Integral Group 2018 Corporate Social & Environmental Responsibility Report

Page 1

2018 CORPORATE SOCIAL + ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY REPORT

INTEGRAL


CORPORATE SOCIAL & ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSER) REPORT We are a global network of engineering and consulting professionals collaborating under a single deep green umbrella. In 2018 Integral Group operated from five geographic regions under the names: Integral Group, Integral Consulting Engineering and Elementa Consulting. We are committed through our CSER initiative to providing an annual global report. Regional summaries will be shared with staff and leadership during the 2019 CSER Roadshow workshops.

Office

Canada

Regions for Reporting US West US East UK

Atlanta, GA, USA

Austin, TX, USA

Calgary, AB, Canada

Los Angeles, CA, USA

Oakland, CA, USA

Richmond, VA, USA

San Jose, CA, USA

Seattle, WA, USA

Sydney, Australia

Toronto, ON, Canada

Vancouver, BC, Canada

Victoria, BC Canada

Washington DC, USA

ANZ

London, England, UK

Oxford, England, UK

 2


CONTENTS Letters from Leadership 01 Executive Summary 02 CSER Introduction

A Who We Are B CSER Approach C Governance, Methodology, Scope

03 Our Performance

A B C D

Environmental Footprint Equity + Diversity Health + Well-being Education + Impact

04 Conclusion 05 Appendix

380 North Pastoria - Sunnyvale, CA Targets: LEED Platinum, Zero Carbon, Zero Net Energy Architect: WRNS Studio 2018 CSER REPORT

A B C D E

Assumptions Data Quality Summary Baselines + Benchmarking Resources Glossary

3


WORDS FROM LEADERSHIP

2018 CSER REPORT

Kevin Hydes CEO AND FOUNDER After celebrating our ten year anniversary as a firm in 2017, we embraced the word Alignment in 2018 as a way to consciously look into what the next ten years will hold. Integral was designed around a mission rather than a service. Our annual commitment to our people and the planet through the CSER initiative is ensuring alignment between our mission, service offerings, and that we walk-the-talk within internal operations. We learned that our values of Trust, Nurture, Inspire continue to resonate at a deep level within the ethos of the organization.

Megan White CHIEF SUSTAINABILITY OFFICER The annual CSER report documents our progress in aligning policy with our mission “to be the deepest green firm with a global reach”. In 2018, we collectively celebrate the new role of Chief Sustainability Officer. Connecting the dots between People + Planet + Profit brings us back to the original definition of sustainability. We believe that applying pressure at all scales and from all angles is the sweet spot to achieve holistic and enduring positive change. Prioritizing data-driven analysis balanced with communication, openness, and inclusion is the key to success within this CSER initiative.

Tiffany Elston DIRECTOR, PEOPLE Focusing on people first is just as important to our technical teams as it is to us on the People team. We share a responsibility to create a positive, healthy, and equitable work environment for everyone at Integral Group. A focus on nurturing our employees is essential to the delivery of highquality projects. That is one reason we are striving to go beyond the industry standard in our workplace culture and policies: it is an extension of our commitment to excellence in project delivery. In 2018, we focused on adaptation and igniting new policies in alignment with our mission and values, while remaining approachable and inviting.

Conrad Schartau CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER At Integral Group, we are focused on making a difference – making a better world for future generations. We are like-minded individuals focused around a mission to create a more positive world for all. As the world changes, we have to evolve. The expectation of our employees have significantly shifted and so we continuously reinvent ourselves, as individuals and as organizations. Initiating and embracing change in management practices have been a focus for us this past year by elevating conversations which came by way of the 2017 CSER report. The leadership group is proud to stand behind this initiative.

4


City of Vancouver Zero Emissions Building Policy

01 EXECUTIVE 01 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SUMMARY

5


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Overview

Staff Engagement: CSER Roadshow

We debuted our inaugural 2017 Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility (CSER) Report to the public in the summer of 2018. Crossing this threshold was celebrated internally with staff and externally with our business partners alike.

The publication of our 2017 CSER report was followed by a ‘roadshow’ workshop which was presented by our Chief Sustainability Officer either locally or remotely in conjunction with local CSER champions.

This report includes an introduction to our firm, our culture, our values, and shares our CSER performance data for the 2018 calendar year. As a mission-driven company, sustainability is foundational to our operations. We are committed to continually engaging employees, improving our practices, and giving back to our communities. The 2018 CSER Report focused on improving upon our processes with a particular focus on improving data quality. Based on our lessons learned moving forward we will use our 2018 performance data as a baseline for future CSER performance.

2018 CSER REPORT

The workshop included: • Overview of 2017 CSER performance data • Looking through the rear-view mirror on 2018 to help us capture local stories so they can make their way into the 2018 report • Goal setting for 2019 by focusing our efforts in exploring ways that staff can participate in local and global initiatives that align with corporate goals for the year ahead All Integral employees know the success of our organization is a reflection of the passion, willingness and commitment to make a positive impact to each other, our clients and the world.

6


Water

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Energy (combined gas, steam, elec)

Performance at a Glance

Employee Commute

50,000

N/A

Gas

We hosted over 500 internal education sessions which took place in 2018 via lunch and learns, design series workshops, and other formats We enhanced our data collection efforts to more accurately reflect our performance in this category

or Vi

ct

Victoria

7.59

US West

72.9%

70.8%

8.54

US East

63.0%

60.1%

7.63

UK 33.3%

ia

r ve

Vancouver

ou

To

ro

Toronto

nc

nt

o

ey

dn Sy

at Se

Sydney

2018 Regional Workplace Satisfaction Male Female

66.7%

Seattle

Va

Ri

Sa

n

Jo

San Jose

tle

se

d m

Richmond

ch

xf O

ak O

on

or

Oxford

la

Oakland

2018 All Staff Gender Distribution

Education + Impact •

d

nd

on

London

Lo

LA

nd

D

DC

LA

y ar

Calgary

lg

Austin

Ca

a nt At

la

Atlanta

C

0

70% response to annual All Staff Survey 97-98% response rate on questions on: racial and ethnic diversity, sexual orientation, gender identity Increased technical female staff from 19% (2016) to 26% (2018) while adding ~230 employees to our global family. This puts us within 4% of our 2020 target to reach 30% female technical staff

Newly expanded questions to All Staff Survey on happiness and satisfaction with the company, individual workstation, and workplace environment

Steam Electricity

Health + Well-Being •

Actual Business Travel

100,000

Equity + Diversity • •

Benchmark

150,000

in

Significant improvements in data quality collected within this category, specifically access to utility bills Committing to zero scope 1 + scope 2 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2020 through joining the World Green Building Council’s (WGBC) Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment

200,000

st

250,000

Au

Environmental Footprint

300,000

GHG Emissions (KgCO2e)

We track CSER performance across four categories: (a) environmental footprint, (b) equity + diversity, (c) health + well-being, and (d) education + impact. We developed a set of key performance indicators in each category, and set targets for 2020, 2025 and 2030. The following are our key takeaways from 2018 calendar year:

2018 GHG Emissions by Office

37.0% 29.2%

39.9%

7.86

Canada

27.1%

8.25

Australia Australia

Canada

UK

US East

US West

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

1 represents not satisfied at all; 10 represents extremely satisfied.

2018 CSER REPORT

7


02 CSER INTRODUCTION

Oakridge Centre Redevelopment Vancouver, BC Photo Credit: Henriquez Partners Architects

8


WHO WE ARE Our Global Network

Our Design Studios

Our Services

Integral Group is an interactive global network of design professionals collaborating under a single deep green engineering and consulting umbrella. We are a mission-driven company that strives to be transparent, demonstrating leadership and commitment to social and environmental sustainability.

Operating under the umbrella of Integral Group, we are a collective of design studios around the world. This includes Integral Consulting Engineering in Atlanta, and Elementa Consulting in our London and Oxford offices in the United Kingdom.

Our reputation and competitive advantage are built on our ability to distinguish ourselves as experts and industry leaders. In our work we hold ourselves and our clients to a high standard of sustainability, aiming to achieve increasingly higher levels of performance.

In 2018, we welcomed our 15th office and 4th country to our portfolio: Sydney, Australia.

Founded on the mission of being “the deepest green MEP engineering firm in the world” we expanded beyond mechanical, electrical, and plumbing engineering services. We are sustainability consultants, energy modelers, commissioning agents, policy makers, lighting/daylighting designers, refrigeration specialists, process authors, researchers, solution providers, and trusted advisors. Our list of service offerings continues grow based on market demands and an evolving world.

We employ 500+ talented and innovative people across Canada, United Kingdom, United States, and Australia who are drawn to Integral Group based on the quality and nature of our work combined with our commitment to this mission.

2018 CSER REPORT

Our organization operates under the following regions: • • • • •

Australia Canada United Kingdom United States East United States West

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Mechanical Engineering Electrical Engineering Plumbing Engineering Energy Systems Energy Modeling Sustainability Consulting Refrigeration Commissioning Lighting Design Fire Protection Fire Engineering Technology

9


WHO WE ARE

4 25

12 3

Passive House Projects

Certified Passive House Designers/ Consultants

10

Fitwel Ambassadors

3.3M

Hours Worked Toward the Green Movement

15 Offices

LBC Projects Completed or in Design

Fitwel Projects (London, Oakland, and Toronto offices)

100+

Zero Net Energy Projects Completed or in Design

100+ 100+

30+

Countries with Integral Group Projects

Total LEED Projects Completed

LEED Accredited Professionals

153

BREEAM Projects

500+ Employees

400+ Industry Awards

7

WELL Certified Projects

2018 CSER REPORT

10


WHO WE ARE Our Purpose

Our Pillars

Integral Group’s mission is to be the top quality Deep Green engineering and consulting firm with global reach.

Our work is structured around four pillars: imagine, perform, accelerate, and sustain.

Our People

Imagine

Our People combine passion with purpose. They are diverse, ready, willing and able. They are committed to innovation, quality and to providing our clients with the best possible service.

Our Values We are guided by three core values - trust, nurture and inspire.

Trust The basis of every successful relationship, team and collaboration. We build trust by trusting others whilst keeping our promises and conducting ourselves to the highest levels of professionalism, integrity and honesty.

Nurture We never stop learning or growing. The environment and culture of the firm is supportive and inclusive. We listen openly, respect the opinions and beliefs of others, and provide honest feedback. We mentor and train for success and fulfillment.

Inspire We share our passion and expertise widely. We make time to explain our thinking, challenge clients and project partners with new ways of working. We share innovations in technology and tools drawn from across our firm, and leverage our investment in research and development.

2018 CSER REPORT

We bring creativity and curiosity to solve complex problems. Integral is home to dreamers and innovators, systems thinkers and the people with the big ideas - backed up by the technical know-how to deliver. We question why things should stay the same and work collaboratively and across disciplines to find new and better solutions.

Perform Our work is target-driven, outcome-led, and evidence-based. Perform is how we get to what we imagine. We work with clients to define ambitious performance targets and focus our efforts on achieving them. Through analysis we translate data into insights. By working across the entire project lifecycle we are closing the performance gap.

Accelerate Time is short - we need to urgently scale up. Our impact is not limited to our projects. We influence decision making beyond the boundaries of our business - rewriting rules, shaping policy, sharing best practices, bringing new technologies to market and partnering with like-minded firms.

Sustain We grow and thrive so that we can have more impact. We apply the same sustainable business practices across our firm that we advocate in our work. We invest the profits generated by our activities in the the tools and resources necessary for our people to excel, and to support game-changing industry initiatives.

11


APPROACH Our CSER Report is a reflection of what is important to our company, and an extension of the company’s mission and vision. This is the 2nd CSER report, in which we show our commitment to measure and track our social and environmental performance across the company, as it relates to our internal operations. We are committed to generating an annual report reflecting the interests and priorities of each of us as individuals, as teams, and as the broader Integral ‘family’. Our approach to CSER includes staff engagement, tracking our performance, introducing or improving upon policies and initiatives, and reporting on our progress. During 2017, we developed an overarching CSER strategy for all offices within the firm. The CSER report team established a common set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and a shared format for CSER reporting. In 2018, we focused on improving data quality and related processes. Through the 2018 reporting process, we are already excited about the improvements which we will be recognized in 2019. This iterative process is recognized and appreciated by our staff globally. We are committed to reporting at a global and regional level on the following four categories: • Environmental Footprint • Equity + Diversity • Health + Well-being • Education + Impact

2018 CSER REPORT

Data Collection

Shared Values + Common Policies

Policy Review

Create + Evolve Programs

Data Review

Policies + Initiatives

Firmwide CSER Strategy

Employee Led Initiatives Engagement + Action

Meet or Exceed Targets

Annual CSER Report

12


STAFF ENGAGEMENT CSER Roadshow Our aim is to build trust and inspire honest communication across all levels of the organization. Our goal is for this report to reflect our values as individuals and as a team, and inspire participation and commitment. The publication of our 2017 CSER report was followed by a ‘Roadshow’ workshop which was presented by our Chief Sustainability Officer either locally or remotely in conjunction with local CSER champions. The workshop included: • An introduction to our firm, our culture, and our values • Overview of 2017 CSER performance data • Sharing our commitment to continually engaging with our employees, improving our practices, and giving back to our communities • Reviewing our process to setting targets for 2020, 2025, 2030 • Looking back on 2018 to help us capture local stories so they can make their way into the 2018 report

2018 CSER REPORT

Goal setting for 2019 by focusing energy into 2019, exploring ways in which staff can participate in local and global initiatives that align with corporate goals for the year ahead

We reiterated to our staff that the success of our company is a reflection of the passion which we pour into our spaces, relationships, and local communities. Staff participation in these activities is a critical piece in co-creating the future of our workplace as well as our world at large. The initial Roadshow will be followed up workshops to engage staff in spearheading local initiatives which support the global targets. Staff are encouraged to “think globally while acting locally” by spearheading initiatives in their local offices that contribute to the company’s overarching targets and goals.

AWARENESS Raise awareness through internal initiatives which focus on both people + planet

ENGAGE Empower employees through engagement activities around corporate social and environmental responsibility

BRAINSTORM Generate ideas about possible actions to improve environmental and social performance

COMMIT Identify specific actions that employees are able to take on in the short term or via long term strategic planning

13


GOVERNANCE, METHODOLOGY + SCOPE Methodology

Scope + Structure

For this report we used available data to measure our baseline environmental and social performance. To facilitate future tracking and reporting we developed a process for ongoing data collection. Where data was challenging to obtain, we used proxy values based on industry benchmark data.

This report contains data from January through December 2018. This is in alignment with our fiscal year. The data in this report pertains to all offices including the newly added Australian office.

For reporting on our carbon emissions, we are currently focused on Scope 1 (direct) and Scope 2 (indirect) emissions globally. We collected flight data by way of travel records and expense forms. Going forward a universal tracking tool will be used to consistently track flight emissions. To measure our diversity and equity performance we used data collected through anonymous all staff annual survey and data pulled from employee records where appropriate. Health and well-being data was obtained partially by survey, through our efforts to increase the number of fitwel certifications across our offices, and partly through internal tracking mechanisms. Education and impact data was collected by internal tracking mechanisms and the survey. Our team has reviewed this report for accuracy and validity. The final report was approved by the CEO, COO, and senior-level management.

Audience This report is intended to be viewed by our staff, clients, and others with whom we collaborate. We want this report to inspire staff to continue to believe in and support our values and pillars. We hope our clients will gain a better understanding of what makes us unique and how we are able to continuously strive for innovation and performance in our projects by taking action on sustainability.

2018 CSER REPORT

Leadership Integral Group executive leadership is led by Kevin Hydes, CEO/President and Conrad Schartau, Chief Operating Officer. Members of the corporate operational leadership team include: Christine Jeffery, Chief Financial Officer; Carl Foster, Chief Information Officer; Megan White, Chief Sustainability Officer; Ed Garrod, Director of Communications; Tiffany Elston, People Director; and Heidi Mathena, Administration Director. Each region is led by its respective director, as follows: Andrew Mather, Australia; Gerry Faubert, US West; Goran Ostojic, Canada; Chris Piche, US East; Doug Kerr, United Kingdom.

CORPORATE POLICIES Integral Group operates within a framework of policies, some of which are global and others which are regionally specific. These include: • Environmental Policy • Code of Conduct • Equity and Diversity • Discrimination and Harassment • Recruitment and Selection • Parental Leave • Professional Development and Training • Employee Relations • Health and Safety • Wellness

Office leadership in 2018 includes the following managing principals: Andy Reilman, Los Angeles; Stuart Hood, Vancouver; Matt Grace, Calgary; Kenny Smith, Toronto; Sara Lappano, Washington, DC; Tom Simpson, Richmond; Bungane Mehlomakulu, Austin; Stanton Stafford, Atlanta; Brian Goldsmith, London, Carl McKenzie, Oxford. Leadership at the office level are further supported by Senior Principals, practice area leaders, Principals, Associate Principals, and Associates. For a more full list of our people, please visit our website: https://www. integralgroup.com/people/. Integral Group is a member of DAR Group.

14


2018 FIRM LEADERSHIP

KEVIN HYDES Chief Executive Officer

CHRISTINE JEFFERY Chief Financial Officer

CONRAD SCHARTAU Chief Operating Officer

ANDREW MATHER Managing Director, ANZ

GERRY FAUBERT Regional Director, US West

CARL FOSTER Chief Information Officer

GORAN OSTOJIC Regional Director, Canada

MEGAN WHITE Chief Sustainability Officer

TIFFANY ELSTON Director, People

CHRIS PICHE Regional Director, US East

ANDREA TRABER USW Sustainability + Resilient Design Leader

ERIC SOLRAIN USW Engineering Leader

STUART HOOD Managing Principal Vancouver

MIKE GODAWA Senior Principal Toronto

SARA LAPPANO Managing Principal Washington, DC

TOM SIMPSON Managing Principal Richmond

ANDY REILMAN Managing Principal Los Angeles

JOHN GAUTREY Senior Principal Los Angeles

MATT GRACE Managing Principal Calgary

KENNY SMITH Managing Principal Toronto

BUNGANE MEHLOMAKULU

STANTON STAFFORD Managing Principal Atlanta

2018 CSER REPORT

Managing Principal Austin

HEIDI MATHENA Director, Administration

ED GARROD Director, Communications

DOUG KERR Regional Director, UK

BRIAN GOLDSMITH Managing Principal London

CARL MCKENZIE Managing Principal Oxford

15


03 OUR PERFORMANCE

University of California, Berkeley Haas School of Business Connie & Kevin Chou Hall, Berkeley, CA LEED Platinum + WELL Silver Certified Architect: Perkins+Will

16


OUR PERFORMANCE Introduction We will focus on four areas to track and report progress on our commitment to our people and the planet. These themes emerged through conversations and engagement with staff and senior management across Integral Group. They allow us to communicate our vision and values through the lens of this CSER. In this section, we report on our performance across a range of environmental and social indicators. Where these have been recorded for the first time, they enable us to create a baseline against which performance can be benchmarked and targets for progress set. Where we have access to a data from previous years, they help us to understand trends over time and to calibrate performance targets for future years. The key performance indicators (KPIs) address the greater part of our operations. These include inward-facing KPIs: tracking our policies and grass-roots initiatives that nurture our culture and well-being, to externalfacing KPIs: focused on fostering a resilient society and nurturing a culture of sustainability.

By the Numbers Additional data, figures and charts, calculation and estimation methodology can be found in the Appendix.

2018 CSER REPORT

ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT

Energy, Water, Waste, Business Travel, Employee Commute, Purchasing

EQUITY + DIVERSITY

Gender, Pay Equity, Sexual Orientation, Race/Ethnicity, Nationality

HEALTH + WELL-BEING

Safety, Benefits, Happiness, Satisfaction, Wellness Initiatives, Retention

EDUCATION + IMPACT

Publications, Mentorship, Impact Fund, Charity Donations, Sponsorships

17


ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT Overview While we are proud to be at the forefront of improving the environmental performance of the built environment through our project work, we recognize that it is important to have awareness of, and continuously improve, the environmental impact of our internal operations. We define the environmental impacts of our everyday operations as the space we occupy, the associated resource use of the office (heat, water, electricity, paper, etc.), and our travel footprint (daily commute and business flight data). This year, we dedicated more time, effort, and resources to move away from benchmarking our performance and pushing to get real, accurate consumption data for all offices. With these improvements in place, we will be resetting 2018 as the new baseline for all future data. See the Appendix for more details on how we benchmarked our emissions.

Targets Environmental Footprint

Performance

Key Performance Indicators

2018

2020

2025

2030

441,806 kWh

Better DCQ: 100% Offset

25% Reduction

50% Reduction

Total electricity kWh

1,103,724 kWh

Best DCQ: 100% Offset

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

Total combined gas and electricity kWh

1,582,308 kWh

n/a

n/a

n/a

385,426 KgCO2e

100% Offset

100% Offset

100% Offset

808 KgCO2e

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

Total combined gas and electricity kWh per m2 floor area

208 kWh

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

Water consumption (m³)

5,396 m³

Best DCQ: 100% Offset

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

11 m³

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

736 KgCO2e

10% Reduction

20% Reduction

30% Reduction

% of staff taking public transport

38%

Set new targets via survey

TBD

TBD

% of staff that cycle or walk

35%

Set new targets via survey

TBD

TBD

% of staff that drive

28%

Set new targets via survey

TBD

TBD

493 Tonnes CO2e

Global travel agency to track

100% Offset Flight emissions

10% Reduction from 2025

12 KgCO2e

Set audit process + policy

25% Reduction

50% Reduction

64%

Set baseline + waste audits

75%

90%

-

100% IT + Office Policy

100% IT + Office Policy

100% IT + Office Policy

Total KgCO2e (waste, energy, water, & trash)

397,006 KgCO2e

Gas + Elec + Water: 100% Offset

2020 target +Flights/+Staff Commute

100% + Waste Offset

Total KgCO2e (waste, energy, water, & trash) per person

832 KgCO2e

n/a

n/a

n/a

Sustainable + Wellness purchasing policy

-

Policy Released

Establish Targets/Tracking

TBD

% suppliers who completed a supplier questionnaire

-

Survey created and issued

50%

100%

% supplier respondents with procedures compliant with or equivalent to ISO 14001

-

n/a

n/a

n/a

Total gas kWh

Total combined gas and electricity carbon emissions (KgCO2e) Total combined gas and electricity per person (KgCO2e)

Water consumption (m³) per person Daily commute KgCO²e per person, per annum

Flight emissions tonnes CO2e Total waste KgCO2e per person % of recycled waste % of recycled electrical waste

2018 CSER REPORT

Global Targets

18


ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT 2018 Highlights

Calculating Our Emissions

Each office has its own set of unique challenges but also areas of excellence. The following are examples of where we see early leadership and positive trends: • Integral become a founding signatory of the Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment which was co-created by the World Green Building Council and EP100, and announced at the 2018 Global Climate Action Summit. • New role of Chief Sustainability Officer was created which includes commitment to firm-wide corporate responsibility goals which include both globally and locally purposeful and impactful initiatives. • Both United Kingdom offices consume electricity from 100% renewable sources, and their gas use is either 100% carbon offset with Certified Emissions Reductions generated under the Kyoto Protocol (London) or sourced from Anaerobic Digestion • With a focus on data quality improvement, our 2020 targets for data quality were realized within the 2018 calendar year. This early improvement provides the CSER Planet Team the ability to more confidently progress in our zero carbon strategic planning process.

The World Resource Institute (WRI) Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol for Corporations outlines three emissions scope categories: direct, indirect, and indirect upstream and downstream: • Scope 1: onsite combustion of natural gas or other fossil fuels • Scope 2: electricity, district steam, water • Scope 3: waste, business travel, employee commute

2018 CSER REPORT

We recognize our current evaluations may not be in full accordance with the Protocol. As our data quality improves we will strive for full alignment. In addition to using actual consumption data for the majority of our calculations, we measured a baseline carbon footprint to assess how close to the expected consumption range our buildings are performing. In our 2018 baseline reset, we used industry standard benchmarking datasets and tools to determine typical electric, gas, and water use intensities for office buildings. Wherever possible, those tools were used to adjust the energy use baselines to be specific for each office location, density, and use, to present the energy use that would be expected if the building performed at the industry median. Data were drawn from: • US Department of Energy Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECs) 2012 – US • Statistics Canada Survey on Commercial and Institutional Energy Use (SCIEU), 2014 – Canada • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager National Median EUI – US and Canada • Better Buildings Partnership Real Estate Environmental Benchmark, 2017 – UK • National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) - Australia • US DOE CBECS Water Consumption, 2012 – US • Real Property Association of Canada, Water Management, 2011 – Canada

In 2018, we became one of the three founding signatories of the WGBC’s Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment which was announced at the Global Climate Action Summit (GCAS) in San Francisco this past September. This commitment has become our guiding light for our Environmental Footprint targets, for both our internal operations and our external service offerings. By aligning to this commitment we apply the same levels of ambition and performance for which we strive in every project to our own activities. This commitment includes every Integral Group office achieving an accelerated path to zero operational (scope 1 + scope 2) carbon emissions by 2020, with additional targets around water, waste, flights, and commuting by 2030; as well as commit to advocacy on all projects to target zero carbon by 2030. We are proud to walk-the-talk of Deep Green!

Megan White Chief Sustainability Officer, Integral Group Oakland Office

19


ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT Data Quality The focus of last year’s report was to set a baseline by which we could compare future performance to in order to show reductions, improvements, or advancement towards our targets. As data quality was identified as our biggest opportunity for improvement within the 2018 CSER reporting year, we began to look at re-setting baselines to the 2018 data set. The table to the right summarizes our data quality targets per World Resource Institute (WRI) emissions scopes. Our goal is to continue to align with WRI reporting protocols in preparation for official GHG reporting of our 2020 performance. Data quality is categorized by “Good, Better, or Best” to delineate the relative accuracy of data sets - details are described in the key below. A global summary evaluation was provided for the 2017 and 2018 reporting periods. A detailed breakdown of this table per office can be found within the Appendix. With a focus on data quality improvement, our 2020 targets for data quality were realized within the 2018 calendar year. This early improvement provides the CSER Planet Team the ability to more confidently progress in our zero carbon strategic planning process.

Global Performance

Zero Carbon Targets (Offset)

2017

2018

2020

2025

2030

GOOD

BETTER

BETTER

BEST

BEST

2020

NR

NR

NR

BEST

BEST

2020

GOOD

BETTER

BETTER

BEST

BEST

2020

GOOD

BETTER

BETTER

BEST

BEST

2020

GOOD

BETTER

BETTER

BEST

BEST

2020

NR

NR

NR

GOOD

BETTER

2050

Scope 1 - Direct A

Company Facilitis - Gas

Gas

B

Company Fleet Vehicles

Fleet Vehicle

Scope 2 - Indirect C (1)

Purchased indirect Utilities (Electricity, Electricity C (1)* Steam*, Heating & Cooling for Own Steam* Operations Use; Water) C (2) Water Scope 3 - Indirect Upstream D

Purchased Goods and Services

E

Capital Goods

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

F

Fuel & Energy activities (not included in Scopes 1+2)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

G

Upstream transportation and distrubtion

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

H

Waste Generated in Operations

Waste

NR

NR

GOOD

BETTER

BEST

2030

I

Business Travel

Business Travel

GOOD

GOOD

BETTER

BEST

BEST

2025

J

Employee Commuting

Employee Commuting

GOOD

GOOD

BETTER

BEST

BEST

2025

Office Supplies

KEY N/A

N/A: Not Applicable to our business

NR

NR: Not Reported at this time (Data points not available currently)

GOOD BETTER BEST

2018 CSER REPORT

Data Quality Targets

GOOD: Benchmarking Data (i.e. CBECS COM Energy / LEED Water Assumptions); preliminary data collection efforts which could use improvement (waste, flights, commute) BETTER: Whole Building Utility Bills - prorated usage by rentable area; better data quality, improvements made (waste, flights, commute) BEST: Actual Metered / Sub-metered usage; great data quality, confident in accuracy (waste, flights, commute)

20


ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT Benchmarking

350 300 250 200 150 100 50

Va

Vi

ct

or

ia

ve nc

ou

o nt ro To

ey dn Sy

N/A

Steam

Benchmark

Energy Star Ratings

tle

r

Gas

at

Se

n

Jo

Steam

Sa

Ri

Electricity

se

d

on

m

d

or

xf O

ak O

Lo

Gas

ch

nd la

on

Electricity

nd

LA

D

C

y ar

in st

lg Ca

Benchmark

Actual Performance

N/A

Actual Performance

100

75

50

25

Vi

ct

or

ia

r ou ve Va nc

ey

nt o ro To

at

Se

Jo

Sa n

m

ch

Ri

or

xf

O

ak l

O

Energy Star bars are excel data point times 2

Sy dn

tle

se

d on

d

an d

n

nd o

Lo

D

LA

Energy Star bars are excel data point times 2

C

y ar lg Ca

st in

0

At

2018 CSER REPORT

Au

la

nt

a

0

la

All offices were entered into the ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager tool to achieve a rating out of 100. These scores were calculated with normalized data for all United States and Canadian offices. The ENERGY STAR tool does not contain such data for United Kingdom and Australian offices, so for those offices average performance in the United States was used as a reference point and the scores may not fully represent of how the buildings perform relative to their local peers. Under ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, a score of 50 represents the median performance as compared to peers, while a rating of 75 or higher indicates top performers. Nine out of 15 of our offices are considered top performers, according to this scoring, while three fall below the national median.

N/A

EUI bars are excel data point times 0.5

400

Au

Energy Star

Steam

*not adjusted for use factors

At

EUI is an important metric for reporting our portfolio, as it provides normalized energy use data per square meter. Per our World Green Building Council’s Net Zero Carbon Buildings commitment, we are not only required to offset 100% of our scope 1 and scope 2 energy related emissions, but also to show reductions in energy consumption. We are exploring opportunities to reduce energy use intensity across all offices. Measuring our energy use intensity will allow us to track improvements in efficiency over time. Whereas our absolute energy use may increase as we grow our employee base and open new offices, we will make an effort not to increase energy use per unit area, maintaining or improving relative efficiency.

Gas

Actual

450

nt a

Energy Use Intensity (EUI)

Electricity Benchmark*

EUI bars are excel data point times 0.5

Energy Use Intensity (kWh/m2)

Where actual consumption data was not available for an office, standard benchmarking datasets and tools were used to determine typical electric, gas, and water use intensities for office buildings within similar regional zone. Details on benchmarking standards used to support our baseline/ benchmark comparisons can be found within the Appendix.

EUI Benchmarks and 2018 Actual Performance

21


ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT Total GHG Emissions

2018 GHG Emissions by Office (Average Headcount) 300,000

This graph represents the 2018 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per category by office, based on actual collected utility data where available, and using benchmarking standards where actual data was not available. We’ve focused our 2018 reporting GHG emissions to Gas for scope 1, electricity and steam for scope 2, and employee commute and business travel for scope 3. Water use was excluded from the GHG inventory because the emissions associated with water consumption are negligible compared to emissions from energy use. Data on water consumption can be found on page 25. We will reevaluate reporting on GHG emissions associated with waste in 2019 calendar year after waste audit protocols are created to ensure consistency in data collection.

200,000

GHG Emissions (KgCO2e)

Understanding total emissions as well as emissions per capita and per office leasable area are all important indicators that provide information to support future decision making related to office operations.

250,000

150,000

Actual

Benchmark

100,000

50,000

Business Travel Employee Commute Steam N/A Electricity

) .4 (8 Vi

ct

or

ia

r( ou ve Va nc

To r

on

to

(2

(1 ey dn Sy

16 3)

7. 2

0.

.4 (6 tle at Se

)

1)

)

) (7 Jo se n

Sa

d on m ch Ri

.3

(9 .8

5. (1 d or xf O

an d ak l

)

5)

) 02 (1

on nd Lo

O

2018 CSER REPORT

.4

5) (5

1) LA

(2 0.

) 0. 2 (1 C D

(1 y ar Ca lg

st in Au

2.

(1 2.

6. (1 a nt la At

8)

9)

0

1)

Gas

22


ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT

1.23 Million kgCO2e Total GHG Emissions

equivalent to emissions from

2,847 barrels of oil consumed

equivalent to emissions from

156,802,408

avoided by

46,709

incandescent bulbs switched to LEDs

smartphones charged

equivalent to emissions from

610 equivalent to emissions from

4,838,671

kilometers driven by a passenger vehicle 2018 CSER REPORT

metric tons of coal burned

sequestered by

20,333

tree seedlings grown for 10 years 23


ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT Summary of GHG Emissions by Scope Energy (Gas, Electricity, Steam)

Employee Commute

As mentioned, we have made progress in our effort to improve data quality: • Nine out of the 11 offices consuming gas are already at the ‘BETTER’ target. • Four offices have achieved “BEST” for electricity; while all but one office have achieved at least “BETTER”. • 13 out of 15 offices analysed in this report are performing better than the benchmark for total GHG emissions.

Employee commute data was captured via the All Staff Survey which achieved a 70% response rate. All data obtained from the Survey was assumed to be representative of the staff in each location and so a calculation to pro-rate the data to the full head count was applied. The following trends were observed: • High GHG emissions per capita in suburb locations (Calgary, Richmond, Oxford, Los Angeles); • Low per capita in urban cores/ walkable cities (Vancouver, Sydney, Oakland, Victoria) As part of our strategy to reduce our environmental footprint, we will consider siting new offices in areas with high walk scores, and access to public transit.

For offices that needed to rely on benchmarking proxy data either: • Data was benchmarked from published data, or; • Data was collected from pro-rated landlord building data. This introduces a margin of error that is difficult to quantify – as the data is not from raw data, nor is it representative of only office use – it includes all common areas.

For 2019, the aim is to improve the employee commute survey to allow responses for seasonal differences in commuting.

Flight Emissions (Business Travel)

Waste

We estimated total air travel miles using data from our accounting system. The method for pulling data required assumptions to be made and assigned transportation to the destination office, rather than the traveler’s home office location.

We are in a preliminary investigative stage in regards to measuring waste. This year, we discovered that across the firm as a whole, we are using at least three different methodologies to quantify waste. Additionally, at least one third of offices have no mechanism in place to quantify waste at all.

In 2019, a new platform to manage business travel will be implemented which will help us to more accurately track distances travelled and GHG emissions associated with that travel. Once we have a full year of data on this platform, the baseline will be reset. In addition, we will look at extracting corporate travel into a new category to give a clearer representation of staff travel versus executive travel.

2018 CSER REPORT

One of the main targets for improvement for 2019 will be to identify best practices for waste audits, and then define the protocol for all offices to follow. The intention is for at least one waste audit to occur per office in 2019, to allow us to obtain benchmark data for future years where multiple audits will be completed in the calendar year to reduce seasonal outliers.

24


ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT Water Consumption

2018 Water Consumption (m3) by Office (Average Headcount)

This graph represents the 2018 water consumption by office, based on actual collected utility data where available, and using benchmarking standards where actual data was unavailable.1 Data for the months of July and August for the Richmond office were normalized due to a hurricane which caused damage to the water main, resulting in meters reading over 15 times higher than the average of all other months. To ensure a fair water consumption reporting, we applied the 2017 July/August figures as a proxy. Only four offices reported consumption figures larger than the benchmark – the largest difference reported for the Vancouver office. Similar to other offices, Vancouver data was pro-rated based on the total consumption for the building. This includes some retail units on the ground floor, so figures are potentially skewed negatively for the Vancouver office. Looking ahead, we will continue to implement strategies to reduce water consumption in our offices. Additionally, we will implement a flow and flush fixture audit to determine if there are opportunities for upgrades to more water-efficient fixtures.

2,500

2,000

1,500

1,000

.4

)

3)

ia ct or Vi

Va nc

ou ve

r(

(8

7. To

ro

nt

o

(2

(1 ey dn Sy

16

2)

1) 0.

.4 Se

at

tle

(6

(7 Sa

n

Jo

se

d on ch m Ri

)

.3 )

.8 (9

(1 5. O

xf

or

d

(1 an d ak l

)

5)

) 02

(5 on nd O

2018 CSER REPORT

.4

5)

) (2 LA

2) D

C

(1

0.

8) 2. (1 ar y

0. 1 Lo

Au

st in

(1 nt a At la

1 Benchmarked data was used for: Austin, Toronto, Seattle, & San Jose

(1

6.

2.

1)

9)

0

Ca lg

Benchmark Water

Actual Performance

500

25


0

2018 CSER REPORT Victoria

Vancouver

Toronto

Sydney

Seattle

San Jose

Richmond

Oxford

Oakland

London

LA

DC

Calgary

Austin

0 Victoria

Vancouver

Toronto

Sydney

6,000

8,000

4,000

2,000 2,000

0

20

15

10

5

Sydney

Seattle

San Jose

Richmond

Oxford

Oakland

London

Victoria

25

Victoria

30

Vancouver

35

Vancouver

40

Toronto

2018 Water (m3) per capita

Toronto

Sydney

8,000

Seattle

12,000

San Jose

10,000

Richmond

18,000

Oxford

2018 GHG emissions (KgCO2e) per capita

Oakland

12,000

0.00

London

200 LA

600

LA

0.60

DC

2018 GHG emissions (KgCO2e) per m2

DC

800

Calgary

0.80

Calgary

1,000

Austin

1,200

Atlanta

1,600

Austin

Victoria

Vancouver

Toronto

Sydney

Seattle

San Jose

Richmond

Oxford

Oakland

London

LA

1,800

Atlanta

4,000

Seattle

6,000

San Jose

10,000

Richmond

14,000

Oxford

16,000

Oakland

2018 Energy (kWh) per capita

London

20,000 0

LA

100

DC

200

DC

Average

Calgary

400

Calgary

500

Austin

600

Atlanta

2018 Energy (kWh) per m2

Austin

Victoria

Vancouver

Toronto

Sydney

Seattle

San Jose

Richmond

Oxford

Oakland

London

LA

DC

Calgary

Austin

700

Atlanta

0 Atlanta

300

Atlanta

ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT 2018 Water (m3) per m2

1.40

1,400

1.20

1.00

400

0.40

0.20

26


ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT Looking Forward Now that we have a better sense of our calculated impact, we are focusing on developing and implementing strategies to reduce our footprint. Initiatives and areas of focus for the 2019 reporting year: • Developing a waste audit protocol; conduct one audit per office in 2019; conduct quarterly waste audits in 2020 • Investigating ways to implement building level water metering and sub-metering • Introducing a firm-wide environmental policy and sustainable purchasing policy to align with ISO 14001 targets • Reducing per capita emissions and energy consumption towards our 2020 target • Reducing air travel by continuing to facilitate teleconferencing, and introduce new programs to encourage a reduction in air travel • Striving towards “paperless” offices • Rolling out a new software system to support a better tracking process for business travel flight emissions • Updating the all-staff survey to improve employee commute data • Continuing to collaborate with WeWork on creating a mechanism by which we can gather gas, electricity, water data for our offices which are located within their facilities • Updating the new office / office close-out checklist to add parameters such as walk scores, etc. which support CSER initiatives

2018 CSER REPORT

27


EQUITY + DIVERSITY Overview Equity + Diversity speaks to our commitment to be a safe and inclusive workplace in which employees thrive. We maintain, by increasing diversity across our firm, we will attract and retain the best, brightest, and most passionate people motivated by a mutual sense of purpose. We believe that a diverse and inclusive employee community, rich with a wide array of perspectives, is a fundamental condition of innovation and resiliency in our firm. We are dedicated to promoting greater diversity and inclusion internally and throughout the AEC industry, with emphasis on those who are traditionally underrepresented. We are committed to providing equal opportunity to people of all races, ethnicities, religions, genders, sexual orientations, gender identifications, abilities, incomes, marital statuses, ages, geographic locations, philosophies, and veteran statuses in all levels of staff and leadership.

Targets Equity + Diversity

Performance

Key Performance Indicators

2018

2020

2025

2030

% Female staff (All)

33%

40%

45%

50%

% Technical female staff

26%

30%

40%

50%

% of female Associates/ Associate Principal

30%

10%

20%

40%

% of female Principal / Managing Principal

6%

7%

15%

30%

% of female Senior Management (C-Suite, Directors)

29%

5%

10%

20%

In Process

Third Party Analysis

Third Party Analysis

Third Party Analysis

38

No Target

No Target

No Target

Gender Pay Equity evaluation Number of nationalities represented

Global Targets

Number of languages spoken

Not collected

No Target

No Target

No Target

% of staff race/ethnicities represented

Data collected

Evaluate data & set strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

Sexual orientation

Data collected

Evaluate data & set strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

Gender identity

Data collected

Evaluate data & set strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

Re-evaluate data/strategy

Although diversity was core to our founding vision, our journey really began in 2016 by taking an honest look at who we are. We first focused on gender and ethnic diversity because our industry faces unique challenges as it struggles to be more representative while meeting global talent demands. However, we also recognize the need to continually revisit our focus as diversity goes far beyond gender and ethnicity. The main area to continue to focus on for improvement is female leadership. We have increased our number of female associates and associate principals from nine in 2016 to twenty-three in 2018 but our proportion of females in principal and managing principal roles remains low. This points to the need to focus on not just attracting female talent, but retaining and supporting the growth and development throughout their careers.

2018 CSER REPORT

28


EQUITY + DIVERSITY 2018 Highlights All-Staff Survey This year in our annual anonymous All Staff Survey, we asked employees to share how they identify with respect to their: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, nationality, disability, and current or former military or armed forces status.

International Women’s Day For the third consecutive year, we celebrated the women in our firm on International Women’s Day. International Women’s Day is a global day celebrating the social, economic, and political achievements of women. This is one of the ways we are highlight the incredible women we have across the firm. 95% of offices participated in this event.

Regional Highlights •

The Oakland office supported its LGBTQ + staff, family, friends, and community members by participating in the Oakland Pride Parade for the second year. Representatives from the Sydney office attended the Diversity Series seminar hosted by the Australia Property Council. Sessions included topics on creating a safe environment for LGBTQ employees, First Nations reconciliation, and domestic violence awareness. The Atlanta office supported the Georgia Tech Women Alumnae Network which provides scholarships for exceptional undergraduate junior and senior women. The Los Angeles office values diversity and inclusion and to represent that, they’ve created the International Breakfast Club. Every Tuesday, a team member in the office showcases a breakfast specific to their culture that they love to eat or grew up eating. This is a chance for staff to try something new and learn more about their colleagues.

2018 CSER REPORT

Society Of Women Engineers We continue to be involved with Society of Women Engineers (SWE). For the first time we participated in SWE’s career fair which takes place during its annual WE Conference. This year the conference was held in Minneapolis, and Integral Group had the opportunity to connect with female college students and professionals from all over the world. Additionally, our Toronto office stepped up its involvement with the local SWE affiliate chapter, led by Rachel Lieberman. Rachel served on the Board as Lead Program Officer. The office was the corporate sponsor for SWE’s Toronto Affiliate and provided space for SWESpeaks events.

#WeAreIntegral 2018 #WeAreIntegral month is an annual, firm-wide, employee-driven fundraiser held in the spirit of diversity. Each year, a different charitable organization is selected at the country-level and “fun-raising” events are held across our offices. It is an opportunity for employees to engage with one another while having local and/or national impact. In 2018, employees raised approximately $1,600 for these charitable organizations: • Canada: Rainbow Refugee • Australia: Property Industry Foundation • United Kingdom: Blue Cross Animal Welfare • United States: National Society for Black Engineers (NSBE) Office events included a chili and guacamole cook-off, bake-off, wine and cheese tasting, and raffles.

It has been a rewarding experience to be involved in the Society of Women Engineers (SWE) Toronto Affiliate and to serve on the Board as Lead Program Officer in 2018. In this role, I helped organize our monthly SWESpeaks events. The SWESpeaks series invites ‘speakers from industry and academia to discuss their career paths and showcase their successes and challenges, acting as inspirations for their peers and aspiring engineers. Through these event series, like-minded engineers and engineering professionals can connect by engaging in meaningful conversations and learn about different industries and options for their career path.’ SWE’s presence in Canada is not as strong as in the US and the Toronto Affiliate saw a huge demand for this type of education, networking and connection to fellow women in the industry.

Rachel Lieberman Principal, Integral Group Toronto Office

29


EQUITY + DIVERSITY 2018 International Women’s Day

Los Angeles

Oakland

Austin

Washington DC

Oxford

Oakland

London

Toronto

Atlanta

2018 CSER REPORT

Oakland

Sydney

Vancouver

30


EQUITY + DIVERSITY All Staff Survey In 2018, we focused on supporting the ever-expanding lens of how we ask questions. Each year we evaluate and refine to ensure we are being as inclusive and aware of biases as possible. The All Staff Survey received a 70 percent response rate. All responses are anonymous and self-reported. The topics of gender identity and sexual orientation are reported at the global level and these questions received a 98.5% and 97.7% response rate, respectively. Options for transman, transwoman, agender, genderqueer, and gender fluid were offered in the All Staff Survey, and the responses have been collectively reported as gender nonconforming (GNC) and/or non-binary. As we understand our diversity blueprint, we will proactively work to create inclusive and equitable spaces for non-binary staff, including but not limited to: gender inclusive restrooms, introducing unconscious bias training, and removing gender-specific language.

2018 Self-reported Gender Identity

Questioning or unsure, 2 Cis Woman, 113

2018 Self-reported Sexual Orientation

Gender Non Conforming, 4

Bisexual, 9

Gay, 6

Asexual, 1

Lesbian, 4

Prefer not to disclose, 3

Questioning or unsure, 2

Pansexual, 1

Cis Man, 226

Prefer not to disclose, 10

Queer, 3

Heterosexual, 307

Other not listed, 1

Gathering more robust data on our employee populations will help us develop internal awareness and drive program and outreach strategies.

Gender Pay Equity Our Global Just Label is valid through the close of the 2018 calendar year. The Equity category within Just includes a Gender Pay Equity evaluation per the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) program criteria. In 2018 we started the conversations of exploring third-party verified Pay Equity evaluations. In 2019 we are committing to a third-party verified approach, and will begin our search for an organization to execute this evaluation.

2018 CSER REPORT

31


EQUITY + DIVERSITY Gender Distribution | Employees For the purpose of gender analysis, the data used was collected during onboarding where employees are asked to specify their legal gender. The All Staff Survey gave employees an opportunity to identify beyond legal binary gender options. Since the All Staff Survey only had a 70% response rate and employees were assured in the Survey that the gender identity would only be reported at a global level. We will continue to use our internal People records to report on gender distribution. Because gender diversity is a key area of focus for us, we need a comprehensive data set to fully understand our progress and areas for improvement. Our primary goal is to challenge the norm of gender imbalance seen in our industry. We have increased our overall proportion of female staff from 28% in 2016 to 33% in 2018, our proportion of female technical staff has increased from 19% in 2016 to 26% in 2018 while we added approximately 230 employees to our global family. This puts us within 4% of our 2020 target to reach 30% female technical staff.

2018 All Staff Gender Distribution

2018 Employee Category Distribution 92.9%

89.7%

87.4%

63.0%

60.1%

39.9%

37.0%

33.3%

29.2%

27.1% 12.6%

Canada

UK

US East

US West

Australia

2018 Non-Technical Employee Gender Distribution

For clarification, technical employees are billable and represent all service offerings.

Canada

UK

13.1%

11.1%

10.3%

7.1%

Australia

86.9%

72.9%

70.8%

66.7%

88.9%

US East

US West

2018 Technical Employee Gender Distribution

100%

85.7%

81.5%

78.6%

78.7%

69.2%

66.7%

66.7%

62.2%

55.6% 44.4%

Male 33.3%

Female Technical Non-Technical

18.5%

30.8% 21.4%

37.8%

21.3%

14.3%

0%

Australia

2018 CSER REPORT

33.3%

Canada

UK

US East

US West

Australia

Canada

UK

US East

US West

32


EQUITY + DIVERSITY Gender Distribution | Leadership 2018 Associate / Associate Principal

2018 Principal / Sr. Principal / Managing Principal

20

2018 C-Suite / Director

20

14 13

13

12

10

8 7

7 6

3 2

0

2

1

Australia

Canada

UK

US East

1

US West

0

Australia

0

0

Canada

UK

4

1

US East

US West

The main area to continue to focus on for improvement is female leadership. We have increased our number of female associates and

We recognize our proportion of females in principal and managing principal roles remains too low. In 2017 we reported 4% female

In 2017 we did not break out the c-suite/director level in our reporting. This group includes both operation directors as well as regional directors. We

associate principals from 9 in 2016 to 23 in 2018.

representation at this leadership level; now we are at 8%. This is an area that leadership continues to take seriously. This data point is a crucial indicator for encouraging young and established females in the industry to both enter and stay by seeing representation at the top.

recognize that there is gender balance at the operational leadership level and our opportunity for growth is to bring forward female representation at the regional director level.

Male Female

2018 CSER REPORT

33


EQUITY + DIVERSITY Nations Represented

Race + Ethnicity

Through our All Staff Survey, employees reported that they collectively represent the following 38 countries/nations:

Employees reported with a 98.8% response rate on the race and ethnicity they most strongly identify with. As we continue to expand into different countries, we have added options inclusive of identification of race and ethnicity to reflect the populations present. Next year, this portion of the survey will be conducted at the country-level to best capture this data in correlation with the local census.

Armenia

Iran

Australia

Ireland

Bangladesh

Italy

Bolivia

Jamaica

Brazil

Lebanon

Canada

Mexico

Chile

Netherlands

China

New Zealand

Colombia

Nigeria

El Salvador

Peru

England

Philippines

France

Scotland

Germany

South Africa

Greece

South Korea

Guam

Sweden

Guyana

Ukraine

Hong Kong

United States of America

Hungary

Venezuela

India

Vietnam

2018 Self-reported Race + Ethnicity Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, 1 Other race/ethnicity not listed, 2 Prefer not to say, 14 Two or more races (mixed-race, multiple ethnic groups), 13 Middle Eastern or North African, 22

Asian, 43 South Asian, 19 Black, African, Caribbean, African American, Black British, or of any other Black/ African/ Caribbean background, 16

Hispanic or Latino, 19 Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin, 1

2018 CSER REPORT

White, 208

34


ee

cat

ion

in St kin yl g es

Th JHU, “The center of the wheel represents internal dimensions that are usually most permanent

Race

Mil i Exp tary erie nce

Ethnicity Jo Cl b as si

/ orn e B ive tiv Na -Nat n No

This image was adapted from John Hopkin’s University’s (JHU) “Diversity Wheel”. According to

Sexual Functional Orientation/ Speciality Identity

Gender

ic ph a r ion og Ge ocat L

l rita a M tus Sta

Age

Religious Beliefs

Parental Status

Physical Abilities/ Qualities

Eco Socionom Sta ic tus

Edu

d

P id olit eo ic lo al gy

rk Wo d n rou ckg

Cr

e

Ba

We have made progress at raising awareness about the importance of being a diverse, inclusive, and equitable workplace since the conversation was initiated at our 2016 Leadership Summit. Over the next several years, we will be focusing on these key areas: • Establish a Diversity Council to create a three-year action plan and further engage employees across the firm • Leverage the Diversity Council to identify regional and office-specific programs and areas of focus • Introduce unconscious bias and communication training • Create policies designed to promote a family-friendly, flexible workplace • Focus on STEM outreach and internal mentorship and professional development for female staff • Expand our onboarding questions to be more inclusive and continue to evaluate the All Staff Survey annually

App ear anc

Looking Forward

Communication Style / Skills

EQUITY + DIVERSITY

fic

at

io

n

or visible. The outside of the wheel represents dimensions that are acquired and change over the course of a lifetime. The combinations of all of these dimensions influence our values, beliefs, behaviors, experiences and expectations and make us all unique as individuals.”

2018 CSER REPORT

35


HEALTH + WELL-BEING Overview As health and well-being increasingly become a focal point in the work we do in communities and the built environment, we also recognize that it needs to be a focus within our own offices and corporate culture. Personal wellness helps us feel our best so we can do our best work and make positive change in the world. In 2018, we continued to have a growing number of Fitwel Ambassadors and WELL Accredited Professionals, two organizations leading the efforts on health and wellness in the built environment. We have continued to pursue Fitwel certification for our own offices, demonstrating our commitment to maintenance of healthy work environments. In 2018, our largest office, Vancouver, began its pursuit of Fitwel certification and look to completing the process in 2019. Staff-led wellness committees continue to organize recreational activities in and out of the office, including but not limited to: participation in races and educational seminars to raise awareness about issues related to physical, mental and emotional health and well-being.

Targets Health + Well-being

Performance

Key Performance Indicators

2018

2020

2025

2030

# of staff social events

209

Tracking process established

Quarterly per office

Quarterly per office

# of accidents reported

2

0%

0%

50%

Data collected

10%

20%

30%

100%

100%

100%

100%

# of people on EH&S Committee

In Progress

Establish Committee, 1 per office, regular meetings, policies in place

Re-evaluate

Re-evaluate

Culture of workplace satisfaction (Happiness)

8.5 avg

Global survey established

Best work places - global

Best work places - global

Churn rate (employee turnover)

Reporting framework in process

<12%

<12%

<12%

Work Station Satisfaction

Data collected

Data Collected

5% Improvement

10% Improvement

Workplace Environment Satisfaction

Data collected

Data Collected

5% Improvement

10% Improvement

Local Health/Wellbeing Initiatives

Data collected

1 per office

2 per office

3 per office

Employee benefits - Comprehensive Medical Coverage % of employees receiving performance reviews

Global Targets

Inventorying our health and well-being activities for the purpose of this report revealed a broad range of grass roots initiatives across the company. We will continue to nurture our existing programs and initiatives, while building a universal and holistic approach to employee health and well-being.

2018 CSER REPORT

36


HEALTH + WELL-BEING 2018 Highlights Fitwel Fitwel is a high-impact building certification standard positioned to optimize building occupant health and productivity through targeted improvements to workplace design and operational policies. Fitwel is based on the idea that all office facilities can be improved through specific, incremental changes, resulting in healthier places to work, regardless of building size, age, or location. Healthy people and healthy buildings are where the values of Integral thrive. We achieved Fitwel certification in three of our offices in 2017 and our largest office, Vancouver, is on track to receive their certification in 2019. As offices move or expand, we are evaluating which should pursue certification and other wellness-focused workplace additions. The Oakland office, which achieved 2 stars through its Fitwel Certification in 2017, actively strove to increase their score during their 2018 kitchen remodel project. The new kitchen includes a new Liquos filtered water cooler with ADA accessibility, a kegerator which features local microbrewed beers and cold brew coffee, increased capacity for compost and recycling, and dual dishwashers to improve cleanliness. Staff continue to show improved happiness and satisfaction with their improved office amenities.

Mental Health Awareness United Kingdom offices have introduced Mental Health First Aiders to provide mental health support whenever needed. They have organized the “Elemental Week” including talks on mental health within the industry, meditation and Yoga sessions. Furthermore the United Kingdom region promoted an anonymous Mental Health Survey to get suggestions directly from employees to implement actions to improve mental health.

2018 CSER REPORT

Wellness Committee Since 2015, the Vancouver office Wellness Committee has been offering bimonthly activities and events focused on improving the health and happiness of employees. The Committee focuses on three areas: advocacy (e.g. fundraising or awareness campaigns); education (e.g. seminars, speakers, documentaries); and physical activity (e.g. yoga and team sports). 2018 activities and initiatives include: • Fresh fruit and vegetable delivery • Award-winning softball team • Vancouver Sun Run • Summer yoga

Focus On Safety In 2018, we focused on the physical safety of our offices. A Safety page template was launched on our company intranet to house key information including Injury & Illness Prevention Plans, evacuation plans and other critical office-specific safety information. Automated external defibrillator (AED) machines were installed in Vancouver and Oakland and employees received emergency response training.

BCO Wellness Matters Elementa (London) was honored to conduct and complete the “Wellness Matters: Health and wellbeing in offices and what to do about it” report for the British Council for Offices (BCO) this year. Although this body of work represents our leadership in external services, the research also helped us as an organization deepen our understanding on workplace wellness. In 2019, we look forward to reviewing our portfolio more holistically and apply learnings strategically.

It has been an honor to work with the British Council for Offices (BCO) on the research study “Wellness Matters: Health and wellbeing in offices and what to do about it”. The study critiques existing measurements and certifications, identifies the most recent and relevant medical evidence justifying a proactive approach to Health and Wellbeing in the built environment, and articulates the business case for investment in this space beyond simply improving productivity. Most significantly, this research delivers a practical and professional guide to creating a healthy environment. The report was led by a consortium of Sentinel RPI, Elementa Consulting, Perkins +Will and Will+Partners, backed by medical and academic input from Royal Brompton, Imperial College and Queen Mary University. We are excited to take these findings and apply them to our own Integral and Elementa facilities.

Ed Garrod Director of Communications London Office

37


HEALTH + WELL-BEING Workplace Satisfaction

Mental + Emotional Well-being

Through the All Staff Survey, we asked two questions related to workplace satisfaction:

New questions which we added to the All-Staff survey this year include questions about satisfaction relative to:

Additionally, we expanded the All Staff Survey to include the following question:

1. Considering all aspects of your job, how satisfied are you with your organization? (optional) 1 represents not satisfied at all; 10 represents extremely satisfied.

3. Individual Workstation (Desk) • Personal Workstation • Thermal Comfort • Visual Comfort (light/ glare) • Physical Comfort • Technology Instruments • Telecommunication • Desk Chair

5. Please indicate the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following statements as they relate to your current workplace. This data will be reported on by office to understand health, happiness, well-being in the workplace. • My physical health and well-being are supported. • My mental/ emotional health and well-being are supported. • The workplace supports mindfulness. • There are engaging activities/ events offered at my workplace. • Workplace concerns I raise are addressed in a timely manner. • The workplace enables and inspires sustainable living. • The workplace allows me to show up as my authentic self.

7.59

US West

8.54

US East 7.63

UK

7.86

Canada

8.25

Australia 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

2. How likely is it that you would recommend your organization as a good place to work? (optional) 1 represents not likely at all; 10 represents extremely likely. 7.21

US West

• 8.65

US East

7.44

Canada

2

Acoustics/ noise levels

9.17

Australia 1

Details of these results by office will be shared with staff and leadership during the 2019 CSER Roadshow workshops.

Details of these results by office will be shared with staff and leadership during the 2019 CSER Roadshow workshops.

7.96

UK

4. Workplace / Office Environment • Attractiveness • Communal Spaces • Kitchens • General Cleanliness • Employer Provided coffee and teas • Employer provided snacks • Restroom facilities

3

4

5

2018 CSER REPORT

6

7

8

9

10

38


HEALTH + WELL-BEING

Zero Carbon by Cathy Chan Integral Vancouver Office

Grass Roots Initiatives The following is a list of initiatives within the category of Health + Wellbeing which were led at local levels around the firm: • Team lunch outings (Oakland, Austin) • Half-marathon training group (Oakland) • Weekly meditation in the office (Calgary, Vancouver) • Fun holiday parties (all offices) • Signs to take the stairs over elevator (Oakland, Calgary, London) • The Integral Games (Toronto) • Zero Carbon Art Installation (Vancouver) • Dogs in the office (Los Angeles, Oakland) • No Meat Week (Los Angeles) • Daily plank challenge/stretches (Victoria, London) • Bike to Work Week/ Day (Victoria, Oakland) • Flexible working during Forest Fires (Oakland) • Ergonomic seating options + salvaged wood standing desks (Atlanta) • Fruit delivery service (Vancouver, Oakland, Austin) • Work/life balance through weekly staff planning (Austin) • Social events like bowling, wine tasting, shrimp boils, barbecues, picnics (all offices) • Mental Health Day (Sydney) • Social Committee (Sydney, Vancouver) • Promote caffeine alternatives/awareness (Sydney, Atlanta, Oakland, London, Vancouver) • Lactation rooms (Vancouver, Oakland) • Netflix Fridays (Richmond) • Lake walks (Richmond) • Standing desks (Oakland) • Lunch & Learns on health and wellness (all offices) • Team building events off-site (all offices) • Fitness/wellness subsidy and benefits (United States offices) • Office yoga (Los Angeles, Vancouver)

2018 CSER REPORT

39


HEALTH + WELL-BEING

2018 CSER REPORT

40


HEALTH + WELL-BEING Looking Forward Cataloging our ongoing activities to encourage Health + Well-being presents the opportunity to set in motion future programs that can meaningfully improve our lives. By understanding our current conditions, we are better able to plan for the future and improve accordingly. We are committed to enhancing our Health + Well-being standards across the company. In 2018, we started to test Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) monitoring technologies in some offices, and resulted in the understanding that we will need to continue in this exploration phase over the next few years before rolling out globally in our spaces. The monitors track information such as pollution levels and temperature variation. We would like to supplement IAQ testing with other Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) factors such as acoustics, thermal comfort, visual comfort, physical comfort, etc. We will continue to engage staff to understand employee interests and priorities around health and well-being. Our actions are and will continue to be a reflection of engagement sessions, happiness surveys, and wellness committee requests.

Lastly, we look forward to forming a Wellness Committee through a spoke and hub model, where we can review our global portfolio holistically and start to apply initiatives locally and strategically. Next year we will initiate or expand upon the following initiatives: • Continue to certify our offices with industry leading occupant health standards, such as but not limited to Fitwel • Support and encourage staff to use healthy, active modes of transportation • Introduce food purchasing guidelines emphasizing healthy food choices through our Sustainability & Healthy Purchasing Policy (target roll out Q1 2020) • Continue to improve employee happiness & satisfaction questions in the All Staff Survey • Continue to test air quality monitoring technologies • Ensuring clean (filtered) drinking water, accessible to all • Desk fans and other occupant comfort controls • Green Cleaning Policies (target roll out Q1 2020) • Continue to expand lactation and prayer rooms in all offices • Establish a wellness committee initiative where local committees can cross-collaborate with other offices

2018 CSER REPORT

41


EDUCATION + IMPACT Overview Education + Impact is about our commitment to both internal professional training, development, and employee engagement, as well as external involvement and contributions to our local communities. In 2018, we collected additional data from our All Staff Survey as well as office-level information from roadshows and our support teams. This included: expanded questions in the survey on average annual time spent on volunteer and personal development activities; details on the amount and content of internal presentations and trainings; campaigns to raise awareness on environmental and/or social matters; and employeedriven charitable contributions. Offices continued to host a variety of educational seminars featuring content from fellow employees, trainers, and vendors. An emphasis on internally-delivered education resulted in over 200 staff-led presentations in 2018. Passive House trainings took place again in several offices and we shared our knowledge and expertise externally through workshops and conferences.

Targets Education + Impact

Performance

Key Performance Indicators

2018

2020

2025

2030

30+ (tracking process in development)

Tracking process in place

10% of FTE; review effectiveness

10% of FTE; review effectiveness

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in place

25

50

# of hours of educational outreach

Program in development

Define program; establish policy and tracking process

1 paid day per employee per year

2 paid days per employee per year

# of office wide volunteer activities

Program in development

Define program; establish policy and tracking process

TBD

TBD

# of externally provided CPD (continuing professional development)'s offered within offices

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in place

2 per office per month

2 per office per month

Hours of external CPD received by employees within office

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in place

TBD

TBD

# of internally delivered seminars/ workshops

200+ (tracking process in development)

Tracking process in place

1 per office per month

2 per office per month

# of staff-wide open design reviews

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in place

1 per office per quarter

Every significant project as defined by PIC

$190,000 USD

.5% NSR

TBD

TBD

$8,000+ USD (tracking process in development)

TBD

TBD

TBD

Target met

1 per office

2 per office

3 per office

Donations (to charity or non-profit - from company)

$12,658 USD

3% pre-tax profits

3% pre-tax profits

3% pre-tax profits

$ toward industry/event Sponsorships (where we receive marketing perks)

$77,000+ USD

Tracking process in place

TBD

TBD

Volunteer hours

Tracking process in development

TBD

TBD

TBD

Personal Development hours

Tracking process in development

Tracking process in place

TBD

TBD

# of external industry presentations (conferences) # of publications

$ awarded for Impact Fund

It is evident our employees are motivated to grow, learn, and give back. As we look forward, it will be key to develop both a more formal approach to Education + Impact while allowing space for employee and office-led initiatives.

2018 CSER REPORT

$ Raised for Charity (staff-driven fundraising, ex #WeAreIntegral) # of Campaigns (example Plastic Free July)

Global Targets

42


EDUCATION + IMPACT 2018 Highlights The Impact Fund

External Education + Outreach

The Impact Fund is an internal research and development program aimed at accelerating innovation by providing funding to employees for successful research proposals related to zero net energy, water, or waste, urban systems, building technology, data visualization, and resilience, and adaptation. The intent of the Impact Fund is to provide employees with a platform to pursue their research interests while insuring we remain on the cutting edge of building science.

This past year, employees presented their work at 30+ conferences,

The 2018 Impact Fund allocated funds to projects at group and regional levels. Highlights: • Creation of a water tool that enables rapid assessment of pathways to net zero water for projects across North America • Comprehensive review of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) workflows and software platforms that has led to the establishment of best practices in fluid flow simulation • Application of gaming engine technologies to create immersive experiences for reviewing Revit models of our projects

Internal Training We hosted well over 500 lunch and learn and design series workshops in 2018 across all offices. These sessions are an opportunity to learn from fellow employees as well as external vendors on topics ranging from time management to smart building technology. Some samples of topics include: Rain Water Harvesting, How to Design a School in an Hour, Building Pathology, Mates in Mind, and Embodied Carbon. Vancouver placed emphasis on training in 2018. The “Being a Leader” training was launched and twenty-six total attendees participated in twenty-four hours of workshops. The Vancouver office also logged 2,632 total internal training hours for the year.

2018 CSER REPORT

panels, workshops, and public events including Ecobuild (London), Greenbuild (Chicago), ILFI Living Future Conference (Seattle), and Lightfair International (Chicago). Our audience ranged from university students to experts in building science. Ali Nazari from our Vancouver office was appointed as adjunct professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC) Master of Engineering Leadership program (MEL) program in High Performance Buildings.

I am excited to be appointed as an adjunct professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in the Master of Engineering Leadership (MEL) program in High Performance Buildings – offering a new degree for practicing professionals to acquire cross-disciplinary engineering instruction and personal leadership skills. I completed my Master of Applied Science degree at UBC and benefited from the great mentors I had there, so I want to contribute back by building relationships between industry and universities in this new program. Students will gain real project expertise, but it benefits the industry and Integral Group as well. We are finding and training good talent who will contribute back to the sustainable work we are all a part of. We are building strong teams and new relationships, nurturing students and growing their knowledge, and inspiring these new leaders to drive positive and proactive changes in the field of high performance buildings.

Ali Nazari Senior Principal, Energy & Sustainability Director Integral Group Vancouver Office

43


EDUCATION + IMPACT 2018 Volunteer Hours through Company Events (Annually)

Giving Back

60

As we work to develop our policies and programs, it is important to understand how much volunteer time is currently being spent by employees through existing company events and outside of work.

1-4 hrs Number of Responses

The majority of employees spend 1-5 hours annually volunteering outside of work. Twenty-four employees reported they spend between 51-100 hours annually volunteering outside of work and nineteen reported they spend over 100 hours which is indicative of the passion for community involvement.

0 hrs

While many offices hosted one or more volunteer events, the majority of employees reported they spend zero hours volunteering during work hours. It is clear there is opportunity to improve our overall strategy and approach to volunteering and community engagement.

5-10 hrs

40

10-20 hrs 20-40 hrs 40+ hrs

20

0

Australia

• •

2018 CSER REPORT

US East

US West

40

0 hrs 1-5 hrs 6-10 hrs

30

11-25 hrs Number of Responses

The Oakland office participated in the San Francisco Leap Sandcastle Classic, where teams comprised of architects, engineers, contractors and local elementary school students work together to build giant sand sculptures. The funds raised by teams and sponsors make it possible for Leap to continue to provide arts programs to Bay Area students. Joe Quad from our Vancouver office partnered with One Girl Can and raised over $3,700 to help a young girl go to university to be an engineer. The Vancouver office hosted two female high school students from Crofton House. They each spent a week with a variety of female engineers in the office learning about the different projects and work that we do. Several offices hosted a Holiday Food Drive. The Austin office spent their Earth Day volunteering at the Wildflower Center cleaning, planting seedlings and mulching.

UK

2018 Volunteer Hours Outside Company Events (Annually)

Highlights •

Canada

26-50 hrs

20

51-100 hrs 100+ hrs 10

0

Australia

Canada

UK

US East

US West

44 44


EDUCATION + IMPACT 2018 Professional Development through Company Training (Annually)

All Staff Survey

40

In 2018, we included additional questions in the All Staff Survey to get a better understanding of how much time employees are spending on developing themselves personally and professionally, as well as time spent on volunteering both through work and on their own time.

• • •

Self reported via the annual All Staff Survey Professional development is defined as training which has a direct relationship an employee’s role within the workplace Employees were asked how many hours they typically spent on company-provided or sanctioned trainings and seminars as well as through activities outside of work.

1-4 hrs

10-20 hrs 20-40 hrs

20

40+ hrs

10

Personal Development

0

Self reported via the annual All Staff Survey Personal development covers activities that improve awareness, develop talents/ potential, contribute to the realization of dreams/ aspirations. It may have an indirect relationship to an employee’s role professionally.

Australia

Canada

UK

US East

US West

2018 Personal Development Outside of Work (Annually)

0 hrs

30 1-5 hrs 6-10 hrs

Number of Responses

• •

5-10 hrs

30 Number of Responses

Professional Development

0 hrs

26-50 hrs 51-100 hrs 100+ hrs

10

0

2018 CSER REPORT

11-25 hrs

20

Australia

Canada

UK

US East

US West

45


EDUCATION + IMPACT

30+

external industry presentations

$8,000+

$190,000 USD awarded through IMPACT fund

USD raised by staff and donated to charities

$77,000+ 200+

USD spent by Integral on industry sponsorships

internally delivered seminars/ workshops/ trainings 2018 CSER REPORT

46


EDUCATION + IMPACT

2018 CSER REPORT

47


EDUCATION + IMPACT

Integral IMPACT

Looking Forward In the coming years we will work to formalize an approach to Education + Impact throughout the firm, codifying our commitment to growing, learning and to giving back. We will focus on firm-wide policies and frameworks that will allow regions and offices the flexibility to support organizations and programs which are locally relevant while demonstrating our pledge to this area on a global level. We will focus on continuing or beginning the following initiatives: • Roll-out our charitable giving policy to ensure our annual contribution targets are met • Improving our tracking and continuing to report our corporate donations to charitable organizations • Encouraging, tracking, and increasing frequency of school visits to support STEM engagement • Introducing Integral Engaged, a formalized approach to group volunteering, including pro-bono work • Developing local and firm-wide training initiatives for both technical and soft skills • Establishing internal and external mentorship opportunities

2018 CSER REPORT

48


04 CONCLUSION

49


CONCLUSION 2018 Outcomes

2019 Opportunities

In summary, we are excited to celebrate progress through the 2018 report in the following areas: • Hitting our 2020 Data Quality target 2 years early • First official global roadshow and staff engagement • 3% away from our 2020 target on gender distribution of technical staff • Improvements on All Staff Survey questions and 70% response rate • Formalizing an annual commitment to global CSER reporting through establishing the new role of Chief Sustainability Officer • Joining as original signatory to the World Green Building Council + EP100 Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment which was announced at the 2018 Global Climate Action Summit, and includes target of zero scope 1 and scope 2 emissions from our portfolio

In 2019, we are looking to focus our efforts in the following areas to show immediate improvement to our processes: • Issue a waste audit protocol and target one audit per office in the 2019 calendar year • Distribute the All Staff Survey by region to address differences in race and ethnicity by country • Shift our CSER schedule so that the All Staff Survey and Roadshow activities occur in the fall • Reevaluate the CSER global team and strategize on roles and responsibilities to help streamline the efforts • Fully integrate the United Kingdom CSER efforts into the global program • Starting the Zero Carbon strategy plan for our portfolio in compliance with the Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment by World Green Building Council • Continue to align with targets for ISO 14001 for Australia and Vancouver • Release our global Environmental Policy & Sustainable Purchasing Policies • Ignite the following initiatives: • Diversity Committee • Integral Engaged (giving ack, pro-bono work) • Pathway to Zero Carbon Buildings (designed) • Celebrating the Fresh Voices initiative of 2019

2018 CSER REPORT

50


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The 2018 CSER report was created by a global team of representatives, including a network of Office Champions, Peer Reviewers, and a Core CSER Team. Without the expertise and effort of the entire CSER Team this report and resulting initiatives would not be possible. It is through the passion and dedication of everyone on this team and all employees who have helped with the development of this report that we will be able to reach our Social and Environmental goals in the long and short term.

2018 CSER REPORT

Amber Hart Annie Martin Brandi Minter Brenden McEneaney Brenna Henry Briana Jeffery Chris Piche Christina Shum Debbie Halifax Donna Isaia Ed Garrod Gerry Faubert Heather Svyrensky Campbell Helena Cowper Jeff McEntee Jennifer Harvey Louise Wilkinson Maisha Harris Matt Colbert Marco Treglia Marissa Clark Marshall Duer-Balkind Megan White Melissa Moulton Meloney Bulliner Monique Campbell Rachel Moscovich Rodney Roberts Sinead Browne Tiffany Elston

51


05 APPENDIX

Assumptions Data Quality Summary Baselines + Benchmarking Resources Glossary

George Brown College, The Arbour, Toronto, ON Moriyama & Teshima Architects and Acton Ostry Architects

52


ASSUMPTIONS Planet Data Emissions data has been prorated for transportation based on survey respondents and actual employee counts for December 2018 when the survey was completed. It was assumed that eGRID US 2016 electricity factors were representative of 2018 energy generation. eGRID factors are not updated annually, and the most current data available was used for all calculations. Atlanta: • Bills show $ amount only, not consumption. Consumption was back-calculated using https://www.atlantawatershed.org/ billcalculator/index.php?ccf=100 • no water bill was available for Nov and Dec for the new office suite. Consumption was calculated by taking an average of the consumption for months 1 to 10, and pro-rating to the new office size. Austin: • Water benchmarked using CBECS 2012 • Office area includes restroom area rental Calgary: • Energy data was pro-rated from whole-building usage DC: • Whole building data was pro-rated by area to calculate office energy consumption LA: • All energy data was benchmarked for the building before being pro-rated for the IG office size Oakland: • 6 Corporate staff added onto headcount figures Richmond: • As water bills are charged by multiple factors including drainage, the July / September bill included drainage charges

2018 CSER REPORT

at a time when Hurricane Florence achieved landfall on the east coast, resulting in the Richmond area issuing 19 tornado warnings, with evidence of winds up to 80 to 85 mph. It is assumed that the storms caused damage and/or flooding which was recorded in the utility billing. As this is not representative of the Office’s normal consumption, the data for this billing period was replaced with July / Sept 2017 utility data. San Jose: • All utilities included in rent, so all energy and water data was benchmarked to CBECS 2012 Median Office, Marine Climate Seattle: • All utilities included in rent, so all energy and water data was benchmarked to CBECS 2012 Median Office, Marine Climate • One additional Corporate staff added to the standard headcount Sydney: • Energy data was collected using the NABERS certificate values for energy use and converting it to kWh. It was assumed that the building is all electrical heat pump - no gas. Toronto: • Gas and water bills were not available, and so had to be benchmarked agains SCIEU 2014 and REALPAC 2011 respectively. • There are three bills for the Toronto office, one for IG, one for a tenant, and one is split between IG and the tenant. The split bill was assumed to be a 50:50 consumption ratio. UK: • 4 Corporate staff added onto the headcount figures for London • No utility data was provided to the core Planet team to check consumption levels, and so the data provided was assumed to be correct without any QC Vancouver: • Landlord data was supplied in lieu of actual bills. Consumption for the entire building was supplied, and pro-rated. It had to

be assumed that the data was both correct, and that the prorating based on office size was an appropriate reflection of IG’s consumption despite it being a mixed-use building with commercial units on the ground floor. Victoria: • Landlord data was supplied in lieu of actual bills. Consumption for the entire building was supplied, and pro-rated.

People Data Aside from the Gender Representation in Technical Roles, People Data was collected based on voluntary survey during December 2018. Response rates were not 100%, so in turn the data is only representative of employees who completed the survey. Data was not prorated based on actual employee numbers due to the personal nature of the questions asked. Staff numbers listed are average numbers for the calendar year except for those used in relation to calculating staff commute. The values indicated at the top of each Regional Section numbers have been rounded to the nearest whole. These unrounded numbers match what was used for all Environmental Footprint calculations and were collected through our accounting team who shared monthly staff numbers from which we extracted the average yearly staff count. Remote staff were allocated to the office which they most frequent. Corporate staff were re-allocated to the office they most frequent. When calculating transportation data from survey responses, the responses were assumed to be representative of the remainder of the staff and pro-rated to actual staff numbers on the deadline date of the survey.

53


2018 ENVIRONMENTAL DATA QUALITY SUMMARY

London (LON)

Oakland, CA (OAK)

Oxford (OX)

Richmond (RVA)

San Jose WeWork (SJ)

Seattle WeWork (SWA)

Sydney

Toronto (TOR)

Vancouver (VAN)

Victoria (VIC)

BETTER

BEST

BEST

BETTER

GOOD

BETTER

N/A

GOOD

N/A

BETTER

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

BEST

BEST

BEST

BETTER

GOOD

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

BEST

BEST

BETTER

GOOD

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

N/A

BEST

N/A

BETTER

BEST

N/A

N/A

BETTER

BEST

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

DC (DC)

BETTER

Austin (ATX)

Atlanta (ATL)

N/A

Global Performance Rating

Los Angeles (LA)

2018 Data Quality Performance Calgary (CAL)

2018

Scope 1 - Direct A

Company Facilitis - Gas

Gas

B

Company Fleet Vehicles

Fleet Vehicle

BETTER BETTER BETTER N/A

N/A

N/A

Scope 2 - Indirect C (1)

Purchased indirect Utilities (Electricity, Electricity C (1)* Steam*, Heating & Cooling for Own Steam* Operations Use; Water) C (2) Water

BETTER BETTER BETTER BETTER N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

BETTER BETTER BETTER BETTER BETTER

BETTER BETTER BETTER BETTER BETTER N/A

N/A

BETTER BETTER

N/A GOOD

BETTER

N/A

BETTER BETTER

Scope 3 - Indirect Upstream D

Purchased Goods and Services

Office Supplies

E

Capital Goods

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

F

Fuel & Energy activities (not included in Scopes 1+2)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

G

Upstream transportation and distrubtion

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

H

Waste Generated in Operations

Waste

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

NR

I

Business Travel

Business Travel

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

BEST

GOOD

BEST

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

GOOD

J

Employee Commuting

Employee Commuting

GOOD

BETTER BETTER BETTER BETTER BETTER

BEST

BETTER

BEST

BETTER BETTER BETTER BETTER BETTER BETTER BETTER

KEY N/A

N/A: Not Applicable to our business

NR

NR: Not Reported at this time (Data points not available currently)

GOOD BETTER BEST

2018 CSER REPORT

GOOD: Benchmarking Data (i.e. CBECS COM Energy / LEED Water Assumptions); preliminary data collection efforts which could use improvement (waste, flights, commute) BETTER: Whole Building Utility Bills - prorated usage by rentable area; better data quality, improvements made (waste, flights, commute) BEST: Actual Metered / Sub-metered usage; great data quality, confident in accuracy (waste, flights, commute)

54


BASELINES + BENCHMARKING SUMMARY Baseline • • •

Set baselines, depending on category/KPI in different ways Baselines sometimes are set from benchmarked data points, but not always Some baselines are set off data sets from specific performance years, when we feel a data set has hit a high enough quality standard (i.e. Employee Commute, Business Travel)

Benchmark • • • • •

Baselines have been set or will be set based off the following: • Energy - Benchmarking Data (prorated by TBD - headcount or leasable area) • Water - Benchmarking Data (prorated by TBD - headcount or leasable area) • Business Travel - pending (2020 via Concur) • Employee Commute - 2018 performance (prorated by headcount) • Waste - TBD (either Calrecycle or 2020 performance) • Supply Chain - TBD • Diversity & Equity - see KPI Table and global targets • Health & Well-being - see KPI Table and global targets • Education + Impact - see KPI Table and global targets

Benchmarked data comes from third party sources Does not reflect actual performance in anyway It is used as a baseline by which we will compare actual performance to Helps us to understand our performance compared to typical office buildings Where Benchmarked data is not available for specific KPI’s, we will use a high quality annual data set to create a baseline for which we compare future performance Benchmarking proxy data was necessary for the following offices: Austin – Water; San Jose – Gas, Electricity, Water; Toronto – Gas, Water. Our Los Angeles and Seattle offices were not able to provide actual utility bills. However, both offices are located within buildings which are listed on EPA’s Portfolio Manager website, and therefore reported on pro-rated usage of the annual whole building reports.

Electrical Grid Carbon Factors DEFRA - UK Government; ATHENA – Canada carbon factors eGRID – US carbon factors - US Environmental Protection Agency; NGERS – Australian Government Clean Energy Regulator

Bencharmking Data Sources Consumption Survey (CBECs) 2012 – US Statistics Canada Survey on Commercial and Institutional Energy Use (SCIEU), 2014 – Canada U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager National Median EUI – US and Canada Better Buildings Partnership Real Estate Environmental Benchmark, 2017 – UK National Australian Built Environment Rating System (NABERS) - Australia US DOE CBECS Water Consumption, 2012 – US Real Property Association of Canada, Water Management, 2011 – Canada

2018 CSER REPORT

55


RESOURCES Resources (General)

Resources (Census Data)

ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager

id – the population experts, Australia Community Profile, Greater Sydney Ancestry

Fitwel Global Climate Actions Summit (GCAS) John Hopkin’s University’s (JHU) “Diversity Wheel” JUST Label - Living Future Institute Stanford University UC Davis United States Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, Commercial Reference Buildings World Green Building Council (WGBC), The Net Zero Carbon Buildings Commitment World Resource Institute (WRI), The Greenhouse Gas Protocol for the U.S. Public Sector

Office for National Statistics (UK), 2011 Census Analysis Statistics Canada, Census Profile, 2016 Census, Calgary Census Metropolitan Area Statistics Canada, Census Profile, 2016 Census, Toronto Census Metropolitan Area Statistics Canada, Census Profile, 2016 Census, Vancouver Census Metropolitan Area Statistics Canada, Census Profile, 2016 Census, Victoria Census Metropolitan Area United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts California United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts Georgia United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts Texas United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts Virginia

Resources (LGBTQIA+)

United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts Washington

GLAAD

United States Census Bureau, QuickFacts Washington, DC

GLAAD, Tips for Allies of Transgender People Human Rights Campaign Out & Equal Workplace Advocates, Allies Tips for the Workplace Out & Equal Workplace Advocates UMASS. LGBTQIA+ Terminology

2018 CSER REPORT

56


GLOSSARY Agender: Individuals who identify as not having a gender. Some describe themselves as genderless, while others see themselves as gender neutral. Asexual: The lack of a sexual attraction or desire for other people. One maybe asexual, yet romantically attracted to others. ATHENA factors: The Athena Sustainable Materials Institute market a software called the Impact Estimator for Buildings to assist sustainability professionals to explore how material choices can affect environmental footprint. Version 5.2.0119 of Athena IE4B was used to generate electricity emissions factors for all Canadian offices. Aromantic: Individuals who experience little or no romantic attraction to others of any gender. One may be aromantic, yet sexually attracted to others. Androgyne/Androgynous: Identifying and/or presenting as neither distinguishably masculine nor feminine. Audit: A formal examination of an organization’s or individual’s accounts or financial situation. Baseline: The baseline (or reference) is the state against which change is measured. A baseline period is the period relative to which anomalies are computed. Bigender: Individuals who experience their gender identity as two genders at the same time or whose gender identity may vary between two genders. Bisexual: A person emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to more than one sex, gender or gender identity though not necessarily simultaneously, in the same way or to the same degree. Carbon Intensity: The amount of emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) released per unit of another variable such as Gross Domestic Product (GDP), output energy use or transport.

2018 CSER REPORT

Cisgender: A term used to describe a person whose gender identity aligns with those typically associated with the sex assigned to them at birth. (i.e. “Cisman” & “Ciswoman”) CO2-equivalent (CO2e, CO2eq) emission: The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emission that would cause the same integrated radiative forcing, over a given time horizon, as an emitted amount of a greenhouse gas (GHG) or a mixture of GHGs. The CO2-equivalent emission is obtained by multiplying the emission of a GHG by its Global Warming Potential (GWP) for the given time horizon. For a mix of GHGs it is obtained by summing the CO2-equivalent emissions of each gas. Decarbonization: The process by which countries or other entities aim to achieve alow-carbon economy, or by which individuals aim to reduce their consumption of carbon. Demigender: Individuals who feel a partial connection to a particular gender identity. Examples of demigender identities include demigirl, and demiboy, and demiandrogyne. Department of Environment, Fisheries, and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) factors: The UK government emission conversion factors for greenhouse gas company reporting. E-GRID factors: The Emissions & Generation Resource Integrated Database (eGRID) is a comprehensive source of data on the environmental characteristics of almost all electric power generated in the United States. Energy Efficiency: A ratio of service provided to energy input (e.g., lumens to watts in the case of light bulbs). Services provided can include buildings-sector end uses such as lighting, refrigeration, and heating: industrial processes; or vehicle transportation. Unlike conservation, which involves some reduction of service, energy efficiency provides energy reductions without sacrifice of service. May also refer to the use of technology to reduce the energy needed for a given purpose or service.

Energy Use Intensity (EUI): The ratio of energy consumption to floor space. Ethnicity: A personal identification based on ancestry origin, language, and culture. Can also be based on religion, beliefs, and customs. Fitwel: A building rating system to provide guidelines to design and operate healthier buildings. A cheaper alternative to the WELL Building Standard. Gay: A person who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to members of the same gender. Commonly used to describe men who are attracted to men. Gender-fluid: A person who does not identify with a single fixed gender; of or relating to a person having or expressing a fluid or unfixed gender identity. Genderqueer: Genderqueer people typically reject notions of static categories of gender and embrace a fluidity of gender identity and often, though not always, sexual orientation. People who identify as “genderqueer” may see themselves as being both male and female, neither male nor female or as falling completely outside these categories. Global Climate Action Summit (GCAS): A summit showcasing the actions states and regions, cities, companies, investors and civil society have taken already to reduce their emissions; secure bold commitments to do even more, show that decarbonization; job generation and resilient economic growth go hand-in-hand and galvanize a global movement for climate action that leaves no one behind. Held September 2018 in San Francisco.

57


GLOSSARY Greenhouse gas emissions (GHG): Greenhouse gases are those gaseous constituents of the atmosphere, both natural and anthropogenic, that absorb and emit radiation at specific wavelengths within the spectrum of thermal infrared radiation emitted by the Earth’s surface, the atmosphere itself, and by clouds. This property causes the greenhouse effect. Water vapor (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and ozone (O3) are the primary greenhouse gases in the Earth’s atmosphere. Indirect Emissions: Emissions that are a consequence of the activities within well-defined boundaries of, for instance, a region, an economic sector, a company or process, but which occur outside the specified boundaries. Just Label: A voluntary disclosure tool for organizations to help optimize policies that improve social equity and enhance employee engagement. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs): a measurable value that demonstrates how effectively a company is achieving key business objectives. Organizations use KPIs to evaluate their success at reaching targets. Lesbian: A woman who is emotionally, romantically or sexually attracted to other women. NGERS factors: The National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting came from the Australian NGER Act 2007 to act as a national framework for single reporting and disseminating company information about GHG emissions, energy production/consumption, and other related information. Non-Binary: An adjective describing a person who does not identify exclusively as a man or a woman. Non-binary people may identify as being both a man and a woman, somewhere in between, or as falling completely outside these categories. While many also identify as transgender, not all non-binary people do. Pansexual: Describes someone who has the potential for emotional, romantic or sexual attraction to people of any gender though not necessarily simultaneously, in the same way or to the same degree. 2018 CSER REPORT

Race: A personal identification based on physical/biological attributes, such as skin tone, facial features, hair, etc. Queer: A term people often use to express fluid identities and orientations. Often used interchangeably with “LGBTQ.” Resilience: The capacity of social, economic and environmental systems to cope with a hazardous event or trend or disturbance, responding or reorganizing in ways that maintain their essential function, identity and structure, while also maintaining the capacity for adaptation, learning and transformation. Sustainability: A dynamic process that guarantees the persistence of natural and human systems in an equitable manner. Transgender: An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/ or expression is different from cultural expectations based on the sex they were assigned at birth. Being transgender does not imply any specific sexual orientation. Therefore, transgender people may identify as straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual, etc. Transgender is not a noun, nor verb and is offensive if used in that manner. Trans-Man: A man who was assigned female at birth. This can be based on gender or sex. Trans-Woman: A woman who was assigned male at birth. This can be based on gender or sex. Water Use Intensity (WUI): The ratio of water consumption to floor space. Wellness: An active process of becoming aware of and making choices toward a healthy and fulfilling life. Wellness is more than being free from illness, it is a dynamic process of change and growth. WGBC: The World Green Building Council is a global network of Green Building Councils which is transforming the places we live, work, play, heal and learn.

58


INTEGRAL

integralgroup.com


Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.