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AA MSc + MArch Sustainanble Environmental Design 2016-17 Architectural Association School of Architecture Graduate School Term 2 Design Research : Refurbishing the City - Part 2

Peckham Student Living Artem Oslamovskyi TingTing Gao Deep Gala Naitik Patel


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

Authorship Declaration Form

Term 2 Project : Peckham Student Living

TITLE

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING

NUMBER OF WORDS

13,996 WORDS

STUDENT NAME(S):

DEEP GALA TINGTING GAO ARTEM OSLAMOVSKYI NAITIK PATEL

DECLARATION: “I certify that the contents of this document are entirely my own work and that any quotation or paraphrase from the published or unpublished work of others is duly acknowledged.” Signature(s):

Date: March 23rd, 2017

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY

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CHAPTER 1 OVERVIEW 1.1 Location 1.2 Weather Data 1.3 Historical Study 1.4 Policy 1.5 Urban Analysis 1.6 Context Analysis 1.7 Site Observations 1.8 Spot measurement

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CHAPTER 2 CASE STUDY 2.1 Units Examples 2.2 Schedule &Consumption 2.3 Case Study Summary

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CHAPTER 3 DESIGN PROPOSAL 3.1 Environmental Matrix 3.2 Strategy 3.3 Room Typology 3.4 Room Orientation 3.5 Proposal 3.6 Accommodation zoning 3.7 Proposal of Courtyard 3.8 Plan & Elevation & Section 3.9 Room Material 3.10 Visualization

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CHAPTER 4 DAYLIGHT STUDY 4.1 Daylight Strategy 4.2 Communal Space 4.3 Unit 1 4.4 Unit 2 4.5 Unit 3 4.6 Unit 4

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CHAPTER 5 SOLAR STUDY 5.1 Winter Solar Gains 5.2 Summer Solar Gains 5.3 Roof Slopes Study

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CHAPTER 6 THERMAL STUDY 6.1 Annual Thermal Analysis of Room 6.2 Thermal Analysis of Room – Summer 6.3 Thermal Analysis of Room – Winter 6.4 Annual Thermal Analysis of Common Space 6.5 Thermal Analysis of Room during Vacation – Winter 6.6 Future Annual Thermal Analysis

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CHAPTER 7 ENERGY STRATEGY 7.1 Total Energy Consumption 7.2 Renewable Strategy

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CHAPTER 8 PUBLIC PROGRAM 8.1 Proposal of Public Program 8.2 Daylight Factor of Public Program

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CHAPTER 9 OUTDOOR STUDY 9.1 Site Plan 9.2 Shadow Study 9.3 Wind Study 9.4 UTCI

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CHAPTER 10 CONCLUS ION

87

REFERENCES

APPENDICES Appendix A Software Simulation Appendix B Site Study: Comments & Condition Appendix C Case Study Appendix D Student Interview Appendix E Appliances Calculation Appendix F Wind Study Appendix G Mint Sheet Appendix H Schedules of Thermal Simulation Appendix I Electricity Policy


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This report was developed with a great team work spirit and we learnt as much as possible through the different tasks distributed among the members. All the efforts in this report wouldn’t have been possible without the help of AA School of Architecture professors Simos Yannas and Paula Cadima, who has provided all the needed information, tutorials and supervision along the process to accomplish this report. We are also grateful for the rest of the lecturers in Sustainable Environmental Design program who never hesitated to support us while learning the different softwares used in this report, and has always dedicated extra time to do so. Special thanks to the occupants of Chapter Living, Woodlane Studio, Victoria Paul St East and UCL Prankerd House for their continuous help and their honest feedback on the building in different aspects. We would like to express our gratitude to our families for their constant support to each one of us everyday while studying outside our home countries.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

INTRODUCTION

This report is the term 2 project of the MSc+March Sustainable Environmental Design Program for 2016-2018. It is a base for practicing the knowledge learnt in the program in design. The project brief asked the students to form a design project of mixed use residential development in a site of 4400sqm area located besides the Peckham Library. This report begins with a general overview of the site, including its location, weather data, historical background and so on. It comes out with the conclusion to offer student accommodation on the site. Then a deep study on student accommodation is presented, followed by the design brief. As it is concluded from the Term 1 project as well as the case study and interview with occupants from different student accommodations in London, that overheating could become a major issue in student accommodation, which the proposal focuses on. The proposal also takes students requirements, both physical and psychological, context, neighbor and climate change into consideration. Both simulations of daylighting and thermal were taken to define the detail design and predict the different possible scenarios. The window size for students’ room and communal space is based on the criteria of enough daylighting while avoiding the overheating issue. Different strategies are applied to fit different needs for different functions. The energy consumption is calculated to compare with that of common student accommodation in London. Solar PV is equipped as renewable energy to enhance the sustainability of the project. In terms of the site plan, the layout is decided by the studies of outdoor space, context and the comments of neighbor. The proposal offers central courtyard in accommodation part to encourage students to use communal spaces indoor as well as the outdoor space which is assumed to be the main space for the occupants to communicate and hold activities. As for the relationship between the site and the Peckham library, the public program is set to perform as the transition between public and private space, in addition to the extension of the Peckham Library. Due to the sense of landmark of Peckham Library, the proposal introduces the library as a part of the site instead of building something against it. As an essential part in the proposal, outdoor studies, including shadow, wind and UTCI, were done to simulate the comfort level when people have outdoor activities. Work was split reasonably between the team members to ensure everyone has a clear understanding of the project and get necessary knowledge and skills during the entire process. This project provides a strong foundation for design in the future terms. It is a mix of research, investigation, design and simulation that helps each team member learn how to take sustainability into account while design a project. It especially highlights the understanding of the overheating issue as well as the solution.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 1

CHAPTER 1 OVERVIEW

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 1 1.1 Location

Fig. 1.1.1. Location of site in south-east of london. (Source: Google Maps)

Eagle Wharf Site

LOCATION

The site is located (51.4743° N, 0.0692° W) in Peckham, in a densely populated residential and commercial context. The site (Fig. 1.1.1) is in south-east of london and falls under the Sourthwark borough. It is very well connected with major transport facilities, nearest underground station being Peckham Rye and it also has various bus stops in the vicinity. The site (Fig. 1.1.2) is easily identified as it sits right next to a landmark building called Peckham library. For the purpose of collecting weather data, the London central weather station was selected. 4

N

Fig. 1.1.2. Perspective view showing site and site context.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 1 1.2 Weather Data

Peckham Climate History

Peckham Climate Future

m/s 10

5

Wh/m2

°C 35.0

0

1800.0

30.0

1600.0

25.0

1400.0

20.0

1200.0

15.0

1000.0

10.0

800.0

5.0

600.0

0.0

400.0

-5.0

200.0

-10.0

0.0 Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Fig.1.2.1 Peckhame climate chart history & future

Diffuse Horizontal Solar Radiation (Average Hourly)

Global Horizontal Solar Radiation (Average Hourly)

Comfort Band (Based on EN15251)

The historical and future weather data was taken from Meteonorm software. The London Central weather station was selected. London has a temperate oceanic climate, with regular but generally light precipitation throughout the year. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climate_of_London).

Maximum & Minimum Temperature (Hourly)

Wind Speed (Average Hourly)

Dry Bulb Temperature (Average Hourly)

CLIMATE CHART OF HISTORY AND FUTURE

History

Future

Average Wind Speed

3.55 m/s

3.19 m/s

Average Temperature

11.98°C

12.0°C

111.33wh/m²

108.94wh/m²

Average Hourly Solar Radiation

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It can be seen from Fig.1.2.1, the average temperature in Peckham doesn’t show much difference in historical and future weather data. In order to simulate the future scenario, the epw file for future was manually edited according to “UK Climate Projection, 2002”. The temperature is assumed to rise 2 degrees in the future. Therefore, overheating may become the major issue in the future instead of heating problem. In addition, it is noticed that the solar radiation would decrease in the future. Simulations for this project are based on the historical weather data in the epw file of Peckham now and the edited future one.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 1 1.3 Historical Study

A branch opened

HISTORICAL STUDY

It should be noted that the grass slope next to the site was surrey canal built in early 19th century for timber import and the Whitten Timer Yard on the north was established following the development of the canal. Nonetheless, the Surrey Docks were in decline and canal was eventually disused and filled to be a green walk (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Surrey_Canal). About the surrounding buildings, it was listed on the heritage statement by AB Heritage Archaeological Consultancy, 2016 that 58 Peckham High Street and 91 & 93 Peckham High Street which is the west end of the shard terrace were built during 18th to 19th century. They were both original flats. Later, shops were built in front due to the development of commercial centre of rye lane Peckham conservation area which is the blue area in the Fig.1.3.1. Most buildings in this area were constructed between the early – 19th and 20th century with a wide range of construction materials and architectural styles. Since then, this area was famous for various shops and services (Southwark Council, 2011).

Surrey Canal 1700

1800 58 Peckham High Street

Canal closed drained filled to be green walk

1835

1900

1960s

1970s

Shop remodelled Shards Terrace shop fronts

Majority of The Rye Lane Peckham Conservation Area constructed The Kentish Drovers public house

Fig.1.3.1 Timeline (After Source: Carl Turner design statement, 2016)

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Peckham Library built

Development of a residential and industrial nature

Shards Terrace built

In 2000, the Peckham Library was built and won the Stirling Prize for Architecture in 2000, which made it the landmark of Peckham. The Sweeping views from library allows residents of Peckham to know that they are in London. With Peckhame square, this part becomes the centre of Peckham which the people living in Peckham attach a lot of importance to (Appendix B Site Study: Comments & Condition).

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1826

Dock in decline Canal disused

58 Peckham High Street shop built in front

The Kentish Drovers public house,is right next to the Peckham canopy, constructed during the late – 19th century, following the widening of Peckham High Street during the c. 1870s. It changed from Former London and South Western bank to a public house with a pub (Southwark Council, 2011) (Fig.1.3.1).

During the design process, the history elements are essential to be taken into consideration to embed the building within its current and historic context. For example, the material palette should emphasize the building’s civic nature and respond to Peckham Library and the wider Square.

Whitten Timber Yard established

Changed to bar

2000


CHAPTER 1 1.4 Council Policy

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

LEISURE & COMMUNITY USES AROUND PECHKHAM SQUARE AND WHARF TO INCREASE VITALITY.

ENHANCEMENT OF OPEN SPACES & PUBLIC REALM. LINKING THEM TOGETHER WITH BUILDINGS WITHIN A DESIGN STRATEGY FOR THE AREA.

COUNCIL POLICY IMPROVEMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF RYE LANE AND PECKHAM HIGH STREET PEDESTRIAN LINKS AND ACTIVE FRONTAGE. (Fig. 1.4.2)

TO ENABLE PUBLIC TRANSPORT ACCESSIBILITY ZONE INTENSIFICATION AROUND PECKHAM RYE RAILWAY STATION AND TH BUS INTERCHANGE. (Fig. 1.4.3)

Fig. 1.4.1. Peckham action area plan. (Source: southwark council)

In addition to general needs housing, there are a number of other housing types that cater for the specific needs of certain members of the community.These types of housing include • Sheltered housing • Supported housing • Student accommodation. These specialist housing types can be both self-contained, such as flats, and non self-contained, such as hostels, houses in multiple occupation and cluster flats. In non self-contained accommodation facilities such as kitchens, bathrooms and lounges are usually shared. In most cases these types of housing are designed to meet the specific needs of the user group they are intended to accommodate and therefore do not meet general needs housing because they are not necessarily permanent housing and are only available to a specific user group. Student housing is not considered to be affordable housing (Fig.1.4.1).

1. By 2011 there will be a 12% growth in people over 85 years of age. 2. Nearly 20,000 households in Southwark contain one or more persons with a special need. 3. Of the 54.1% of households living in social rented housing, 61.8% contain a disabled person. 4. 22.6% of social rented housing contains a frail elderly person. 5. In March 2004, Southwark was providing temporary accommodation for over 900 homeless households.

Fig. 1.4.2. Photograph showing Peckham high street. (Source: Google maps)

Fig. 1.4.3. Photograph showing Rye Lane. (Source: Google maps)

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6.There are approximately 24,000 students in the borough.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 1 1.5 Urban Analysis

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500 M Radius Site for Development Trees Greenspace Roads

Fig 1.5.1. Lanscape Features and Greenery on the site .

URBAN ANALYSIS

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Residential From the site information received from Carl Turner’s Proposal (Carl Tuner Architects, 2016) and Digimap (https://digimap.edina.ac.uk/), we were able to map out the site conditions with a radius of 500m around the site. As we can see (Fig 1.5.1) the basic road networks have been mapped. Peckham Road runs from east to west is situated toward south of the site. This road is a primary road which is a major transportation route. The landscaped spaces are allocated around the site and towards north of the site where most of the residential buildings are situated (Fig 1.5.2) in order to have a peaceful surrounding. In (Fig 1.5.2), all the public, commercial and mixed use spaces are situated along the Peckham Road making it a medium density zone. Public parkings have been allotted around these medium density zones. A lot of public schools and colleges are located in the vicinity which shows that high student crowd add up to the local population number.

Mixed - Use Commercial Public Parking

500 M Radius

Site for Development Trees Greenspace Roads

As can be seen, the location of the proposed site is situated in a well-connected zone. Fig 1.5.2. Building Functions and Typologies. 8

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 1 1.5 Site Analysis

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Bus Route Bus Stop 500 M Radius

Parking Site for Development Trees Greenspace Roads

Fig 1.5.3. Public Bus Movement on the site.

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Cycle Route on Road Dedicated Cycle Route Pedestrian Path 500 M Radius

Parking Site for Development Trees Greenspace Roads

In (Fig. 1.5.3.), we can observe that the proposed site is situated around 20 public bus stops within 500m radius. Out of these bus stops 3 are located within 50m distance from the site. It shows that our site is well connected by public bus network. In (Fig. 1.5.4.), we can observe that the north – south cycling route runs along our site which shows users are encouraged to use cycles in Peckham allowing to control the noise pollution and traffic movement and thus promoting a healthy environment. Pedestrians have been given easy access around Peckham square.

Fig 1.5.4. Pedestrian and Cyclist Movement on the site. AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

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CHAPTER 1 1. 6. Site Context

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

Lisford Street

P

Goldsmith Road To Burgess Park Jocelin Street

C Construction Site D

P P

Main Cycling Route Peckham Hill Street Peckham Library Bus Stops Main Pedestrian Routes

P

SITE CONTEXT The Fig. 1.6.1. shows the main access routes of bicycle and predestrians around the site. The cycling route directly connects the peckham rye station to the Burges park in north of the site. It was also observed that a lot of cyclists go through the surrey canal walk on a day to day basis.

Peckham High Street

P

The Peckham platform which is a very popular space which is situated right outside the Peckham library and fall at the junction of the above mentioned access routes thus making it a very imoprtant point of connection with the site. There are three major bus stops located just outside the site which make the site under readily availble public transport zone as described in the council policy.

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To Peckham Rye Overground Station

Fig. 1.6.1. Transport and access.

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N B


CHAPTER 1 1. 6. Site Context

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

Whitten Timber Yard To Burgess Park

Oliver Goldsmith Estate

C Surrey Canal Walk

Eagle Wharf Site Construction D Peckham Library

P

Peckham Pulse Centre

$ Peckham Library Bus Stops

P

Peckham Square

Shard’s Terrace

SITE CONTEXT

$ Kentish Drovers

Peckham Square Canopy

The Fig. 1.6.2 shows array of public and commercial activities happening around the site. As it is situated in the urban center of soutwark borough and falling under peckham action area plan, the site is surrounded by densely populated housing.

P To Peckham Rye Overground Station

B

Jones & Higgins

N

There are a wide variety of pubs and restaurants on the Peckham high street with historical background and context thereby the frontages of shops require architectural renovation as also described in the council policy. The Peckham Pulse center (indoor sports building) and peckham square makes the site a very attractive area in the morning and evening for various recreational activities.

Fig. 1.6.2. Buildings and facilities.

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CHAPTER 1 1. 7. Context Observations

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

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1

2

3

4

5

6

Construction Site

3 2

5

1

4 N

Key-plan

CONTEXT OBSERVATIONS It can be seen from the Fig.1.7.1 that there is a nice green walk on the west of the site. It is welcomed to bring the green of Surrey Canal Walk into Peckham. The building heights in the context largely vary from two to four storeys. Peckham Pulse and Peckham Library at the northern end of the conservation area are taller buildings at a height of four storeys. There is a wide range of architectural styles and construction materials in the surrounding. Fig.1.7.2 summarizes the main material in the surrounding constructions. As the Peckham Library is regarded as the landmark and the Peckham library square is a key civic space within Peckham town center, the proposal should emphasize the building’s civic nature and respond to Peckham Library and the Victorian villas along Peckham Hill Street in aspects of scale and material.

Fig. 1.7.1. Site photos.

It is summarized from the interview of neighbor and comments of the Peckham Library that the main concern of the site includes 1. Security issue because of the lack of lighting and natural supervision. 2. Conflict points of cyclists and pedestrians 3. Lack of cafĂŠ and space in Peckham Library. (Appendix B Site Study: Comments & Interview) 12

Zinc Cladding

Brickwork

Fig. 1.7.2. Context materials palette.

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Stone Pavment

Wood Decking

Glazing

Structural Steel


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 1 1.8 Spot Measurement

20.01 Temperature °C 15.5

2.5

15.0 14.5

1.8 1.2 0.8

13.5

13.3

2.0

> +46

B

12.5

Extrem heat stress

+32~+38

0.5

13.0

68.5dB

+38~+46

2

1.0

0.7

35% - 45%

UTCI Thermal Scale

1

1.5

14.1

14.0

13.0

16100 Lux

Wind Speed m/s

A

0

+26~+32

3

+9~+26

No thermal stress

4

7

+9~0

6 5

8

0~-13 -13~-27 -27~-40 < -40

G O L D S M I T

Extrem cold stress

H

1

2

8

3

Fig. 1.8.3 UTCI calculation (After Source: Carl Turner design statement, 2016)

Fig. 1.8.1 Spot measurement in Elevation A (After Source: Carl Turner design statement, 2016)

Temperature

°C

Wind Speed m/s

15.6

15.5

2.5

15.0

2.0

14.5

1.1

14.0

0.7

13.5

13.3

1.5

1.1

1.0

13.7 0.4 13.0

13.0 LIBRARY

0.5 0

UTCI & OBSERVATION

Spot measurement was taken both under the sunshine and the shadow in 20th January which was a sunny day. There is a long green walk on the west of site while on the east side is the main road, so spot measurements were taken along the west end and near the main road to compare the UTCI in different conditions. Additionally, the narrow lane at the back of the library is shaded by the library all the time, so another spot was measured there. One spot at the entrance of the library was also taken into account, as it is under the huge overhang. The UTCI calculation in Fig. 1.8.3 demonstrates that there is no thermal stress outside. The data in Fig. 1.8.1 and Fig. 1.8.2 illustrates that the temperature difference can reach up to 3.5 degrees.

4

5

6

7

Fig. 1.8.2 Spot measurement in Elevation B (After Source: Carl Turner design statement, 2016)

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It was observed that the grass in the shadow was with frost while that in the sunlight wasn’t which was really interesting. The site was quiet and pleasant with the chirping of the birds. The park cleaner said that during the day there were many pedestrians and cyclists, but in the evening, this place was empty which triggers safety issue.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 2

CHAPTER 2 CASE STUDY

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 2 2.1 Unit Examples

SCAPE STUDENT ACCOMODATION

Address London Shoreditch N1 6DX

Architects Ab Rogers Design

Total occupants 600

Room type Standard studio (2 kinds) Medium studio (4 kinds) Large studio (2 kinds)

Amenities

Study room

Gym

Restaurant

Cinema

Kitchen

Roof terrace

Bar

Deli

Reception

Comments Good 1. Perfect in terms of facilities, hygiene, kindness and quality of the service and design (Fig.2.1.1) 2. Near the underground 3. Amenities in good quality and really offer a lot for occupants 4. The rooms are smartly arranged with great views, as everything needed is to be found in them.(Fig.2.1.2) 5. Building is quiet Bad 1. Materials were quite cheap as wooden pieces fell out from the bookshelf. 2. The room is assembled with glue and silicone which make allow the furniture to break easily 3. Safety issue with bikes being stolen out of the locked

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Fig. 2.1.1 Photos of SCAPE student accomodation (Source:https://www.scape.com/en-uk/student-accommodation/london-shoreditch)

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 2 2.1 Unit Examples

Small Studio Standard 14.65sqm 1

2 2 1

Medium Studio with Windowseat 13.80sqm 3

4 4 3

Large Studio with accessible Windowseat 30.20sqm

5

6

66

55

Fig. 2.1.2 Different room type in SCAPE student accomodation (Source:https://www.scape.com/en-uk/student-accommodation/london-shoreditch)

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 2 2.1 Unit Examples

CHAPTER STUDENT ACCOMODATION Address London King’s Cross N1 9JP

Architects Tigg + Coll Architects (Refurbished) Total occupants 900

Room type Bronze twin studio Bronze studio Silver studio Gold studio Platinum studio

Amenities

Exercise studio

Study space

Game area

Screening room

Social space

Courtyard

Outdoor seating

Laundry

Mail boxes

Comments 1. It’s a nice place for students with all the amenities.(Fig.2.1.3) 2. Good acoustics 3. Double glazing with proper insulation for vent panel 4. The room is satisfactory, but the corridor is always stinky without natural ventilation(Fig. 2.1.4) 5. There are only 2 lifts which is far from enough for so many occupants

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Fig. 2.1.3 Photos of Chapter student accomodation (Source: https://www.chapter-living.com/properties/kings-cross/)

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 2 2.1 Unit Examples

Material

28.01 Walls - Gypsum Board

Flooring - Wood Parquet Ceiling - Gypsum (Olive Green Color)

Window - Double Glazed (Full height) 1

2

15:30

Kitchenette and Wardrobe Sunmica laminate (white color ) 3 Bronze Studio 16 sq.m

1

2 3

4

5

Kitchen Appliances

Silver Studio 18 sq.m

- Microwave - Mini Refrigirator - 2 induction hob - Toaster - Electric Kettle

4

5

Fig.2.1.4 Field work in CHAPTER student accomodation

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 2 2.2 Schedule &Consumption

1200

1000

800

600 CHAPTER WOODLANE STUDIO VICTORIA PAUL ST EAST

400

200

UCL PRANKERD HOUSE (COUPLE) UCL PRANKERD HOUSE (SINGLE)

0

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

STUDENTS’ WEEKDAY SCHEDULE & CONSUMPTION

Due to the lack of specific guides for student accommodation, some precedents in London were studied including some compact residential one (Appendix C. Case Study). It demonstrates the main character of student accommodation including room types and amenities. The comments and interviews of the occupants show the main concern. For example, students complained about the noise and the inefficiency of the extract fan in the bathroom, also the dark and stuffy corridor. We even go further to get detail schedules of students (Appendix D. Student Interview). Combined with the interview from the last term project UCL Prankerd House, there is information on 5 Students’ schedule and accommodation, 3 of them have kitchenette and others don’t. Fig. 2.2.1 Weekday schedule & hourly energy consumption

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14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

0

1

2

3

4

5


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 2 2.2 Schedule &Consumption

1200

1000

800

600 CHAPTER 400

WOODLANE STUDIO VICTORIA PAUL ST EAST

200

UCL PRANKERD HOUSE (COUPLE) 0

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

0

1

2

3

UCL PRANKERD HOUSE (SINGLE)

4 5

STUDENTSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; WEEKEND SCHEDULE & CONSUMPTION

Both weekday and weekend are taken into account to get a more precise result. Fig.2.2.1 and Fig.2.2.2 illustrate the hourly consumption of each room. These students, from different countries can have really different lifestyle. Some of them may cook dinner for an hour or even more, but some they would only spend less than 10 minutes. Occupants from UCL Prankerd house shared similar schedules as they come from the same country and faculty. All the schedules are considered to be reasonable. During the weekday, most consumption happens after students go back to cook dinner and work in the room while during the weekend, more activities happen during daytime when students would spend more time in the room. It was noticed from the interview that the student from Chapter living, open his window all daylong. He complained about the overheating when he cooks dinner with some friends. The student from Woodline said she barely use heater in winter cause the room is always warm enough

Fig. 2.2.1 Weekend schedule & hourly energy consumption

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 2 2.3 Case Study Summary

Table 2.3.1 Energy comsunption

CONSUMPTION SUMMARY

The consumption by kitchen appliances and others is calculated separately to get average daily consumption for single and double room, because two of the cases do not have kitchenette. As for double rooms, through the interview, some of them would always cook together, but some separately. Therefore, it is assumed that the kitchenette consumption for double room is that for single one multiplied by 1.5. Exact power and schedules for all the appliance are listed in Appendix E. Appliances calculation. From Table.2.3.1, it’s noticeable that the daily consumption of kitchen accounts for about 50% of the total consumption. As can be told from the power density, the appliances can generate a lot heat. Additionally, from the last term’s project, it is concluded that the communal kitchen would cause overheating problem in some degree. Hence, the overheating could become a potential issue for student accommodation. All the numbers got from case study would be used for the further simulation step. Except for these students, some classmates who live in student accommodation were also interviewed to get more general idea about student accommodation. It should be noticed that most of them said they prefer to have their own kitchenette in their room.

22

Single Room

Double Room

Average Appliances Consumption (Exclude Kitchen)

1594.2 w.h

2575.7 w.h

Average Appliances Consumption (Kitchen)

1842.9 w.h

2764.4 w.h (Single room*1.5)

Average Total Consumption

3437.1 w.h

5340 w.h

Average Power Density

6.99 w/m²

10.32 w/m²

Average Metabolism

1559.2 w.h

3014.2 w.h

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 2 2.3 Case Study Summary

MATERIAL & APPLIANCES & FURNITURE SUMMARY

Summarized from the case study, the common appliances in student room include a mini refrigerator, a kettle, a microwave, two hobs, an extractor fan in kitchenette and 2-3 lights, desk lamp, laptop, mobile phone and heaters in the room (Fig.2.3.2).

Window: double glazing Average Height: 2m Average Area: 3.6m² operable area: 2.2m² Wind to floor ratio: 21.2%

Window Frame: Aluminum

Wall & Ceiling: gypsum Average Height: 2.68m

Floor: Wood Average area: 15.2m²

Wardrobe: Wood(White)

Fig.2.3.2 Typical room summary

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As for materials, most of them have wooden floor or wood effect floor. Although in some student accommodation, they have carpet for flooring, occupants complained that it is difficult to clean and it’s old and dirty. Therefore, the wood would be the ideal material for flooring. It needs to be pointed out that most of student accommodations use aluminum for window frame. Nevertheless, as aluminum does not performs well thermally, it would be better to change it for wood or vinyl. Fig.2.3.2 illustrates the common condition of student accommodation which is compared as base case in the following steps.

23


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

24

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 3

CHAPTER 3 DESIGN BRIEF

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25


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 3 3.1 Environmental Matrix

1200 1050 900

450 300

ENVIRONMENTAL Daylight

In the student accommodation, the most important function to consider are the student’s studio rooms because it covers more than 50% area of the whole student accommodation. We can observe (Fig. 3.1.1) that daylight, ventilation, views out, security, privacy and glare control are critical which means that these strategies have to be given primary importance while designing. Other strategies like close control thermal range and acoustic isolation have been given secondary importance which means that I can be tested after the critical strategies have achieved the required results.

Natural Ventilation Solar Access Views Out Acoustic Isolation Close Control Thermal Comfort Range

The common study rooms and the common rooms they cover more than 30% area of the accommodation. In this case, daylight, natural ventilation and close control thermal range requires high consideration leaving out others to be given importance after the above strategies have achieved the required results. The public theatre and gallery cover an area more than 1200 sq.m. Daylight, security and close control thermal range are considered to be critical Most of the public space is being occupied by the theatre and the gallery. In this case, daylight, close control thermal range and security are to given critical importance. Daylight in public café also have been given critical importance. This environmental matrix provides us a base where detailed analysis is needed and thus this information can be used to manage time.

26

Individual Controls

OTHER Critical

Desirable

Privacy

Not Important

Security

Not Desirable

Glare Control

Fig 3.1.1. Environmental Matrix Chart.

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Public Cafe

Receptions

Laundry Rooms

Gym

Study Rooms

Public Theatre/ Gallery

The Environmental Matrix employs a weighting scheme to indicate relative importance of impacts. In this matrix, key environmental sustainability strategies have been identified which associates to different functions of the building. Every functions have a designated floor area which then also helps to define the strategies requirements for the respective functions. The matrix is differentiated into 4 categories depending on their importance – critical, desirable, not important and not desirable.

Common Rooms

ENVIRONMENTAL MATRIX

Common Kitchens

150 Room Units

Area (m2)

750 600


CHAPTER 3 3. 2. Strategy

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

BURGES PARK

REPOSE

PRIVATE

STUDENT HOUSING PUBLIC TRANSPORT

CYCLE

ACCESS SURREY CANAL WALK

MULTIFUNCTIONAL

EXTENSION

PUBLIC PROGRAM

LANDSCAPE

PEDESTRIAN

ACCESS

INTEGRATED

STRATEGY PECKHAM RYE STATION

LIBRARY

SQUARE

PECKHAM

Regarding to site overview and urban study, student accommodation surely suits to the urban context as the neighborhood is filled with schools and colleges. Due to good accessibility by public transport and closeness to the Peckham public center formed by library, public square and multi-functional canopy, the public program was introduced. The Fig. 3.2.1 illustrates the stratergy that was a base for our proposal. It was assumed that for both: student housing and public program, the accessibility by public transportation, bicycle as well as by walking is necessary to provide. The Public Program needs to be integrated into the existing greenery axes from the Burgess Park and extend the functions of the Peckham Library and Peckham Square.

CANOPY

Student accommodation was assumed to keep distance from the Peckham center and visually be separated from the Public program for privacy and security reasons.

Fig.3.2.1 Strategy

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27


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 3 3.3 Room Typology

Corridor

Proposed plan

Living Space Bathroom Kitchen Conventional plan

ROOM TYPOLOGY

Fig.3.3.1 compares the conventional room plan of student accommodation and the proposed one. As summarized from the case study, students complied about the mechanically ventilated bathroom due to the noise and the inefficiency. There is same complaint about the kitchen. Kitchen and the bathroom are usually put next to the corridor which makes them dark and smelly. Although in this way, it can achieve higher density and less exposure, in order to offer a more pleasant living condition for students, kitchen and bathroom are naturally ventilated in this proposal, which simultaneously increase the daylit area because of less depth. 28

Advantage

Advantage

Daylit Bathroom & Kitchen

Less Exposed

Increase Daylit Area

Higher Density

Naturally Ventilated Bathroom& Kitchen

Fig.3.3.1 Conventional & Proposed Room Typology

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 3 3.4 Room Orientation Study

Double Room Without Kitchenette

Couple Room With Kitchenette

20%

Single Room With Kitchenette

10%

70%

ORIENTATION STUDY OF THE ROOM

The proposed student accommodation consists of three different room units: double room without kitchenette, couple room with kitchenette and single. From the case studies, we learnt that the single rooms are in more demand than the other rooms. So for the proposed student accommodation single rooms account for 70% of the total rooms, whereas double room without kitchenette account for 20% and couple room account for 10% of the total rooms. The single room occupies an area of 12 sq.m whereas the couple room with kitchenette occupies an area of 15.4 sq.m and the double room without kitchenette occupies an area of 18 sq.m which is the largest. 18

sq.m

2.9 sq.m

15.4 sq.m

2.4 Kwh

Window U-value = 1.4 W/m2-k Ext. Wall U-value = 0.197 W/m2-k

3°C

N

14.1°C

15°C

22.9°C

15°C

N

22.1°C

W

N

18°C

14.1°C

23.1°C

25.9°C

18.8°C

N

25.2°C

W

23.3°C (natural vent. of 7ach is provided for 10 hours a day in summer)

18°C

N

14.4°C

26.1°C

26.9°C

14.3°C

W

15°C

E

S

The next step would be to find out the suitable orientation for the different rooms based on the internal gains and the external gains. The values have been achieved through mint sheet (Appendix G Mint Sheet). We can observe that (Fig. 3.4.1) in the case of double room without kitchenette where the internal gains are low (appliances: 2.4 kwh), it would be preferably oriented towards south so that it receives plenty solar gains in order to achieve a higher temperature of 15°C than facing other direction during cold days when the outside temperature is 3°C. During days when its 15°C outside there might be a chance of overheating but with the help of ventilation and low internal gains, the operative temperature can become 23.3°. Thus the double room without kitchenette would be suitable to orient towards south.

3.4 Kwh

3°C

E

S

2 sq.m

Window U-value = 1.4 W/m2-k Ext. Wall U-value = 0.197 W/m2-k

17.9°C

W

15°C

E

S

(natural vent. of 7ach is provided for 10 hours a day in summer)

3°C

E

S

12

sq.m

4.5 Kwh

Window U-value = 1.4 W/m2-k Ext. Wall U-value = 0.197 W/m2-k

14°C

W

2.9 sq.m

E

S

15.1°C

N

25.2°C

W

26.4°C

E

S

(natural vent. of 7ach is provided for 10 hours a day in summer) Fig 3.4.1. Room Orientation Study.

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27.4°C

14.4°C

27.1°C

In case of couple room with kitchenette where the internal gains are high (appliances: 4.5 kwh), it would be suitable to orient itself towards north in order to receive less solar gains to prevent overheating in summer. During cold days when the outside temperature is 3°C, the internal temperature would be 17.9°C which is lowest as compared to other directions but when the outside temperature is 15°C, the internal temperature is 25.2°C which is low compared to other direction thus it wouldn’t overheat. In case of single rooms with kitchenette the internal gains from the appliances is 3.4kwh. As the other rooms have been the orientated towards north and south, the single rooms can be oriented towards east and west as the building blocks have the longer side oriented towards east and west which can occupy all the single rooms which are large in number compared to other rooms and thus will help to simplify the design. During cold days when the outside temperature is 3°C, the internal temperature can be around 14.4°C and when the temperature outside is 15°C, the internal temperature cam be between 26 to 27°C. In conclusion, the three room are orientated towards different direction based on the internal gains and design solutions.

29


CHAPTER 3 3. 5 Proposal

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

N Private Housing

N

C

Student Accomodation Construction Site

Peckham Library

Public Program

Surrey Canal Walk

Main Cycling Route

Main Pedestrian Routes

Peckham Square

Fig. 3.5.1. Context.

Fig. 3.5.2. Program.

PROPOSAL

N Multifunctional Theatre Space

The Fig. 3.5.1. demonstrates that the considered area surrounded by public facilities on the south and south-west, while the private housing located on the north. There are major pedestrian and cyclist axes that pass from the south to north direction near the western border of the site. The closest public transport subject is a bus stop on the east from the site.

Lighting Wells New Hill

3.5m

The program (Fig. 3.5.2.) consist of two main zones: accommodation which locates in the northern quiet part of the site close to existing private houses and the public program in the south to supplement the Peckham Library and Peckham Square. Landscape strategy (Fig. 3.5.3.) is based on continuation of the rhythm of existing rises by adding a dominant hill of the 3.5 meters height covered with grass. This mound considerates public enclosed spaces (Fig. 3.5.4.) such as cafe and multipurpose theatre. To provide uniform diffuse daylight, as well as for natural ventilation proposes, the north oriented lighting wells were established.

30

N

Cafe

2.5m 1.5m

Fig. 3.5.4. Public facilities.

Fig. 3.5.3. Landscape.

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CHAPTER 3 3. 5 Proposal

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

Average Eave Hight

Facade Projection East Block East Block

15m

9m West Block West Block

Previliant Wind

17m

N

10m

N

9m

Fig. 3.5.5. Accommodation massing.

Fig. 3.5.6. Wind protection.

PROPOSAL

Window Sill

2m

East Block

East Block

Roof Eave Axe Courtyard

West Block

West Block South Block

South Block

Pedestrian Transit

N

Fig. 3.5.7. Transit and access.

N

The student accommodation houses (Fig. 3.5.5.) have the north to south long axes as the previous study defined that the west and east orientations is the most appropriative for the most of the rooms. The blocks location determined by the privacy consideration and the height set to be similar with existing surrounding. To create windproof, private area between the buildings (Fig. 3.5.6.), the west block was extended (appendix F. Wind Study) in the east direction. As was mentioned the nearest public transport stop locates near the eastern border of the site and main pedestrian axes in the west. To provide the access to the bus stop for the occupants as well as to link it with the walking axes, the west block was divided (Fig. 3.5.7.). The courtyard was drowned in to the ground for a 2 meters to provide community space and to extend the area of the blocks within the established height. The entrances to the student houses oriented inside the yard for a privacy and security reasons. To minimize the overshadow and to prove the view for the existing private houses, the heights (Fig. 3.5.8.) of the East and South Blocks was decreased and East block mass was carved. The roof was sloped in order to increase the solar gains for further photovoltaic panels as well as for aesthetic proposes.

Fig. 3.5.8. Slopes.

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31


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 3 3. 6 Accommodation Zoning

West Block East Block

8.65m 4.65m 3m 3m

14.65m

-2m 11.10m 4.65m 3m 3m 3m 3m

South Block

4.60m 3m 3m 3m

N

Key-plan

Fig. 3.6.2. Perspective view showing functional distribution of floors.

Fig. 3.6.1. Perspective view showing division of floor heights and total building heights.

ACCOMODATION ZONING

The strategy for zoning in accomodation blocks was to first divide each floor by 3m in height (floor finish to floor finish level) and then dividing the floors by functional attributes. As shown in Fig. 3.6.1, the west block is 14.65m high, the south block and east block, 11.10m and 8.65m high respectively. The functions broadly allocated to each levels is determined by the use of the spaces inside each block. (Fig.3.6.2) The sub-ground levels have communal spaces together with utlitiy areas such as gym, laundry room etc., which do not require immidiate or strong use of daylighting as defined earlier in environmetal matrix. The majority of typical floors above sub-ground level are populated with living units, while the top floors in each block has living units along with common study areas and balconies.

Communal + utilitiy spaces

Communal spaces

Living spaces

Living + Communal spaces

Single Room Blocks

Single Room Blocks Couple and shared room blocks

Fig. 3.6.3 shows defning of room typology in each block. The west and east blocks have single occupancy rooms with kitchenettes while the south block has couple rooms (north facing) and double-bed shared rooms (south facing) with and without kitchenette respectively. The divison of room typology was based upon the room orientation study as it was observed that rooms with high internal gains could be oriented with windows facing east and west while rooms with low internal gains can have windows faing towards south as seen indicatively in design of built form in Fig. 3.6.4

32

Fig. 3.6.3. Perspective view showing division of room typology in accommodation blocks.

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Fig. 3.6.4. Perspective view of proposed built form of accommodation blocks.


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 3 3.7 Proposal of Courtyard

Playground

-

Bicycle Parking Gathering Space

Buffer Space

N

Fig. 3.7.1 Proposal of Courtyard Spaces

Sythetic Ground

PROPOSAL OF COURTYARD Paver Blocks

The courtyard is designed as the main area for all the occupants to gather together to make friends and have outdoor activities. The entrances of each block are linked to define the area. The space next to the main pedestrian route is set to be the buffer space between public pedestrian route and more private zone. The central area is the main zone for students to have group activities, studies and communication. The back of the courtyard offers bicycle parking area (Fig. 3.7.1.)

Greenary

Wooden Pavement

At the north corner, there is a playground for students to have sports activities. In this way, the sports activities wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t conflict with the pedestrian. Steps with seats are next to the playground for rest and watching the sports activities as well as continuing the axis to link the accommodation part with the future residential development (the Whitten Timer Yard will be demolished to be a residence in the future).

N

Fig. 3.7.2 Proposal of Courtyard Pavement

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The pavement includes greenery, wooden pavement (platform for activities), common paver block and synthetic playground to define different functions of different zones (Fig. 3.7.2)

33


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

SUB-GROUND FLOOR PLAN

CHAPTER 3 3.8 Plan & Elevation & Section

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

Gym

Single Rooms

Toilets

Double-Bed Shared Rooms

Laundry room

Double-Bed Couple Rooms

Staircase + Lift

Common Kitchen + Dining

Reception + Waiting

Residentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lounge

Lounge / Common room Cinema / Tv Room Administrative office

FLOOR PLANS - ACCOMODATION

The Sub-Ground Floors (Fig. 3.8.1) of all the blocks are composed of utilities and facilities such as Gym, Lounge room, laundry rooms, Reception and waiting, cinema room and games room. The strategy to plan the sub-ground floor was to divide spaces according to the environmental matrix formed to study the areas which require immediate attention to environmental factors such as daylight, ventilation and thermal comfort. The Typical floor plans (Fig 3.8.2.) has three types of rooms divided even on the floor namely - Single Rooms(with kitchenette), Double-Bed Shared rooms(without kitchentte) and Double-Bed Couple rooms. There are a total of 46 Single shared rooms combined in west and east blocks, 15 Double-bed Shared rooms and 8 Double-Bed couple rooms combined in south block. The floors are centrally divided by the staircase in order to shorten the length of the corridor to a maximum of 19m. This is also helps in poviding daylit corridors which are around 50% more than 2% daylight factor as found during simulations (refer daylight studies). The daylight corridors have a positive pychological effect on the occupants and also helps in decreasing increasing consumption as noted in case studies and interviews. 34

Fig. 3.8.1. Sub-Ground Level Floor Plan

Fig. 3.8.2. Typical Floor Plan

N 0m

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5m

10m

15m

20m


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 3 3.8 Plan & Elevation & Section

TOP FLOOR PLAN Single Rooms Double-Bed Shared Rooms Common Study Area Common Kitchen + Dining Balcony Store / Mechanical room

FLOOR PLANS - ACCOMODATION

Fig. 3.8.3. Top Floors Plan

The Top Floor Plan (Fig 3.8.3) is composed of a mix of living units, study areas, balconies and common kitchen+dining. The idea was to provide common areas such as quite study spcaces on top floor utlising the ineefficient area under the sloping roofs and to keep all the noisy activites on the floors below. Also the study spaces can make use of the skylights in sloping roof (Fig 3.8.4) to have diffused and even daylight spread out on study table levels.

Fig. 3.8.4. Roof Plan

N 0m

5m

10m

15m

20m

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35


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 3 3.8 Plan & Elevation & Section

0m

1m

2m

3m

4m

5m

West Block

East Block

D A

Ground Level

Fig. 3.8.4 Elevation B

-2m

E B

South Block

C

N F

Key-plan

Ground Level

Fig. 3.8.5Elevation C

-2m

ELEVATIONS

The proposed materials in elevations for student Accommodation blocks are kept in consideration with that of the context materials. The Fig. 3.8.4, Fig.3.8.5, Fig.3.8.6 reflects materials used in the elevations facing the courtyard. Bricks are used as wall cladding materials and matching coloured roof tiles for sloped roof. This forms a continuity in elevations in the courtyard and provides a more psychological feeling of a small yet homely feeling for students living in there. The facades are punctured by windows and balconies and centralised staircase which has a glazed faced to provide good amount of dalight in corridors (refer daylight simulations) as it was found during the interviews that most student accommodations lack appropriate daylit corridors. A large portion of walls are left blank intentionally in elevations (refer daylight studies) as they house common spaces such as residentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lounge and common kitchen/ dining on typical floors and cinema room,store rooms and other utility spaces on sub-ground floors, which either do not require strong daylighting functionally or can cause glare issues if provided with windows.

36

Ground Level -2m Fig. 3.8.6Elevation A

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 3 3.8 Plan & Elevation & Section

0m

1m

2m

3m

4m

5m

West Block

Ground Level -2m

East Block

D A

Fig. 3.8.7. Elevation E

E B

South Block

C

N F

Key-plan

Ground Level -2m

Fig. 3.8.8. Elevation F

ELEVATIONS

The propsed materials for elevations facing the neighbourhood and library is Zinc cladding panels to keep in context with library which is a landmark in itself. Therefore the building blocks along with brick cladding facing courtyard and Zinc cladding outside, are seen as an â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; integration and not an addition â&#x20AC;&#x2122; in the surrounding urban context of the site.

Ground Level -2m

The large glazed walls seen in the Fig. 3.8.7, Fig. 3.8.8, Fig. 3.8.9 are a result of daylight studies and thermal studies in communal spaces which is why the glazed wall is broken by horizontal bands of wall 0.75m high. The result of which is maxmum thermal and visual comfort in those particular common spaces.It is to noted that the proportions rooms and of window sizes have been decided also keeping into considerations the brick sizes to minimize wastage of bricks formed by cutting at junctions of windows.

Fig. 3.8.9 Elevation D

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37


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 3 3.8 Plan & Elevation & Section

-

Accomodation site

Y

West Block

West block

Neighbourhood Houses

Central Courtyard

East block

East Block

X

X

South Block Key-plan

N

Y

Fig. 3.8.10. Section XX Single-Bed Rooms

Reception

Study areas

Double-Bed / Couple Rooms

SECTIONS Central Courtyard

The Fig. 3.8.10 shows a section through the accomodation blocks and the central courtyard. The section shows the realtionship of height of buildings with neighbourhood houses and the central courtyard which acts as a point of entry to the buildings and is also used to various outdoor activities. The east block is lowest in height keeping in mind not to overshadow the neighbourhood houses while also allowing sunlight to the courtyard in winter when the sun angle is quite low. The west and the east accomodation blocks provide a sense of privacy to the courtyard while also linking public access to through site. Although the courtyard is overshadowed by the two buildings it provides plenty of oppurnities to seek outdoor activites during spring and summer when there is ample of sunlight.

Games area + Bicycle Parking

The Fig. 3.8.11 shows a section through south block and thought the courtyard highlighting various levels happening thought the site. The north-east corner of the site has outdoor games area such as halfcourt for basketball which is directly accessible through the games room situated in east block. The courtyard also has deciduous tress which provides a shaded sitting area below its canopy during afternoon in summer.

38

East block

South Block Pedestrian access

Fig. 3.8.11. Section YY

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 3 3. 9 Material Composition

TOP

BOTTOM HUNG WINDOWS EPOXY/ POLYURETHANE RESIN FLOORING (5mm)

CEMENT SCREED (35mm) 250mm FLOOR SLAB INSULATION (30mm)

CONCRETE (180mm) BOTTOM

MATERIAL COMPOSITION TOP HUNG OPERABLE WINDOWS

The Fig. 3.9.1 shows defines the proposed material layout for all typical living units used in the design. To keep in the mind the required approximate air changes per hour both in room and the bathroom operable windows such as bottom hung and top hung awning windows were proposed in design. The windows open upto 10% to facilitate ventilation inside the room due to stack height of top hung double level windows. External walls are 450mm wide and has two layers of bricks both interior and exterior along with insulation and air cavity to create a good thermal mass (u-values defined in thermal simulations). As for the internal walls, they are one brick wide which provides enough mass to create both thermal and acoustic insulation between rooms.

450mm EXTERNAL WALL IN

OUT

BRICKS (230mm)

INSULATION (100mm)

AIR GAP (50mm)

BRICKS (100mm)

The floors are 250mm thick concrete slabs proposed with expoxy coating as flooring for aesthetic purpose and also being low in maintainance. The ceiling is kept as smooth exposed concrete as it is known to have good light reflectance properties. All furniture inside the rooms are proposed to be plain white corian surfaces as found in case studies( see Appendix. C) as light reflectance is affected a lot by the type of surfaces in a room and also because it was more preffered by occupants during the interviews.

IN

OUT

250mm INTERNAL WALL

Fig. 3.9.1. Exploded view of a single room

PLASTER+ PAINT

BRICKS (230mm)

PLASTER+ PAINT

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Kitchen cooking appliances are minimal in kitchenette and is just one electric based hot plate (with two hobs) and a kettle for heating water (refer case studies for more details).

39


CHAPTER 3 3. 10. Visualisations

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

Fig. 3.10.1 View from Surrey Canal Walk.

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41


CHAPTER 3 3. 10. Visualization

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

Fig. 3.10.2Courtyard. 40

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

42

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 4

CHAPTER 4 DAYLIGHT STUDY

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43


CHAPTER 4 4. 1. Daylight Strategy

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

N

West Block

Unit 1

West Block

W

Unit 2

N

Unit 1

Communal Space

E Communal Space

East Block

S

E

W

South Block

W

N

N

Unit 3

S

W

East Block

S

Unit 2

N S

E

Unit 4

Key-plan

E

DAYLIGHT STRATEGY Regarding to occupants interview (Appendix D. Student Interviews) as well as common knowledge, daylit environment is preferred by occupants. Furthermore, it proves health, wellbeing, productivity outcomes increases and reduces the energy consumption. The daylight strategy grounds on the determination of the passive daylit zones regarding to the function of the space and minimization of the glazing area in the rooms with the highest internal heat gains such as living units in order to prevent the overheating issue during the summer sunny weather. At the start, the basic simulation (Appendix A. Software Simulations) was run. Fig 4.1.1. demonstrates the Daylight Factor on the exterior wall surfaces layered by the zones of glazing, obtained results ranged from 35% to 70%. As it was expected, the sub-ground surfaces receive the less daylight and it was assumed that this floors could be populated with the communal spaces that do not require strong daylighting but required good accessibility, glazing of this areas was applied for natural ventilation, visual connection with courtyard and aesthetic purposes. The communal spaces that will used on a regular basis, studying areas, student common lounge, dining rooms and the area of the desks and kitchenette (where applicable) in the living rooms are considered as passive zones and those that requires good access to daylight. Among the passive zone, the areas with the less daylight were selected for further study. The criteria for the passive daylight zones was determined by the BREEM New Construction 2016 technical manual and consist of the Daylight Factor average of 2% covered the 80% of the area. 44

N

W

S

E

East Block Unit 3

N

Unit 4

E

Selected Areas

Circulation Space Glazing

Living Units Glazing

Common Kitchen Galzing

Communal Space Glazing Fig. 4.1.1. Daylight Factor on the exterior surfaces.

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S 35% DF

40%

W 45%

50%

55%

60%

65%


CHAPTER 4 4. 2. Communal Space

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

N

>20%

15%

West Block

W

10%

N

E Communal Space

5%

East Block

S

E

W

2% South Block

W

N

>1%

S

DF

N S

Key-plan

E

Passive Zone Space Area sq./m. Window Area

sq./m.

27

Window to Floor Ratio

33%

Offset From the Floor

0.75

Daylight Factor Average

3.1

Daylight Factor >2%

COMMUNAL SPACE

83

47%

The communal space of the ground floor in the West Block was selected for daylight study as it window surfaces have the less Daylight Factor. The circulation space of the floor was tested as well. The area of the working desks and lounge sofa was considered as passive zone with the height of the window estimated as 1.5 meters and area of the glazing in within that that is around 16 meters. Due to simulation result (Fig. 4.2.1.) the average Daylight Factor within the passive zone estimates 4.7%, and the 86% of the space receive the demanded daylight. It is important to mention that the light evenly distributed and exclude preconditions for the glaring effect. For the whole common area of the floor, including the corridor and the stairs, the average Daylight Factor is 3.1, that is reasonable considering that most of the area is a transit space.

4.7% 86%

Fig 4.2.1. Communal Space.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017 45


CHAPTER 4 4. 3. Unit 1

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

Unit 1

Unit 1

>20%

West Block

15%

East Block

10%

5% South Block 2%

>1%

DF

N

UNIT 1

Passive Zone Glazing Visible Transmittance

The living unit 1 represents the single bedroom with kitchenette (Fig. 4.3.1.), that locates in the West Block, which has best daylight potential. Due to the minimum obstructions the area of the windows was estimated as only 2 sq/m.. The window to floor ratio estimates 22% that is very usual for local housing and match the typical student accommodation bedroom. Compact floor layout allow to keep the area of the window 45% smaller comparing to an average (Appendix C. Case Study) in the case study. It reduces solar heat gains in the summer as well as heat loss in the winter. To compensate the minimized area inside bedrooms, the extensive communal program provided on each floor. The simulation (Appendix A. Software Simulations) shows that within the passive zone the average daylight factor estimates 3.8% and the 83% of the area receive the required daylight what guarantee good quality of the daylight on the surface of the working desk and kitchenette. The window in the bathroom allow it to be daylited with an average Daylight Factor of 1.8% that allow to use it use during the most of the daytime without addition artificial lighting. 46

0.65

Room Area sq./m.

9

2.3

Window Area sq./m.

2

0.4

Window to Floor Ratio

22%

17%

Offset From the Floor

0.75

1.5

Daylight Factor Average

3.8%

2%

1.8%

Daylight Factor >2%

83%

30%

28%

Fig. 4.3.1. Living unit 1.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


CHAPTER 4 4. 4. Unit 2

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

UNIT 2

Unit 2

>20%

West Block

Unit 2

15%

10%

East Block

5% South Block 2%

N DF

>1%

Passive Zone Glazing Visible Transmittance

0.65

UNIT 2

Room Area sq./m.

9

2.3

2.2

0.4

Window to Floor Ratio

25%

17%

Offset From the Floor

0.75

1.5

Window Area sq./m.

Daylight Factor Average

3.9%

2%

1.5%

Daylight Factor >2%

84%

31%

23%

The living unit 2 represents the single bedroom with kitchenette (Fig. 4.4.1.), located in the East Block that in average receives the less daylight. In order to achieve the necessary criteria the area of the windows was increased comparing to the West Block single bedrooms and estimates 2.2 sq./m.. Window to floor ratio increased to 25% but still could be considered as a common. Simulation (Appendix A. Software Simulations) indicates that within the passive zone the 84% of the area is covered with a Daylight Factor of 2% or more. The bathroom hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been considered as a passive zone, and the size of the window remain the similar with other blocks as it provide the necessary natural ventilation, also unified bathroom window could provide visual unity of the complex as well as simplify the construction. The average Daylight Factor inside this area is 1.5%.

Fig. 4.4.1. Living unit 2.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

47


CHAPTER 4 4. 5. Unit 3

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

Unit 3

>20%

West Block

15%

East Block

10%

5% South Block 2% Unit 3 >1%

DF

N

Passive Zone Glazing Visible Transmittance

UNIT 3 The living unit 3 is a double bedroom with kitchenette for couples (Fig. 4.5.1.), that locates in the South Block, due to the highest power density among other spaces it oriented to the north. The area of the windows estimates 2.9 meters. The window to floor ratio is 24%. The passive zone The simulation (Appendix A. Software Simulations) shows that within the passive zone cover the working desk for both occupants and the kitchenette. The simulation showed that the 80% of itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s area achieve 2% or more Daylight Factor. The window in the bathroom allow it to be daylited with an average Daylight Factor of 2.1%. 48

0.65

Room Area sq./m.

12

2.3

Window Area sq./m.

2.9

0.4

Window to Floor Ratio

24%

17%

Offset From the Floor

0.75

1.5

Daylight Factor Average

3.4%

2.3%

2.1%

Daylight Factor >2%

80%

45%

31%

Fig. 4.5.1. Living unit 3.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


CHAPTER 4 4. 6. Unit 4

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

Unit 4

>20%

West Block

15%

10%

East Block

5% South Block 2%

N

>1%

DF

Unit 4

Passive Zone Glazing Visible Transmittance

0.65

Room Area sq./m.

15

Window Area sq./m.

2.9

2.3

UNIT 4

0.4

Window to Floor Ratio

24%

17%

Offset From the Floor

0.75

1.5

Daylight Factor Average

4.5%

2.5%

2.3%

Daylight Factor >2%

83%

47%

35%

The living unit 3 is a shared double bedroom without the kitchenette (Fig. 4.6.1.), that locates in the South Block, the internal heat gains is the less among the living units. The Windows oriented to the South as this room didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t assumed to be overheated in the summer. The area of the windows is the same with the couple bedroom and estimates 2.9 meters . The window to floor ratio is 19% and the passive zone cover working desks and students beds. The simulation (Appendix A. Software Simulations) demonstrates that within the passive zone the 83% of the area is covered with a Daylight Factor of 2% or more. The window in the bathroom allow it to be daylited with an average Daylight Factor of 2.3%.

Fig. 4.6.1. Living unit 4.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

49


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

50

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 5

CHAPTER 5 SOLAR STUDY

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

51


CHAPTER 5 5. 1 Winter solar gains

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

West Block N

West Block

W

N

E

East Block

S

E

W

N

South Block

W

N

E

S

W

East Block

S

N S E

N

W

S

E

East Block

WINTER SOLAR RADIATION GAINS The solar study was performed to define the distribution of the solar gain on the different exterior surfaces. To identify the potential thermal stress in the indoor spaces and study them in the further thermal study the glazing area was displayed. To define the differences of the solar gains during the cold months, the initial simulation (Appendix A. Software Simulations) was run. The resulted diagram (Fig. 5.1.1.) demonstrates that for the all vertical surfaces the amount of the receiving energy is evenly low and is within the 0.3-0.7 kWh/sq.m. range. Due to resulting similarity, the winter solar gains assumed to not be considered in determination of the spaces to be tested in further thermal study. The period for the simulation was set from 8 December 01 AM to 14 December 12 PM. 52

N

E

Selected Areas

Circulation Space Glazing

Living Units Glazing

Common Kitchen Galzing

Communal Space Glazing Fig. 5.1.1. Winter solar gains.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

S >0.3 kWh/sq.m./day

0.5

W 1

1.5

2

2.5

3


CHAPTER 5 5. 2 Summer solar gains

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

SUMMER SOLAR RADIATION RATE West Block -

Single Room

N

Single Room

N

West Block W

E

East Block

S

N

E

S

East Block

W

W

E Communal Space

South Block

W

N

Communal Space

S

Shared Room

Double Room

N

S

Key-plan

N

W

East Block

S

E

Double Room

N

Shared Room

E

Selected Areas

Circulation Space Glazing

Living Units Glazing

Common Kitchen Galzing

Communal Space Glazing

E

S >0.3

0.5

W 1

1.5

2

kWh/sq.m./day

Fig. 5.2.1. Summer solar gains.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

2.5

WINTER SOLAR RADIATION GAINS 3

The Fig. 5.2.1. illustrates the daily solar radiation gains in a typical summer week. The mesh reveals noticeable differences in the distribution of the solar energy from the 0.5 kWh/sq.m. to almost 3 kWh/sq.m.. Within the different living unit types the most radiated were identified for further thermal study. 53


CHAPTER 5 5. 3 Roof slopes study

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

1200 kWh

West Block

987 kWh 1000 kWh East Block

960 kWh 40

970 kWh

900 kWh

880kWh 30 800 kWh South Block

700 kWh

N

600 kWh Key-plan

WINTER SOLAR RADIATION RATE

Simulation Results

500 kWh

90% Available Solar Radiation Assuming that photovoltaic panels are the most feasible source of renewable energy due to economic reasons and urban context, the roof slopes were studied precisely. To define the interrelation between the angle of the roof slope and the amount of the receiving solar energy, the series of the annual simulations were performed. For each slope angle in each block, the amount of energy was calculated and compared in the diagrams, all the surrounding context was carefully modeled and considered. The angle is shown in degrees and the energy in kWh/sq.m. Fig. 5.3.1. and Fig. 5.3.2. illustrate the results for the West and East Blocks were 40 degrees and 30 degrees for the west oriented and east oriented slopes respectively, which were determined as the optimum in aspects of solar radiation and internal typological volume. 54

Highest Solar Radiation Gains

400 kWh

Optimal Angle 0 0

Fig. 5.3.1. West Block.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

10 14

20

30 32

40

50

60 57

70

80

90


CHAPTER 5 5. 3 Roof slopes study

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

1200 kWh

1200 kWh

1050 kWh 40 1074 kWh 1000 kWh

1000 kWh 961 kWh

926 kWh 900 kWh 901 kWh

900 kWh

865 kWh 14

837 kWh 40

800 kWh

800 kWh 821 kWh 30

700 kWh

700 kWh

600 kWh

600 kWh

500 kWh

500 kWh

WINTER SOLAR RADIATION RATE

400 kWh

400 kWh

0 0

10 7

Fig. 5.3.2. East Block.

20

30

27

40 40

50

60

70

80

90

0 0

10 4

20 14

30 31

40

50

60

70

80

90

For the roof of South Block (Fig. 5.3.3.) the 14 degrees and 40 degrees angles in north and south slopes accordingly were the most efficient. In conclusion, the 3 types of the slopes were established: 40 for the west and south orientation, 30 for the east and 14 for the north. Selected angles allow more than 90% solar gains, comparing to the maximum .

59

Fig. 5.3.3. South Block.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

55


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

56

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6

CHAPTER 6 THERMAL STUDY

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

57


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6 6.1 Annual Thermal Analysis of Room

N

ANNUAL THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR ROOM UNITS From the previous project of UCL Prankerd House (Student Accommodation), occupant’s interview and the basic knowledge we found that the room units used to overheat. In the Prankerd House the students used to open the window for natural ventilation during winter period because of overheating. Looking at those issues we have proposed additional changes to the room.

W

N

E

East Block

S

E

W

South Block

W

N

NORTH COUPLE S

S

SOUTH DOUBLE

Area of the room = 15 sq.m No. of occupants = 2 Total Glazing Areas = 2.9 sq.m

E

For this annual thermal simulation of the student units, schedules have been defined below: A] SINGLE ROOM EAST

C] COUPLE ROOM NORTH WITH KITCHEN 3.4 kWh

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

1.0 kWh

Students go away for an Easter break during the month of April (Fig. 6.1.2) (Appendix H Schedules of Thermal). During Christmas Break, very few students go away which can provide a diverse schedule. Thus no vacation is provided in the occupation schedule.

1.19 kWh

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

4.5 kWh 2.0 kWh 0.8 kWh

Schedules

Daily heat gains

Student spend most of daytime in university, schedule generated according to occupants interview. Appliances schedule defined by occupants interview and room review.

0.1 ach infiltration

Windows starting opening (36% of the area is openable) at temperature of 21°C and closing at 19°C. During Summer windows are kept open during the day between 8am to 9pm which allows natural ventilation and generates 7ach. During the night windows are kept slightly open allowing fresh air to enter and generates 0.8ach. During Winter windows are kept open during the cooking hours 9am to 10am and 9pm to 11pm which allows natural ventilation and removes odour and generates 6ach and during the night windows are kept slightly open allowing fresh air to enter and generates 0.8ach.

Area of the room = 9 sq.m No. of occupants = 1 Total Glazing Areas = 2 sq.m Fig 6.1.1. Room Typologies and Key plan.

58

2.5 kWh 2.0 kWh 1.98 kWh

Daily heat gains

These rooms have double glazed window with a U- Value of 1.4 W/m2k (Fig. 6.1.1). The walls are 450mm thick with a U-Value of 0.197 W/m2k (Fig. 6.1.1). All the rooms have an infiltration rate of 0.1ach.

In the student occupation schedule, the students are in the college/universities between 10am to 8pm during the weekdays and return back home. During weekends, the behaviour of the students are similar but instead of going to college they are usually visiting some places or studying in the common rooms (Appendix H Schedules of Thermal).

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

West Block

For the simulation three different rooms have been considered: A) Single Room with kitchenette facing East B) Double Room without kitchenette facing south C) Couple Room with kitchenette facing North These rooms are selected because from the Solar Studies (Chap. 5) we found that the exterior surfaces of these rooms were under thermal stress.

B] DOUBLE ROOM SOUTH WITHOUT KITCHEN

EAST SINGLE

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

Daily heat gains

0.1 ach infiltration

Area of the room = 12 sq.m No. of occupants = 2 Total Glazing Areas = 2.9 sq.m


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6 6.1 Annual Thermal Analysis of Room

30 C 29 C 28 C 27 C 26 C 25 C 24 C 23 C 22 C 21 C 20 C 19 C 18 C 17 C 16 C 15 C 14 C 13 C 12 C 11 C 10 C 9C 8C 7C 6C 5C 4C 3C 2C 1C 0C -1 C

Sky Conditions Statistic for London Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Totl.

20.84 C 20.69 C 20.14 C

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2.0 kWh 1.8 kWh 1.6 kWh 1.4 kWh 1.2 kWh 1.0 kWh 0.8 kWh 0.6 kWh 0.4 kWh 0.2 kWh 0.0 kWh

Operative Temp Couple Room North

Transmitted Solar Radiation Couple Room North

Operative Temperature Single Room East

Transmitted Solar Radiation Single Room East

Ventilation Air Rate Change

Operative Temperature Double Room South

Transmitted Solar Radiation Double Room South

Student Easter Break

Fig 6.1.2. Annual Thermal Simulation for Room Units. AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

28

26

27

33

29

31

36

32 38

31

27

31

44

44

43

41

39

38

43

43

45 37

47

45

42

31

28

31

32

28

33

26

21

23 25

22

28

27

The graph (Fig. 6.1.2) illustrates the efficiency of the different rooms throughout the year. The average outside temperature is 11.97°C and the average temperature of 11.97 C A) Single Room with kitchenette facing East – 20.69°C B) Double Room without kitchenette facing South – 20.14°C C) Couple Room with kitchenette facing north – 20.84°C

10 ach 8 ach 6 ach 4 ach 2 ach 0 ach

Outside Temperature

25

In case of double room without kitchenette facing south, internal heat gains are less as compared to others but has high solar gains. Due to this factor, the internal temperature doesn’t over heat much making the room comfortable throughout the year with necessary ventilation. In case of summer when the outside temperature is higher than the comfort band, the room tends to overheat a little. In case of single room with kitchenette facing east, internal heat gains are higher than the double room but has less solar gains. The internal temperature doesn’t overheat much making the room comfortable throughout the year with necessary ventilation. In case of summer when the outside temperature is higher than the comfort band, the room tends to overheat a little. In case of couple room with kitchenette facing north, internal heat gains are higher than all the rooms but has very minimum solar gains. In case of summer when the outside temperature is higher than the comfort band, the room tends to overheat a little. But with the help of necessary ventilation the room temperature can be brought down to the comfort band. No. of hours the outdoor temperature above comfort band annually = 79 Hours Out of those hours the temperature of the space above comfort band Single Room = 57 Hours Double Room = 55 Hours Couple Room = 48 Hours During April when the students have gone for a vacation, the internal gains of all the rooms are almost zero except for the rooms where refrigerator have to be kept running throughout. During that period, the internal temperature of the south double room rises cause of high solar gains due to its orientation. But the internal temperature of the north couple room drops down due to its north orientation receiving minimum solar gains. But if window shutters are applied during that period then the temperature of all rooms could be less affected. From the graph we can observe that all the rooms are most of the time in comfort band throughout the year without any additional heating or cooling supply thus making it free running.

59


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6 6.2 Thermal Analysis of Room - Summer

N

B] DOUBLE ROOM SOUTH WITHOUT KITCHEN

EAST SINGLE

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

West Block W

2.5 kWh 2.0 kWh 1.83 kWh

N

E

Daily heat gains East Block

S

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF ROOM UNITS - SUMMER WEEK

0.1 ach infiltration

South Block

W

N

In this simulation we are looking at the thermal analysis of all the rooms during a summer period [ 22nd June - 28th June]

NORTH COUPLE S

For the simulation three different rooms have been considered: A) Single Room with kitchenette facing East B) Double Room without kitchenette facing South C) Couple Room with kitchenette facing North

E

W

S

SOUTH DOUBLE

Area of the room = 15 sq.m No. of occupants = 2 Total Glazing Areas = 2.9 sq.m

E

These rooms are selected because from the Solar Studies (Chap. 5) we found that the exterior surfaces of these rooms were under thermal stress.

A] SINGLE ROOM EAST

These rooms have double glazed window with a U- Value of 1.4 W/m2k (Fig. 6.2.1). The walls are 450mm thick with a U-Value of 0.197 W/m2k (Fig. 6.2.1). All the rooms have an infiltration rate of 0.1ach.

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

C] COUPLE ROOM NORTH WITH KITCHEN 3.4 kWh 1.0 kWh

For this weekly thermal simulation of the student units, schedules have been defined below: In the student occupation schedule, the students are in the college/universities between 10am to 8pm during the weekdays and return back home. During weekends, the behaviour of the students are similar but instead of going to college they are usually visiting some places or studying in the common rooms (Appendix H Schedules of Thermal).

1.6 kWh

Daily heat gains

0.1 ach infiltration

Schedules Student spend most of daytime in university, schedule generated according to occupants interview.

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

4.5 kWh 2.0 kWh

1.36 kWh

Daily heat gains 0.1 ach infiltration

Appliances schedule defined by occupants interview and room review. Windows starting opening (36% of the area is openable) at temperature of 21°C and closing at 19°C. During Summer windows are kept open during the day between 8am to 9pm which allows natural ventilation and generates 7ach. During the night windows are kept slightly open allowing fresh air to enter and generates 0.8ach.

60

Area of the room = 9 sq.m No. of occupants = 1 Total Glazing Areas = 2 sq.m Fig 6.2.1. Room Typologies and Key plan. AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

Area of the room = 12 sq.m No. of occupants = 2 Total Glazing Areas = 2.9 sq.m


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6 6.2 Thermal Analysis of Room - Summer

2.5 m/s

2.0 m/s

2.2 m/s

2.7 m/s

3.6 m/s

2.7m/s

4.1 m/s

30 C 29 C 28 C 27 C 26 C 25 C 24 C 23 C 22 C 21 C 20 C 19 C 18 C 17 C 16 C 15 C 14 C 13 C 12 C 11 C 10 C 9C 8C 7C 6C 5C 4C 3C 2C 1C 0C -1 C

18.70 C

00:00

18:00

12:00

Tu 28/06/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

Mo 27/06/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

Su 26/06/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

Sa 25/06/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

Fr 24/06/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

06:00

12:00

Th 23/06/16

00:00

18:00

12:00

06:00

20 ach 18 ach 16 ach 14 ach 12 ach 10 ach 8 ach 6 ach 4 ach 2 ach 0 ach

We 22/06/16

00:00

2.0 kWh 1.8 kWh 1.6 kWh 1.4 kWh 1.2 kWh 1.0 kWh 0.8 kWh 0.6 kWh 0.4 kWh 0.2 kWh 0.0 kWh

24.54 C 24.07 C 23.75 C

Outside Temperature

Operative Temp Couple Room North

Transmitted Solar Radiation Couple Room North

Operative Temperature Single Room East

Transmitted Solar Radiation Single Room East

Ventilation Air Rate Change

Operative Temperature Double Room South

Transmitted Solar Radiation Double Room South

Student Occupancy Period

Fig 6.2.2. Thermal Simulation for Room Units during Summer Week. AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

The graph (Fig. 6.2.2) illustrates the efficiency of the different rooms during a summer week where the outside temperature ranges between 14°C to 24°C. The average outside temperature is 18.70°C and the average temperature of A) B) C)

Single Room with kitchenette facing East – 24.07°C Double Room without kitchenette facing South – 23.75°C Couple Room with kitchenette facing north – 24.54°C

In case of double room without kitchenette facing south, internal heat gains are less as compared to others but has high solar gains. Due to this factor, the internal temperature doesn’t over heat much making the room comfortable. The internal temperature is lower than all other rooms. In case of single room with kitchenette facing east, internal heat gains are higher than the double room but has less solar gains. The internal temperature doesn’t overheat much making the room comfortable throughout the year with necessary ventilation. In case of couple room with kitchenette facing north, internal heat gains are higher than all the rooms but has very minimum solar gains. But with the help of necessary ventilation the room temperature can be brought down to the comfort band. The internal temperature is higher than all other rooms. From the graph we can observe that all the rooms do not overheat at any point during the week. The rooms are most of the time in comfort band during the week without any additional heating or cooling supply thus making it free running.

61


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6 6.3 Thermal Analysis of Room - Winter

N

B] DOUBLE ROOM SOUTH WITHOUT KITCHEN

EAST SINGLE

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

West Block W

2.5 kWh 2.0 kWh

N

0.388 kWh

E

Daily heat gains East Block

S

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF ROOM UNITS - WINTER

0.1 ach infiltration

South Block

W

N

In this simulation we are looking at the thermal analysis of all the rooms during a winter period [ 16th December - 22nd December]

NORTH COUPLE

For the simulation three different rooms have been considered: A) Single Room with kitchenette facing East B) Double Room without kitchenette facing South C) Couple Room with kitchenette facing North

E

W

S

S

SOUTH DOUBLE

Area of the room = 15 sq.m No. of occupants = 2 Total Glazing Areas = 2.9 sq.m

E

These rooms are selected because from the Solar Studies (Chap. 5) we found that the exterior surfaces of these rooms were under thermal stress. These rooms have double glazed window with a U- Value of 1.4 W/m2k (Fig. 6.3.1). The walls are 450mm thick with a U-Value of 0.197 W/m2k (Fig. 6.3.1). All the rooms have an infiltration rate of 0.1ach. For this weekly thermal simulation of the student units, schedules have been defined below:

C] COUPLE ROOM NORTH WITH KITCHEN

A] SINGLE ROOM EAST 3.4 kWh

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

1.0 kWh

In the student occupation schedule, the students are in the college/universities between 10am to 8pm during the weekdays and return back home. During weekends, the behaviour of the students are similar but instead of going to college they are usually visiting some places or studying in the common rooms (Appendix H Schedules of Thermal).

0.12 kWh

0.1 ach infiltration

Student spend most of daytime in university, schedule generated according to occupants interview.

4.5 kWh 2.0 kWh

Daily heat gains

Schedules

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

0.09 kWh

Daily heat gains 0.1 ach infiltration

Appliances schedule defined by occupants interview and room review. Windows starting opening (36% of the area is openable) at temperature of 21°C and closing at 19°C. During Winter windows are kept open during the cooking hours 9am to 10am and 9pm to 11pm which allows natural ventilation and removes odour and generates 6ach and during the night windows are kept slightly open allowing fresh air to enter and generates 0.8ach.

62

Area of the room = 9 sq.m No. of occupants = 1 Total Glazing Areas = 2 sq.m Fig 6.3.1. Room Typologies and Key plan. AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

Area of the room = 12 sq.m No. of occupants = 2 Total Glazing Areas = 2.9 sq.m


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6 6.3 Thermal Analysis of Room - Winter

5.5 m/s

3.3 m/s

2.7 m/s

2.5 m/s

1.3 m/s

2.7 m/s

4.1 m/s

30 C 29 C 28 C 27 C 26 C 25 C 24 C 23 C 22 C 21 C 20 C 19 C 18 C 17 C 16 C 15 C 14 C 13 C 12 C 11 C 10 C 9C 8C 7C 6C 5C 4C 3C 2C 1C 0C -1 C

09.05 C

00:00

18:00

12:00

Th 22/12/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

We 21/12/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

Tu 20/12/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

Mo 19/12/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

Su 18/12/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

06:00

12:00

Sa 17/12/16

00:00

18:00

12:00

06:00

20 ach 18 ach 16 ach 14 ach 12 ach 10 ach 8 ach 6 ach 4 ach 2 ach 0 ach

Fr 16/12/16

00:00

2.0 kWh 1.8 kWh 1.6 kWh 1.4 kWh 1.2 kWh 1.0 kWh 0.8 kWh 0.6 kWh 0.4 kWh 0.2 kWh 0.0 kWh

20.48 C 19.77 C 19.18 C

Outside Temperature

Operative Temp Couple Room North

Transmitted Solar Radiation Couple Room North

Operative Temperature Single Room East

Transmitted Solar Radiation Single Room East

Ventilation Air Rate Change

Operative Temperature Double Room South

Transmitted Solar Radiation Double Room South

Student Occupancy Period

Fig 6.3.2. Thermal Simulation for Room Units during Winter Week. AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

The graph (Fig. 6.3.2) illustrates the efficiency of the different rooms during a winter week where the outside temperature ranges between 1°C to 14°C. The average outside temperature is 9.05°C and the average temperature of A) B) C)

Single Room with kitchenette facing East – 19.77°C Double Room without kitchenette facing South – 19.18°C Couple Room with kitchenette facing north – 20.48°C

During the winter season, the solar gains are comparatively low. So in order to achieve a comfortable temperature the rooms need to be well insulated to prevent heat loss. In case of double room without kitchenette facing south, internal heat gains are less as compared to others but because of well insulated walls and south orientation, the room is in comfort band during the week. In case of single room with kitchenette facing east, internal heat gains are higher than the double room. Because of moderate internal gains and well insulated walls, the room is in comfort band during the week. In case of couple room with kitchenette facing north, internal heat gains are higher than all the rooms. Thus it achieves a temperature in comfort band which doesn’t overheat. From the graph we can observe that all the rooms neither overheats nor it drops lower than the comfort band at any point during the week. The rooms are most of the time in comfort band during the week without any additional heating or cooling supply thus making it free running.

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CHAPTER 6 6.4 Annual Thermal Analysis of Common Space

N

West Block

N

ANNUAL THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR COMMUNAL SPACES W

E

East Block

COMMON SPACE

From the previous project of UCL Prankerd House (Student Accommodation), occupant’s interview and the basic knowledge we found that the common space used to overheat. It was because of high occupancy density and very little natural ventilation.

S

For the simulation common space in the west block has been considered

E

W

South Block

W

N

This common space is selected because from the Solar Studies (Chap. 5) we found that the exterior surfaces of the common space was under thermal stress.

S

S

The room has double glazed window with a U- Value of 1.4 W/m2k (Fig. 6.4.1). The walls are 450mm thick with a U-Value of 0.197 W/m2k (Fig. 6.4.1). It has an infiltration rate of 0.1ach.

E

For this annual thermal simulation of the student units, schedules have been defined below:

A] COMMON SPACE

In the student occupation schedule, the common space usually gets crowded during the evening period after the college hours post 5pm. However, some students do occupy the space during the afternoon hours. During weekends, the common spaces are usually crowded from afternoon to night. (Appendix H Schedules of Thermal).

7.0 kWh

3.8 kWh 0.5 kWh/m2

For the appliances schedule (Fig. 6.4.2) (Appendix H Schedules of Thermal) students use laptops, speakers, chargers and video game consoles in the common space.

Daily heat gains

Schedules 0.1 ach infiltration

Appliances schedule defined by occupants interview and room review. 1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

Windows starting opening (36% of the area is openable) at temperature of 21°C and closing at 19°C. During Summer windows are kept open during the day between 8am to 9pm which allows natural ventilation and generates 10ach. During the night windows are kept slightly open allowing fresh air to enter and generates 0.8ach. During Winter windows are kept open during the evening hours 5pm to 9pm which allows natural ventilation and removes odour and generates 2ach and during the night windows are kept slightly open allowing fresh air to enter and generates 0.8ach. 64

Area of the room = 40.8 sq.m No. of occupants = 10 Total Glazing Areas = 16.5 sq.m Fig 6.4.1. Common Space Features and Key plan. AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6 6.4 Annual Thermal Analysis of Common Space

30 C 29 C 28 C 27 C 26 C 25 C 24 C 23 C 22 C 22.28 C 21 C 20 C 19 C 18 C 17 C 16 C 15 C 14 C 13 C 12 C 11 C 10 C 11.97 C 9C 8C 7C 6C 5C 4C 3C 2C 1C 0C -1 C

Sky Conditions Statistic for London Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Totl. 25

28

26

27

33

29

31

36

32 38

31

27

31

44

44

43

41

39

38

43

43

45 37

47

45

42

31

28

31

32

28

33

26

21

23 25

22

28

27

10 ach 8 ach 6 ach 4 ach 2 ach 0 ach

Outside Temperature Operative Temperature Common Space

Transmitted Solar Radiation Common Space

Ventilation Air Rate Change

Operative Temperature Study Room

Transmitted Solar Radiation Study Room

Student Easter Break

Fig 6.4.2. Annual Thermal Simulation of Common Space. AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2.0 kWh/m2 1.8 kWh/m2 1.6 kWh/m2 1.4 kWh/m2 1.2 kWh/m2 1.0 kWh/m2 0.8 kWh/m2 0.6 kWh/m2 0.4 kWh/m2 0.2 kWh/m2 0.0 kWh/m2

The graph (Fig. 6.4.2) illustrates the efficiency of the common room throughout the year. The average outside temperature is 11.97°C and the average temperature of the common room is 22.28°C. In case of common room, internal heat gains are high but has moderate solar gains. In case of summer when the outside temperature is higher than the comfort band, the common room tends to overheat a little. But with help of ventilation the temperature of the common room appears to be in comfort band most of the times. The temperature can be even more controlled if window shutters are applied. In case of winter, the internal temperature tends to be in comfort zone without any additional heating. No. of hours the outdoor temperature above comfort band annually = 79 Hours Out of those hours the temperature of the space above comfort band Common Room = 73 Hours During April when the students have gone for a vacation, the internal gains of the common room is almost zero. During that period, the internal temperature of the common room slightly drops down because of the drop in the external temperature. From the graph we can observe that the common room is most of the time in comfort band throughout the year without any additional heating or cooling supply thus making it free running.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6 6.5 Thermal Analysis of Room during Vacation - Winter

N

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF ROOM UNITS - WINTER INCASE OF SHORT VACATION. In this simulation, we have considered a case when students go away for a weekend and find out what would happen to the internal room temperature and how it would change when the students come back and start operating it. This simulation is a thermal analysis of all the rooms during a winter period [ 16th December - 22nd December]. The students would be away from 16th December to 18th December. This simulation has been applied for a winter week and not for a summer week because the room units free running during winter (Fig. 6.3.2) which depends on the internal gains and external gains in order to heat the rooms, so it would be interesting in analysing the condition when the students are away thus reducing internal gains and what effects it would have on the rooms.

B] DOUBLE ROOM SOUTH WITHOUT KITCHEN

EAST SINGLE

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

West Block W

2.5 kWh 2.0 kWh

N

0.388 kWh

E

Daily heat gains East Block

S

0.1 ach infiltration

South Block

W

N

NORTH COUPLE S

For the simulation three different rooms have been considered: A) Single Room with kitchenette facing East B) Double Room without kitchenette facing South C) Couple Room with kitchenette facing North

E

W

S

SOUTH DOUBLE

Area of the room = 15 sq.m No. of occupants = 2 Total Glazing Areas = 2.9 sq.m

E

These rooms are selected because from the Solar Studies (Chap. 5) we found that the exterior surfaces of these rooms were under thermal stress.

A] SINGLE ROOM EAST

These rooms have double glazed window with a U- Value of 1.4 W/m2k (Fig. 6.5.1). The walls are 450mm thick with a U-Value of 0.197 W/m2k (Fig. 6.5.1). All the rooms have an infiltration rate of 0.1ach.

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

C] COUPLE ROOM NORTH WITH KITCHEN 3.4 kWh 1.0 kWh

For this weekly thermal simulation of the student units, schedules have been defined below: In the student occupation schedule, the students are in the college/universities between 10am to 8pm during the weekdays and return back home (Appendix H Schedules of Thermal).

0.12 kWh

0.1 ach infiltration

Student spend most of daytime in university, schedule generated according to occupants interview.

4.5 kWh 2.0 kWh

Daily heat gains

Schedules

1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

0.09 kWh

Daily heat gains 0.1 ach infiltration

Appliances schedule defined by occupants interview and room review. Windows starting opening (36% of the area is openable) at temperature of 21°C and closing at 19°C. During Winter windows are kept open during the cooking hours 9am to 10am and 9pm to 11pm which allows natural ventilation and removes odour and generates 6ach and during the night windows are kept slightly open allowing fresh air to enter and generates 0.8ach.

Area of the room = 9 sq.m No. of occupants = 1 Total Glazing Areas = 2 sq.m Fig 6.5.1. Room Typologies and Key plan.

66

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Area of the room = 12 sq.m No. of occupants = 2 Total Glazing Areas = 2.9 sq.m


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6 6.5 Thermal Analysis of Room during Vacation - Winter

5.5 m/s

3.3 m/s

2.7 m/s

2.5 m/s

1.3 m/s

2.7 m/s

4.1 m/s

30 C 29 C 28 C 27 C 26 C 25 C 24 C 23 C 22 C 21 C 20 C 19 C 18 C 17 C 16 C 15 C 14 C 13 C 12 C 11 C 10 C 9C 8C 7C 6C 5C 4C 3C 2C 1C 0C -1 C

09.05 C

00:00

18:00

12:00

Th 22/12/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

We 21/12/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

Tu 20/12/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

Mo 19/12/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

12:00

Su 18/12/16

06:00

00:00

18:00

06:00

12:00

Sa 17/12/16

00:00

18:00

12:00

06:00

20 ach 18 ach 16 ach 14 ach 12 ach 10 ach 8 ach 6 ach 4 ach 2 ach 0 ach

Fr 16/12/16

00:00

2.0 kWh 1.8 kWh 1.6 kWh 1.4 kWh 1.2 kWh 1.0 kWh 0.8 kWh 0.6 kWh 0.4 kWh 0.2 kWh 0.0 kWh

19.51 C 19.36 C 19.30 C

Outside Temperature

Operative Temp Couple Room North

Transmitted Solar Radiation Couple Room North

Operative Temperature Single Room East

Transmitted Solar Radiation Single Room East

Ventilation Air Rate Change

Operative Temperature Double Room South

Transmitted Solar Radiation Double Room South

Student Occupancy Period

The graph (Fig. 6.5.2) illustrates the efficiency of the different rooms during a winter week when the students are away during the weekend. The outside temperature ranges between 1°C to 14°C. The average outside temperature is 9.05°C and the average temperature of A) B) C)

Single Room with kitchenette facing East – 19.30°C Double Room without kitchenette facing South – 19.36°C Couple Room with kitchenette facing north – 19.51°C

During the winter season, the solar gains are comparatively low. So in order to achieve a comfortable temperature the rooms need to be well insulated to prevent heat loss. When the students are away, the internal heat gains are very minimum. From the graph we can understand that in spite of low internal gains, the rooms are still in comfort band because of good insulation which prevents heat loss. When the students are away the temperature of the rooms drop to 18.5°C. But as soon as the students are back, the internal temperature rises to 21°C. From the graph we can observe that all the rooms neither overheats nor it drops lower than the comfort band at any point during the week when the students were away. The rooms are most of the time in comfort band during the week without any additional heating or cooling supply thus making it free running.

Fig 6.5.2. Thermal Simulation of Room Units when students are away.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6 6.6 Future Annual Thermal Analysis of Room and Common Space

N

FUTURE ANNUAL THERMAL ANALYSIS FOR ROOMS AND COMMUNAL SPACES A future thermal analysis of the rooms and the common space has been tested. In this future scenario, the outside temperature has risen high by 2°C. This scenario has been tested in order to find out overheating issues in the future when the temperature rises. The common space and the couple room with kitchenette facing North has been considered for the simulation because of high internal gains these rooms have the tendency to heat up. These rooms have double glazed window with a U- Value of 1.4 W/m2k (Fig. 6.6.1). The walls are 450mm thick with a U-Value of 0.197 W/m2k (Fig. 6.6.1). All the rooms have an infiltration rate of 0.1ach. For this annual thermal simulation of the student units, schedules have been defined below: In the student occupation schedule, the students are in the college/universities between 10am to 8pm during the weekdays and return back home. During weekends, the behaviour of the students are similar but instead of going to college they are usually visiting some places or studying in the common rooms (Appendix H Schedules of Thermal). In the student occupation schedule, the common space usually gets crowded during the evening period after the college hours post 5pm. However, some students do occupy the space during the afternoon hours. During weekends, the common spaces are usually crowded from afternoon to night. (Appendix H Schedules of Thermal).

B] COUPLE ROOM NORTH WITH KITCHEN 1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

West Block W

N

E

2.0 kWh 0.31 kWh/m2

East Block

COMMON SPACE

Daily heat gains

S

E

W

0.1 ach infiltration

South Block

W

N S

NORTH COUPLE S

Area of the room = 12 sq.m No. of occupants = 2 Total Glazing Areas = 2.9 sq.m

E Fig 6.6.1. Common Space Features, Room Typology and Key plan.

A] COMMON SPACE

Students go away for an Easter break during the month of April (Fig. 6.6.2) (Appendix H Schedules of Thermal). During Christmas Break, very few students go away which can provide a diverse schedule. Thus no vacation is provided in the occupation schedule.

Daily heat gains

Student spend most of daytime in university, schedule generated according to occupants interview.

0.1 ach infiltration

Appliances schedule defined by occupants interview and room review. 1.4 W/m2-K 0.197 W/m2-K

Windows starting opening (36% of the area is openable) at temperature of 21°C and closing at 19°C.

68

7.0 kWh

3.8 kWh 0.5 kWh/m2

Schedules

Room Unit :During Summer windows are kept open during the day between 8am to 9pm which allows natural ventilation and generates 7ach. During the night windows are kept slightly open allowing fresh air to enter and generates 0.8ach. During Winter windows are kept open during the cooking hours 9am to 10am and 9pm to 11pm which allows natural ventilation and removes odour and generates 6ach and during the night windows are kept slightly open allowing fresh air to enter and generates 0.8ach.

4.5 kWh

Common Space :During Summer windows are kept open during the day between 8am to 9pm which allows natural ventilation and generates 10ach. During the night windows are kept slightly open allowing fresh air to enter and generates 0.8ach. During Winter windows are kept open during the evening hours 5pm to 9pm which allows natural ventilation and removes odour and generates 2ach and during the night windows are kept slightly open allowing fresh air to enter and generates 0.8ach.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

Area of the room = 40.8 sq.m No. of occupants = 10 Total Glazing Areas = 16.5 sq.m


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 6 6.6 Future Annual Thermal Analysis of Room and Common Space

32 C 31 C 30 C 29 C Sky Conditions Statistic for London 28 C 27 C Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Totl. 26 C 25 C 24 C 23 C 23.08 C 25 28 26 27 33 29 31 36 32 38 31 27 31 22 C 21.47 C 21 C 20 C 19 C 44 44 43 41 39 38 43 43 45 37 47 45 42 18 C 17 C 16 C 15 C 31 28 31 32 28 33 26 21 23 25 22 28 27 14 C 13.80 C 13 C 12 C 11 C The graph (Fig. 6.6.2) illustrates the efficiency of the common space and the 10 C couple room facing north for the future scenario. The average outside 9C 8C temperature has risen from 11.97°C to 13.80°C and the average temperature 7C of 6C 5C A) Common Space – 23.08°C 4C B) Couple Room with kitchenette facing north – 21.47°C 3C 2C 1C In case of couple room with kitchenette facing north, internal heat gains are 0C -1 C higher than all the rooms but has very minimum solar gains. In case of summer 10 ach 8 ach 6 ach 4 ach 2 ach 0 ach

Outside Temperature

December

November

October

September

August

July

June

May

April

March

February

January

2.0 kWh/m2 1.8 kWh/m2 1.6 kWh/m2 1.4 kWh/m2 1.2 kWh/m2 1.0 kWh/m2 0.8 kWh/m2 0.6 kWh/m2 0.4 kWh/m2 0.2 kWh/m2 0.0 kWh/m2

Ventilation Air Rate Change Couple Room

Operative Temperature Common Space

Transmitted Solar Radiation Common Space

Ventilation Air Rate Change Common Space

Operative Temperature Couple Room North

Transmitted Solar Radiation Couple Room North

Student Easter Break

Fig 6.6.2. Future Annual Thermal Simulation of Common Space and Room Units AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

when the outside temperature is higher than the comfort band, the room tends to overheat a little. Looking at the future scenario, we can propose to add window shutters to control the internal temperature when the temperature rises in the future. During the winter period the internal temperature of the room tends to be in comfort zone without any additional heating.

In case of common room, the internal heat gains are high and receives moderate solar gains. When the outside temperature is higher than the comfort zone, the internal temperature of the common space tends to overheat. Looking at the future scenario, we can propose to add window shutters to control the internal temperature when the temperature rises in the future. During the winter period the internal temperature of the room tends to be in comfort zone without any additional heating. No. of hours the outdoor temperature above comfort band annually = 134 Hours Out of those hours the temperature of the space above comfort band Couple Room = 109 Hours Common Room = 129 Hours During April when the students have gone for a vacation, the internal gains of the room and common space are almost zero except for the rooms where refrigerator have to be kept running throughout. During that period, the internal temperature of the north couple room drops down due to its north orientation receiving minimum solar gains. But if window shutters are applied during that period then the temperature of all rooms could be less affected. From the graph we can observe that in future when the outside temperature rises, the room and the common space tends to overheat when the outside temperature rises above comfort zone. So it would be important that the application of window shutter can be proposed in order control the internal temperature. During winter, the operative temperature of these rooms are most of the time in comfort zone hence reducing the use of any additional heating supply. 69


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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 7

CHAPTER 7 ENERGY STRATEGY

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CHAPTER 7 7.1 Total Energy Consumption

Summer 24hr Schedule 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

per day 3.4 Kwh x

7

=

Equipments

1047.2 Kwh

x

48 units

Mechanical Ventilation

per day 4.5 Kwh x

7

=

1386 Kwh

x

6 units

per day 2.5 Kwh x

7

=

770 Kwh

x

12 units

per day 4.1 Kwh x

7

=

1262.8 Kwh

x

7units

Mechanical Ventilation Lighting SINGLE ROOM [kitchen]

Winter 24hr Schedule 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

23.8 Kwh per week

Refrigerator Cooking Appliances

44 weeks x (8 weeks for vacation during major breaks)

=

50,265.6 Kwh/a

Annual Appliances Consumption Annual Lighting Consumption Annual Heating Consumption

Lighting 100kwh/m2

COUPLE ROOM [kitchen]

80kwh/m2

31.5 Kwh per week

Refrigerator Cooking Appliances Equipments

44 weeks x (8 weeks for vacation during major breaks)

=

8,316 Kwh/a

60kwh/m2 40kwh/m2

Mechanical Ventilation Lighting

20kwh/m2

DOUBLE ROOM

0kwh/m2 UCL Prankerd House 82kwh/m2

Chapter Living 72kwh/m2

Victoria Paul St East 67kwh/m2

Refrigerator Cooking Appliances Equipments

Peckham Student Living 51kwh/m2

Fig 7.1.1. Total Annual Energy Comparison Chart

TOTAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION

Mechanical Ventilation Lighting COMMONROOM

Refrigerator

From the thermal analysis (Chap. 6) we can have concluded that the common rooms and the room are free running and they do not require any additional heating requirements. Thus heating would be required if needed in other spaces like reception, offices and gym. The difference between energy consumption of different cases is show in (Fig. 7.1.1.) As the UCL Prankerd House is an old building with weak air tightness. The heating consumption is the highest there. As for Chapter Living, the room have poor daylighting condition which results in the artificial daylighting all day long.

72

Mechanical Ventilation Lighting OTHER ROOMS

44 weeks x (8 weeks for vacation during major breaks)

=

28.7 Kwh per week

Refrigerator Cooking Appliances Equipments Heating (if needed)

9,240 Kwh/a

44 weeks x (8 weeks for vacation during major breaks)

Cooking Appliances Equipments

From the (Fig. 7.1.2) we can observe that the Entire student accommodation consumes 142.36 Mwh annually / 51.02kwh per.m2 annually. The consumption is for a period of 44 weeks because the student accommodation usually has a contract of 50 weeks out of which 6 weeks are considered to be the period when the students are not occupying during major holiday seasons.

17.5 Kwh per week

=

8,839.6 Kwh/a

common laundry lifts reception kitchen + + + + 216.54 Kwh 283.53 Kwh 10.22 Kwh 37.17 Kwh 86.52 Kwh x x x x x 1 3 3 3 3 gym

1468.8 Kwh x 44 weeks (per week)

+ 2100 Kwh = heating

65,707.2 Kwh/a

TOTAL =

142.36 Mwh/a

(total area = 2790 sq.m) TOTAL per sq.m = Fig 7.1.2. Total Energy Consumption Chart.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

51.02 kwh/a


CHAPTER 7 7.2. Renewable Strategy

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

17230 kWh

2100 kWh 18240 kWh

16680 kWh

13850 kWh

17920 kWh

3750 kWh

14810 kWh

3.300 kWh

18240 kWh

Annual electricity generation of the surface

Type 1

Type 2

1990 mm

1640 mm

Photovoltaic panels zones Panels of type 1 Panels of type 2

990 mm 990 mm Total - 70 panels

Total - 265 panels

STRATEGY

PV panels showed in Fig.7.2.1 are consumed as the most common size. The green color represent for type 1 PV panel which is 70 in total, while type 2 is in blue color with 265 in total. The efficiency of the PV panel is assumed as 20%. The surface covered by PV panels is illustrated in Fig 7.2.1. The angle of the slope roof is defined according to the solar study. Additional wall surface is also equipped with PV panel to enhance the generation. (http://brightstarsolar.net/2014/02/common-sizes-of-solar-panels/). The calculation shows the Total Annualy Electricity Generated would be 107.88 mWh while the total annual electricity consumption 142.36 mWh, which mean 75.8% of the energy consumption can be covered. Commonly, it would cost 190 pounds to 290 pounds per square meter. Therefore the total cost in the proposal would be around 135,000 pounds. (http://www.theecoexperts.co.uk/how-much-do-solar-panelscost-uk)

Fig. 7.2.1. PV strategy.

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CHAPTER 7 7.2. Renewable Strategy

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

-8,190 kWh

-10,400 kWh

-11,890 kWh

October

November

December

+70 kWh July

+6,630 kWh

+790 kWh June

September

+170 kWh May

+1,080 kWh

+11,530 kWh April

August

-3,510 kWh

Energy generation

March

-11,690 kWh

Energy consumption (pick hours) 27,240 kWh

-9,020 kWh

ENERGY BALANCE

107,880 kWh 20,000kWh Energy consumption (off-pick hours) 7,240 kWh

Fig. 7.2.2. Annual energy balance.

15,000 kWh

10,000 kWh

Energy Balance

0 kWh

January

Detailed monthly results are illustrated in Fig.7.2.3 in order to compare the cost of buying energy from the grid and installing another PV panel. It need to be noted that the vacation period is also taken into consideration as summarized from the interview with occupants (Appendix D Students Interview). In conclusion, total annual cost of annual grid electricity is 5,060 GBP.

5,000 kWh

Fabruary

Fig. 7.2.2 demonstrate the relationship between energy consumption and generation. Both peak time and off peak time is taken into account to get a more precise result. Off-Peak period in London area is 7 hours per day from 11PM to 07AM. Prices for a 100% renewable energy from the grid in London is 16.2 and 8.9 pences for pick and off-pick hours respectively.(Appendix I Electricity Policy).

Energy generation Energy consumption Fig. 7.2.3 Monthly energy balance.

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CHAPTER 7

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 8

CHAPTER 8 PUBLIC PROGRAM

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 8 8.1 Proposal of Public Program

Linkage to main road

Cafe Muntifunction space entrance

N

Fig. 8.1.1 Proposal of Steps and Café

PROPOSAL OF PUBLIC PROGRAM

Fig.8.1.1 shows the detail of the ground part of public program. The steps face the main road to attract people from outside to use the space. The whole grass slop performs as the continuation of the green walk and introduces the Peckham Library into our site. It activate the backside of the Peckham Library which solve the safety problem mentioned by the cleaner on site visit. The Café, as the extension of the library, offers people in the library a place to take a break for coffee. The plan of the café shows that the café is mainly separated as indoor and semi-outdoor parts. The underground part goes reasonable depth (Appendix B Site Study: Comments & Condition) to achieve goal of response to the Peckham library. Different scenarios are showed in Fig.8.1.2 to suggest how the multifunction space may be used. The inner circle is sliding foldable door. When it is fully opened. The whole space can be used as gallery or theater or lecture hall according to the need. According to the new concept of theater performance which appeal to involving audiance. When it is closed, it creates 2 different kind of space, the inner space is daylit by the light well while the outer circle is artificially lit for exhibition. The movable seats (Fig.8.1.2) are offered to cater the need of more flexible usage.

78

Muntifunction space

Gallery

Theater

Theater & Gallery

Movable Seats

Daylit area

Fig. 8.1.2 Proposal of Multifunction Space

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

Artificial-lit area

Auxiliary area

N


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 8 8.2 Daylight Factor of Public Program

>1%

2%

5%

10%

15%

>20%

DF

Caffe Multifunction space

N

Windows Area

sqm

95.5

526

39.8

61.1

Window to Floor Ratio

41.7%

11.6%

Offset From the Floor

0.75

0.75

Daylight Factor Average

3.3%

4.1%

Daylight Factor >2%

81.5%

91.2%

Window Area

sqm

Fig. 8.2.1 Simulation of Daylight Factor for public program

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DAYLIGHT FACTOR OF PUBLIC PROGRAM

As can be seen from the simulation of daylight factor (Fig.8.2.1) for public program, the result is quite good. The average daylight factor in cafe is 3.3% and the daylight factor of 81.5% area is more than 2%. In the underground multifunction space, average daylight factor of the daylit part is 4.1% and the area with more than 2% daylight factor accounts for 91.2%. It is noticable that the light is spread softly.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 9

CHAPTER 9 OUTDOOR STUDY

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 9 9. 1 Site Plan

Wood Pavement

SITE PLAN

Concrete Pavement

The proposed site plan incorporated with student accomodation blocks and the multipurpose theatre with cafe as public program is developed as described in the degin brief and proposal. A pedestrian access route to the bicyle and jogging track is linked from the accomodation plaza by a timber finish walkway (Fig. 9.1.2) to merge with the existing context materials of grass and trees. The pedestrian access link starts/ends beside the exiting bus on the main street in the east. The cafe in front of the library is linked with existing hardscape found around the library at the peckham platform. The cafe and multifunction theatre space also has a direct access from the main street in the east. Amphitheatre like decking steps are developed on the green mound over the multipurpose theatre to attract people to enter the site from the main street. The green landscape is extended into the site thus merging the clear outline of the site with the surrey canal walk landscape integrating it into one common landscape as seen in 3D visualisations. Other materials used for outdoor walkways and courtyard are show in the figure 9.1.2

82

Stone Pavement

N 0m

5m 10m

15m 20m

Fig. 9.1.2. Pavement Material

Fig. 9.1.1. Proposed site plan with outdoor spaces

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CHAPTER 9

PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

Fig. 9.2.1. View from the top floor of the Peckham Library.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 9 9. 3 Wind Study

m/s 8 7

WIND STUDY

It was observed (Fig. 9.3.1.) that the wind flow around the buildings was diverted towards the surrounding landscapes as the proposed public programme merges with existing landscape to form a continuity. The accelerated winds from neighbourhood housing community in the south west and west are slowed down as it hits the south block of student accomodation. Thereby, protecting the courtyard from extreme wind conditions but not stopping the flow completely through the courtyard. During summer this flow of light breeze through the courtyard could be seen as a welcome change for outdoor activities when the surfaces are heated and the mean radiant temperatures can cause discomfort. Therefore the design and placement of the student accomodation blocks works in favour of the windflow. This allows good opportunity to use outdoor spaces such as the green mound above multipurpose theatre and the courtyard without causing any wind turbulance.

6 5 4 3 2 1 0

N

VELOCITY Fig. 9.3.1. Wind flow analysis in site with insertion of proposed buildings

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 9 9. 4 Shadow Study

12

DECEMBER

06

JUNE

N

SHADOW STUDY

As seen in Fig. 9.4.1 the shadows casted by the accommodation blocks and the library are very long and overshadow the outdoor spaces during December. But as not many people prefer to use the outdoor spaces during December in London, the occupants have a choice to use the Peckham square platform during sunshine hours or the surrey canal landscape also. While during the summer (Fig. 9.4.2) there are plenty of surfaces exposed to the sunlight and thus the occupants and even the outside pedestrians are encouraged to the use the courtyard and the green mound above the theatre where if they feel discomfort due to extreme solar radiation, they have the option to use the shadowed areas around the proposed building blocks and near library also. It can also be seen in the perceptive view that the placement of accommodation blocks the site have not overshadowed the neighboring houses thus the design considerations height of the blocks are working in favor of the built environment. Fig. 9.4.1. Shadow range projection on site during December.

Fig. 9.4.2. Shadow range projection on site during June.

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EAGLE WHARF PECKHAM Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 9 9.4 UTCI

Typical cold week Jan 20 - Jan 26

Typical hot week June 29 - July 05

Mild season week May 14 - May20

-

Comfortale Area 1.8%

Comfortale Area 20.3%

Comfortale Area 72.5%

Comfortale Area 67.3%

Comfortale Area 74.6%

I UTCI

It is assumed that the outdoor space is mostly use during the mild period of the year. Thus a week of May was chosen to be simulated to see the UTCI as well as the typical hot and cold week. As it can be told from the Fig.9.4.1, after the proposal, the comfort area in typical hot week is dramatically increased. In the typical cold week and the mild week in May, there are not much big changes but the percentage of comfort area still increases a little bit. 86

Comfortale Area 8.3% Fig. 9.4.1 UTCI before and after

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Condition

3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CHAPTER 10

CHAPTER 10 CONCLUSION

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

CONCLUSION

This report presents a student accommodation design beside the Peckham Library with a specific research question about the overheating issue. It is concluded from the site analysis that a student accommodation could be an appropriate proposal for the site. Through the study of the comments from the neighbor and the user of Peckham Library, a public program which can activate the negative part to the back of library, simultaneously, make up the existing problem of the library and neighbor, is indispensable. In the aspect of the scale and material, the proposal totally respects the surrounding buildings to embed itself within its current and historic context. Student accommodation Student accommodation is mainly divided into two parts: living units and communal space, including the indoors and outdoors. Different room types were offered to cater the need of different students. Based on deeply studied case study in London and interview with students from different student accommodations combined with the conclusion from term 1 project, overheating issue is defined as the major problem in student accommodation. Due to the lack of specific guide for student accommodation, the average energy consumption and the schedule of students from case study were used for simulation steps. The difference of the internal heat gain between different room types, together with Mint calculation decided the main orientation of different rooms. The conventional room plan of student accommodation was improved to provide better living condition for students. As for indoor communal space, according to the different needs of daylighting, they were placed in different level and orientation. The psychological factor of students was also taken into consideration, as most students mentioned in the interview that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s difficult to make friends in the huge block, which worsens the homesick. Hence, a group of blocks with small scale are proposed to enhance the sense of home and scale down the huge group of people in one block to make it easier to make friends. Additionally, it responded to the context.

From the thermal analysis, we can conclude that the most important spaces like the studios and the common spaces are free running throughout the year. Additional heating is required for the spaces like gym, reception and offices. For the future scenario we found that the common room and the north couple studio with high internal heat gains over heat during the summer period when the outdoor temperature rises above the comfort zone. For this situation in future it is highly recommended to use window shutters to prevent additional solar gains to enter. During the winter period in the future, these spaces are in the comfort band without the use of any additional heating devices. The courtyard was designed to be the main outdoor space for occupants to make friends. It enclosed to be protected from the undesirable wind and form a respectively private space. The courtyard was divided by the pedestrian connection to define the different function zones. Renewable energy like solar PV is equipped which was an important element to determine the roof angle. It is calculated that 75.8% of the energy consumption can be covered by the energy generated through PV panel. Public program Public program is consist of the cafĂŠ and underground multifunction space which combined with the grass slope to maximize the landscape and enhance the setting of the Stirling Prize winning Peckham Library. In addition, it works as the extension of the library where some function and space is missed. The daylighting of underground space is offered by light well. Sliding foldable door is set to divide the space with different daylight needs and cater the needs of flexibility. Outdoor study including shadow, wind and UTCI were done to confirm the comfort level, especially during the mild season which assumed to be the main period when people would like to have outdoor activities.

In order to avoid overheating, daylight factor was simulated to define the minimum window to floor ratio while keeping the criteria that the Daylight Factor of more than 80% of the daylit area can exceed 2%.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

REFERENCE

Book Reinhart, C. (2014). Daylighting Handbook I. United States : Christoph Reinhart

Website https://platform.carbonculture.net/places/prankerd-house/1178/(Energy consumption of UCL Prankerd House)

Yannas, S. (1994). Solar Energy and Housing Design. Volume 1: Principles, Objectives, Guidelines. London: AA Publications.

http://www.southwark.gov.uk/ (Documents of site)

Chartered Institute of Building Service Engineers (CIBSE). (2007 January). Environmental Design- CIBSE guide A. Norwich, Norfolk, Great Britain: Page Bros. (Norwich) Ltd. Journal Tom, R., 2013. Stirling Prize revisited - is Peckham Library still a winner?. The Architectsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Journal [online]. [viewed 02 February 2016]. Available from: https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/buildings/stirling-prize-revisited-is-peckha m-library-still-a-winner/8653504.article Ella, B., 2016. Anger as Carl Turner prepares to demolish Peckham Arch. The Architectsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Journal [online]. [viewed 02 February 2016]. Available from: https://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/anger-as-carl-turner-prepares-to-demolis h-peckham-arch/10009140.article

https://www.gov.uk/feed-in-tariffs/overview(Documents of electricity policy) https://digimap.edina.ac.uk/ (Site analysis) http://brightstarsolar.net/2014/02/common-sizes-of-solar-panels/ (PV Panel Calculation) http://www.theecoexperts.co.uk/how-much-do-solar-panels-cost-uk (Cost of PV Panel) Lecture Harries, A. Lecture Renewable Energy Technologies, 21 Feburary 2016. AA SED, London.

Documents Carl Turner Architects, Design, Access and Heritage Statement of Mountview Academy of Theatre Arts, 2016. Carl Turner Architects, Peckham High Street Design & Access Statement, 2016. Carl Turner Architects, Noise Impact Assessment, 2016 Carl Turner Architects, Existing Elevation, 2016 AB Heritage, 71-79 & 89-93 Peckham High Street, Southwark, London, Heritage Statement, 2016 AB Heritage, 71-79 & 89-93 Peckham High Street, Southwark, London, Historic Environment Desk Based Assessment, 2016 Friends Of Burgess Park, Neighbour Consultation Replies, 2016 Arndale Court Headingley Leeds, Underground Condition, 2015 Archaeology South East, Archaeology Of Site, 2016 Motion, Public Transport Near Site, 2016 AB Heritage, Conservation Area, 2016

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

PERSONAL STATEMENT

Artem Oslamovskyi

Tingting Gao

Deep Gala

Naitik Patel

The Peckham Student Living has been a very interesting project that provide me an exciting experience both for the interesting context of the site, complexity of the proposal and the studying process itself. Our team worked as a single organism during the term and the process was pleasing for me. As it was a team studies we equally spread the project objectives among members. This process took naturally and I am happy with my task within the project.

For the primary study of the site, I mainly worked on the history of our site, comments from the neighbor and comments about Peckham Library which is an essential element we need to take into consideration. Through all the study, I was clear about the importance of our site for the neighbor as well as the existing problem. As we are required to take climate change into account, I got the weather data for Peckham history and future to conclude the potential issue. I also did the UTCI calculation for spot measurement and summarized our second site visit.

I would like to start by thanking all the tutors and lecturers for providing useful knowledge which helped us to develop a strong sense stratagem towards sustainability and towards this project. After reviewing the term 1 project UCL Prankerd House which provided us a great input for the current design project. Going in detail with the study helped us to understand various issues, policies which were involved while designing.

The term 2 learning outcome was concluded with integration of environmental design strategies learnt during the term 1 into architectural design proposal. By delving into more in-depth knowledge obtained during this term through various lectures and tutorials we were able to arrive at a design outcome. It was a very interesting experience for me as it involved intense team work and discussions. I would like to thank my team mates for being very helpful to me throughout the term.

In the beginning of the term, I worked on the site context analysis, preparing the 3D model, graphical schemes and giving the overview of the neighborhoods dignities and points of concern. For those proposes I used digimaps.ac.uk, google.maps and openstreetmap.org as a source of information and McNeel Rhino, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop as presentational tools. After that, I optimized 3D model for the wind, solar and daylighting studies that performed further. During the mid-term I worked on the design brief, creating the presentational schemes and infographic. As a part of the team, I participated in discussion related to the project and solving the problems during the process. In digital simulations, I performed the solar study of the whole building, and daylight study of the living units, including the determination of the strategy and explanation of the results. For both simulations, I created optimized scripts that simplified the working process, also I performed the series of simulations using Galapagos component in Grasshopper plugin, which allowed us to define the optimal variables for the roof geometry. At the end of the term I worked on visualizations, performing the renders in V-ray for Rhino and postproduction in Photoshop. In the energy strategy part, I calculated the PVs energy generation values, studied the pricing policies of the electrical grid companies and performed the energy balance diagrams.

2 90

With all the information, we decided to do student accommodation which was the same building type we did case study for term 1. Without specific guide for student accommodation, I summarize the main character of famous modern student accommodation precedent in London, as well as the comments from the occupants to get a comprehensive view about student accommodation. Going in detail, I did interviews with many classmates who live in student accommodation to get the schedule and energy consumption. The calculation offered the number that would be used for simulation. Such a deep study of occupants dramatically enhanced my understanding of student accommodation and clearly defined overheating as the main issue of student accommodation which became our main research question in this project. In design process, I helped design the plan of different rooms and the organization of the whole proposal. I went in detail with the design of the public program to offer possibility for different functions. In terms of the technical work, I focused on the daylight factor simulation for communal space in accommodation part and the public program. Thanks to the practices, I am able to manipulate the simulation now. The project is a good preparation for the final dissertation. It helps me to practice how to use all the software to help with the design, which was the main confusion at the beginning. Our team worked well with each other with great team spirit. We learnt a lot from each other including how to deal with all the information, design strategy and updated concept of different things. We worked together to conquer the challenge step by step to successfully complete the project. What’s more, I learnt not only about professional knowledge, but also the different cultures and life experience. Especially through the interview with classmates, I realized how huge difference in lifestyle it can be in students come from different culture background.

I found the approach of the project brief quite interesting. It was also helpful that all the groups in the class had a same site and had to design something different depending on the various contexts. It not only created competition amongst all the groups but also provided different strategies which derived by every group based on similar site context. Having UCL Prankerd House measured as our previous term project, it did provide us with a lot of data and inferences based on issues found earlier. It provided us with a base case for number of calculations and strategies. The design approach was very interesting. The basic massing of the proposal was kept simple and was based on the performance of the living units. It was like an ‘Inside Out’ Strategy. And this strategy was the key factor to this project. All the design strategies were represented very clearly and graphically through various illustrations. For the last term project, I had no opportunity to work on thermal analysis. Thus, for this project I had a chance to simulate the thermal analysis. I wasn’t able to grasp it in the beginning but with the help of the tutors and my teammates, I was able to perform the simulations without much difficulties. I was also able to map out the urban conditions of our site representing various site parameters. Creating the Environmental Matrix was definitely helpful in order to focus on key issues. The orientation of the room based on the internal gains was used to define room typologies and a base for simulation. This term we had a chance to work with new member. It was really a beneficial as we produced more amount of work than last term. I would like to see this project guide me during the design dissertation phase. This project and this semester has improved my confidence regarding the academic work and my personal understanding regarding sustainability.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

The technical studies I focused on during this was refining architectural design through trial and error of simulation based testing of daylight and solar studies. I was integrally involved with Artem Oslamvosky when he performed daylight and solar study simulations to directly adopt the design decisions formed by the studies. Planning and designing the accommodation blocks and units took up my major second half of the term, trying to learn thermal studies with deep gala along the way. I was particularly interested in designing the building architecturally keeping in mind the smallest changes in room area or window to floor ratio could radically alter the outcome of thermal and daylighting comfort. Furthermore I was involved in detail modelling of the building blocks which was used for simulations and presentations. This process allowed me to be involved with all the team members during all the design stages. For further technical studies I would like to study in detail about thermal comfort as in term 1 i was responsible to daylighting studies.


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX A

-

m/s 8 7 6

WIND STUDY

5 4

In the existing site conditions it can be observerd from the figure that the accelerated winds from the west through the neighbourhood spreads out to the open area around the library and the deatched house creating a lot of turbulence and possibility of dicomfort situations due to the drop in temperature resulting from the turbulent winds. Therefore while proposing buildings on site one must consider the wind factor and to protect the pedestrians and building occupants from sudden gusts of winds. Also orienting the buildings on north-south axis could create pressure differences on windows facing west and east thus providing opportunities for natural ventilation through cross ventilating in the buildings.

3 2 1 0

N

VELOCITY

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX A

12

DECEMBER

06

JUNE

N

SHADOW STUDY

The shadow range casted on exiting site shows that during winter the north and north east corner of the site is not overshadowed thus providing possiblities for placing outdoor activities or a building block the that corner. Also during the summer it is seen that the north-east corner becomes a shadowed surface providing opportunities for using outdoor activities such as sports and games that causes internal body heat gains thus using the corner as a place of relief from extreme solar radiation also. The site conditions are quite challenging and favourable at the same time to consider design options exploring different orientations.

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX A Wind Simulations

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX A

THERMAL STUDY

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX A

UTCI COMPUTATION

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX A

ROOF SLOPES STUDY DEFINITION

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX A

DAYLIGHT FACTOR GRASSHOPPER DEFINITION

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX B

Underground Condition

DO NOT SCALE: CONTRACTOR TO CHECK ALL DIMENSIONS AND REPORT ANY OMISSIONS OR ERRORS

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Client:

LONDON BOROUGH OF SOUTHWARK

Project: A092988

EAGLE WHARF

Drawing Title:

CONCEPTUAL SITE MODEL

A3

N.T.S Project No.

Drawn

Date

CM

27.08.15

Office

Type

A092988 LND N

TEL: +44 (0)113 278 7111 FAX: +44 (0)113 275 0623 e-mail: enviro@wyg.com

BY CHK APP

DESCRIPTION Scale @

Checked

Date

Drawing No.

04

Approved

DATE Date

Revision

C WYG Group Ltd.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX B

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX B

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX B

NEIGHBOUR CONSULTATION REPLIES

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX C

UNIT EXAMPLES Chapter student accomodation

1

2

3

1

2 3

Bronze Twin Studio 16 sq.m

4

5

4

6 5 6

Gold Studio 24sq.m

7

8

9 8

7 9

Platinum Studio 25-29 sq.m

Source: https://www.chapter-living.com/properties/kings-cross/

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX C

UNIT EXAMPLES Riverlight residential Address London Vauxhall SW8 5DA Architects Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Total apartments 806 Room Type 1 Bedroom suite 1 Bedroom 2 Bedroom 3 Bedroom Penthouse Amenities

Concierge

Fitness suite

Swimming pool

Spa

Café

Residents Lounge

Gallery

Restaurant

Bar

Retail unit

Office space

Crèche

Cinema

Digital entertainment

Health care

Supermarket

Energy System Centralised energy system - Combination of a gas fired Combined Heat and Power Engines (CHP), Gas Fired Boilers and Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHP)

Comments 1. Good river view 2. Energy efficient with low bill 3. All lights would automatically on with the least level you need 4. It’s convinient to have all the amenities just in the basement AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX C

1 Bedroom suite 40.80sqm Material Wall & Ceiling - Gypsum Flooring - Wood Parquet 1

Balcony - Engineered Wood Window - Double Glazed (Full height) 2

Bathroom Finishing - Tile 3

1

2

3

Source: http://www.riverlightnineelms.com/

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX D

STUDENT INTERVIEW

Occupant 01 (UCL Prankerd House Room East)

Occupant 02(UCL Prankerd House Room West)

Occupant's Nationality: Chinese

Occupant's Nationality: Chinese

Program: UCL MSc Civil Engineering

Program: UCL MSc Graphic and Media Design

Date & Location: 19/10/2016 7:00 pm, UCL Prankerd House, Kitchen

Date & Location: 23/10/2016 15:00 pm, through Wechat

Question

Answer

Question

Answer

For how long have been living here?

Just this year, I was living in Nottingham

For how long have been living here?

I just moved in this September. I think most of us are new students here.

Does your room get sunlight?

Yes, in the morning the sun shines straight into my window, this is for

Does your room get sunlight?

Yes, there is sunlight around the noon.

about one hour from 8:00 to 9:00 am.

Is the daylight good enough without the help of artificial light?

No, I always have to turn on the light, especially when it’s cloudy or rainy

How would you rate the daylighting in your room?

It’s ok, but I always need to keep the lights in the bathroom and the

which is always

entrance. There is always dark there.

Do you like the organization of your room?

Yes, I think nothing need to be changed.

Do you feel a little bit cold while staying in this dorm?

No, even without heat, the room is quite warm

How would you rate the air quality?

Ventilation and air quality in the room is good. But I think the bathroom

Is your room humid?

Humid? No, it's quite dry and I use humidifier.

Is there anything that annoys you about your room?

The extractor fan in the bathroom keeps on for at least 20 mints which is

Is there any humidity problems

No, there is dry, and I use humidifier every day for about 8 hours

really noisy. Also, it can’t remove the smell efficiently.

Are you satisfied with your heating system?

I’m satisfied with the heating system. I start to use it from 03/10

Do you like organization of room?

Yes, I can show you my room if you want

Is there anything that annoys you about your room?

The blanket. It’s difficult to clean it and you can’t remove it.

How would you rate the air quality?

It is ok, we have two windows rooms.

How long are you home during weekdays?

I go to school at 10 and usually go back at 18

The toilet has an AC but it takes a while for the smell to be removed

What about weekends? Do you usually stay in your room?

I usually hang out with my girlfriend in the afternoon. And I would go back

have some problems.

While sitting in room, can you hear the other people in other rooms?

No, I can't hear any noise from my neighbors

Is there any cracks in the walls, problems with the flooring?

The carpet was already dirty when I moved in, I tried to clean it but it's

What do you usually wear inside your room?

A shirt with a jacket I think, I find London really cold

really difficult.

Do you usually have guests?

No, not really

5-6 hours except sleeping hours. In the morning I stay home, then go to

Is the electrical lighting you get in your room enough?

Yes, I almost keep it on whenever I’m in the room.

class in afternoon.

How do you charge your mobile in your room?

I leave it to charge for the whole night

What about weekends?

Usually I go out one day and the other I stay in room

How often do you cook?

I cook almost twice a day, I like to cook for myself. I share the housework

Are you allowed to have guests to stay with you?

Yes, a guest can stay for three nights but you have to tell the staff about

How long are you home during weekdays?

late maybe 9 at night

with my girlfriend

it

Do you prefer to have your own kitchenette?

Yes, but it needs to be guaranteed that the smell can be removed

Is there any communal zones? Games room?

No, we just have the laundry room and each floor has its own kitchen

How often do you cook?

I cook everyday but we just boil the vegetables because we work out and

What devices do you use in the kitchen?

All the device I think, I love to cook

we cannot eat any food that is full of fats and oil

Are the systems here controlled manually or by sensor?

I don’t know, I think it’s manual.

I use the oven, the special Chinese cooking device and the microwave

What about the lighting of the staircase?

I have no idea, but it’s always on even during the daytime.

for heating the juice and also the kettle

How do you pay for this accommodation? is everything included

It's all included, all the utility bills. We pay in three installments covering

Of course! But we don’t pay a lot, it’s acceptable to use communal

in your payments?

228 GBP a week.

There is a courtyard behind your housing, do you go there?

No, I barely go there.

What devices do you use in the kitchen?

Do you prefer to have your own kitchenette?

kitchen. How do you charge your mobile in your room?

I charged and when it's full, I unplug the charger

Are the systems here controlled manually or by sensors?

Manually, but the corridors (pathways) and lit with sensors when we walk

What about the lighting of the staircase?

I don't know but there is always light there

Is the electrical lighting enough?

Yes, enough

Do you know how much is the bill?

No, it’s all included in the installments.

There is a courtyard behind your housing, do you use this place?

No, I only pass through it when I need to but I don't stay there because

efficiently.

it's so cold

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PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX D

STUDENT INTERVIEW

Occupant 03 (VICTORIA PAUL ST EAST)

Occupant 04 (CHAPTER student accommodation)

Occupant's Nationality: Indian

Occupant's Nationality: Indian

Program: AA SED

Program: AA SED

Date & Location: 03/02/2016 2:00 pm, AA SED Studio

Date & Location: 03/02/2016 4:00 pm, AA SED Studio

Question

Answer

Question

Answer

For how long have been living there?

Since September.

For how long have been living there?

Since September.

How would you rate the daylighting in your room?

It’s not good, I always need to keep light on, even in the morning.

How would you rate the daylighting in your room?

It’s quiet good, the only problem is the entrance part with kitchenette and

Is your room humid?

No, it's fine

Is there anything that annoys you about your room?

The daylighting needs to be improved. It’s always dark inside.

Is your room humid?

No, it's fine

Do you like organization of room?

Yes

Is there anything that annoys you about your room?

Just sometimes the room is overheated when I have 3 or 4 friends in the

Are you satisfied with the air quality?

Yes, the air quality is good.

How would you rate the ventilation in your room?

It is good, but sometimes when I’m cooking I need to open the window,

bathroom of the room

room, cooking and playing. Is there anything that annoys you about your accommodation?

There are only 2 elevators, which is not enough for so many people.

otherwise the smell can’t be removed efficiently by the exhaust.

Also, there are some problem of the corridor. It’s always stuffy and dark.

Is there any problems with the interior material?

No, I love the wooden effect sheet of the flooring.

Other occupants always put their rubbish there.

How long are you home during weekdays?

I leave at 11 in the morning and go back at 8 in the evening.

Do you like organization of room?

Not really, I want to change the position of my bed.

What about weekends?

It’s almost the same with weekday.

Are you satisfied with the air quality?

Yes, the air quality is good.

Are you allowed to have guests?

Yes, sometimes I invite my friends to have fun.

How would you rate the ventilation in your room?

It is good, but sometimes when I’m cooking I need to open the window,

Is there any communal zones?

Yes, they offer all kinds of communal space, including games room, gym

otherwise the smell can’t be removed efficiently by the exhaust.

room and so on, but I barely use them and it’s not daylit.

Is there any problems with the interior material?

No, I like the color of ceiling in my room (olive green).

There is a courtyard in your accommodation, do you use it frequently?

Yes, it’s a nice place for party. We have many activities there.

How long are you home during weekdays?

I leave at 10 in the morning and go back at 8 in the evening.

How often do you cook?

I cook dinner almost every day. I usually cook curry, so it will take about

What about weekends?

I’ll get up later and stay in the room in the morning. Sometimes I hang out in the afternoon.

half an hour for it. What devices do you use in the kitchen?

I usually use the oven, kettle and hob.

Are you allowed to have guests ?

Yes, my friends usually come 2-3 times a week.

What do you think of your kitchenette?

It’s important. I’m vegetarian, so it would be difficult for me to share

Is there any communal zones?

Yes, we have everything. I usually go to the gym and cinema room.

kitchen with others.

Is the communal space daylit?

No, most of them are at the corner, so it needs artificial lit.

How do you charge your mobile in your room?

I charge it when I’m sleep

How often do you cook?

I love cooking, I spend an hour cooking every day averagely.

Are the systems here controlled manually or by sensors?

I think it’s controlled by sensors.

What devices do you use in the kitchen?

I usually need to use all the appliance for cooking.

Is the electrical lighting enough?

Yes, enough

What do you think of your kitchenette?

It’s good, but it’s not daylit and the mechanical ventilation system is not

How often do you use heater?

I almost use it every day in winter.

Do you know how much is the bill?

No, it’s all included

How do you charge your mobile in your room?

I charge it when I’m sleep

Do you know other occupants in your accomodation?

Yes, but most of them are my friends from India. I knew them before I

Are the systems here controlled manually or by sensors?

I think it’s controlled by sensors.

came here.

Is the electrical lighting enough?

Yes, enough

How often do you use heater?

I barely use it. Even when I use it, it’s only for 20 mints.

Do you know how much is the bill?

No, it’s all included

Do you know other occupants in your accomodation?

Not really, I usually play with my friend. It’s difficult to make friends here.

efficient enough to remove the smell quikly.

It’s such a big block with so many students.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX D

STUDENT INTERVIEW

Occupant 05 (WOODLANE STUDIO) Occupant's Nationality: Egypt Program: AA SED Date & Location: 05/02/2016 1:00 pm, AA SED Studio Question

Answer

For how long have been living there?

Since September.

How would you rate the daylighting in your room?

It’s good. I have full height glazing.

Is your room humid?

No, it's fine

Is there anything that annoys you about your room?

I think there are some mechanical ventilation system which is on all day long. It makes some noise.

Is there anything that annoys you about your accommodation?

No, not really

Do you like organization of room?

Yes

Are you satisfied with the air quality?

Yes, the air quality is good.

How would you rate the ventilation in your room?

It’s fine with the 24h mechanical ventilation system, but I prefer to naturally ventilate every space.

Is there any problems with the interior material?

No, I love the interior design of my room.

How long are you home during weekdays?

I leave at 10 in the morning and go back at 7 in the evening.

What about weekends?

I’ll get up early in the morning and go out for a couple of hours. After I come back, I’ll cook and leave room to study in the communal space.

Are you allowed to have guests to stay with you?

Yes, but I barely invite my friends. We usually hang out.

Is there any communal zones?

Yes, I’m satisfied with these communal spaces. I use the study room during the weekend to work.

Is the communal space daylit?

The daylight in study room is ok, but I don’t know about other communal space.

How often do you cook?

I cook once a day for dinner, I eat oaks for breakfast.

What devices do you use in the kitchen?

I use microwave and kettle for breakfast and plus hobs for dinner

What do you think of your kitchenette?

It’s good, I love it.

How do you charge your mobile in your room?

I charge it when I ran out of the battery, not necessarily in the evening

Are the systems here controlled manually or by sensors?

I think it’s controlled by sensors.

Is the electrical lighting enough?

Yes, enough

How often do you use heater?

I barely use it. It’s quite warm for me in the room.

Do you know how much is the bill?

No, it’s all included

Do you know other occupants in your accomodation?

I know 2 other students here. I spend a lot of time in school, so actually I don’t make many friends here.

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX D

ROOM room area(sqm) room height(m)

window area (sqm)

WINDOW window height (m) operable area

window to floor ratio(%)

UCL PRANKERD HOUSE (single)

15.2

2.7

4

1.6

1.76

30.53435115

UCL PRANKERD HOUSE (couple)

15.2

2.7

4

1.6

1.76

30.53435115

VICTORIA PAUL ST EAST

18

2.8

3

2

4

18.86792453

CHAPTER

18

2.6

2.6

2.6

0.3

16.35220126

WOODLANE STUDIO

20

2.6

4.4

2.2

3.3

24.58100559

AVERAGE

17.28

2.68

3.6

2

2.224

24.17396673

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

APPLIANCE appliance Humidifier Desk lamp Laptop Mobile phone Hairdrier Ipad Lights*2 Heater Kettle Humidifier Desk lamp Laptop*2 Mobile phone*2 Lights*2 Heater e-toothbrush Exhaust Fan Microwave Kettle Toaster Hob*2 Mini refrigirator Desk lamp Laptop Mobile phone Lights*2 Heater Exhaust Fan Microwave Kettle Mini refrigirator Hob*2 Mobile phone Laptop*2 Monitor Lights*3 Heater Extractor Microwave Kettle Oven Mini refrigirator Hob*2 Mobile phone Laptop Hairdrier Lights*4 spotlight Heater Exhaust Fan Microwave Kettle Mini refrigirator Hob*2 Desk lamp Laptop Mobile phone Lights*2.6 Heater

wall

floor

ceiling

gypsun (white)

Carpet(blue)

Perforated Plasterboard

gypsun (white)

Carpet(blue)

gypsun (white)

MATERIAL window frame

window

wardrobe

aluminum

double glazing

Wood(yellow)

Perforated Plasterboard

aluminum

double glazing

Wood(yellow)

wooden sheet

gypsum (white)

aluminum

double glazing

wood(white)

gypsun (white)

Wood Parquet

gypsum (Olive Green)

aluminum

double glazing

Sunmica laminate (white)

gypsun (white)

Amtico Vinyl (wood effect)

gypsum (white)

aluminum

double glazing

wood(white)

gypsun (white)

wood

gypsum (white)

aluminum

double glazing

wood(white)


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX E

APPLIANCES CONSUMPTION

UCL PRANKERD HOUSE Kitchen Appliances Calculations Area of kitchen = 22.8 m2 ID 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Appliance Fan Microwave Rice cooker1 Rice cooker2 Kettle Toasters Blender Stewpot Oven Freezer1 Freezer2 Hob(electric), small Hob(electric), big Lighting Fixtures (LED) Heater (1500*600 mm)

Quantity (No.) 1 3 2 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 4 4 2 1

Power (watt) 9 1200 350 500 350 900 500 120 1700 25 25 1000 1600 36 1200

Total

9515

Appliances Total Power

8279

w.hr exclding lighting

28999.6

Usage per day (hr) 1 0.083 1 0 0.25 0.016 0.016 4 1.5 24 24 1.5 1.5 6 4

w.hr 9 298.8 700 0 175 28.8 8 480 5100 600 1200 6000 9600 432 4800

hr/24 0.041666667 0.003458333 0.041666667 0 0.010416667 0.000666667 0.000666667 0.166666667 0.0625 1 1 0.0625 0.0625 0.25 0.166666667

29431.6

Power Density (watt/m2) 0.016447368 0.546052632 1.279239766 0 0.319809942 0.052631579 0.014619883 0.877192982 9.320175439 1.096491228 2.192982456 10.96491228 17.54385965 0.789473684 8.771929825

Notes Assumed as each one is used for 5 mints a day

Assumed to be used 15 mints a day as an average Assumed to work for 1 min at least a day each Assumed to work for 1 min at least a day each

53.78581871

Room East Calculations Area of room = 15.2 m2 ID 1

Appliance Humidifier

Quantity (No.) 1

Power (watt) 100

Usage per day (hr) 6

w.hr 600

hr/24 0.25

Power Density (watt/m2) 1.644736842

2

Speaker

1

5

0.5

2.5

0.020833333

0.00685307

3

Laptop

1

165

8

1320

0.333333333

3.618421053

4

Desk lamp

1

5

0

0

0

0

5

Mobile phone

1

5

8

40

0.333333333

0.109649123

6

ipad

1

10

0.016

0.16

0.000666667

0.000438596

7

Hairdryer

1

2000

0.16

320

0.006666667

0.877192982

8

Lighting Fixtures (LED)

2

18

6

216

0.25

0.592105263

9

Heater (900*600 mm)

0

700

5

0

0.208333333

Total

2498.66

3008

Appliances Total Power

2290

w.hr exclding lighting

2282.66

Notes

Assumed to be used for 10 mints a day

0 6.84939693

Room West Calculations Area of room = 15.2 m2 ID 1

Appliance Humidifier

Quantity (No.) 1

Power (watt) 100

Usage per day (hr) 10

w.hr 1000

hr/24 0.416666667

Power Density (watt/m2) 2.74122807

2

Laptop

2

45

5

450

0.208333333

1.233552632

Notes

3

Desk lamp

1

30

9

270

0.375

0.740131579

4

Mobil phone

2

5

8

80

0.333333333

0.219298246

5

e-toothbrush

1

10

0.6

6

0.025

0.016447368

Assumed to be charged for 8 hours a week

6

Kettle

1

2200

0.16

352

0.006666667

0.964912281

Assumed to be used for 10 mints a day

7

Lighting Fixtures (LED)

2

18

10

360

0.416666667

0.986842105

8

Heater (900*600 mm)

0

700

10

0

0.416666667

Total

3108

Appliances Total Power

2390

w.hr exclding lighting

2158

2518

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

0 6.902412281


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX E

APPLIANCES CONSUMPTION

VOCTORIA PAUL ST EAST VICTORIA PAUL ST EAST Area of room = 18 m2 ID 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Appliance Exhaust Fan Microwave Kettle Toasters

Quantity (No.) 1 1 1 1 1

Power (watt) 5 1200 3000 900 5

Usage per day (hr) 24 0 0.167 0 8

w.hr 120 0 501 0 40

hr/24 1 0 0.006958333 0 0.333333333

Power Density (watt/m2) 0.277777778 0 1.159722222 0 0.092592593

Desk lamp

1 1

25 20

24 2

600 40

1 0.083333333

1.388888889 0.092592593

Laptop Hob(induction), small Lighting Fixtures (LED) Heater (700*600 mm)

1

194

3

582

0.125

1.347222222

1 2 0

1500 5 1200

1 6 10

1500 60 0

0.041666667 0.25 0.416666667

3.472222222 0.138888889 0

Mobile phone mini refrigirator

Total

8054

Appliances Total Power

6849

w.hr exclding lighting

3383

3443

Notes Barely used Assumed to be used 10 mints a day as an average Barely used

7.969907407

CHAPTER CHAPTER Area of room = 18 m2 ID 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Appliance Exhaust Fan Microwave Kettle

Quantity (No.) 1 1 1 1

Power (watt) 5 1200 3000 5

Usage per day (hr) 6 0.083 0.083 8

w.hr 30 99.6 249 40

hr/24 0.25 0.003458333 0.003458333 0.333333333

Power Density (watt/m2) 0.069444444 0.230555556 0.576388889 0.092592593

monitor

1 1

25 19

24 4

600 76

1 0.166666667

1.388888889 0.175925926

Laptop Hob(induction), small Lighting Fixtures (LED) Heater (700*600 mm)

2

165

4

1320

0.166666667

3.055555556

2 3 1

1500 18 1200

0.333 6 0

999 324 0

0.013875 0.25 0

2.3125 0.75 0

Mobile phone mini refrigirator

Total

3737.6

7137

Appliances Total Power

5919

w.hr exclding lighting

3413.6

Notes Assumed as each one is used for 5 mints a day Assumed to be used 5 mints a day

once for every 3 days Barely used

8.651851852

WOODLANE STUDIO WOODLANE STUDIO Area of room = 20 m2 ID 1 2 3 4 5 6

Appliance extracator Microwave Kettle Mobile phone mini refrigirator

Quantity (No.) 1 1 1 1

Power (watt) 20 1200 3000 5

Usage per day (hr) 0.167 0.1 0.083 8

w.hr 3.34 120 249 40

hr/24 0.006958333 0.004166667 0.003458333 0.333333333

Power Density (watt/m2) 0.006958333 0.25 0.51875 0.083333333

1 1

25 150

24 3

600 450

1 0.125

1.25 0.9375

Laptop

7

spotlight

1

5

3

15

0.125

0.03125

8

Hairdryer Oven Hob(electric), small2 Lighting Fixtures (LED2B2S) Heater (700*600 mm)

1

2000

0.04

80

0.001666667

0.166666667

1 1 2 1

1700 1500 18 1200

0.083 0.167 6 0

141.1 250.5 216 0

0.003458333 0.006958333 0.25 0

0.293958333 0.521875 0.45 0

9 10 11 12

Total

10823

Appliances Total Power

9605

w.hr exclding lighting

1948.94

2164.94

4.510291667

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

Notes be used for 10 mints a day be used twice each for 3 mints a day be used twice each for 2. 5 mints a day

be used for once every two days for 5min be used for 5 mints a day be used for 10 mints a day Barely used


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPLIANCES SCHEDULE WEEKDAY

APPENDIX E

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

100

100

100

100

100

100

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

165

165

165

165

165

165

10

10

10

10

167 10

10

UCL ROOM EAST 15.2 Humidifier

2.5

Speaker

165

Laptop

165

Desk lamp

5

Mobile phone

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

ipad

167

Hairdryer Lighting Fixtures (LED) Heater (900*600 mm) Total w.h

10 700 175

700 105

105

105

105

0

1

2

3

100

100

100

100

105

700 105

700 5

700 5

169.5

0

0

0

165

0

0

0

0

175

175

175

175

342

175

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

100

100

100

100

100

100 90 30

90 30

90 30 10 6

90 30 10 6

36 700 156

36 700 172

36 700 172

Daily Consumption 2366.5

UCL ROOM WEST 15.2 Humidifier

30

30

30

90 30

36

36

36

183 36

Laptop

30

Desk lamp

10 6

Mobil phone e-toothbrush

10 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

Kettle Lighting Fixtures (LED) Heater (900*600 mm) Total w.h

6 183

6

116

700 116

700 116

700 289

36 700 172

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

25 20 165

25 20 165

700 116

700 116

116

116

116

0

1

2

3

5

5

5

5

66

0

0

66

0

0

0

0

66

339

36 700 156

Daily Consumption 2582

VICTORIA PAUL ST EAST Exhaust Fan Microwave

250

Kettle

250

Toasters

5 25

Mobile phone mini refrigirator

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

25

25

10

10

10

45 30

290 280

40 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

5

5

5

5

25 19

25 19

25 19 330

25 19 330

1000 54

54

54

54

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

Desk lamp Laptop Hob(induction), small Lighting Fixtures (LED)

1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30

Heater (700*600 mm) Total w.h kitchen w.h

0

1

5

5

2

3

4

5

6

7

1500 10

10 10 1200 1200 1790 225 225 1780 30 30

Daily Consumption 3195 2720

CHAPTER Exhaust Fan

100 250

Microwave Kettle

5 25

5 25

Laptop Hob(induction), small

330

330

Lighting Fixtures (LED)

54

54

419 30

419 30

30 25

30 25

30 25

30 25

30 25

30 25

375 375

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

1103 1030

103 30

433 30

433 30

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

25 150 5

25 150 5

25 150 5

25

141.67 250 36

36

36

36

641.01 605.01

216 25

216 25

216 25

Mobile phone mini refrigirator

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

monitor

Heater (700*600 mm) Total w.h kitchen w.h

Daily Consumption 3740 1980

WOODLANE STUDIO

3.34 60 125

extractor

60 125

Microwave Kettle

5 25

Mobile phone mini refrigirator

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

Laptop spotlight

83

Hairdryer Oven Hob(electric), small2 Lighting Fixtures (LED2B2S) Heater (700*600 mm) Total w.h kitchen w.h

30 25

30 25

30 25

30 25

30 25

30 25

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

30 25

30 25

108 25

210 210

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

Daily Consumption 2097.01 1365.01


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX E

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

100

100

100

100

100

100

9

10

11

12

13

2.5 165

2.5 165

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

APPLIANCES SCHEDULE WEEKEND

21

22

23

165 165

165

165

36

36

167 36

36

UCL ROOM EAST 15.2 Humidifier Speaker Laptop

165

165

Desk lamp

5

Mobile phone

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

ipad

167

Hairdryer Lighting Fixtures (LED) Heater (900*600 mm) Total w.h

36 700 201

36 700 201

105

105

105

0

1

2

3

100

100

100

105

700 105

700 105

700 5

5

5

5

334.5

167.5

0

0

0

0

0

0

201 201

368

201

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

100

100

100

100

100

100 30

30

90 30

90 30

90 30

90 30

183 36

36

36 700 156

36 700 156

Daily Consumption 2525

UCL ROOM WEST Humidifier Laptop Desk lamp

10 6

Mobil phone e-toothbrush

100 100

90 30 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

10 6

116

116

249

66

0

0

0

0

0

0

183 36 36 700 700 339 156

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

25 20 165

25 20 165

Kettle Lighting Fixtures (LED) Heater (900*600 mm) Total w.h

36 700 162

700 116

116

116

116

0

1

2

3

5

5

5

5

116

700 116

700 116

700 700 116 116

4

5

6

7

8

5

5

5

5

5

Daily Consumption 2560

VICTORIA PAUL ST EAST Exhaust Fan Microwave

250

Kettle

250

Toasters Mobile phone mini refrigirator

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

25

25

10

10

10

45 30

290 280

40 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

30 30

10 10 1200 1200 290 225 225 280 30 30

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

5

5

5

5

5

5

25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 330 330 330 330 330 330 330 330 400 400 54 54 54 54 54 54

25 19 330

25 19 330

54

54

779 379 428 428 428 428 833 433 430 30 25 25 25 25 430 30

433 30

433 30

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

Desk lamp Laptop Hob(induction), small Lighting Fixtures (LED) Heater (700*600 mm) Total w.h Kitchen Total w.h

1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 1200 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 35 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 30 0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

10

Daily Consumption 1695 1220

CHAPTER Exhaust Fan Microwave

250

Kettle Mobile phone mini refrigirator monitor Laptop Hob(induction), small Lighting Fixtures (LED)

25 19 330

25 19 330

54

54

428 25

428 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

25 19 330

25 19 330

25 19 330

Heater (700*600 mm) Total w.h Kitchen Total w.h

0

1

30 25

30 25 2

30 25 3

30 25 4

30 25 5

30 25 6

30 25 7

8

30 25 9

30 25

624 275 10

11

374 25 12

374 25 13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

Daily Consumption 7500 1680

23

WOODLANE STUDIO

60 125

Kettle Mobile phone mini refrigirator

AVERAGE CONSUMPTION FOR SINGLE ROOM

3.34

extractor Microwave

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

5 25

25

125 25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

25

125 5 25

DAILY CONSUMPTION

Laptop

5

spotlight

83

Hairdryer Oven

250

Hob(electric), small2

36

Lighting Fixtures (LED2B2S) Heater (700*600 mm) Total w.h Kitchen Total w.h

30 25

30 25

30 25

30 25

30 25

30 25

30 25

150 150

25 108 25 25

403.34 403.34

25 25

25 25

25 25

85 85

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

25 25

196 150

KITCHEN CONSUMPTION

Weekday Weekend Average Weekday Weekend Average

Daily Consumption 1452.34 1288.34

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

UCL PRANKERD HOUSE (Single)

2366.5

2525

2411.8

UCL PRANKERD HOUSE (Couple)

2582

2560

2575.7

VICTORIA PAUL ST EAST

3195

1695

2766.4

2720

1220

2291.4

CHAPTER

3740

7500

4814.3

1980

1680

1894.3

WOODLANE STUDIO

2097.3

1452.7

1913.1

1365.0

1288.3

1343.1

AVERAGE SINGLE ROOM

3355.1

3642.2

3437.1

2021.7

1396.1

1842.9


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX F

VENTILATION ANALYSIS

OPTIVENT 2.0

OPTIVENT 2.0

A Natural Ventilation Steady-State Calculation Tool for the Early Design Stage of Buildings.

A Natural Ventilation Steady-State Calculation Tool for the Early Design Stage of Buildings.

Project Data:

Natural ventilation strategy:

Project Data:

Natural ventilation strategy:

Project Name: PECKHAM UNIT BASE CASE Version: Run 1 Date: 2017-02-10 Consultant: NAITIK

Single sided ventilation

Project Name: PECKHAM UNIT BASE CASE Version: Run 1 Date: 2017-02-10 Consultant: NAITIK

Single sided ventilation

Location Data:

Building Data:

Latitude (decimal degrees): 51.5 Month: July Hour: 13 Prevailing mean outdoor temperature (°C): 20.0 Meteorological Wind Speed (m/s): 4 Terrain data: 1 SW Inlet (surface) Azimuth:

Cell - Floor area (m²): Cell - Volume (m³): Outdoor temperature (°C): Indoor temperature (°C) To - Ti (°C):

Construction Data:

Cell - Heat Gains:

Glazing:

Number of people: occupant gains (W/m²): Equipment gains (W/m²): Lighting gains (W/m²): Total internal gains (W/m²): Total Solar Gains (W/m²) Cell 1: Total heat generated (kW) Cell 1:

Solar Transmittance Factor (0-1): Shading Proportion (%):

0.5 0

Wall Surface Absorptance (0-1): U-Value (W/m²·K): Ext. Surf. Transmittance (W/m²·K):

0.6 0.3 4.0

Roof Surface Absorptance (0-1): U-Value (W/m²·K): Ext. Surf. Transmittance (W/m²·K)

14 39.2 21 27 6

Apertures Data: 1 5.43 10 0 15.43 0.96 0.23

Inlet 1: Outlet 1:

Effective Area (m²)

Height Zn (m)

1.02 1.02

1.7 2

Airflow Rate (m³/s) B B+W 0.11 0.34 0.11 0.34

Location Data:

Building Data:

Latitude (decimal degrees): 51.5 Month: July Hour: 13 Prevailing mean outdoor temperature (°C): 20.0 Meteorological Wind Speed (m/s): 4 Terrain data: 1 Inlet (surface) Azimuth: SW

Cell - Floor area (m²): Cell - Volume (m³): Outdoor temperature (°C): Indoor temperature (°C) To - Ti (°C):

Construction Data:

Cell - Heat Gains:

Glazing:

Number of people: occupant gains (W/m²): Equipment gains (W/m²): Lighting gains (W/m²): Total internal gains (W/m²): Total Solar Gains (W/m²) Cell 1: Total heat generated (kW) Cell 1:

Solar Transmittance Factor (0-1): Shading Proportion (%):

0.5 0

Wall Surface Absorptance (0-1): U-Value (W/m²·K): Ext. Surf. Transmittance (W/m²·K):

0.6 0.3 4.0

Roof 0.6 0.2 4.0

Surface Absorptance (0-1): U-Value (W/m²·K): Ext. Surf. Transmittance (W/m²·K)

Buoyancy driven

Buoyancy driven

Buoyancy + Wind driven

Buoyancy + Wind driven

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

0.6 0.2 4.0

11 30.8 21 27 6

Apertures Data: 1 6.91 10 0 16.91 -3.11 0.15

Inlet 1: Outlet 1:

Effective Area (m²)

Height Zn (m)

1.32 1.32

1.7 2

Airflow Rate (m³/s) B B+W 0.15 0.44 0.15 0.44


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX G

MINT SHEET

MINT SHEET SOUTH ROOM

MINT SHEET NORTH ROOM

MINT SHEET EAST ROOM

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX H

THERMAL SCHEDULES

STUDENT OCCUPANCY FOR SINGLE ROOM

EQUIPMENT SCHEDULE FOR SINGLE ROOM WITH KITCHEN

STUDENT OCCUPANCY FOR DOUBLE ROOM

VENTILATION FOR SUMMER PERIOD

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

EQUIPMENT SCHEDULE FOR DOUBLE ROOM WITHOUT KITCHEN

VENTILATION FOR WINTER PERIOD


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX I

ELECTRICITY POLICY

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017


PECKHAM STUDENT LIVING Term 2 Project

APPENDIX I

AA - SED | Msc + MArch 2016 - 2017

Peckham student living  

Design Project - Sustainable Environmental Design. AA School of Architecture.

Peckham student living  

Design Project - Sustainable Environmental Design. AA School of Architecture.

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