Today Magazine • ​December 2022

Page 1

Covering the Heart of the Farmington Valley

TODAY
DECEMBER 2022 • WWW.TODAYPUBLISHING.NET COMBAT COMRADE Bidding Farewell To WWII Legend His ‘Best Friend’ Went On Missions

RAPTUROUS RAPTORS

• Above — a juvenile aka immature bald eagle

• Left — a juvenile aka immature red-tailed hawk

• Both birds were spotted at Nepaug Reservoir in Canton — a raptor is a bird of prey, such as an eagle, hawk, falcon or owl

• Juvenile bald eagles are a mottled brown color and bear little resemblance to adult bald eagles — eagles get their signature white head and tail feathers in their fourth or ffth year — as juveniles, eagles can be mistaken for large hawks or golden eagles because of the color similarities

• Juvenile red-tailed hawks are typically defned by their red tails — but some have gray or brown tails instead

See page 15 for another raptor photo

CALENDAR CLICK for TODAY ONLINE CALENDAR Email Events newsroom@TodayPublishing.net
Photos by Wendy Rosenberg

4 — Man Named England Is U.S. Legend

George England was drafted at 18, received America’s top aviation award for his WWII valor, and later was honored as Citizen of the Year for his volunteer service

9 — Up On The Roof

Simsbury ABC (A Better Chance) is the grateful recipient of an astounding gift — a new $30,000 roof

11 — Journey Home-Coming

Who doesn’t want to fnd the best home possible? Journey Home seeks inclusive answers for everyone

14 — Hearing + Heart Assistance

An Avon-based initiative called U Are Heard aims to support young people with their human heart issues

“ The students come from school systems around the country that would impair their chances to achieve their potential ” — ABC’s Robert Pearce

ABC house built in — 1812

LETTERS

COVER STORY KUDOS

LEADING OFF

English-American WWII Connection

GEORGE WESLEY ENGLAND was a living legend in the Farmington Valley until the day before Thanksgiving, when he died and joined his wife Carolyn on the other side of eternity — see page 4 for a feature in his honor. A World War II veteran, he was awarded the prestigious Distinguished Flying Cross.

In the Serendipity Department, my father-in-law was also named George, and his parents were natives of England. George Sykes was likewise a WWII veteran — by the time he fnished boot camp, V-E Day in May 1945 was a done deal, but he served in postwar Europe as an airplane mechanic with the U.S. Army Air Corps aka Air Forces. He was a Simsbury resident for 35 years until he died in 2012. George England resided in Avon for 42 years.

This December edition is dedicated to the veterans whose sacrifce has secured our freedom — especially the extraordinary Old-Timer whose arrival in this war-torn world as a Bethlehem infant was essentially God’s D-Day move, so to speak, according to some best-selling news accounts + BWD

Today Magazine’s November cover story features the milestone 90th birthday of the McLean Game Refuge, a true Farmington Valley treasure — CLICK HERE for our coverage

THANK YOU for focusing on the McLean Game Refuge’s 90th anniversary in the November magazine. I shared it with the other senior staf at McLean as well as our trustees, and it was universally praised. I was glad to read about many of my colleagues’ long connections with the Game Refuge.

— Connor Hogan • Director, McLean Game Refuge

LOVED the recent magazine — great choice of photos and articles. I must tell you how much it means to me to be part of Today Magazine. It truly is such a special gift for me, and I thank you so much for including me over the past few years. You can’t imagine what it has done for me. Hopefully it will continue!

— Wendy Rosenberg • Canton

• Rosenberg has been a contributing photographer for Today Magazine since January 2019 — and we likewise appreciate her special and stunning wildlife photos

• Wendy and her husband Jefrey have lived in the Farmington Valley since moving to Canton in 2002

ON BEHALF of Simsbury-based Metacomet VFW Post 1926, I want to thank all the residents of the Farmington Valley who donated to our Buddy Poppy Drive in honor of Veterans Day in early November. We also thank Fitzgerald’s Foods for providing space outside the store for our table.

The monies raised will be distributed to local and national organizations that serve veterans. In addition, wreaths will be donated to Wreaths Across America for the December 17 ceremony at Simsbury Center Cemetery.

— Lee M. Wilson • Commander, VFW Post 1926

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Bidding Farewell to WWII Legend George England COMBAT COMRADE

A friend (aka comrade) to so many, World War II veteran George England was born on October 13, 1924 and died on November 23, 2022 — reporter Chloe Kieper had the privilege of interviewing him in September, about two months before his death

GEORGE WESLEY ENGLAND was a Navy airman during World War II, fying in B-24 Liberators. A longtime Avon resident, he passed away the day before Thanksgiving at 98 years old.

His story is both unique and complex — a man of incredible strength and perseverance, he faced an unforgiving and relentless force throughout his service

COVER STORY VETERAN VOICES

in the Pacifc theater. For his bravery, England received the Distinguished Flying Cross — the highest American aviation award, given “for heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial fight,” per the U.S. Air Force website.

England grew up in Manchester, Conn., and graduated from Manchester High School. He was drafted into the military soon after graduation, serving from June 1943 until April 1946. He attended various Navy training schools and found himself in the midst of a world he had never experienced before.

England had never been on a plane until he entered the Navy. He considered himself to be “pretty good mechanically”—

4 DECEMBER 2022 – www.TodayPublishing.net – TODAY MAGAZINE
George
England’s crew was one of very few WWII Navy bomber crews with a pet mascot as a member of their team
George England (bottom right) and his B-24 Liberator bomber crew — with their German shepherd mascot Shiba ON THE COVER — George and Shiba and a B-24 nicknamed Golden Girl — his favorite plane was called Modest Miss Courtesy Photos B-24 Liberator

and that is how he found himself working in Memphis as an aviation mechanic, and later at Jacksonville’s Naval Aviation Technical Center.

At the beginning of his service in Jacksonville, he was on the beaching crew for the PBY Catalina fying boat (aka seaplane) — “PB” stands for patrol bomber, and “Y” was the code assigned to the manufacturer, Consolidated Aircraft. Consolidated also produced the B-24 Liberator bomber.

The job of the beaching crew was to swim out to the fying-boat aircraft in the water, grab ties attached to the rear of the seaplane, and then attach the cables to a tractor that pulled the amphibious aircraft out of the water and onto a ramp.

The work was tiring and hard, England said — and where beginner Navy members started.

One of the biggest changes in his early military life was rather unexpected — cockroaches. England was shocked (and disappointed) to discover the multitudes of cockroaches in Memphis and Jacksonville.

After spending time in the South, England was stationed in Wichita, Kansas, before heading to Camp Kearny, an airfeld base about 10 miles from San Diego where he frst met the members of the crew he would be with for the duration of World War II. He had previously completed several stages of basic training at other stations.

He remembers a time of panic when, during a training activity about 350 miles of the West Coast, his crew tried to operate the sextant — a device used to discover latitude and longitude — only to fnd out that it wasn’t working.

Panicked, the crew turned the plane around in hopes of fnding their way back to Camp Kearny without navigation. They discovered a bright spot on the horizon. The bright spot turned out to be San Clemente Island, a U.S. Navy base in Los Angeles County.

The crew eventually made their way back to Kearny, using San Clemente as a landmark.

Throughout his WWII service, England learned about a variety of planes — the

PBY Catalina twin-tail seaplane, PB4Y2 Privateer, and his favorite, the B-24 Liberator. England would go overseas in the B-24 — he had never had the opportunity to travel overseas before. The B-24 Liberator typically had a crew of 10 men. England was an aerial gunner and a fight engineer.

Regarding the Navy’s plane assignments, England said it was “a mixed bag, everyone few everyone’s plane”— but his favorite was a B-24 with the nickname Modest Miss.

After Camp Kearny, they were stationed in Hawaii to fy missions of the islands. Shortly before leaving Kearny, England and a few crew members

borrowed a convertible. While traveling around town, they met two girls who had a dog. The Navy air crew asked if they could buy the dog, and after some hesitancy the girls said yes. George England’s crew now had a mascot — a female German shepherd named Shiba.

They took Shiba back to the base in a wooden crate and she few on all their missions, essentially living on the plane and making England’s crew one of very few WWII Navy bomber crews with a pet mascot as a member of their team.

England experienced a range of new places during his service, traveling to locations such as Borneo, Guam, Guantanamo Bay, Hong Kong and the Philippines.

He recalled a specifc moment when fying into Hong Kong — he and his crew were amazed by the sight of the Yau Ma Tei boat people, who lived on interconnected chains of boats in the Yau Mei Tei typhoon shelter near Kowloon,

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George England in a Navy B-24 bomber — he was an aerial gunner and fight engineer
“Appreciate your
— and don’t
— George
country
listen to anyone who says otherwise”
England

a section of Hong Kong. Shocked by the sheer magnitude and expanse of the boat chains, the crew found themselves marveling at this new place and culture as they few toward the city.

During WWII, Hong Kong was occupied by Japan from 1941 until 1945. As the crew was distracted by the views of the Yau Ma Tei settlement, a Japanese fghter plane crossed their path, and they were brought back to the danger of the moment— and the fact that they were fying in enemy territory.

The crew avoided any confrontation by pure luck, England said.

England fnished his service with 38 missions and did not have a single plane get hit hard by enemy frepower. After the war, he made his way back to Connecticut, working in Hartford for IBM before moving to Avon in 1980.

Over 75 years after his service ended, he remained a committed member of the veteran community and was steadily involved in Avon-based VFW Post 3272. He often participated in Veterans Day ceremonies in the Avon public schools.

George England was a man of the community — he joined a number of local clubs as he neared retirement age. Although the friends he made during WWII are scattered all over the country, he had the opportunity to reconnect with some of them and to meet new veterans through various clubs and activities.

He was incredibly close with his crew, having a relationship with them built upon the trust and teamwork needed to survive the danger of their missions. England said he respected and trusted the vast majority of the people he served with, and meeting other veterans after the war revealed a wonderful community of well-rounded colleagues.

What is the most important thing he learned from his World War II service that he wants today’s youth to know?

“Appreciate your country,” England said, “and don’t listen to anyone who says otherwise.” +

• Reporter Chloe Kieper is a senior at Avon High School — she frst met George England as a student at Avon’s Thompson Brook School after he spoke at a Veterans Day ceremony

• Chloe’s grandfather, Francis William Kieper, was a B-24 bomber pilot during WWII — he and George England were in diferent planes, but they served together in the Navy’s VPB-111 patrol bombing squadron

• Francis Kieper and George England both received the Distinguished Flying Cross — the U.S. military’s highest honor for aviation achievement

CLICK HERE for our previous cover story about B-24 pilot John Benjamin — also a Distinguished Flying Cross recipient — and other Farmington Valley WWII heroes

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A B-24 over Maxwell Field in Alabama — a key training site for the U.S. Army Air Forces during WWII Courtesy Photo — Wikipedia

The GEORGE ENGLAND File

George Wesley England — a World War II veteran and native of Connecticut — was an Avon resident for over four decades •

Here is a synopsis of his life — his family, military service, career and more:

Born — October 13, 1924

Died — November 23, 2022

Age — 98

Hometown at birth — Manchester, CT Hometown at death — Avon, CT

Parents — George J. and Helen D. England • oldest of four children

Wife — Carolyn Ellen (Dailey) England

Born — October 18, 1927

Died — January 12, 2022 Age — 94

Hometown at birth — Rockville, CT • village in Vernon Hometown at death — Avon, CT

Military Service

• World War II veteran — Pacifc Theater

• U.S. Navy — June 1943 to April 1946

• Age upon joining Navy — 18

• Navy Patrol Bombing Squadron VPB-111

• Aerial Gunner and Flight Engineer B-24 Liberator • PBY Catalina fying boat

Military Awards

• Distinguished Flying Cross — highest U.S. military award for exceptional aviation achievement

• WWII Victory Medal

• Navy Combat Aircrew Wings

• Admirals Unit Commendation

• Air Medal — fve bronze stars

• Asiatic-Pacifc Campaign Medal — three stars

• Philippine Liberation Ribbon — one star

Education

• Monson Academy, MA — now Wilbraham & Monson Academy

• University of Connecticut

• former Connecticut Engineering Institute

• Degree — Mechanical Engineering

Career

• IBM — hired in 1951 after graduating — served 38 years

• Managed ofces in tristate area — primarily in New York City

• Returned to Hartford ofce in 1980 — moved to Avon same year

• Retired — 1989

George

Volunteer Service

Avon-based VFW Post 3272, Avon Lions Club, Avon Veterans Memorial Committee, American Red Cross, CCSU Veterans Project, Connecticut Eye Bank, Favarh, Farmington Valley Men’s Club, Meals on Wheels, Saint Francis Hospital Mended Hearts and more

• Citizen of the Year — Avon-Canton Rotary Club

Source — George England obituary • CarmonFuneralHome.com

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England was a man of the community — he joined a number of local clubs as he neared retirement age
George England and Shiba — his crew’s German shepherd mascot during WWII
8 DECEMBER 2022 – www.TodayPublishing.net – TODAY MAGAZINE

Simsbury ABC Receives Amazing Roof Donation

Editor’s Note

• Your favorite Top 40 song might not be “Up on the Roof” and your favorite musical might not be “Fiddler on the Roof” — but this story might cheer you up, to the bottom of your heart, right in time for the holidays

• By the way — while a publication typically has one cover story, this edition of Today Magazine comprises a riddle — because we’re ofering two cover stories this month

• Happy holidays to you and yours!

Special to Today Magazine

IMAGINE THAT YOU are sitting in your home, and you hear a knock at the door. You answer and the owner of a roofng company says he noticed that you need a new roof — and he and his company will roof your house at no cost to you.

You are surprised because for several years you have experienced occasional roof leaks and wondered how you would be able to aford the new roof that is needed.

This was the situation facing Simsbury ABC when Jim Carroll, president and CEO of JP Carroll Roofng, knocked on the door. He ofered to replace the roof on the

Simsbury ABC residence located at 835 Hopmeadow Street in Simsbury, free of charge.

The house was built in 1812 and has had several additions that led to a large, complicated roofng project valued at $30,000.

The Simsbury ABC (A Better Chance) program is a nonproft organization “making a diference in the lives of academically talented young men of color from underserved communities,” according to the Simsbury ABC website.

The program’s mission is “to increase the number of well-educated minority men who graduate from college and assume positions of responsibility and

TODAY MAGAZINE – www.TodayPublishing.net – DECEMBER 2022 9
NOTEWORTHY NONPROFITS BUSINESS BEAT
A TRUE COVER STORY
The JP Carroll Roofng crew in the driveway of the Simsbury ABC house

leadership in their careers,” per the website.

The program operates entirely on donations at no cost to the students and their families.

“The students come from school systems around the country that would impair their chances to achieve their potential,” says Simsbury ABC board president Robert Pearce. “We provide room, board and supervision, and see them through four years at Simsbury High School at no cost to their parents.”

Established in 1973, Simsbury ABC has graduated more than 85 students — and 90% of them have completed college in four years. These days, the national average for four-year graduates is about 60%.

Jim Carroll established his business in 1987 as a home-builder and transitioned to roofng in the early 1990s. Bloomfeldbased JP Carroll Roofng specializes in high-quality roofng services — both residential and commercial — plus siding, gutters and windows.

“We take our work very seriously because we value the welfare of our customers and their homes,” says Carroll, who is president of the Connecticut Roofng Contractors Association.

He believes in building a business that is customer-focused and communitydriven — as evidenced by his generous gift to Simsbury ABC this autumn. + www.simsburyabetterchance.org • 860-264-6188 www.jpcarrollroofng.com • 860-586-8857

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HERE for Today’s award-winning cover story on Simsbury ABC First Place SPJ Award
“Being in Simsbury has been quite the transition, from city life to a rural atmosphere — I’m used to a bustling and hustling environment with many cars ... I am enjoying this Simsbury adventure” — Simsbury ABC scholar
Outside the Simsbury ABC house — JP Carroll Roofng service manager Joe Rivera, ABC’s Mark Deming and JP Carroll VP Jack Carroll

Journey Home celebrating 15th anniversary

Agency seeks a home for all

Special to Today Magazine

Alison Sjoberg has answered this Q&A — she is Journey Home’s community engagement manager

Mission

Our mission is to ensure a home for all. We believe the most powerful way to do this is collectively — by working together with service providers, elected ofcials, businesses and local communities to end homelessness in the Capital Region of Connecticut. We will build partnerships, advance innovative solutions and achieve enduring, systemic change.

— JOURNEY HOME —

255 Main Street • 2nd Floor Hartford, CT

(860) 808-0336

Email — info@journeyhomect.org

Social Media — @JourneyHomeCT www.journeyhomect.org

Year Established — 2007

NOTEWORTHY NONPROFITS

Slogan

Together

We Can End Homelessness

Most fulflling aspect of your work?

Being able to bring community agencies, businesses, schools, hospitals and others to the table to work together to make systemic change in the Capital Region toward ending homelessness!

Your biggest obstacle, and how you overcome it?

Lack of afordable housing to house those experiencing homelessness and lack of

TODAY MAGAZINE – www.TodayPublishing.net – DECEMBER 2022 11

funding to be able to hire and maintain staf to support clients on their journey out of homelessness. We work to overcome this obstacle each day through a variety of ways. Our most signifcant investment in working to improve this reality is hiring staf to seek out afordable housing options and building relationships with local landlords.

Most satisfying accomplishment?

90% decline in chronic homelessness in Greater Hartford since the start of the Coordinated Access Network in 2014.

Goals for the next 1-5 years?

• Reduce the number of people at risk of becoming homeless by addressing the root causes of homelessness.

• Reduce the number of people becoming homeless for the frst time, and reduce returns to homelessness, using strategies that relate to prevention, diversion and systemic solutions.

• Reduce the length of people’s episodes of homelessness, using strategies that relate to system efciency and exit options.

Volunteers

We have about 200 volunteers working with us each year, but only about 7-10 recurring weekly volunteers. We are looking for volunteers who can help move furniture and household items to assist those moving out of homelessness into their own apartments!

We have opportunities seven days a week, but strongly need weekday volunteers to pop in and lend a hand so we can make sure everyone moving out of homelessness has a bed to sleep in, a table to eat at, and a couch to relax on at the end of the day.

How has the COVID pandemic impacted your work?

The pandemic added a whole new dimension to our work but also

made more clear the importance of housing, when having a place to go and stay home wasn’t an option for so many people.

Journey Home was responsible for coordinating the homeless service system’s response to COVID across our 35-town region. We solicited funding from various foundations and government agencies to support our partner agencies in their eforts to respond to COVID and to directly support our neighbors experiencing homelessness.

Journey Home did not use any of this funding to support our own staf time related to coordinating this response. This time included convening and coordinating weekly meetings of partners, soliciting and distributing PPE (personal protective equipment) and cleaning supplies to 20 providers, managing the placement of 250+ individuals into hotels, coordinating eforts of three diferent agencies stafng the hotels, communicating to the public and our stakeholders about our eforts in response to COVID, and funneling millions of dollars in assistance to our partner agencies.

As you can see, the region’s ability to quickly and efectively react in the face of this public health crisis would not have been possible without the eforts of our Journey Home staf.

Interesting stats + numbers

We have seen a 90% decline in chronic homelessness in Greater Hartford since 2015 — and we helped 350 households with furniture and household items in 2021.

Besides donations, how is your work funded?

We are funded through federal, state and local grants as well as area corporate and family foundations.

How closely do you work with other agencies/ nonprofts?

Our work is all about collective impact and collaboration. We work very closely with other local nonprofts, agencies and municipalities in order to fulfll our important mission of ensuring that everyone has a place they can call home.

What do you appreciate most about the Farmington Valley? What constructive change would you like to see?

The strength of the community to come together and support each other when one of their own is experiencing a hard time — more afordable housing, not just in the Valley, but everywhere!

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Journey HomeComing Story

Alison Sjoberg is the community engagement manager for Journey Home— this Hartford-based nonproft seeks to end homelessness

HOMELESSNESS can happen to anyone. We say it because we have witnessed the truth of that statement.

Prior to being homeless, one individual worked as a roofer, had his own apartment, his own bed, his own couch, his own place to call home. He had all of that until one fateful day at work.

He took a serious fall while roofng and fell 25 feet to the ground below and injured his wrist, back and leg. Physically, he was never the same.

The injuries left permanent damage, causing him to have to constantly use a cane to walk. He was unable to regain employment and eventually lost his apartment.

Without family support, he was left with one choice — he had to explore the shelter system in Hartford. For three years he bounced from shelter to shelter. When he was unable to obtain shelter for the night he slept outside.

In one of his conversations with one of our team members, he said, “I slept anywhere I could lay my head down. I slept in bank portals, by church steps, under the bridge, bus shelters and bus stations.”

Like many people who live unsheltered, he experienced a lot of misfortunes. He was robbed, assaulted and harassed.

Journey Home began to work with him, and although he was quite hard to locate as he slept in diferent places daily, thankfully our staf was able to quickly get a bed for him at a shelter in Hartford. Before long, his life began to stabilize with just a little extra assistance and some concentrated attention.

By working diligently together to obtain all of his documents and because someone believed in him, he began to really believe in himself. What seemed

insurmountable before became possible.

The Journey Home team helped him obtain his medical records, allowing him to apply for a new Social Security card. Once he obtained his Social Security card, his case manager went with him to New Britain City Hall and assisted him with getting his birth certifcate. From there, they went to the Department of Motor Vehicles so he could apply for his ofcial state ID. Soon after that trip to the DMV, he received his state ID in the mail.

In June 2017 he was document-ready and was ofcially placed on the list for a housing opportunity. In August he

was referred to one of our community partners, and moved into his new place in September. Three years of homelessness had fnally come to an end.

He wouldn’t be where he is today without our supporters. We can’t do this work without all of you. There is so much that goes into housing just one person. For someone who is chronically homelessness, it is defnitely not as simple as just getting a key to a new place.

There are lots of steps, and having someone’s support is the diference between fnding a home or remaining homeless. +

TODAY MAGAZINE – www.TodayPublishing.net – DECEMBER 2022 13
After fall from roof, harrowing journey has home-happy ending
Journey Home accepts furniture donations — and will pick up from your residence
What seemed insurmountable before became possible ... We can’t do this work without all of you — there is so much that goes into housing just one person

Supporting Students with Human Heart Issues

ELEVEN YEARS AGO I was practicing privately as a family therapist, seeing mainly high school and college-aged young people in my ofce to help them with many of their difculties.

At the end of that summer, 12 students I had worked with for several years were getting ready to go to college. So much in their lives was about to change, and I wondered how I could help. I ofered to see them through video calls — I felt this would support them with the transition. Each of my patients agreed and we made appointments before they left.

I researched this and learned that what I would be doing is called coaching. I would support them with this newness they were about to experience and help solve things that came up along the way. As I worked with them in the frst month of school, I noticed my students progressing and looking forward to our call. I naively thought I would see each of them for a few sessions and hand them of to a

huge college counseling center with many qualifed counselors waiting to see them. So I requested that each of them make an appointment to see a college counselor.

After a full month of asking, providing phone numbers, emails and even a map of where the counseling centers were located on campus, only 5 of my 12 students attempted to go. The others were too frightened and “did not want to start over with someone new.”

The 5 who went were met with a wait of 3-4 weeks, a diferent counselor each time, a counselor grad student who “was only a few years older than me” or a limit of three visits per semester. For all of these reasons, all 12 students strongly requested to continue to see me.

I saw each of them weekly all school year by video sessions. They progressed amazingly — making new friends, learning ways to reach out, balancing academics and putting the correct amount of time in, and participating in many diferent extracurricular activities. It was extraordinary to watch!

I was witness to these students making the transition into college magnifcently. This led me to create my business U Are Heard in 2012 — a new way I could use my clinical skills to help students.

During the next several school years I started seeing many students. Some began with me in person and then transitioned to school, while others began while at school. I then started to see a trend of students who were not receiving help and sufering in silence.

Those students would come home after a semester hurting in many ways. They would have low GPAs and their emotional health often was not good. U Are Heard assisted those students to get “back on their feet” and believe in themselves again. Through this process, I began to recognize

e Carmon Family believes that each funeral should be personal and meaningful. Our services re ect the Carmon family values and our ongoing commitment to serve families with care and compassion.

14 DECEMBER 2022 – www.TodayPublishing.net – TODAY MAGAZINE Granby Location 364 Salmon Brook Street 860.653.6637 Avon Location 301 Country Club Road 860.673.8610
www.carmonfuneralhome.com Owned & Operated by the Carmon Family
Marc

the importance of proactiveness with students. It is so important for students and their families to recognize the signs of struggle as they are starting.

U Are Heard addresses a large problem that exists nationally. The excessive anxiety (over 60%) and depressive rates (38%) of college students nationally is at an all-time high. A main reason for this is that most students graduate high school with relatively no idea of what will be coming next. Students think they know and are therefore surprised when they encounter difculty. This trend leads to high levels of anxiety and depression.

Making new friends, the high cost of college, and communal living being new and tricky all make college challenging. The dropout/transfer rate is also super-high nationally — about 1 in 3. All of this means there needs to be more prep before and more support during this critical juncture in a young person’s world.

For all of these reasons, I started U Are Heard. No more sufering in silence. We ofer support and direction — not so students just get through, but actually thrive and grow.

U Are Heard is easy to set up. Most new students and their parents start with a 10-minute phone consultation, followed by an intake session.

Then I match them with the best counselor/coach for them. We cut through all of the reasons students don’t seek help, allowing busy college students to maintain their schedules while getting support. The process is designed to make it easy to get help.

We bring the support to them — otherwise, many students ignore needing help and their problems only get worse. Our amazing staf of coaches and counselors can be found on our website. + www.uareheard.com

For a limited time, U Are Heard is ofering 50% of intake sessions to all who mention Today Magazine

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RAPTOR REDUX A juvenile aka immature red-shouldered hawk perches on a branch in a Canton backyard — see page 2 for two other raptor photos
Photo by Wendy Rosenberg
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