Rice? A book by author Joe McGinniss claims the ex-Alaska governor had a one-night stand with Rice when she covered him as a sports reporter 25 years ago. McGinniss also said Palin had a “fetish� for Black men. Rice refused to comment on the situation when reporters reached him at his Florida home, but he allegedly confirmed the relationship to McGinniss in the book. Palin’s husband Todd, however, said it isn’t so. “His book is full of disgusting lies, innuendo, and smears,� Palin said.

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1(%/$!. Sonceria Messiah-Jiles  2!.0%/%*#ÄĽ(%!*0ĆŤ!(0%+*/ĆŤ !()ĆŤ+ /+*ĆŤ5(!.ĆŤĆŤ //+%0!ĆŤ %0+./ !/$+* ĆŤ%((%*#/(!5 .%(5*ĆŤ ./$((ĆŤ Art Director +*5ĆŤ!.** !6ÄĄ2%(

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defendernetwork.com DEFENDER | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011

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DEFENDER | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011

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entertainment Multi-talented TourĂŠ talks By KAM WILLIAMS Defender

Born  in  Boston  on  March  20,  1971,   TourĂŠ  is  a  cultural  critic  for  MSNBC,  as  well   as  the  host  of  a  couple  of  shows  on  Fuse-­ TV:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hip  Hop  Shopâ&#x20AC;?  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;On  the  Record.â&#x20AC;?   A  contributing  editor  at  Rolling  Stone,  his   articles  appear  regularly  in  publications  rang-­ ing  from  the  New  York  Times  to  the  Village   Voice  to  the  New  Yorker. TourĂŠ  is  also  the  author  of  a  collection   of  essays  called  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Never  Drank  the  Kool-­ Aid,â&#x20AC;?  a  collection  of  short  stories  called   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Portable  Promised  Land,â&#x20AC;?  and  a  novel   titled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Soul  City.â&#x20AC;?  Furthermore,  he  serves  on   the  Rock  &  Roll  Hall  of  Fame  Nominating   Committee,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Adjunct   Faculty  of  the  City  University  of  New  Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Graduate  School  of  Journalism.                        A  devoted  father,  TourĂŠ  lives  in   Brooklyn  with  his  wife,  Rita,  and  their  two   children,  Hendrix  and  Fairuz.  Here,  he  talks   about  his  new  book,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Afraid  of  Post-­ Blackness?â&#x20AC;?  KW:  What  inspired  you  to  write  the   book?  Let  me  guess,  the  incident  in  college   where  somebody  embarrassed  you  by  saying,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shut  up,  TourĂŠ!  You  ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  Black!â&#x20AC;?   T:  <HDKWKDWZDVGHÂżQLWHO\DQLQFLWLQJ incident.  I  had  already  been  thinking  very   actively  about  what  it  means  to  be  Black   since  I  was  very  young.  But  that  got  me   thinking  about  it  with  a  different  intensity  on   an  extremely  deep,  personal  level.   So,  that  sort  of  got  the  ball  rolling,  but   WKHPRUHVSHFLÂżFLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHZDVWKHVXFFHVVRI

Barack  Obama  which  was  an  indication  to  me   that  something  had  changed  in  terms  of  race   and  what  it  meant  to  be  Black  in  America.   We  are  not  post-­racial,  but  some  things  have   changed.  For  instance,  I  think  the  younger   generation  has  a  more  progressive  attitude,   DQGWKDWGHÂżQLWHO\SOD\HGWR%DUDFNÂśVIDYRU  KW:  How  can  so  many  in  the   period  you  describe  as  post-­ Blackness  give  up  being   boxed  in  by  race  if  they   have  neither  the  educa-­ tional  nor  economic   opportunities  to  leave   the  ghetto  locality? T:  What  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  say-­ ing  is  that  you  have  the   ability  to  embody  black-­ ness  however  you  wish.   I  believe  [itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s]  right  that   you  see  greater  opportunity   for  education  and  advancement   as  you  go  up  the  class  scale,  but   America  is  the  land  of  rapid  class   ascension  within  a  generation,   within  a  decade,  

even  within  a  year.  So,  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  this  only   applies  to  middle-­class  Black  people.  If  you   go  into  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hood,  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  encounter  a  huge   variety  in  terms  of  blackness.â&#x20AC;? KW:  Do  you  see  any  value  in  the   government  census  trying  to  keep  track  of   people  by  race  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Black,  white,  etcetera?  If   so,  how  can  we  truly  become  post-­ racial? T:  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  the  goal   is  to  become  post-­racial.   I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  a  world  in   which  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  think-­ ing  about  race.  I  want   a  world  where  people   are  proud  to  be  who   they  are,  and  where   everybody  feels  comfort-­ able  imposing  the  beauty   of  their  culture  on  America.   The  goal  is  that  prejudice   based  around  those  differ-­ ences  ends.  Post-­racialism  is   not  the  goal,  because  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  

even  possible.       KW:  What  key  quality  do  you  believe  all   successful  people  share?     T:  The  ability  to  take  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no,â&#x20AC;?  because   in  order  to  become  successful  at  anything,   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  experience  a  lot  of  setbacks   and  a  lot  of  doors  closing.   KW:  What  message  do  you  want  the   public  to  take  away  from  your  book? T:  Two  things:  First,  I  want  the  Black   people  made  to  feel  like  outsiders  because   they  like  opera  or  sushi  or  scuba  diving  to   know  that  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  weird  and  that  they   are  Black.  You  can  do  Black  and  be  Black  in   any  way  you  choose.  And  secondly,  I  want   the  self-­appointed,  volunteer  identity  cops  to   be  frozen  in  their  tracks,  because  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not   really  doing  the  race  a  service.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  time  for   them  to  take  off  their  badges  and  let  people  be   %ODFNLQZKDWHYHUZD\WKH\VHHÂżW KW:  What  advice  do  you  have  for   young  people  who  are  interested  in  entering   WKHÂżHOGRIMRXUQDOLVP" T:  Think  about  something  else  that   might  make  you  happy.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  serious.  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think  the  opportunities  are  there  to  make  a   comfortable  living  in  journalism  anymore.   KW:  What  was  the  best  business  deci-­ sion  you  ever  made? T:  I  bought  some  shares  of  Google  and   Apple  a  few  years  ago.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  good  so  far. KW:  What  advice  do  you  have  for  any-­ one  who  wants  to  follow  in  your  footsteps? T:  Read  a  lot,  write  a  lot,  try  to  experi-­ ence  a  lot,  and  take  a  big  bite  from  the  buffet   of  life.  

whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sup +Forbes names Tyler Perry richest man +Houston legend Archie Bell suing +R. Kelly opens up about next album in entertainment industry with $130 mil

record companies over royalties

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Black Pantiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;scaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; throat surgery

Tyler Perry, creator of the popular â&#x20AC;&#x153;Madeaâ&#x20AC;? franchise and TBS shows â&#x20AC;&#x153;House of Payneâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meet the Browns,â&#x20AC;? recently topped Forbes Magazineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list of Entertainmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Highest Paid Men. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thanks to five movies he has cranked out over the past two years and two TV series, Perry earned $130 million between May 2010 and May 2011, which ranks him as the highest-earning man in entertainment for that time period,â&#x20AC;? the magazine wrote. Producer Jerry Bruckheimer came in second on the list with $113 million. Perry is set to appear as detective Alex Cross in author James Pattersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;I, Alex Crossâ&#x20AC;? film. Cross was originally portrayed by Morgan Freeman in the films â&#x20AC;&#x153;Along Came a Spiderâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kiss the Girls.â&#x20AC;? Perry also has plans to launch his own television network tentatively titled Tyler TV.

Local music legend Archie Bell has filed suit against Philadelphia International Records and its sister company Gamble-Huâ&#x2030; Productions for money he claims they owe him. The court filing alleges the companies breached their contract with Bell by not paying him royalties and other fees. He and his group, Archie Bell and the Drells, had a huge hit in the 1960s with the dance single, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tighten Up.â&#x20AC;? Members included Archieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother Lee Bell, along with James Wise, Joe Cross, Billy Butler, Lucious Larkins and Willie Pernell. The group left Atlantic Records and recorded for TSOP, a subsidiary of Gamble and Huâ&#x2030;  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Philadelphia International Records. Their first hit was â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Could Dance All Night,â&#x20AC;? followed by â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Soul City Walkâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Groove.â&#x20AC;? Archie Bell and the Drells last performed together in 1979.

After undergoing throat surgery in July, R. Kelly is getting back on track with his next album. Kelly stopped by WGCIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Morning Riot radio show in Chicago for a rare interview. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was really scary,â&#x20AC;? Kelly said of his surgery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the end of the Love Letter Tour, towards the end, I started feeling it. I thought I had a cold, but, man, I had like a cyst as big as a golf ball on my tonsils. The doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s though, they cut it out, they took care of me really good.â&#x20AC;? Kelly revealed his 11th album will be titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Panties,â&#x20AC;? and the title says it all. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just did the whole Love Letter joint and everybody thinking, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the direction heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; now,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153; Kelly said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nah, that was a moment in timeâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;?

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defendernetwork.com

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011 | DEFENDER

diversity The state of

Minority Business

By ASWAD WALKER Defender

H

as  the  global  economic   downturn  negatively   affected  Houstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   minority  businesses?    If   so,  what  can  be  done  to   breathe  new  life  into  these  entrepre-­ neurial  efforts?     Richard  Huebner,  president  of  the   Houston  Minority  Supplier  Develop-­ ment  Council,  recently  spoke  to  the   Defender  about  the  state  of  minority   business  in  Houston. Richard Huebner He  also  discussed  the  recently   held  HMSDC  Expo  2011  that  sought  to  provide  minority   business  owners  with  the  information  and  contacts  needed   to  take  their  businesses  to  the  next  level.   Huebner  said  that  despite  the  economy,  not   everyone  is  suffering,  and  minority  businesses  that  are   members  of  the  HMSDC  tend  to  be  plugged  into  larger   contracts.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  2011  some  minority-­owned  small  businesses   are  doing  quite  well,  but  it  depends  on  the  industry  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   in,â&#x20AC;?  Huebner  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Retail  is  doing  poorly  because  no  oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  

spending  money.  The  IT  industry  became   overcrowded;Íž  so  some  businesses  are   washing  out.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Still,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  actually  seeing  some   spending  again,  especially  with  suppli-­ ers  to  oil,  gas  and  transportation.    Private   industry  has  rebounded  a  little  bit,  but   government  contracting  fell  off  big-­time.     Government  agencies  are  really  having  a   tough  time.    But  this  year  private  industry   is  spending  a  little  more.â&#x20AC;? Huebner  offered  additional  insight   into  minority  entrepreneurship. Defender:  What  hurdles  besides  the   general  economic  downturn  provide  the   greatest  challenges  moving  forward  for   minority  Businesses? Huebner:  Two  things  in  particular:  capacity  and   capital.    We  are  living  in  a  global  marketplace;Íž  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no   longer  a  local,  community  or  even  a  national  marketplace.     Businesses  have  to  meet  the  needs  of  contractors  on  a   global  scale.    Many  small,  minority-­owned  businesses  lack  that   capacity.    Contractors  want  to  know,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are  you  large  enough   to  perform  on  my  contract?â&#x20AC;?    Accessing  capital  is  another   challenge.    Trying  to  get  any  capital  to  grow  your  business  

in  todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  market  is  almost  impossible.    And  as  lending   criteria  has  increased  it  has  impeded  access  to  capital,   particularly  growth  capital.     2QHDUHDRIFKDOOHQJHWKDWPD\EHKDUGHUWRGHÂżQH involves  what  industry  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  in.    The  U.S.  moved  from  an   agrarian  society  to  an  industrial  society  to  a  knowledge-­ based  one.    Jobs  and  opportunities  changed  as  well.    We   have  to  ask  ourselves,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are  we  in  the  right  industry?â&#x20AC;?    Part   RIWKHWKLQJLVWRÂżQGWKHULJKWPDUNHWIRU\RXUSURGXFWVDQG the  right  industry  for  your  talents.     In  IT,  for  example,  though  the  competition  is  crowded   over  here  you  may  have  more  of  a  market  overseas.    A  very   FRQJHVWHGÂżHOGRIFRPSHWLWRUVH[LVWVLQGRZQVWUHDPEXVL QHVV>VXFKDVUHÂżQLQJDQGVHOOLQJRLODQGRLOEDVHGSURG ucts].    Just  the  opposite  exists  in  upstream  business  [pulling   the  oil  out  of  the  ground.  Minority  businesses  should  set   their]  sights  on  where  the  business  is  instead  of  competing   LQRYHUFURZGHGÂżHOGV$OVRPDQ\RIRXUFRQWUDFWRUVDUH doing  much  better  overseas.    So,  is  our  opportunity  here   or  overseas?  Major  corporations  would  love  to  see  more   minority-­owned  drilling  companies,  or  even  one.    But  capi-­ WDOUHTXLUHPHQWVIRUVXFKDEXVLQHVVDUHVLJQLÂżFDQW Defender:  What  is  minority  supplier  development   and  how  does  it  relate  to  the  overall  success  of  minority   businesses? Huebner:  The  majority  of  our  minority  suppliers  are   Continued on Page 9

!"!* !.*!03+.'Ä&#x2039;+)ĆŤÄ&#x2018;ĆŤ!.2%*#ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ+1/0+*ĆŤ.!ĆŤ"+.ĆŤ+2!.ĆŤÄ&#x2030;Ä&#x20AC;ĆŤ5!./ĆŤ

7


8

DEFENDER | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011


defendernetwork.com

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011 | DEFENDER

diversity

9

$!ĆŤ00!ĆŤ+"Ä&#x2039;Ä&#x2039;Ä&#x2039;Continued from page 7 African  American  (43%),  compared  to  Latinos  (38%),  Asians   (17%),  and  Native  Americans  (2%).    That  means  African   American  businesses  should  be  winning  about  43%  of  the   supplier  contractsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and  they  are.    That  tells  me  what  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   doing  is  working.     However,  even  though  Black  businesses  are  winning   43%  of  the  contracts  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  only  obtaining  27%  of  the  dollar   volume  compared  to  Native  American  businesses  getting   20%.    Does  that  mean  contractors  prefer  Native  American   companies  over  Black  companies?    No.    It  means  [some]   Black  companies  are  in  the  wrong  industries.  Native  Ameri-­ cans  are  in  the  right  industries,  such  as  oil  country  tubular  bids,   that  generate  large  amounts  of  capital,  and  also  require  access   to  big  capital  to  get  in.     Generally,  African  Americans,  because  of  the  historic   lack  of  capital,  tend  to  be  in  industries  that  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  require  a  lot   RIFDSLWDO²VWDIÂżQJFRQVXOWLQJWUDLQLQJ,77KRVHLQGXVWULHV are  really  down  right  now.    [HMSDC  has]  done  a  good  job  of   growing  companies  to  qualify  for  contracts.    Now  we  need  to   help  them  with  getting  in  the  right  industries,  gaining  capital,   turning  the  dollar  over  many  more  times  in  our  community,   forming  strategic  alliances,  and  developing  strategies  for   growing  wealth. Defender:  Why  do  you  think  supplier  diversity  is  often   overlooked  during  discussions  on  equality  and  diversity? Huebner:  Most  people  think  employment  when  talking   about  diversity,  not  realizing  minority  businesses  create  way   PRUHMREVIRUPLQRULWLHVWKDQODUJHUÂżUPVVHHNLQJGLYHUVLW\LQ their  hiring.    Supplier  diversity  helps  small  businesses  grow   and  succeed.    Small  businesses  create  way  more  jobs.    We  

Houston Minority Supplier Development Council Ä&#x2018;ĆŤ+.)!.(5ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ+1/0+*ĆŤ %*+.%05ĆŤ1/%*!//ĆŤ+1*%( Ä&#x2018;ĆŤ%$. ĆŤÄ&#x2039;ĆŤ1!*!.Ä&#x152;ĆŤ.!/% !*0Ä&#x17D;ĆŤ+*/0*!ĆŤ +*!/Ä&#x152;ĆŤ%.!0+.ĆŤ +"ĆŤ !)!./$%,ĆŤ!.2%!/ Ä&#x2018;ĆŤ+ĆŤ!+)!ĆŤĆŤ !)!.Ä?ĆŤ+1ĆŤ)1/0ĆŤ!ĆŤ*ĆŤ!0$*%ĆŤ)%*+.%05ĆŤ 3$+ĆŤ+3*/Ä&#x152;ĆŤ)*#!/Ä&#x152;ĆŤ* ĆŤ+*0.+(/ĆŤÄ&#x2020;Ä Ĺ&#x152;ĆŤ+"ĆŤ5+1.ĆŤ1/%*!//ĆŤ* ĆŤ 5+1ĆŤ)1/0ĆŤ!ĆŤĆŤÄ&#x2039;Ä&#x2039;ĆŤ%0%6!*Ä&#x2039;ĆŤ+1ĆŤ*ĆŤ+0%*ĆŤ*ĆŤ,,(%0%+*ĆŤ5ĆŤ ((%*#ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ ĆŤ+Ăž ĆŤĆŤ!/ĆŤ+.ĆŤ +3*(+ %*#ĆŤ%0ĆŤ".+)ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ3!/%0!Ä&#x2039;ĆŤ *!ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ,,(%0%+*ĆŤ%/ĆŤ+),(!0! Ä&#x152;ĆŤ.!01.*ĆŤ%0ĆŤ(+*#ĆŤ3%0$ĆŤ((ĆŤ .!-1%.! ĆŤ +1)!*0/ĆŤ* ĆŤĆŤÄ¸Ä Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x20AC;ĆŤ$!'ĆŤ,5(!ĆŤ0+ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ+1/ÄĄ 0+*ĆŤ %*+.%05ĆŤ1/%*!//ĆŤ+1*%(Ä&#x2039;ĆŤĆŤ/%0!ĆŤ2%/%0ĆŤ5ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ %.!0+.ĆŤ+"ĆŤ )!)!.ĆŤ/!.2%!/ĆŤ3%((ĆŤ!ĆŤ+* 10! Ä&#x2039;ĆŤ$!*Ä&#x152;ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ!.0%ßƍ0%+*ĆŤ +),(%*!ĆŤ+))%00!!ĆŤ.!2%!3/ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ,,(%0%+*Ä&#x2039; Ä&#x2018;ĆŤ!.0%ßƍ0%+*ĆŤ.+!//Ä?ĆŤ 0ĆŤ*+.)((5ĆŤ0'!/ĆŤ,,.+4%)0!(5ĆŤÄ&#x192;Ä&#x20AC;ĆŤ 5/ĆŤ%"ĆŤ

ĆŤ.!-1!/0! ĆŤ%*"+.)0%+*ĆŤ%/ĆŤ/1)%00! ĆŤ3%0$ĆŤ0$!ƍĸÄ&#x2020;Ä&#x20AC;ĆŤ !.0%ßƍ0%+*ĆŤ* ĆŤÄ¸Ä Ä&#x20AC;Ä&#x20AC;ĆŤ)!)!./$%,ĆŤ"!!Ä&#x2039;ĆŤ+3!2!.Ä&#x152;ĆŤ%0ĆŤ*ĆŤ0'!ĆŤ Ä&#x2026;ĆŤ0+ĆŤÄ&#x2021;ĆŤ3!!'/ĆŤ%"ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ +1)!*00%+*ĆŤ.!-1!/0! ĆŤ%/ĆŤ%*+),(!0!Ä&#x2039; Ä&#x2018;ĆŤ !)!.ĆŤ!!/Ä?ĆŤ+1ĆŤ,5ĆŤÄ¸Ä Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x20AC;ĆŤ+*!ĆŤ0%)!Ä&#x2039;ĆŤ$!ƍĸÄ&#x2020;Ä&#x20AC;ĆŤ%/ĆŤ"+.ĆŤ!.0%ÄĄ ßƍ0%+*ĆŤ* ĆŤ0$!ĆŤÄ¸Ä Ä&#x20AC;Ä&#x20AC;ĆŤ%/ĆŤ"+.ĆŤ)!)!./$%,ĆŤ1*(!//ĆŤ5+1ĆŤ.!ĆŤ%05ÄĄ !.0%ßƍ! ĆŤ3$!.!/ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ"!!ĆŤ3%((ĆŤ&1/0ĆŤ!ĆŤÄ¸Ä Ä&#x20AC;Ä&#x20AC;ĆŤ"+.ĆŤ)!)!./$%,Ä&#x2039;ĆŤ Ä&#x2018;ĆŤ+*00ĆŤ *"+.)0%+*Ä?ĆŤ$.!!ĆŤ%2!.35Ä&#x152;ĆŤ1%0!ĆŤÄ&#x2020;Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x2020;ĆŤ+1/0+*Ä&#x152;ĆŤ ĆŤÄ&#x2C6;Ä&#x2C6;Ä&#x20AC;Ä&#x2020;Ä&#x2021;ĆŤÄ&#x2C6;Ä Ä&#x192;ÄĄÄ&#x201A;Ä&#x2C6;Ä ÄĄÄ&#x2C6;Ä&#x2030;Ä&#x20AC;Ä&#x2020;ĆŤ%*"+ÄŽ$)Ä&#x2039;+.#

really  need  to  be  committed  to  growing  small  businesses  if  we   are  really  committed  to  creating  more  jobs.    Or  are  we  doing   this  because  we  have  to?     If  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  serious  about  creating  jobs,  a  committed  dia-­ logue  around  minority  business  development  will  become  a   priority  beyond  EEOC  requirements.    The  question  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are  we   about  employment  or  compliance?â&#x20AC;?    Minority  business  devel-­ opment  is  as  important  today  as  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ever  been.    For  example,  

Exxon  Mobil  increased  spending  with  HMSDC  businesses  by   33%,  while  other  companies  reduced  their  spending.     That  says  Exxon  Mobil  made  a  concerted  effort  to   ÂżQGFRPSDQLHVZKRFRXOGEULQJWKHPEHWWHUYDOXHLQWKHVH tight  economic  times,  and  they  found  them  in  the  minor-­ ity  community.    Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  huge  victory.    So  to  the  ques-­ tion,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Can  minority  companies  perform  [with  these  major   contracts]?â&#x20AC;?Absolutely.     Defender:  What  was  the  HMSDC  Expo  2011  and  why   should  owners  and  supporters  of  minority  businesses  look   to  attend  next  year? Huebner:  It  was  a  combination  of  incredible  events   and  opportunities  including  20/20  Insight  Forums.    We   broke  down  the  Houston  economy  into  seven  sectors  and   brought  in  top  business  leaders  from  each  sector  to  tell  us   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  happening  next  in  their  sector,  what  opportunities  do   they  see  coming,  and  how  do  we  best  approach  them.    The   luncheon  was  a  huge  networking  opportunity  to  meet  with   corporations,  contractors,  government  agencies,  and  other   businesses. The  Early  Bird  Breakfast  allowed  small  business  own-­ ers  to  get  their  game  plan  and  strategy  together  for  the  Trade   Fair  &  Marketplace.    At  that  event,  corporations  rotated  in   over  1,200  decision-­makers  through  200  booths,  with  the   900  minority  business  owners  present  asking  questions,  gain-­ LQJLQVLJKWDQGÂżJXULQJRXWZKHUHWKH\ÂżWLQ So  often  we  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  the  opportunity  to  ask  the  ques-­ tions.    At  the  EXPO  attendees  had  the  opportunity  to  ask  the   questions  and  explore  the  opportunities,  so  they  can  hit  the   nail  on  the  head  when  writing  up  business  proposals.

Blacks wield considerable consumer power Defender News Services

A  report  released  by  Nielsen  and  the  National  Newspaper   Publishers  Association  reveals  that  African  Americansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  buying   power  is  expected  to  reach  $1.1  trillion  by  2015.   This  growing  economic  potential  presents  an  opportunity   for  Fortune  500  companies  to  examine  and  further  understand   WKLVLPSRUWDQWĂ&#x20AC;RXULVKLQJPDUNHWVHJPHQW Likewise,  when  consumers  are  more  aware  of  their  buy-­ ing  power  it  can  help  them  make  informed  decisions  about  the   companies  they  want  to  support.   So  says  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  State  of  the  African-­American  Consumer   Report.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Too  often,  companies  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  realize  the  inherent  differenc-­ es  of  our  community,  are  not  aware  of  the  market  size  impact   and  have  not  optimized  efforts  to  develop  messages  beyond   those  that  coincide  with  Black  History  Month,â&#x20AC;?  said  Cloves   Campbell,  NNPA  chairman.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  our  hope  that  by  collaborating  with  Nielsen,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be   able  to  tell  the  African-­American  consumer  story  in  a  manner   in  which  businesses  will  understand.  And  that  this  understand-­ ing  will  propel  those  in  the  C-­Suite  to  develop  stronger,  more   inclusive  strategies  that  optimize  their  market  growth  in  Black   communities,  which  would  be  a  win-­win  for  all  of  us.â&#x20AC;?  

7KHUHSRUWWKH¿UVWRIWKUHHDQQXDOLQVWDOOPHQWVLQD three-­year  alliance  between  Nielsen  and  NNPA,  showcases   the  buying  and  media  habits  and  consumer  trends  of  African   Americans.   The  41st  Annual  Legislative  Congressional  Black  Caucus   Foundation  Conference  recent  activities  set  the  backdrop  for  the   announcement.   Flanked  by  civic,  business  and  legislative  leaders,  Nielsen  

and  NNPA  executives  spoke  about  the  relevance  and  impor-­ tance  of  the  information  shared  in  the  report  and  the  fact  that  it   will  be  distributed  in  NNPAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  200-­plus  publications,  reaching   millions  of  readers.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  see  this  alliance  with  NNPA  as  an  opportunity  to   share  valuable  insights,  unique  consumer  behavior  patterns  and   purchasing  trends  with  millions  of  readers,â&#x20AC;?  said  Susan  Whit-­ Continued on Page 11

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10

DEFENDER | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011 defendernetwork.com

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Consumer power..Continued from page 9 ing,  vice  chair,  Nielsen.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;By  sharing,  for  example,  that  African  Americans  over-­ index  in  several  key  areas,  including  television  viewing  and   mobile  phone  usage,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  provided  a  better  picture  of  where  the   African-­American  community  can  leverage  that  buying  power  to   help  their  communities.   Likewise  the  information  literally  points  businesses  in  the   right  direction  for  growing  market  share  and  developing  long   range  strategies  for  reaching  this  important  demographic  group.â&#x20AC;?   Consumer  trends  included  in  the  report  include  eye-­opening   facts  such  as:   Â&#x2021;:LWKDEX\LQJSRZHURIQHDUO\WULOOLRQDQQXDOO\LI$IULFDQ Americans  were  a  country,  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  be  the  16th  largest  country  in   the  world. Â&#x2021;7KHUHZHUHPLOOLRQDFWLYH$IULFDQ$PHULFDQ,QWHUQHWXVHUV in  July  2011  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  76%  of  whom  visited  a  social  networking/blog   site. Â&#x2021;RIDOO$IULFDQ$PHULFDQVRZQDVPDUWSKRQH Â&#x2021;$IULFDQ$PHULFDQVXVHPRUHWKDQGRXEOHWKHDPRXQWRIPRELOH phone  voice  minutes  compared  to  whites  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  1,298  minutes  a   month  vs.  606. Â&#x2021;$IULFDQ$PHULFDQVPDNHPRUHVKRSSLQJWULSVWKDQDOORWKHU groups,  but  spend  less  money  per  trip.   Â&#x2021;7KHQXPEHURI$IULFDQ$PHULFDQKRXVHKROGVHDUQLQJ or  higher  grew  by  almost  64%,  a  rate  close  to  12%  greater  than   the  change  in  the  overall  populationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  earning  between  2000   DQG7KLVFRQWLQXHGJURZWKLQDIĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHVRFLDOLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFH and  household  income  will  continue  to  impact  the  communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   economic  power.

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011 | DEFENDER

diversity

Merger praised for helping close digital divide

A Â

JURZLQJOHJLRQRIHOHFWHGRIÂżFLDOVVD\WKH EHQHÂżWVRIH[SDQGHGQH[WJHQHUDWLRQ* wireless  service  from  the  proposed  merger   of  AT&T  with  T-­Mobile  are  too  good  to   pass  up.     )HGHUDODQGVWDWHRIÂżFHKROGHUVRIERWKSDUWLHV including  26  state  governors  and  scores  of  federal   legislators,  say  the  transaction  would  boost  the  economy   and  create  jobs.     The  merger  also  has  won  the  backing  of  most  of   the  nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  leading  civil  rights  organizations,  as  well   as  advocates  for  rural  organizations,  educational  groups   and  business  organizations.     The  merger  â&#x20AC;&#x153;stands  to  bring  much  needed  relief   to  the  African-­American  community  by  helping  close   the  digital  divide  and  increasing  access  to  vital  services   in  urban  and  rural  communities,â&#x20AC;?  NAACP  senior  vice   president  Hilary  Shelton  told  the  FCC  in  a  recent  letter. By  making  the  new  service  available  to  over  97   percent  of  the  U.S.  population,  the  merger  would  also   bring  the  country  to  the  edge  of  President  Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  goal   of  nearly  universal  high-­speed  wireless  broadband.

With you when

Announced  by  the  companies  in  March,  the  merger   must  be  approved  by  the  Federal  Communications   Commission  and  the  Justice  Department.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;For  consumers,  combining  the  two  companiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   infrastructure  and  spectrum  holdings  promises  clear   EHQHÂżWVLQVHUYLFHTXDOLW\$GGHGVSHFWUXPFDSDFLW\DQG greater  coverage  will  help  address  network  congestion   and  should  result  in  fewer  dropped  calls,â&#x20AC;?  Connecticut   Democratic  Gov.  Dannel  Malloy  said  in  a  letter  to  the   FCC. Last  month,  76  Democratic  members  of  Congress   VDLGWKHHQKDQFHGVHUYLFHVĂ&#x20AC;RZLQJIURPWKHPHUJHU would  â&#x20AC;&#x153;create  thousands  of  jobs,  including  many  good   SD\LQJXQLRQMREVZLWKVROLGEHQHÂżWV´ The  letter,  whose  signers  represent  31  states,   Puerto  Rico  and  the  Virgin  Islands  and  includes  19   members  of  the  Congressional  Black  Caucus,  noted   that  â&#x20AC;&#x153;the  potential  for  ubiquitous,  wireless  broadband   WKURXJKRXWRXUQDWLRQZRXOGEHDVLJQLÂżFDQWEHQHÂżWIRU millions  of  Americans  that  may  not  otherwise  see  those   EHQHÂżWVLQFOXGLQJRXUFRQVWLWXHQWVOLYLQJLQUXUDODQG underserved  communities.â&#x20AC;?

you,re  prepared  for  the  unexpected

Way2SaveÂŽ We all save for planned events, but sometimes we need a financial cushion for those unexpected surprises. With a Way2Save Savings account, you can save automatically at your own pace. Choose one of three automatic transfer options or combine savings options to save even more. And your plan is easy to adjust as your needs change. Pick the savings option thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right for you and feel more confident knowing you have the tools to help keep your cash flowing. Call 1-800-869-3557, click or stop by to open your Way2Save account today.

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DEFENDER | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011 defendernetwork.com

Student loan default rates increase At  public  institutions,  the   default  rate  increased  from  6   percent  to  7.2  percent,  and  from   Figures  recently   4  percent  to  4.6  percent  among   released  by  the  De-­ VWXGHQWVDWSULYDWHQRWIRUSURÂżW partment  of  Education   colleges. reveal  that  the   Students  borrowers   number  of  bor-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to ensure are  being  hit  by  two   rowers  default-­ that all students sides  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  cash-­strapped   ing  on  federal   are able to access institutions  raising   student  loans  has   and enroll in quality tuition  and  high  un-­ jumped  sharply. employment  making  it   7KHÂżJXUHV programs that harder  for  graduates  to   are  the  latest   prepare them for ÂżQGMREV indication  that   well-paying jobs â&#x20AC;&#x153;These  hard   rising  college   so they can enter economic  times  have   tuition  costs,   the workforce and made  it  even  more   low  graduation   compete in our GLIÂżFXOWIRUVWXGHQW rates  and  poor   global marketplace.â&#x20AC;? borrowers  to  repay   job  prospects  are   U.S. Secretary of their  loans,  and  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   causing  more   Education Arne Duncan. why  implementing   students  to  be-­ education  reforms  and  protecting  the   come  overwhelmed  by  debt. maximum  Pell  grant  is  more  impor-­ The  national  two-­year  cohort   tant  than  ever,â&#x20AC;?  said  U.S.  Secretary   default  rate  rose  to  8.8  percent  last   of  Education  Arne  Duncan. \HDUIURPSHUFHQWLQÂżVFDO â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  need  to  ensure  that  all  stu-­ Driving  the  overall  increase  was   dents  are  able  to  access  and  enroll  in   the  number  of  students  who  borrow   quality  programs  that  prepare  them   from  the  government  to  attend  for-­ for  well-­paying  jobs  so  they  can   SURÂżWFROOHJHV enter  the  workforce  and  compete  in  

Defender News Services

E V E RY THING YOUR SMALL BUSINESS NEEDS TO GROW IS HERE. THE GOLDMAN SACHS 10,000 SMALL BUSINESSES PROGRAM IS IN HOUSTON. APPLY TODAY. Goldman Sachs is pleased to announce open enrollment for the next 10,000 Small Businesses program in Houston. The program, led by Houston Community College, is designed to give local small business owners the resources to grow. Participants in the 10,000 Small Businesses program will gain practical business knowledge, skills and insight that can be put to work immediately. The program also offers participants access to capital, experienced mentoring and unique networking opportunities. 10,000 Small Businesses is committed to supporting small businesses across the country to drive job creation and growth. Learn about the application process and apply today at www.hccs.edu/10KSB.

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our  global  marketplace.â&#x20AC;? Steps  are  being  taken  to  help   students. The  Obama  Administration  has   H[SDQGHGĂ&#x20AC;H[LEOHRSWLRQVIRUERU-­ rowers  through  the  income-­based   repayment  plan,  which  makes  loan   payments  more  affordable  by  cap-­ ping  the  montly  payment  at  an   amount  based  on  income  and  family  

size. Through  a  series  of  regulations   ¿QDOL]HGRYHUWKHSDVW\HDUWKH'H-­ partment  of  Education  has  tightened   loopholes  to  protect  students  from   misleading  recruiting  practices,  and   established  rules  that  require  colleges   to  better  prepare  students  for  gainful   employment  or  risk  losing  access  to   federal  student  aid.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Metropolitan Transit Authority of Harris County, TX (METRO) Public Hearing for FY2012 Operating & Capital Budgets The Public Hearing for METROâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s FY2012 Operating & Capital Budgets will be held on Thursday, September 29, 2011, at 9:00 am in the METRO Board Room on the 2nd Floor at 1900 Main Street in Houston, TX. METROâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s FY2012 Operating & Capital Budgets will be available for public review beginning September 15, 2011 at METRO headquarters at 1900 Main Street on the 14th Floor by contacting Rosa Diaz at 713-739-4918. Also, you are urged to visit METROâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website www.ridemetro.org to view the document and make comments.


WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011 DEFENDER

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opinion

A few pointers for

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Parker, Florida Today

pointofview

13

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imes are  hard  and  things  are  not  what  they   used  to  be.  But  you  can  look  at  the  glass  as   half  full  or  half  empty.    Thank  God  there  is   something  in  the  glass.   We  recommend  you  take  a  proactive  approach   and  understand  that  you  are  in  a  unique  position  –  a   SRVLWLRQWRUHGH¿QHZKRDQGZKDW\RXDUHDVDPLQRU ity  business  owner.    And  here  are  a  few  pointers.   Point  One:  Review  and  Cut  Your  Expenses.   Seriously  review  your  expenses  and  determine  what   you  are  spending  money  on  –  every  dime.    Then  ask   FROOHDJXHVDQGXVHWKH,QWHUQHWWR¿QGRWKHUDOWHUQD tives  that  are  less  expensive.  Ask  yourself  the  hard   question  about  every  product  and  service  you  use:     Do  I  really  need  this?  Can  I  do  it  another  way?    Re-­ PHPEHUGRQRWVDFUL¿FHTXDOLW\DV\RXFXWEHFDXVH you  will  lose  in  the  end.    Consider  outsourcing.    The   big  boys  are  doing  it  –  why  not  you.   Point  Two:    Use  Technology.    Explore  the  op-­ portunities  and  ease  that  technology  has  to  offer   from  accounting  and  payroll  services,  to  postage,   rental  space,  presentations  and  more.  The  savings  are   unbelievable  but  you  have  to  be  willing  to  take  the   challenge.   Yes,  it  is  a  learning  curve  and  for  some  it  is   harder  than  others.    But  in  today’s  business  arena   it  is  about  meeting  the  customer’s  needs  and  mak-­ ing  money  at  the  same  time.    If  you  are  not  making   money,  you  need  to  make  a  change.   Point  Three:  Look  at  Your  Business  Model  and   see  if  it  is  still  the  best  way  for  you  to  make  money.     There  may  be  other  revenue  opportunities  you  can  in-­ corporate  into  your  arsenal  of  products  and  services.   Point  Four:  Establish  Strategic  Alliances  and   Partnerships.    There  are  those  who  share  a  common   goal  and  mission  that  together  you  can  create  a  win-­ win  relationship.    Important:  Make  sure  everyone   knows  the  rules  and  guidelines. Finally,  Point  Five:  Be  true  to  Yourself.    When   it  is  all  said  and  done  you  have  to  be  happy  with  what   you  have  created  because  it  is  your  company  and  a   UHÀHFWLRQRI\RX Go  for  it.  

Debilitating poverty %/ƫ+..+/%2! By JULIANNE MALVEAUX NNPA Columnist he fall  of  the  Roman  Em-­ pire  is  best  captured  in  the   SKUDVHWKDW³1HUR¿GGOHG while  Rome  burned.”    Set   on  pursuing  his  own  plea-­ sures  and  indulgences,  Nero  could  not   see  the  walls  crumbling  around  him.     Similarly,  our  leaders  seem  oblivious   to  the  walls  crashing  in  on  us,  bicker-­ ing  about  the  way  that  relief  on  our   employment  situation  should  be  struc-­ tured,  while  poverty  rates  are  soaring.                          The  data  that  came  out  last   Tuesday  included  no  surprises,  but  in   some  ways,  it  was  a  stunning  indict-­ ment  of  the  economic  gridlock  that  has   plagued  us  for  the  past  year.    While   Congress  has  been  yammering  on   about  debt  ceilings,  more  and  more   Americans  are  without  work;;  more  and   more  have  experienced  poverty.                          The  poverty  rate  rose  from  14.3   percent  to  15.1  percent  between  2009   and  2010.  That  means  that  the  number   of  poor  Americans  grew  by  2.6  mil-­

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lion people,  from  43.6  million  to  46.2   million.       For  the  past  three  years  the   poverty  rate  has  continued  to  rise,  and   income  has  continue  to  decline.    In   the  past  year,  the  average  income  has   dropped  by  2.3  percent  to  $49,445.    Of   course,  the  African-­American  level  of   income  saw  a  steeper  decline,  from   $33,122  to  $32,068,  or  by  3.2  percent.       While  median  Black  income   dropped  by  more  than  a  thousand   dollars  a  year,  white  income,  from   a  higher  perch,  saw  a  lesser  decline   of  about  $900,  or  from  $52,717  to   $51,846,  about  1.7  percent.    With   much  less,  African  Americans  are  hit   much  harder.                            Thus,  while  the  overall   poverty  rate  is  15.1  percent,  it  is  27.4   percent  for  African  Americans,  26.6   percent  for  Hispanics,  and  9.9  percent   for  whites.    More  than  40  percent  of   African-­American  children  live  in   poverty.      There  are  further  indications   of  increased  poverty  and  dire  news   for  years  to  come.    

There  are  2  million  more   “doubled  up”  households,  meaning   that  more  than  one  family  is  living  in   the  same  home.    Yes,  we  used  to  do   this  “back  in  the  day,”  but  today  entire   families  are  moving  in  together  because   of  economic  exigencies.    Nearly  a  third   of  those  families  headed  by  women  are   in  poverty,  and  women  are  still  earning   77  percent  of  what  men  earn.                            Those  who  are  poor  are  victims   of  a  corroded  economy.    While  many   would  like  to  blame  the  46.2  million   Americans  who  are  experiencing   poverty,  the  real  culprit  is  our  nation’s   economic  failure.                          This  does  not  mean  that   we  should  give  up.    It  means  that   we  should  organize  and  galvanize   ourselves  to  take  our  economy  back.     Dozens  of  congressional  representa-­ tives  have  ignored  the  poverty  data,   but  they  wouldn’t  be  able  to  ignore  it  if   we  grabbed  their  attention.    More  than   40  years  ago,  Dr.  Martin  Luther  King,   Jr.  planned  a  Poor  People’s  Campaign.     Who  will  plan  it  now?  

nextweekonlineopinions nextweekonline Discouraging News on Child Poverty

Marian Wright Edelman

President Obama’s American Jobs Act a Good Start

Blacks is beautiful all Over the World

Harry C. Alford

Marc Morial

Silver Lining in Obama Poll Numbers

George E. Curry

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DEFENDER | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011

defendernetwork.com

sports

Deion Sanders

A noted pitch man, Sanders will sell the concept of quality education to inner city youth

turns his attention to education By MAX EDISON Defender

To say  that  Deion   Sanders  was  a  great  athlete   is  an  understatement.  An   outstanding  Major  League   baseball  player,  he  once   played  in  an  NFL  game   and  baseball  playoff  game   on  the  same  day.   As  an  NFL   cornerback/wide  receiver/ return  specialist  he  was   one  of  the  greatest  cover   corners  of  all  time  and   was  recently  inducted   into  the  Hall  of  Fame.   Sanders’  appeal  off  the   field  has  been  equally  as   impressive. As  a  sports  analyst   with  the  NFL  Network  he   is  insightful,  witty  and  of   course  very  well  dressed.    

Hall of Famer Deion Sanders will open Prime U Prep Academy in 2012. Photo Credit NFL.com

As a  pitch  man  for  Direct  TV   he  is  comical,  yet  amusingly   on  point  for  his  product,  the   NFL  Sunday  Ticket.   Now  the  multi-­talented   Sanders  has  decided  to  enter   into  an  arena  where  the   stakes  are  decidedly  higher,   education.  Sanders  was   recently  granted  a  charter  to   open  a  charter  school  in  the   Metroplex  area  by  the  Texas   Board  of  Education.   Sanders  plans  to  open   two  schools  in  2012  for   kindergarten-­12  students.   Both  will  be  located  in   traditionally  underserved   areas.  One  of  the  schools   will  be  located  in  Fort  Worth   at  Charity  Church  and  the   other  located  in  the  Oak  Cliff   area  of  Dallas.  The  schools   will  serve  between  650-­1000   students  each.   Sanders,  who  has  been   active  in  area  youth  league  

sports, said  his  interest  in   education  began  to  take   shape  while  watching   over  1200  kids  try  out  for   youth  football. “I  sat  up  in  the  top   of  the  bleachers  and  said,   ‘This  would  be  wonderful   if  we  would  educate  these   kids,”  the  Hall  of  Famer   recalled.  “We  could  marry   the  two.  Why  can’t  we  do   such  a  thing?” The  good  news  from   the  board  of  education   was  music  to  “Prime   Time’s”  ears,  as  evidence   by  his  joyful  tweet.   “GOD  IS  GOOD!   WE  GOT  IT  WE  GOT   IT  WE  GOT  IT!  IM  IN   TEARS  LORD  I  THANK   U  LORD  I  THANK   U!  PRIMEU  PREP   ACADEMY  WILL  OPEN   IN  2012  K-­12  FREE  FREE”     In  the  midst  of  his   jubilation  Sanders  never  lost   site  of  his  main  focus,  the   education  of  underserved   youth.       “[The  notification]  was   pretty  much  one  of  the  best   moments  of  my  life  because   it’s  not  about  you,”  Sanders   said.  “It’s  about  the  countless   number  of  kids  that  will  be   blessed  from  this  school.” Of  course  the  move  was   not  without  its  detractors.   There  were  some  who   thought  Sanders’  celebrity   status  unfairly  influenced   the  education  board’s   decision.   Board  member  Mavis   Knight  (D-­Dallas)  reconciled   her  vote  thusly. “I  had  to  wrestle   with  myself  to  keep  from   penalizing  opportunities   for  students  because  of  the  

celebrity involved.  There   are  probably  more  resources   coming  to  the  students   because  of  it.” Long-­time  Dallas   resident  and  former  Cowboy   and  NFL  executive  John   Wooten  admires  the  Sanders   group’s  involvement  in   education.   “I  have  a  great  deal  of   admiration  for  Deion  and   what  he’s  attempting  to  do   in  the  field  of  education,”   Wooten  said.  “Deion  lives   on  the  far  north  side  of  town,   yet  he  is  one  of  the  few  guys   that  regularly  travels  south  of   the  Trinity  River  [inner  city]   to  spend  time  and  resources   with  those  kids.   “My  grandchildren   also  attend  a  charter  school   that  Deion’s  group  has  an   affiliation  with  and  I’ve  been   very  impressed  with  the   quality  of  their  education.” The  schools  will  be   called,  appropriately  enough,   Prime  U  Prep  Academy.     In  typical  “Prime  Time”   persona,  Sanders  will  seek   to  provide  nothing  but  a   first-­class  environment  for   students  to  matriculate.         “We  plan  on  marrying  the   best  of  teachers  academically,   some  of  the  best  students   academically,  some  of   the  best  athletes  together   –  the  best  attitudes,  the   best  passion  and  desire  all   intertwined  to  educate  these   guys  to  raise  company  CEOs,   and  not  employees,”  Sanders   said.   Somehow,  based  on  his   past  list  of  accomplishments,   you  just  get  the  feeling   Sanders  and  his  future   students  will  be  very   successful.

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DEFENDER | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011

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$Ä&#x2039;/Ä&#x2039;6+*!

sportsbriefs Top-ranked College Park girls spank Kingwood

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is the start of games that count By DARRELL K. ARDISON Defender The  dress  rehearsal  is  over   and  the  formalities  have  been   concluded. Houston  area  high  school   football  teams  have  been   pointing  to  this  moment  since   two-­a-­day  practices  in  the   searing  August  heat.  Now  the   season  gets  more  interesting  as   most  area  teams  begin  district   play  with  a  goal  of  qualifying  for   the  postseason. Six  of  the  toughest  district   races  include  13-­5A,  24-­4A,  22-­ 4A,  20-­5A,  21-­5A  and  19-­5A. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  look  at  some   intriguing  match-­ups  this  week   that  could  help  determine  who   secures  a  playoff  berth  come   November. KLEIN  COLLINS  vs.   KLEIN  OAK,  Sept.  23,  Klein   Memorial  Stadium,  7  p.m. These  two  District  13-­5A   powerhouses  were  preseason   SLFNVWRÂżQLVKLQOHDJXHSOD\ Both  schools  are  coming  off  a   bye  week. Klein  Collins,  the  Houston   areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  top-­ranked  Class  5A   school,  improved  to  3-­0  a  week   earlier  with  a  dominating  49-­23   victory  over  Willowridge.   Five  different  Tigers  scored   touchdowns  in  the  fracas,   including  two  short  TD  runs   from  Shane  Rhodes.  Rhett   3HWWHUVRQNLFNHGÂżHOGJRDOVIURP 26  and  38  yards  out. Quarterback  Tyler  Stehlig   completed  17-­of-­25  passes  for   202  yards  and  a  touchdown. Klein  Oak  had  the   misfortune  of  running  up  against   North  Shore,  which  was  still   smarting  from  an  opening-­ game  beatdown  by  Katy.   The  Mustangs  utilized  their   quick-­scoring  ability  to  sting  the   Klein  Oak  defense  for  three  long   scoring  plays.  Larry  McDuffey   caught  TD  passes  of  78  and  30   yards  from  quarterback  Micah   Thomas.  Davonte  Milton  added   a  67-­yard  TD  run. The  Klein  Oak  defense   PXVWVRPHKRZÂżQGDZD\WR FRQWDLQWKHRIIHQVLYHÂżUHSRZHU

of  Klein  Collins  to  have  a  chance   to  win  this  game.  LA  MARQUE  vs.   MANVEL,  Sept.  23,  Alvin   Memorial  Stadium,  7  p.m. Manvel  tuned  up  for   this  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  showdown  by   pounding  Sharpstown  42-­0.  The   Cowboysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  two-­headed  tandem   at  quarterback  of  Julian  Walker   and  Shane  McCarley  were  both   HIÂżFLHQWDV0DQYHOLPSURYHGWR 4-­0  on  the  season. Walker  completed  10-­of-­ 12  passes  for  216  yards  and  a   touchdown.  McCarley  was  5-­of-­ 8  for  132  yards  and  two  TDs. La  Marque  running  back   Tim  Wright  rushed  for  161   yards  and  three  touchdowns   in  the  Cougarsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  68-­3  win  over   Brazosport  at  Hopper  Stadium.   Wright  averaged  over  16  yards   per  carry  for  La  Marque. Manvel,  La  Marque,   Dawson,  Friendswood,  Santa  Fe   and  Texas  City  are  all  capable  of   winning  games  in  this  district.  La   Marque  and  Friendswood  each   won  regional  titles  last  season. 7KLVÂżJXUHVWREHD high-­scoring  affair  with  the   team  owning  the  football  last  in   position  to  secure  a  victory. LAMAR  vs.  CHAVEZ,   Sept.  22,  Barnett  Stadium,  7  p.m. Chavez  is  2-­1  on  the   season  with  victories  over   Clear  Lake  and  MacArthur.   Lamar  opened  with  a  win  over   Clear  Brook  and  followed  that   with  close  losses  to  Elkins  and   Brenham. Every  victory  in  this   district  puts  you  a  step  closer  to   the  playoffs.  Bellaire,  Westside,   Westbury  and  Lamar  will  be   ÂżJKWLQJLWRXWIRUWKHWRSVSRW in  the  district  standings  with   Chavez  and  Madison  in  hot   pursuit. Demun  Mercer  can  make   plays  with  his  arm  or  his  feet   for  the  Lobos  at  quarterback.   He  threw  for  20  touchdowns   last  season  and  ran  for  12  more   scores. Lamar  is  led  by  defensive   HQG&KLPD8]RZLKHDÂżUVWWHDP all-­district  selection  last  year. The  Redskins  must  be  able  

to  match  the  Chavez  scoring   power. SEVEN  LAKES  vs.   KATY,  Sept.  23,  Rhodes   Stadium,  7  p.m. Katy  proved  it  could  still   dominate  a  good  opponent  last   week  without  standout  running   back  Adam  Taylor,  who  will   miss  the  remainder  of  the  2011   season  with  a  torn  ACL  in  his   left  knee. The  tandem  of  senior   Cody  Gomez  and  freshman   Rodney  Anderson  replaced   Taylor  and  shredded  the   Beaumont  West  Brook  in  a  42-­7   rout  at  Rhodes  Stadium. Seven  Lakes  has   playmakers  in  quarterback   Kaleb  Morton  and  running  back   Denzel  Guillard. The  Spartans  will  need  

WRSOD\DQHDUĂ&#x20AC;DZOHVVJDPH to  win. WORTHING  vs.  JONES,   Sept.  24,  Barnett  Stadium,  6   p.m. The  winner  of  this  annual   grudge  match  will  likely  secure   a  playoff  berth  in  District   22-­4A. Wheatley,  Kashmere  and   Booker  T.  Washington  appear   to  be  virtual  locks  for  the   postseason,  which  adds  to  the   importance  of  this  game. DEER  PARK  vs.  LA   PORTE,  Sept.  23,  Bulldog   Stadium,  7  p.m. Although  these  two   schools  are  no  longer  in   the  same  district,  these  two   neighboring  communities  look   forward  to  owning  bragging   rights  after  winning  this  contest.

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College Park is the Houston areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top-rated girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; high school volleyball team. Trailing 18-14 in the first set against area-rankedKingwood, Michelle Griffith helped reverse the momentum by delivering 10 consecutive serving points for the Cavaliers. Griffith had four aces in that run and ended the match with seven. Kingwood was never able to recover as Kingwood prevailed 3-0 (25-20, 25-19, 25-13). Katie Mitchell and Taylor Erwin were also instrumental in the College Park victory. Each finished with nine kills apiece, as the Cavaliers had 37 kills to just 15 for the Mustangs.

Fort Bend Bush makes history by beating Kempner Bush had never beaten Kempner in football. Trailing by a point in the fourth quarter, Bush called on its field-goal kicker to rally for a victory. Alex Gomez booted field goals of 22 and 38 yards in the final stanza to improve Bush to 3-1 on the season. Despite being limited to 154 yards total offense in the contest, Bush recorded its first win over Kempner in football. After missing the Chavez game due to injury, Bush running back Jalynn McCain returned to action and rushed for a game-high 103 yards on 22 carries and scored on a nine-yard run in the second quarter.

Elkins suddenly on a roll with three straight wins After opening the season with a heartbreaking one-point loss to Dayton, Fort Bend Elkins has rebounded with three consecutive victories. Following wins over Lamar and Clear Brook, the Knights opened their District 23-5A ledger with a 28-17 victory over rival Dulles. The game was tied 14-14 at intermission and the teams played a scoreless third quarter. However, Elkins quarterback Jake Burkhalter tossed two fourth-quarter touchdown passes to seal the win. Burkhalter finished with four TD passes in the contest on 19-of-32 passing for 247 yards and no interceptions. Elkins faces Clements this week.

Jason Bourgeois selected by Astros for Clemente The Houston Astros have selected Jason Bourgeois as the team nominee for the prestigious Roberto Clemente Award presented by Chevrolet. The award goes to the player who best represents the game of baseball through positive contributions on and off the field, including sportsmanship and community involvement. Bourgeois, a Houston native, is honored to be the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nominee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Growing up, baseball was big part of my youth. I loved playing the game and much of what I learned about myself and life is because my family and other adults took time to teach me and make me a better player and a better person,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am grateful to be in a position, right here in my hometown, to do for kids today what others did for me. Clemente was a tremendous player and his commitment to helping others is a great example of giving back. I am honored to be the Astros nominee for the 2011 Roberto Clemente Award.â&#x20AC;?


16

DEFENDER | WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 22 | 2011

defendernetwork.com

For Event Coverage...visit

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$#Ä&#x161;/place

USPS  COMMEMORATIVE  STAMP   Willie  Jordan,  Eddie  Henry,  Lillian  Poats,  Merline   UNVEILEDâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;ŚThe  late  Congresswoman  Barbara   Pitre  and  Roscette  Holman,  to  name  a  few.    A  deserving   Jordan  was  remembered  during  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women  for  Barbara   honor!........... Breakfastâ&#x20AC;?  at  the  Hilton  Americas   ART  SHOWâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;Ś.An  original  abstract  art   +RWHOIROORZHGE\WKHRIÂżFLDO exhibit  and  jewelry  show  was  hosted  by  artist   Join Yvette Chargois unveiling  of  her  Black  Heritage   Coline  Creuzot  and  jewelry  designer  Judy   Events of the Week Stamp  at  Texas  Southern   McConnell  at  Mockingbird  Bistro.    These   More photos on defendernetwork.com University.    Along  with  the   beautiful  works  of  art  were  captivating.    In   See Events on KTRK Ch.13â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crossroads over  300  folks  that  attended  the   the  mix  enjoying  it  all  were  the  Creuzot   with Melanie Lawson Sunday Morning @ 11 a.m. breakfast,  special  guests  included   family,  Cheryl,  Percy  III  and  IV,  Wayne   Congresswoman  Sheila  Jackson   McConnell,  Byronne  Hearn,  Bryce   Lee,  who  introduced  legislation  that  requested  that  Barbara   Kennard,  Sharmagne  Taylor  and  Merele  Yarborough.     be  honored  with  a  commemorative  stamp,  Myrlie  Evers-­ Great  show!........................ Williams,  Dr.  John  Rudley,  Luci  Baines  Johnson,  Dr.   KALEIDOSCOPE  OF  MUSICâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;Ś.The  Young   Thomas  F.  Freeman,  Rev.  Gwen  Pierre,  Mae  Frances   Harmonies  of  Houston  hosted  its  2nd  Annual  Kaleidoscope   Rowlett,  Algenita  Scott  Davis,  LaRence  Snowden,   of  Music  at  Sherman  Clay  Piano.    Founded  by  Fayetta   Rose  Mary  McGowan,  Georgia  Provost,  Carl  Richie,   AllenLQWKHQRQSURÂżWRUJDQL]DWLRQLVGHGLFDWHGWR

Carl Richie, Kelli Rod and LaRence Snowden

Artist Coline Creuzot and Percy Creuzot IV

Dr. John Rudley and Algenita Scott Davis

Byronne Hearn and Cheryl Creuzot

Breylon Reed, Reagan Dennis and Janiya Alexander with Joe Carmouche

Front Row, Sharisse Beavers, Edgar Lopez and Josiah Martinez...Back Row, Fayette Allen, Dehner Franks, Jr. and Kenneth Onigbinde

developing  and  nurturing  the  musical  talents  of  youth  ages   nine-­16  and  emphasizes  the  relationships  between  the  study   of  music  and  academic  achievement  while  bringing  the   MR\RIPXVLFWRWKHZRUOG7KHIXQÂżOOHGHYHQLQJIHDWXUHG jazz,  classical,  spirituals,  disco  and  reggae  music  performed   by  the  children,  Farhan  Ahmed,  Janella  Alfred,  Dehner   Franks,  Edgar  Lopez,  Sharisse  Beavers,  Mahdi  Bey,   Kenneth  Onigbinde,  Josiah  Wade  and  Lily  Ubani-­ Ukoma,  and  accompanied  by  pianist  Dehner  Franks   Sr.,  bass  player  Eric  Elder  and  drummer  Kyle  Turner   Jr.    Special  guest  performers  included  Kyle  Turner  Sr.,   Joe  Carmouche  and  Mickey  Moseley.    Sheldon  Nunn,   KTSU  music  director,  served  as  master  of  ceremonies   and  the  event  was  sponsored  by  the  Houston  League   of  Business  and  Professional  Women,  Inc.    Continued   success!.........From  Chagâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Place  to  your  place,  have  a   blessed  week!

Dr. Thomas Freeman, The Honorable Sheila Jackson Lee, Dr. John Rudley, Luci Baines Johnson and Myrlie Evers-Williams

Wayne McConnell and Designer Judy McConnell

Lily Ubani-Ukoma, Janella Alfred, Mahdi Bey and Farhan Ahmed with Fayette Allen

!"!* !.*!03+.'Ä&#x2039;+)ĆŤÄ&#x2018;ĆŤ!.2%*#ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ+1/0+*ĆŤ.!ĆŤ"+.ĆŤ+2!.ĆŤÄ&#x2030;Ä&#x20AC;ĆŤ5!./ĆŤ

Houston Defender: September 22, 2011  

Houston's Leaading Black Information Source

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