Today Magazine • January 2022

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TODAY Covering the Heart of the Farmington Valley

SNOW PATROL REDUX

After Vietnam , Air Force Veteran Braves High-Risk Arctic Missions

JANUARY 2022

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CONTENTS

High-Risk Snow Patrol

COVER STORY

4 — From Vietnam To Snow Patrol Air Force veteran Bruce Headle served as a navigator for a C-130 transport plane that flew numerous intense missions in the Arctic NOTEWORTHY NONPROFITS

8 — Toy Story An Avon family has raised big-time funds so other local families can give Christmas gifts to their children VALLEY INTEL

9 — Cogent Focus A renewed commitment to an at-risk group — adults with autism — is necessary here and nationwide BUSINESS BEAT

12 — Sky-High Potential Simsbury VFW Commander Lee Wilson is learning to be a drone pilot thanks to Aquiline Drones QUOTE OF THE MONTH

“You can’t use a regular compass when a plane is north of the magnetic pole ... magnetic compasses start to spin” — navigator Bruce Headle BY THE NUMBERS

LETTERS

Years he has been in Alaska — 50

This month’s Today Magazine cover story is a continuation of our July 2021 feature on Air Force veteran Bruce Headle — it’s my second take at telling his amazing military story. By the way, I’m convinced that every human being on the planet has an amazing story to tell — and one reason I launched this award-winning publication is to tell as many of those stories that are connected to the Farmington Valley as I possibly can. A Simsbury native, Headle (rhymes with needle) flew countless perilous missions as a C-130 airplane navigator in Vietnam and the Arctic. In the frozen North, navigating a plane presents many high-risk challenges — such as compasses that stop working above the magnetic North Pole. For more on Bruce Headle’s astonishing aviation career, see page 4 — BWD Today Magazine • Covering the Heart of the Farmington Valley Bruce William Deckert — Publisher + Editor-in-Chief 860-988-1910 • Bruce.Deckert@TodayPublishing.net www.TodayPublishing.net > Digital Editions • Award-Winning Today Magazine Online — www.TodayPublishing.net/blog Follow Today Magazine CT on social media: Advertising — Contact the Publisher Editorial Associate — Kayla Tyson Contributing Photographer — Wendy Rosenberg Five Towns, One Aim — Exceptional Community Journalism Farmington • Avon • Canton • Simsbury • Granby – CT, USA • Two other Valley magazines: print circulation — less than 19,000 • Today Magazine: print circulation — 42,000+ • Ad Rates — same ballpark

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COVER STORY KUDOS Today Magazine’s December cover story featured Simsbury A Better Chance (ABC), a college prep program for talented young men of color — www.TodayPublishing.net/digital-editions THANKS VERY MUCH for your December cover story on the Simsbury ABC program. Spectacular. It is obvious how you have received so many awards. Bob Pearce • Simsbury ABC board president THANK YOU — what a great article! We appreciate you highlighting our Simsbury ABC scholars, alumni and program very much. Christine Bonchick • Simsbury ABC program coordinator

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I’VE GOTTEN a number of comments from community members who’ve recognized me in the photos on Facebook along with compliments about the Simsbury ABC story. Overall, a very nice job — thank you. Dr. Ron Brown • Simsbury ABC resident director THANK YOU for the fabulous article you created for Simsbury ABC. I have shared it many times. Your kind and factual words about our program will no doubt be a boost to our mission. Douglas Nielson • Simsbury ABC resident tutor WHAT A WONDERFUL story about ABC House! When I first moved to Simsbury, I became the house’s cook, preparing dinner for the students, resident directors and tutor. It was a great experience and I have great memories of “my guys”! I subsequently served on the board for a number of years. Fantastic program with great results. So glad you let more people know about it. Lynne Adame • Avon SUBSCRIBE to Today for FREE — CLICK HERE TODAY MAGAZINE – www.TodayPublishing.net – JANUARY 2022

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COVER STORY VETERAN VOICES

SNOW PATROL REDUX

After Vietnam Duty, Air Force Vet Flies High-Risk Arctic Missions By Bruce Deckert Editor-in-Chief • Today Magazine

AIR FORCE VETERAN BRUCE HEADLE has been told that he should write a book about his amazing aviation career — for good reason. A Today Magazine cover story last year highlighted two key components of Headle’s historic military service: • Boosting the U.S. space program in NASA’s early days. • Serving an eventful tour of duty during the Vietnam War. A third essential career component transpired after his Vietnam duty: • Flying perilous Arctic missions as a C-130 airplane navigator. In this sequel story, let’s focus on the Arctic aspect of his Air Force work. A Simsbury native, Headle (rhymes with needle) is 85 years old — he was born on August 7, 1936. He graduated from Simsbury High in 1954, when the high school’s home was the landmark stone building on Hopmeadow Street that now houses municipal offices. In 1958 he graduated from Trinity College in Hartford, completing his ROTC training, and was commissioned as an Air Force officer. His work with NASA occurred during his first military decade. After serving in Vietnam in 1967-68 as the navigator for a C-130 transport plane, he returned to the States. In 1972 Headle was stationed at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Anchorage on

Air Force navigator Bruce Headle Alaska’s south-central coast. He retired in 1979 as a major but remained in Alaska, where he has resided for five decades. Today, he lives with his wife Mary-Michele (aka “Mike”) in Chugiak, a small town about 20 miles from Anchorage. Their three daughters and three sons-in-law live in Alaska, plus three granddaughters, three grandsons and two great-granddaughters. During those seven years at the Elmendorf base, he continued guiding C-130s as an airplane navigator — on many hair-raising and high-risk missions. One dangerous assignment was delivering supplies to Fletcher’s Ice Island, a massive floating iceberg in the Arctic Ocean — roughly seven miles long and three miles wide — also known as T-3 island. For 20-plus years, the U.S. Navy maintained a research 4

JANUARY 2022 – www.TodayPublishing.net – TODAY MAGAZINE

Bruce Headle grew up in Simsbury and now lives in Alaska facility on T-3 manned by a team of 25-30 scientists and military personnel. “Our C-130 would air-drop their supplies to them with parachutes,” Headle says. Once, the plane’s crew inadvertently released a postal delivery too early: “We had to say, ‘Guys, sorry about your mail — it’s a few miles out at sea,’” he quips. “Trying to find this floating ice island could be a challenge,” he observes. “T-3 was 1200 miles northeast of Point Barrow, the northernmost tip of Alaska. We’d fly up there from Anchorage.” Finding such pinpoint locations was precisely Headle’s responsibility as a C-130 airplane navigator. While the pilot flew the plane and controlled its course, the navigator directed the pilot — guiding the plane with maps, charts, on-board radar and instruments, plus other time-tested methods such as celestial navigation. “This was way before anybody heard or even dreamed of GPS,” Headle says. Since the advent of GPS technology, the role of an airplane navigator has been phased out. However, in Headle’s day, navigators were as vital as pilots for safe aviation. Further, navigation in the Arctic is complicated by the fact that the geographic North Pole and the magnetic North Pole aren’t in the same location. “You can’t use a regular compass when a plane is north of the magnetic pole,” Headle notes. “That’s when magnetic compasses start to spin — they’re useless at that point. To navigate, you had to un-slave the compass and use it as a directional gyro. Plus, you didn’t always have the stars for navigation.” Headle’s star reference alludes to a major complication of navigating in the Arctic in the summertime: the legendary whitenights phenomenon. In the summer, the sun barely sets in the Arctic Circle, so the nighttime is bright instead of dark — making standard celestial navigation impossible because the stars aren’t visible during those white nights and therefore aren’t available as navigational aids. Moreover, navigators in the Arctic must use an “artificial


SNOW-CAPPED TAKEOFF Air Force navigator Bruce Headle’s C-130 transport plane received a major boost from jet-assisted takeoff technology that produced a clearly visible wake upon departure ON THE COVER Headle’s ski-equipped C-130 flew countless missions in the high-risk Arctic — since then, he has enjoyed land travel via dog mushing with Siberian Huskies

Courtesy Photos

overlay” because “longitude lines converge at the top of earth and you can’t measure any heading where they all come together,” Headle says. In such extreme conditions, with multiple orientation challenges, it’s a classic understatement to say that a pilot had to totally trust a navigator. “Pilots had no idea what we were doing,” Headle says. “Flying north of the magnetic North Pole makes for some interesting navigation — pilots got really quiet

because they didn’t know where the heck we were going.” The airborne fates of pilots and navigators were as interconnected as a pair of Mount Everest climbers tethered together for safety. One mistake, by either the pilot or the navigator, could too easily spell doom for the entire crew. That was the pre-GPS reality for every pilot and navigator, and this lifeand-death dynamic was magnified and intensified by flying in the Arctic region. In those days, Headle adds, Air Force

planes in the Arctic occasionally “got lost trying to map-read because they couldn’t figure out where the heck they were.” When Headle’s Air Force team undertook an air-drop mission to T-3 — aka Fletcher’s Ice Island — all of the above navigational handicaps were in full force. The island was about halfway between the northern tip of Greenland and the geographic North Pole, he notes. According to the Firebirds.org website, “guiding aircraft over the barren sea ice and open water to the constantly changing

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position of T-3” was a monumental feat, in part because “accurate weather forecasting was impossible” due to “the absence of reporting stations and the distance … over remote Arctic wastes.” Indeed, T-3 wasn’t connected to any land mass … so it would drift in the Arctic Ocean. This circumstance resulted in the following surreal reality: At times, Fletcher’s Ice Island would drift from the territorial waters of the United States into the territorial waters of the Soviet Union. Since this was during the decadeslong Cold War, you can surmise that such a jurisdiction transition presented a problem for the U.S. personnel on T-3. The solution? “Our Navy would have to abandon the research lab,” Headle says. “The Russians got the island for as long as it was in their territory. They were on it for a while, and when it drifted back we reoccupied it.” Ongoing missions to Greenland were another dicey undertaking for Headle and his Anchorage-based Air Force team. His C-130 transport plane would fly from Alaska, on the far western end of North America, and soar clear across Canada to supply and support two air sites on the far eastern end of the continent. “We were the lifeline to two radar sites on opposite sides of the spine of Greenland,” Headle says. “We flew off the hard runway at Greenland’s Sondrestrom Air Base to the open-snow landings at the sites. We delivered whatever was needed — diesel fuel, workers, food, whatever was needed to keep them going.” Headle’s plane was outfitted for Arctic conditions. More specifically, his C-130 was ski-equipped. Yes, an airplane with skis — “26-foot Teflon-coated skis, like the Teflon on kitchen pots and pans,” he says, allowing for takeoffs and landings on snow and ice. With a special focus on landing gear, Headle outlines the journey as follows: • Starting at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Anchorage, “we’d take off on wheels.” • For a refueling pit stop in Yellowknife, the capital of Canada’s Northwest Territories, “we’d land on wheels on their only hard runway.” • From Yellowknife, “we’d take off on wheels and land on wheels at Sondrestrom — commercial airliners from Denmark would also land there.” • From the Air Force base at Sondrestrom, “we’d take off on wheels and 6

VIEW FROM INSIDE A look at a snow runway from navigator Bruce Headle’s C-130 cockpit — in the 1970s, his Air Force unit supplied two Greenland air sites in far northeastern North America then retract the wheel gear and drop the skis so we could land on skis on the snow at the two Greenland air sites.” By the way, Greenland is linked historically and politically to Denmark — and Sondrestrom means “south stream” in Danish. Another facet of Headle’s C-130 connects with its need for a JATO, the acronym for a jet-assisted takeoff — although no jet is actually involved. The term is synonymous with the technically more accurate RATO, or rocket-assisted takeoff. Because his C-130 transport aircraft often carried heavy cargo, additional thrust from small rockets mounted at the rear of the plane boosted the takeoff power while reducing the runway distance needed to go airborne. “The jet-assisted takeoff gave us enough speed to get off the ground,” he says — and in honor of this helpful aviation technology, he named one of his Siberian Huskies JATO. Headle and his wife have owned numerous Huskies. “My wife likes dog shows, so I like dog shows — you know how that works,” he observes. “I’d rather hook them up to a sled. … I prefer mushing dogs for fun and recreation.” Yet while dog mushing is Alaska’s official state sport — underscored by the signature Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race — Headle didn’t pursue mushing full-time when he retired from the Air Force in 1979.

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REFLECTING ON CLASSIC C-130 Air Force and Vietnam veteran Bruce Headle contemplates the legendary C-130 transport plane • “The C-130 is a big four-engine, four-propeller plane with turbojets — it’s been around for more than 50 years, and almost every country in the world has them” • “In a crisis, C-130s can go in and land on shorter runways and dirt runways with a big load, in the jungle or in the Arctic — we had 30,000 pounds in a C-130 … that’s why they’re used so much everywhere” • “The C-130 is also a Hurricane Hunter” Hurricane Hunters are aircraft that fly directly into hurricanes and are otherwise used for weather reconnaissance missions ——————————————————————————— Instead, he pursued more schooling. “I wanted to do something totally different,” he says. “I went back to college for elementary education for two years and got a teaching certificate.” He never taught his own class but was a substitute teacher for 19 years, usually in long-term sub roles for grades 1-6 — filling in for a teacher on maternity leave, for example. Some educators would assert that substitute teaching is the academic equivalent of combat duty.


ON THE RADAR Air Force veteran Bruce Headle was a navigator for a C-130 transport plane that supported two radar sites in Greenland — one of these sites is in the background Courtesy Photos

GREENLAND — FAST FACTS Based in Alaska, Air Force veteran Bruce Headle served as the navigator for a C-130 transport plane that supplied two radar air sites in Greenland • Greenland is the largest island in the world — and it’s more than three times the size of Texas. • Geographically, Greenland is considered part of North America. • Politically, Greenland is a dependency of Denmark — officially, a self-governing Danish administrative division. • Greenlandic has replaced Danish as the official language. • A massive ice sheet, second only to Antarctica’s size-wise, covers over four-fifths of Greenland. Sources — Britannica.com + WorldAtlas.com —————————————————————————————————————————— But to a veteran of Vietnam and high-risk Arctic missions, the comparison falls as flat as a snow-packed runway on a desolate ice island. “Some people say I’ve done a lot of interesting things in my life and I should write a book — but nobody would read it,” says Headle. You be the judge of his self-effacing assertion: If this story continued from here, would you keep reading? + ——————————————————————————————————— Actually, you can keep reading if you wish! CLICK HERE for Part 1 of the Bruce Headle story in Today Magazine’s July 2021 edition, featuring his riveting Vietnam and early NASA tales TODAY MAGAZINE – www.TodayPublishing.net – JANUARY 2022

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AVON TODAY

NOTEWORTHY NONPROFITS

Village Couple Raises $30K For Families Holiday Giving Tree donors spread cheer By Bruce Deckert Editor-in-Chief • Today Magazine

AN AVON COUPLE has raised big-time funds for a significant holiday program sponsored by The Village for Families & Children. A nonprofit social service agency based in Hartford, The Village focuses on an essential goal with many interrelated facets. “The Village’s mission,” per its website, “is to build a community of strong, healthy families who protect and nurture children.” The nonprofit’s Holiday Giving Tree program supports this mission, and Dana and David Misorski have supported this festive initiative by fundraising nearly

Dana, Lane and David Misorski

$31,000 since 2015. The program provides gift cards for families in need so they can purchase toys, food and necessities during and after the holiday season. David and Dana — who is known as “Mrs. Christmas” — serve as volunteer ambassadors for The Village. Dana wants all children to experience “that time of year where magic should exist,” she says. While the holidays can be full of joyous

moments, the season is also known to be a stressful time for families — financially and emotionally. In the mist of this seasonal tension, Dana sees an opportunity to give back. “The holidays are so meaningful to a lot of people, and they can be challenging for many others,” she says. “If there’s something I can do to help, or ease a continued on page 13

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Lauren Gardner is the public relations and marketing coordinator at FOCUS Center for Autism in Canton —————————————————————— ACROSS THE UNITED STATES, adults with autism and their families are in crisis. Although autism is a diagnosis that often requires lifelong support, once an individual with autism graduates from high school or reaches the age of 22, services and funding come to a halt. Studies have shown that adults with autism are the least likely to be employed and to live independently compared with adults of the same age with serious mental illness and intellectual disability. In addition, preliminary health data reveals that adults with an autism diagnosis die an average of 16 years earlier than those without an autism diagnosis and are nine times more likely to die from suicide. Despite an estimated 700,000 to 1.1 million American youth with autism entering adulthood over the next decade, there is extraordinarily little funding

and few services to support this growing population. Consider JD: At 28 years old, he is an adult with autism who currently lives in Simsbury with his parents — JD’s full name has been withheld to protect his privacy. Despite job readiness and employment programs, JD is still without a job. His parents worry about his future, wondering where he will live and how he will afford to make it on Supplemental Security Income alone. SSI is a federal program that gives monthly payments to adults and children with a disability. The lack of federal and state funding makes it extremely difficult for adults like JD to find much-needed support. Connecticut offers support through the Department of Social Services autism waiver, but this system provides services for only 116 individuals statewide. Over 1,700 individuals are currently on the wait list — requiring a 10-year wait. Canton-based FOCUS Center for Autism recognizes the extreme lack of

VALLEY INTEL services and funding experienced by both providers and families. In response, FOCUS has created an Adult Support Services Program to address the unique needs of adults and their families with autism in the community. The program provides daily check-ins, online activities via Zoom for 15 hours each week, and a two-hour weekly in-person social club. The program’s initial goal is to help participants develop the skills they need to integrate into the community. Unfortunately, the pandemic has further isolated this population and created a greater need for social connection. FOCUS hopes to develop the Adult Support Services Program further to include the employment and social supports these special individuals will need throughout their lives. + www.focuscenterforautism.org

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FARMINGTON TODAY

Suburban Park’s legacy, Unionville history intersect By Vincenzo Frosolone Special to Today Magazine

OLIVIA GERMANO spent over 400 hours helping her son Timothy research his flourishing community project about Suburban Park, besides volunteers and members of the Unionville Museum and Farmington Historical Society. Their combing through historical books, photographs and magazines anticipated mowing overgrown walkways and erecting 13 informative plaques throughout the 20.5-acre landmark. They held a celebratory event with a carousel, ice cream and, fittingly, a trolley ride. A former amusement park in Unionville, Suburban Park was open from 1895-1905.

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HISTORY HIGHLIGHTS For his Eagle Scout project, Timothy sought “something that was of historical significance … something that needed to be brought back to life, something that he could leave for years to come,” says Olivia, a longtime Farmington resident. Incidentally, Timothy’s findings revived interest in the carousel. The Carousel Museum in Bristol had not had it on record. It became an exhibit thanks to the great-granddaughters of the park’s owner and operator, Charles A. Hackney. Hackney acquired Suburban Park after the owners of the Hartford Suburban Railway and subsequently their hires, construction workers and loggers John Parsons and son, underestimated their abilities to properly manage an amusement park, according to Olivia. The original owners enticed weekend riders, plotting to spur suburban development, but soon enlisted the Parsons team to construct a dance hall grander than the one at rival Luna Park in Hartford. Hackney had already found nearby Chutes Park to be a more lucrative site for his carousel. Even though the Parsons had specified that if their loan was not paid off within a specific time frame they would inherit the park, they ended up beckoning for Hackney’s return. Hackney profited from the ice cream parlor, picnics, tennis court and the photographer he hired. When Suburban Park first opened, there was an entry fee for a brief period before the fee was eliminated in favor

Timothy Germano installed educational signs at Suburban Park via his Eagle Scout project

continued on page 14

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SIMSBURY TODAY

VFW Chief Wins Scholarship For Drone Training Special to Today Magazine

THERE ARE 3,510 veteran-owned businesses in the state, according to Census.gov, and Lee Wilson is on track to own the next one. The commander of Simsbury-based VFW Post 1926, Wilson is a decorated Army sergeant who served during Operation Desert Storm and the First Gulf War. He has won a scholarship for free online drone pilot training from Aquiline Drones, a drone manufacturer and technology company whose mission is to make Connecticut the drone capital of America. Wilson, a resident of Avon, is a computer technician employed by the Connecticut department of the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW). After completing the Flight to the Future online course offered by Aquiline Drones, he will earn a Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) drone pilot certification, industry-specific drone instruction and hands-on support in establishing an independent drone business. “I couldn’t stop admiring Aquiline

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also crucial to local, statewide, national and international border security. “It’s our goal to help the 9,000plus unemployed military veterans in Connecticut become trained and employed in a high-paying career that enhances their unique set of skills and dedication to public safety,” says Barry Alexander, founder and CEO of Aquiline Drones. “As the demand for commercial drone operations continues to increase, Commander Wilson will be armed with the proper knowledge, mastery, certification and specialization to successfully fulfill the needs of others with jobs and opportunities.”

Specifically, Aquiline’s Flight to the Future training course prepares a participant to become a licensed drone pilot and business operator in four steps: Comprehensive online training and real-time one-on-one instruction help students become commercial drone pilots certified by the FAA. Additional teaching provides more robust and in-depth exposure to these topics. Participants discover how cloud and edge computing, the Internet of Things (IoT) and artificial intelligence (AI) are

VILLAGE — continued from page 8 burden for families in any way, I know that I need to try.” The outreach is a team effort. While Dana has been the driving force, David and their 7-year-old daughter Lane have worked together in a full-steam-ahead endeavor, encouraging support from friends and strangers alike. The family moved to Avon from Farmington in June 2015. Dana has inspired local schools and businesses to get on board the holiday train — including the Goddard School of Farmington, a combination preschooland-daycare program that collected almost $1,000 in gift cards this year. Her annual fundraising has steadily increased. In 2020 she raised more than $7,000 to purchase gift cards for families. This year her aim was $8,000, but she surpassed that goal by raising over $9,000. “I’m always in awe of the support we receive,” she said. “It’s not just about helping families provide toys and food — though that’s of course a big part — but it’s also about the feeling … it’s about knowing there’s somebody out there who cares enough to try and help.” Trying to help — and following through with tangible support — has been a hallmark of The Village for more than 200 years. The Village for Families & Children was founded in 1809 as the Hartford Female Beneficent Society, and the organization was one of the first in the nation to provide homes for neglected children, per its website. Two centuries later, The Village offers a diverse range of services — including behavioral health, early childhood and youth development, substance-abuse treatment and other

support programs for children, families and adults in Greater Hartford. Due to the COVID pandemic, the Holiday Giving Tree shifted gears in 2020. Instead of collecting toys, the program gave gift cards to families so they could select toys and other gifts for their children. Many families told The Village that the ability to choose in their giftgiving was a major gift itself that boosted their sense of dignity. Before COVID hit, when Dana was still buying toys for the Holiday Giving Tree, she and David met a teen employee at a local toy store as they loaded literally hundreds of toys into their car. Upon learning that the toys were part of a Village initiative, the teen explained that he was a “child of The Village” — he had received support there throughout his childhood. “That young man has stayed in my heart for years,” Dana says. “I take a lot of

TEST reshaping the drone industry — while learning about Aquiline’s industry-leading Command and Control (C2) platform, a cloud-connected drone management service that offers aviation-grade safety and compliance measures.

Students gain specialized expertise using an advanced drone flight simulator to explore in-depth drone applications such as videography, asset inspection, surveying and security in their quest to become an industry expert. continued on page 14

comfort in the fact that he spoke so highly of The Village. We live on that inspiration year after year.” The inspiration of the holiday season can give hope to families — and the Holiday Giving Tree is proof of the power of sacrificial giving in engendering hope — yet the stress of the holidays can exacerbate a family’s hurts and heartaches. “We believe that families can thrive despite traumatic experiences they may have suffered in the past or adversity that may overwhelm them now,” says The Village’s LinkedIn page. “The work we do enables children to be socially and emotionally healthy, thrive in safe and permanent homes and … succeed academically.” The Village’s main campus is on Albany Avenue, complemented by two other Hartford locations: The Village South on Wethersfield Avenue and the Spring Street Family Center. The Village’s model is to customize programs that treat the whole person, per the LinkedIn page — thereby helping children, adults and families “build resilience to overcome challenges that life throws at them.” The agency’s complementary construction goal is as follows: “Our work also builds strong, stable communities.” This mission wholeheartedly dovetails with Dana Misorski’s heart for giving back. “Overall, I want to spread as much awareness as possible,” she says. “At the end of the day, all you can do is put good out into the world and hope that people become inspired by it and want to do more.” + www.thevillage.org Source — Village for Families & Children Today Magazine editor-in-chief Bruce Deckert is an award-winning journalist

TODAY MAGAZINE – www.TodayPublishing.net – JANUARY 2022

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Suburban Park in Unionville featured a carousel at this site Photos by Vincenzo Frosolone

PARK — continued from page 10

DRONE — continued from page 13

of having guests pay for the various attractions. However, money was not Hackney’s primary focus. He was charitable and gracious to his guests, Olivia says. When Hackney took over the park, he incorporated a pagoda, positioned halfway up one of the steep hills, so that people could rest their feet and have tea and scones. When the swimming pond froze over in the winter, he sold the ice to local hospitals so patients with high fevers could take ice baths. He entertained up to a thousand local orphaned children for each of their Sunday outings. Hartford’s Camp Courant scouted Suburban Park as one of the first locations where they would take underprivileged children on excursions. In addition to the groups of chaperoned children, the demographic on Sundays was generally women and their own children strolling through the park or attending one of the park-sponsored dances, which were held on Thursdays and Fridays and twice on Saturdays. Couples usually occupied the evening dances. Entire families would attend events and picnics sponsored by local businesses. A crowd of 3,000 guests attended the park’s grand opening on May 30, 1895. About 300 attended the culmination of

In this step, participants are led through all aspects of drone business ownership and are given key services based on their industry preferences. A turn-key solution tailored to their specific interests and needs, this step reviews: business formation, drone and equipment leasing, insurance, maintenance plans, and accounting and marketing services. Thus far, Wilson has completed two lesson modules and is enjoying learning about the aerodynamics of drones. “Winning this scholarship is the perfect holiday gift that blends my professional technology background with my personal passion for the drone industry,” Wilson says. “I look forward to ascending to new heights — literally and figuratively — in 2022.” The Flight to the Future program costs $1299, but Aquiline Drones is offering a $200 discount for all veterans and active military personnel. Aquiline Drones is located in Hartford’s financial district. The company’s core management comprises highly experienced aviators, systems engineers, IT gurus, active military, veterans and business strategists. +

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Timothy’s Eagle Scout project in 2019 that celebrated the historical reopening of Suburban Park. In the past 125-plus years, the park has undergone many phases and changes to approach its current state as a preserved open space in Farmington. Indeed, the park’s spirit has lingered over Unionville, finally captured and rekindled by Timothy and Olivia. Timothy’s comprehensive website profiles his project and information about the park — www.timgermano.wixsite.com/ suburbanparkct You can also visit his Facebook page on Suburban Park — www.facebook.com/ suburbanparkct The community appreciates Timothy’s honorable contribution to Unionville’s history. + Today Magazine featured Suburban Park in our November 2021 edition: www.TodayPublishing.net/digital-editions

JANUARY 2022 – www.TodayPublishing.net – TODAY MAGAZINE

www.aquilinedrones.com


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TODAY MAGAZINE – www.TodayPublishing.net – JANUARY 2022

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JANUARY 2022 – www.TodayPublishing.net – TODAY MAGAZINE

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TODAY MAGAZINE – www.TodayPublishing.net – JANUARY 2022

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JANUARY 2022 – www.TodayPublishing.net – TODAY MAGAZINE


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