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PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE FROM GALLERY                

   


The Book  as  Art  v.6.0:  Pulp   Presented  by  the  Decatur  Arts  Alliance,     Georgia  Center  for  the  Book,  DeKalb  Library  Foundation,  and  the  Decatur  Library     August  10–September  28,  2018   A  book  begins  as  a  small  mass  of  material,  formed  and  pressed  into  life  by  ideas,  words,  and   machines.  Pulp  becomes  paper,  becomes  thought,  becomes  word,  becomes  book,  becomes   sculpture.     Pulp  is  the  impetus  and  endgame  of  these  physical  book  objects.  From  the  tactile  complexity  of   handmade  paper,  to  the  sensational  tabloid  tales  of  pulp  fiction,  these  objects,  in  an  increasingly   digital  world,  stubbornly  survive.     These  objects  interpret  the  concept  of  the  book  and  invite  the  viewer  to  look  beyond  the  printed   page  to  where  word  has  become  form.       Book  As  Art:  Pulp  is  the  sixth  edition  of  this  critically  acclaimed  artist  book  exhibition  established   by  the  Decatur  Arts  Alliance  in  2013.  Entries  hail  from  across  the  United  States  and  around  the   world,  and  from  emerging  artists  as  well  as  recognized  masters  in  the  genre.  The  Book  As  Art  is   pleased  to  present  these  examples  from  the  finest  in  the  field.     .     Jurors  are  Lisa  Beth  Robinson,  Greenville,  NC;  Stephanie  Smith,  Decatur,  GA;   and  Cynthia  Nourse  Thompson,  Philadelphia,  PA.     Special  events:     Opening  Reception,  August  24,  7:00  –  9:00  p.m.     Closing  Reception  and  White  Glove  Night,  September  28.,  7:00  –  9:00  p.m.     On  White  Glove  Night,  we're  putting  away  the  "do  not  touch"  signs.    Volunteers  will  provide   participants  with  white  gloves  allowing  firsthand  exploration  of  the  books  in  the  exhibition.           Organizing  Committee   Angie  Macon,  Executive  Director,  Decatur  Arts  Alliance   Joe  Davich,  Director,  Georgia  Center  for  the  Book   Gina  Reynoso,  Coordinator,  White  Glove  Nights   Dot  Moye,  Jury  Coordinator,  The  Book  as  Art     Lockey  McDonald,  Registrar   Cynthia  Lollis,  Anna  Carnes,  Anna  Fallon,  and  Charlotte  Pfieffer            


Islam Aly,  Cedar  Falls,  IA    

Fantastic  Fauna   Johannot  paper;  3  images,  laser-­‐engraved  wooden  boards;   large  book,  ten  sections  with  four  folios;    miniature  books,  five  sections  with  three  folios   Edition  of  40     Islam  Aly  is  currently  an  assistant  professor  of  Art  Education  in  the  Department  of  Art  at  the   University  of  Northern  Iowa.  At  Helwan  University,  Egypt,  he  received  a  BA  and  an  MA  in  Art   Education;  afterward,  he  graduated  from  the  University  of  Iowa,  with  an  MFA  in  Book  Arts  and  a   Ph.D.  in  Teaching  and  Learning  with  a  concentration  in  Art  Education.  His  books  explore  the   possibilities  of  historical  bindings  in  contemporary  book  art  practice.  He  has  combined  book   traditions  with  digital  technologies.  His  work  is  created  at  the  junction  between  culture,   technology,  and  aesthetics.   Photography  credit:  Islam  Aly


Islam Aly,  Cedar  Falls,  IA    

  Sacred  Meanings   Laser  cut  mould-­‐made  Johannot  paper   Edition  of  40,  #20/40     Islam  Aly  is  currently  an  assistant  professor  of  Art  Education  in  the  Department  of  Art  at  the   University  of  Northern  Iowa.  At  Helwan  University,  Egypt,  he  received  a  BA  and  an  MA  in  Art   Education;  afterward,  he  graduated  from  the  University  of  Iowa,  with  an  MFA  in  Book  Arts  and  a   Ph.D.  in  Teaching  and  Learning  with  a  concentration  in  Art  Education.  His  books  explore  the   possibilities  of  historical  bindings  in  contemporary  book  art  practice.  He  has  combined  book   traditions  with  digital  technologies.  His  work  is  created  at  the  junction  between  culture,   technology,  and  aesthetics.     Photography  credit:  Islam  Aly  


Andi Arnovitz,  Jerusalem,  Israel    

  ACID   Etchings,  aquatint,  spit  bite,  hand  bound  box,  embossed  cove     Born  in  1959  in  Kansas  City,  USA,  Andi  Arnovitz  now  lives  and  works  in  Jerusalem,  Israel.  A   conceptual  artist,  she  uses  etching,  digital  information  and  various  printmaking  processes,  as   well  as  fabric  and  thread  to  create  both  print  series,  artist  books  and  large-­‐scale  installations.   These  pieces  explore  various  tensions  that  exist  within  religion,  gender  and  politics.  Andi  has   exhibited  her  work  in  England,  China,  The  United  States,  Israel,  Spain,  Poland,  Finland,  Germany,   France,  Lithuania,  Canada,  Italy,  Mallorca  and  Bulgaria.  She  has  had  many  one-­‐woman  shows  and   participated  in  multiple  group  shows.  Her  work  is  in  many  private  collections  in  both  the  United   States  and  in  Europe,  as  well  as  major  universities,  museums  and  institutions,  including  the  US   Library  of  Congress,  The  Smithsonian,  The  Israel  National  Library,  The  Museum  of  Art  in  Ein   Harod,  The  Islamic  Museum,  The  Smithsonian  and  Yeshiva  University  Museum.   Photography  credit:  Andi  Arnovitz  


Andi Arnovitz,  Jerusalem,  Israel    

  Kidnapped   Digital  laser  cut  dolls,  handmade  cage,  silkscreened  bag     Born  in  1959  in  Kansas  City,  USA,  Andi  Arnovitz  now  lives  and  works  in  Jerusalem,  Israel.  A   conceptual  artist,  she  uses  etching,  digital  information  and  various  printmaking  processes,  as   well  as  fabric  and  thread  to  create  both  print  series,  artist  books  and  large-­‐scale  installations.   These  pieces  explore  various  tensions  that  exist  within  religion,  gender  and  politics.  Andi  has   exhibited  her  work  in  England,  China,  The  United  States,  Israel,  Spain,  Poland,  Finland,  Germany,   France,  Lithuania,  Canada,  Italy,  Mallorca  and  Bulgaria.  She  has  had  many  one-­‐woman  shows  and   participated  in  multiple  group  shows.  Her  work  is  in  many  private  collections  in  both  the  United   States  and  in  Europe,  as  well  as  major  universities,  museums  and  institutions,  including  the  US   Library  of  Congress,  The  Smithsonian,  The  Israel  National  Library,  The  Museum  of  Art  in  Ein   Harod,  The  Islamic  Museum,  The  Smithsonian  and  Yeshiva  University  Museum.     Photography  credit:  Andi  Arnovitz                


Andi Arnovitz,  Jerusalem,  Israel    

  Living  Borders   Digital  prints  of  hand  drawings/hand  cut   Edition  of  6     Born  in  1959  in  Kansas  City,  USA,  Andi  Arnovitz  now  lives  and  works  in  Jerusalem,  Israel.  A   conceptual  artist,  she  uses  etching,  digital  information  and  various  printmaking  processes,  as   well  as  fabric  and  thread  to  create  both  print  series,  artist  books  and  large-­‐scale  installations.   These  pieces  explore  various  tensions  that  exist  within  religion,  gender  and  politics.  Andi  has   exhibited  her  work  in  England,  China,  The  United  States,  Israel,  Spain,  Poland,  Finland,  France,   Germany,  Lithuania,  Canada,  Italy,  Mallorca  and  Bulgaria.  She  has  had  many  one-­‐woman  shows   and  participated  in  multiple  group  shows.  Her  work  is  in  many  private  collections  in  both  the   United  States  and  in  Europe,  as  well  as  major  universities,  museums  and  institutions,  including   the  US  Library  of  Congress,  The  Smithsonian,  The  Israel  National  Library,  The  Museum  of  Art  in   Ein  Harod,  The  Islamic  Museum,  The  Smithsonian  and  Yeshiva  University  Museum.   Photography  credit:  Avshlom  Avital                      


Elizabeth Ashcroft,  San  Francisco,  CA    

  Chasm   Altered  book     The Dissected Library is the title I have bestowed upon my ongoing series of altered books. I find the literal board-paper-thread-glue-ink-word essence of the book offers a unique platform to cut into, build onto and burst out of in both two- and three-dimensional forms. I use every facet of the book as a building block to create both wall and freestanding sculptural pieces. In the Open Book series of which “Chasm” is a part, I peruse the pages and choose words and phrases to cut & fold & spill out of the permanently fanned open book leafs – my own form of editing if you will. An opportunity to “write” a new fluttering narrative of randomly chosen segments of someone else’s story – not a formal narrative but one where one’s eye flicks among the words, finding links that connect and reconnect into subsequent uniquely personal narrative tiers. In addition to the essence of the word play, their physical presence creates interlocking spatial relationships through patterns and shadows. Photography  credit:  Elizabeth  Ashcroft


R Burton,  Havre  de  Grace,  MD    

Blue  Highway  #22     Digital  images  inkjet  printed,  assorted  papers     Blue  highways  are  the  small,  winding,  and  less  traveled  roads  printed  in  blue  on  vintage  road   maps.  Taken  at  a  leisurely  pace,  these  highways  provide  an  interesting  view  of  the  passing   landscape,  a  perspective  that  is  missed  when  traveling  major  roadways.  Blue  Highway  #22  began   with  a  photo  of  a  country  road  in  southern  New  Jersey.  My  books  explore  the  layers  of   consciousness  and  sub  consciousness  through  which  travel  is  experienced.  I  am  intrigued  by  the   concept  of  travel  -­‐  movement  from  one  physical  point  to  another  and  travel  through  time,  space   and  place.   Photography  credit:  R  Burton


Robert Creighton,  North  Dundas,  ON,  Canada    

  stones   Mixed  media  bound  book  and  portfolio   Limited  edition  of  20     Photography  credit:  Robert  Creighton                              


Debra Disman,  Santa  Monica,  CA    

  Burning  Bush   Artists'  Book/Sculpture   One  of  a  kind,  discrete  work     I  currently  work  both  as  a  solo  practitioner  and  in  the  public  sphere  of  community  engagement  in   the  form  of  the  book,  in  forms  inspired  by  the  book,  and  in  new  sculptural  media  of  my  own   devising  which  push  the  boundaries  of  the  book  into  new  forms  and  materials.  Although  the  work   remains  tethered  to  loose  definitions  of  the  book  as  structure,  it  is  moving  progressively  into   other  sculptural  and  conceptual  realms  where  labor,  repetition  and  a  passion  for  the  haptic   (Debra  Disman,  Santa  Monica,  CA    


Debra Disman,  Santa  Monica,  CA    

  Profusion   Artists'  Book/Sculpture   One  of  a  kind,  discrete  work     I  currently  work  both  as  a  solo  practitioner  and  in  the  public  sphere  of  community  engagement  in   the  form  of  the  book,  in  forms  inspired  by  the  book,  and  in  new  sculptural  media  of  my  own   devising  which  push  the  boundaries  of  the  book  into  new  forms  and  materials.  Although  the  work   remains  tethered  to  loose  definitions  of  the  book  as  structure,  it  is  moving  progressively  into   other  sculptural  and  conceptual  realms  where  labor,  repetition  and  a  passion  for  the  haptic     (<http://www.dictionary.com/browse/haptic>) become  powerful  motivators  and  themes.   Having  worked  extensively  with  the  built  environment,  I  am  fascinated  by  the  parallels  between   books  and  buildings  in  terms  of  structure,  meaning  and  utility;  each  creates  public  and  private   spaces  where  stories  are  "read”  on  many  levels,  often  revealing  more  than  their  authors  and   makers  ever  intended.  I  try  to  create  such  places  and  spaces  of  contemplation,  realization  and   bafflement  in  my  work  and  to  instigate  investigation,  exploration  and  discovery  in  myself  and   others.   Photography  credit:  Bernard  Wolf


Mari Eckstein  Gower,  Redmond,  WA    

  Common  Threads   Artist  book  with  parchment  page  overlays   Edition  of  40     Forming  Common  Threads  examines  how  storytelling  informs,  inspires  and  transforms  our  lives.   I’ve  taken  stories  of  strong  women  from  history  and  myth  and  used  them  as  a  form  of  antidote  to   the  belittling,  toxic  and  hurtful  comments  I  grew  up  with.  Traditionally  myths,  histories  and  all   the  best  stories  have  been  a  means  of  communicating  deep  truths  about  human  existence.  To  me,   these  are  the  type  of  tales  that  form  a  thread  of  ideas  with  the  power  to  inspire  me  to  move   forward.  When  I  was  young,  I  was  often  told  things  like,  “Girls  can’t  do  that.”  Instead  of  allowing   such  stifling  comments  stop  me,  I’d  study  historical  examples  as  a  form  of  psychic  band-­‐aid  for   the  hurt.  Looking  at  the  accomplishments  of  women  like  Amelia  Earhart  or  Nellie  Bly,  I’d  think,   “Wait  a  minute.  They  didn’t  let  being  female  stop  them  from  flying  an  airplane  or  writing   exposes.”   Photography  credit:  Laura  Russell


Mari Eckstein  Gower,  Redmond,  WA    

  Songs  of  Celestial  Navigators     Artist  book  with  parchment  page  overlays   12"  x  10.5"  x  .75"   Edition  40     I  started  painting  elephants  as  a  form  of  meditation.  I’d  been  working  on  big  projects  intently  for   two  years.  I’d  just  started  a  new  project  that  involved  intensive  research  on  world  cosmologies,   calendars  and  time.  I  soon  realized,  though,  that  I  was  tired  and  needed  to  recharge.  Also  at  that   time  current  world  events  had  left  me  sad,  worried,  and  bewildered.  So  I  began  painting   elephants.  In  the  back  of  my  mind,  I  envisioned  the  elephants  that  were  once  believed  to  support   the  earth  as  it  traveled  through  the  heavens.  I  also  thought  about  the  Hindu  deity  Ganesha.  As  the   remover  of  obstacles,  he  is  the  perfect  companion  for  someone  on  an  artistic  journey.  The   elephants  turned  into  a  little  altarpiece,  partly  to  Ganesha,  partly  to  the  celestial  elephants,  but   mostly  to  healing.   Photography  credit:  Ross  Mulhausen  and  Kat  Gower                  


Andrew Huot,  Norcross,  GA    

  Walks  with  Rosie   Artist’s  Book,  letterpress  and  relief  on  sekishu   Edition  of  20     My  art  is  about  my  observations  of  the  world's  small,  passed-­‐over  details.  Looking  at  everyday   situations,  I  distill  them  down  to  their  essence  and  then  extend  those  situations  outward  to  our   collective  experience.  I  want  to  make  the  viewer  laugh  or  pause  to  consider  the  unnoticed  details   of  the  world.  My  goal  is  to  make  well-­‐crafted  artist  books  and  prints  that  tell  a  story  in  a  graphic   and  oblique  way.  My  process  starts  with  observing  life  around  me;  gathering  details,  making  lists,   drawing  diagrams,  and  maps.  I  find  the  lines  and  shapes  of  patterns  that  I  then  use  to  begin  the   process  of  developing  a  complete  experience,  a  path  for  the  viewer  to  navigate.  I  work  in   traditional  bookbinding  structures  and  use  methods  of  reproduction  such  as  woodblock  and   letterpress  printing  for  the  tactile  qualities  they  give  to  the  final  artwork.  Themes  running   through  my  work  include  commentary  on  everyday  life  and  the  unobserved  humor  of  the     day-­‐to-­‐day.   Photography  credit:  Andrew  Huot


Myda Iamiceli,  Carrollton,  GA    

  50/50:  Finding  Myself  Within  Two  Cultures   Mixed  media,  ink,  paper,  board,  book  arts   Edition  of  5     Myda  Iamiceli's  artwork  and  design  investigates  the  immigrant  and  second-­‐generation  American   and  concepts  of  identity,  hybridity,  adaptation,  memories,  place  and  belonging.  As  a  second-­‐ generation  Cuban-­‐American,  Myda  is  an  American  but  Cuba  is  present  in  her  life  every  day.  She   lives  within  two  worlds.  To  explore  this  experience,  she  has  created  autobiographical  books  that   employ  ethnographic  research  methods  and  conducts  interviews  with  first-­‐  and  second-­‐ generation  Americans  to  learn  about  their  experiences  and  perceptions  of  identity.  These   interviews  provide  rich  content  to  create  work  that  visually  reveals  how  our  experiences  shape   our  cultural  identities.  Myda  believes  storytelling  is  key  to  understanding  other  cultures  and  the   complexities  of  identity.  Through  visual  storytelling  her  intent  is  to  engage  the  audience  and  gain   understanding,  acceptance  and  cultural  empathy.   Photography  credit:  Myda  Iamiceli


Diane Jacobs,  Portland,  OR    

REP-­‐HAIR-­‐ATION       Letterpress,  etching,  relief,  gocco,  felt,  handmade  paper,  photo  engravings,     collagraph,  human  hair     REP-­‐HAIR-­‐ATION  is  a  portfolio  of  15  prints  using  a  wide  range  of  printing  and  image-­‐making   techniques  that  examines  the  legacy  of  slavery  in  the  United  States.  Throughout  the  portfolio,  the   words  SEE,  FEEL,  OPEN,  and  ACT  are  explored  metaphorically  and  literally,  through  text  and   image,  in  a  meditation  on  institutional  racism  that  continues  today  in  the  form  of  the  prison-­‐ industrial  complex.   Photography  credit:  Bill  Bachuber


Peggy Johnston,  Des  Moines,  IA    

  Podiforma  Prickelarium     Papier  maché,  paper,  paint,  thread  and  fishing  line     My  love  of  paper  and  fascination  with  containers  made  it  almost  inevitable  that  I  would  discover   the  book  arts.  Since  crafting  my  first  book,  I  have  explored  bookmaking  as  an  art  as  well  as  a   craft.  I  focus  on  the  book  as  an  art  object.  I  think  of  myself  as  a  sculptor  using  bookbinding   techniques.  The  mechanics  and  engineering  involved  in  book  structures  fascinate  me.  Often,  I  will   exaggerate  elements  of  book  design  in  creating  these  sculptural  pieces.  I  lean  toward  distinctive   materials  (old  leather,  metal,  wood,  old  books)  when  designing  my  one-­‐of-­‐a-­‐kind  works.  The   materials  I  choose  add  a  tactile  aspect  to  the  work.  I  search  for  just  the  right  materials  for  some   projects,  but  other  times  materials  at  hand  suggest  a  project  or  design  to  me.  I  often  say  that  I  am   not  in  control  of  my  art.  It  controls  me.   Photography  credit:  Peggy  Johnston  


Lauri Jones,  Decatur,  GA    

  Newsfeed   Rust  print  on  textile,  machine  pieced,  hand  quilted     My  rust  prints  are  the  product  of  an  on-­‐going  dialog  with  materials.  With  the  help  of  my  vast   collection  of  rusty  objects,  I  create  compositions  that  are  strange  yet  familiar.  My  work  speaks  of   the  decay  and  rebirth  all  around  us,  and  my  interests  are  rooted  in  themes  of  renewal,   transformation  and  the  inevitable  change  in  all  of  our  lives.   Photography:  Lauri  Jones  


Carole Kunstadt,  West  Hurley,  NY  

  Sacred  Poem  LXIII     Thread,  gampi  tissue,  paper,  pages  from  Parish  Psalmody,  1849     Pages  from  a  Parish  Psalmody  dated  1849  are  cut,  layered  and  recombined,  resulting  in  a   presentation  that  evokes  an  ecumenical  offering  –  poems  of  praise  and  gratitude.  The  focus  is  the   temporal  quality  of  our  lives,  intimacy  and  the  vulnerability  of  memory  and  history.  Utilizing  both   a  reductive  and  additive  process,  embracing  its  inherent  qualities  while  transforming  the  book’s   pages,  the  paper  itself  gains  significance  through  the  process  and  merges  with  a  new  intent.  The   gold  leaf  elevates  and  heightens  the  rich  textural  qualities  presenting  a  sumptuous  visual   experience.  The  interplay  alludes  to  the  enticing  presentation  of  illuminated  texts  historically  and   to  its  potential  as  a  spiritual  repository.  The  interplay  alludes  to  the  enticing  presentation  of   illuminated  texts  historically.  Explored  and  displayed  in  this  visual  context,  the  alteration  of  the   papers’  linear,  tactile,  and  facile  nature  emphasizes  transformation,  while  the  possibility  of   revelation  is  playfully  realized.    Photography:  Kevin  Kunstad


Carole Kunstadt,  West  Hurley,  NY  

Sacred  Poem  LXVIII   Thread,  gampi  tissue,  paper,  pages  from  Parish  Psalmody  1849   9"  x  9"  x  3"   One  of  a  kind     Pages  of  psalms*  are  manipulated  and  recombined,  resulting  in  a  presentation  that  evokes  an   ecumenical  offering  -­‐  poems  of  praise  and  gratitude.  The  aged  pages  suggest  the  temporal  quality   of  our  lives  and  the  vulnerability  of  memory  and  history.  Visually  there  is  a  consistent  and   measured  cadence  to  a  page  of  psalms  which  is  echoed  in  the  repetitive  weaving  or  restructuring   of  the  paper.  The  gold  leaf  elevates  and  heightens  the  rich  textural  qualities  alluding  to  the   enticing  presentation  of  illuminated  texts  historically.  The  intended  use,  as  well  as  the  nature  of  a   psalm  as  spiritual  repository,  both  imply  a  tradition  of  careful  devotion  and  pious  reverence.  The   physical  text  evocatively  and  powerfully  serves  as  a  gateway  to  an  experience  of  the  sacred  and   the  realization  of  the  latent  power  of  the  written  word.       *Sacred  Poem  Series  -­‐  physical,  material,  and  intellectual  inspiration  from  Parish  Psalmody,  A   Collection  of  Psalms  and  Hymns  for  Public  Worship,  published  1849.   Photography  credit:  Kevin  Kunstadt


Amadeo Lasansky,  Nashville,  TN    

  8  Variations  on  a  Rectangle   Soft  cover  accordion  book   Edition  of  10     "I  fell  in  love  with  photography  at  the  end  of  college,"  Amadeo  Lasansky  says.  "I  grew  up  in  a   family  of  artists,  surrounded  by  art,  but  it  wasn't  until  I  looked  through  a  camera,  that  I   discovered  my  own  medium  and  a  way  of  seeing  the  world.  I  love  capturing,  in  one  shot,  the   essence  of  a  person  or  a  scene.  We  each  see  the  world  in  a  unique  way,  and  my  photographs   present  my  particular  vision."  That  vision  has  been  honed  by  traveling  to  over  35  countries  and   documenting  what  he  saw  and  experienced.  The  result  is  a  body  of  work  that  spans  the  world  and   yet  also  brings  the  world  into  focus,  so  to  speak.  These  travels  took  place  during  15  years  that  he   lived  in  New  York  City  and  managed  a  commercial  photo  studio.  Lasansky  recently  relocated  to   Nashville,  where  he  has  discovered  a  whole  new  venue,  much  of  it  the  natural  world  in  and   around  this  vibrant  city,  and  he  began  shooting  in  color.   Photography  credit:  Amadeo  Lasansky


Beth Lee,  Bozeman,  MT    

Piano  Accordion   Artist  book  of  archival  papers  and  card  stock,  inkjet  printing,  brads  and  ribbons   Edition  of  10  

My  primary  focus,  and  my  entrance  into  art,  has  been  alphabet,  symbols,  and  mark  making.  Mark   making  as  a  means  of  communication  across  time,  the  alphabet  as  a  repository  of  knowledge  and   memory  –  these  are  what  inspire  me.  I’m  particularly  interested  in  that  knife-­‐edge  between   pattern  and  meaning,  image  and  message,  definition  and  abstraction.  The  personality  of  the  mark   grabs  me,  and  the  physicality  of  it.  The  viscosity  of  the  medium,  the  pliability  of  the  pen  or  brush,   the  way  the  medium  sinks  into  the  paper  are  all  sources  of  never-­‐ending  interest.   Photography  credit:  Beth  Lee                


Susan Lowdermilk,  Eugene,  OR    

  I  Think  that  the  Root  of  the  Wind  is  Water     Letterpress  text  and  pressure  prints,  pop-­‐up  construction   Edition  of  30     I  am  interested  in  expressing  the  tenuous  qualities  of  the  human  experience  as  visual  and   conceptual  ideas.  I  represent  forms,  shapes  and  objects  as  visual  metaphors.  I  am  interested  in   dualities  in  our  human  condition—chance  versus  strategy,  faith  versus  reason,  serendipity   versus  design,  peace  versus  war,  winning  versus  losing  and  our  relationship  to  and  separation   from  nature.  Our  experience  of  reading  books  is  increasingly  changing  from  being  physical  and   tactile  to  digital  and  virtual.  My  artist  books  are  hand  printed  and  hand  constructed  and  feature   low-­‐tech  movable  elements  that  are  meant  to  be  technologically  transparent.  I  view  these  artist   books  as  a  counterpart  to  the  flood  of  mass-­‐produced,  digital  imagery  that  we  contend  with   constantly.   Photography  credit:  Susan  Lowdermilk    


Susan Lowdermilk,  Eugene,  OR    

  Aviary     Multiple  plate  color  etching,  woodcut,  hand  coloring   Deluxe  edition  of  3   Digital  edition  of  30     I  am  interested  in  expressing  the  tenuous  qualities  of  the  human  experience  as  visual  and   conceptual  ideas.  I  represent  forms,  shapes  and  objects  as  visual  metaphors.  I  am  interested  in   dualities  in  our  human  condition—chance  versus  strategy,  faith  versus  reason,  serendipity   versus  design,  peace  versus  war,  winning  versus  losing  and  our  relationship  to  and  separation   from  nature.  Our  experience  of  reading  books  is  increasingly  changing  from  being  physical  and   tactile  to  digital  and  virtual.  My  artist  books  are  hand  printed  and  hand  constructed  and  feature   low-­‐tech  movable  elements  that  are  meant  to  be  technologically  transparent.  I  view  these  artist   books  as  a  counterpart  to  the  flood  of  mass-­‐produced,  digital  imagery  that  we  contend  with   constantly.   Photography  credit:  David  Simone


Amy Lund,  Portland,  OR    

  Memento  Mori     Book,  handmade  paper   Edition  of  6     My  work  seeks  to  understand  the  quality  and  power  of  Home-­‐-­‐to  grasp  the  practices  of  how  we   live  and  how  it  influences  the  skills  we  learn,  resilience  we  acquire,  its  role  in  our  identity  and  the   happiness  we  hopefully  find.  I  reuse,  remake,  and  rethink  the  materials  and  skills  of  my  domestic   life.  I  transform  the  goods  and  skills  of  both  Home  and  Book  making  visible  the  beauty  and  power   of  each.  The  things  I  make  lure  the  viewer  to  touch,  handle  and  feel,  inciting  a  personal  yet   conceptual  response.   Photography  credit:  Shiloh  Gastello  


Linda McConaughy,  Baltimore,  MD    

Non  Site:  Deer  Isle     Found  objects,  handmade  book,  acrylic  on  paper     My  experience  of  place  is  deeply  personal.  It  is  constructed  through  dialogue  -­‐-­‐  what  a  place   discloses  to  me,  what  draws  me  in:  an  unlikely  meeting  of  colors,  spaces  and  shapes  that  recur   unexpectedly,  patterns  formed  by  growth  and  erosion.  My  work  reflects  my  desire  to  attend  to   and  decode  my  dialogue  with  place,  particularly  with  the  natural  world.  The  landscape  of  the   natural  environment  is  full  of  opportunities  for  decoding  –  even  the  smallest,  most  humble   elements  hold  vast  potential  for  investigation.  My  work  is  informed  by  Robert  Smithson’s   Provisional  Theory  of  Non-­‐Sites  (1968).  Smithson  used  the  term  Non-­‐Sites  to  title  a  group  of  works   based  on  specific  geographic  locations,  or  sites,  which  became  the  source  of  natural  materials  he   transported  and  organized  in  a  gallery  space,  or  Non-­‐Site.  Between  the  actual  site  and  the  Non-­‐ Site  itself  exists  a  space  of  metaphoric  significance.  It  could  be  that  "travel"  in  this  space  is  a  vast   metaphor.     Photography  credit:  Linda  McConaughy  


Sara Norman,  Decatur,  GA    

  A  Book  for  Mom   Book/Paper  arts     My  mother’s  parents  passed-­‐away  leaving  behind  all  of  their  belongings,  including  various  files,   letters,  genealogy  records,  and  documents.  These  are  things  that  can  be  seen  as  clutter  or  trash  at   this  point  in  time.  The  juxtaposition  of  various  documents  reveals  the  true  beauty  of  paper  and   history.   Photography  credit:  Sara  Norman  


Birgit Østergaard,  Aarhus,  Denmark    

Eyes  Wide  Shut     Sculpture     I  started  making  my  own  paper  in  1980  after  an  artist  stay  in  San  Cataldo,  Italy,  where  I  made   paper  at  a  local  workshop.  In  the  following  years,  I  established  a  professional  paper  workshop   and  started  my  journey  into  a  tradition  of  communication  which  crosses  the  historical  and   religious  boundaries.  Discovering  the  endless  possibilities  of  a  plain  sheet  of  handmade  paper  my   artistic  expression  changed  towards  three-­‐dimensional  objects  like  books,  sculptures  and  visual   arts.  I  have  thousands  of  paper  samples  produced  by  plants  from  seaweed  to  horse  manure  and   use  them  as  the  primary  material  in  my  art,  and  after  the  closure  of  my  workshop  in  2008  I   decided  to  gather  some  of  the  most  interesting  experiments  in  the  book  series  PULP.  I  became   and  am  still  astonished  at  the  rich  options  given  through  the  handmade  paper,  and  my  artistic   practice  is  deeply  rooted  in  this  beautiful  craft.   Photography  credit:  Birgit  Østergaard  


Chris Perry,  Ridgefield,  CT    

  163  Ripples:  ladder  (fish)   Book  art   Unique     I  use  hand-­‐made  books  to  impart  information  without  the  use  of  words  or  images:  the  books   themselves  are  the  idea,  the  shape  of  the  paper  the  information.  I  try  to  convey  these  ideas  by   selecting  the  number  and  size  of  the  volumes,  by  how  the  filaments  are  employed  and  by  where   and  what  if  anything  happens  inside  the  assembled  mass.  Frequently  there  are  voids  created   within  the  stack  of  books,  and  these  may  be  viewed  with  varying  degrees  of  clarity  with  the  use  of   a  mirror  reflecting  the  light  back  to  the  viewer.  Other  times  the  interior  is  so  filled  or  the  opening   is  too  small  to  view  what  is  occurring  so  that  only  by  lifting  blocks  of  pages  can  the  interior  be   seen,  just  as  not  all  sources  or  ends  of  water  systems  are  always  readily  visible.   Photography  credit:  Chris  Perry  


Chris Perry,  Ridgefield,  CT    

  172  Ripples:  meltwater   Book  art       Unique     I  use  hand-­‐made  books  to  impart  information  without  the  use  of  words  or  images:  the  books   themselves  are  the  idea,  the  shape  of  the  paper  the  information.  I  try  to  convey  these  ideas  by   selecting  the  number  and  size  of  the  volumes,  by  the  way  the  filaments  are  employed  and  by   where  and  what  if  anything  happens  inside  the  assembled  mass.  Frequently  there  are  voids   created  within  the  stack  of  books  and  these  may  be  viewed  with  varying  degrees  of  clarity  with   the  use  of  a  mirror  reflecting  the  light  back  to  the  viewer.  Other  times  the  interior  is  so  filled  or   the  opening  is  too  small  to  view  what  is  occurring  that  only  by  lifting  blocks  of  pages  can  the   interior  be  seen,  just  as  not  all  sources  or  ends  of  water  systems  are  always  readily  visible.   Photography  credit:  Chris  Perry  


Benjamin Rinehart,  Appleton,  WI    

Team  Ramey     Pressure  print,  letterpress,  laser  &  archival  pigment  print,  embroidery  thread,   mylar,  and  vellum  paper  bound  as  a  pop-­‐up  book   10”  x  10”  x  2.5”  (closed),  20"  x  10"  x  9.75"  (open)   Edition  of  10     My  images  depict  an  autobiographical  narrative  critiquing  relationships  between  people  and   personal  identity.  More  specifically  as  a  member  of  the  Lesbian,  Gay,  Bisexual,  Transgender  or   Questioning  (LGBTQ)  community,  I  use  personal  experience  to  raise  awareness  and  speak  about   issues  affecting  under-­‐represented  and  marginalized  people.  Each  piece  is  an  expression  of   intimacy  and  is  intended  to  have  numerous  readings  beyond  the  initial  view.  My  artwork  is   designed  to  communicate  and  help  others  by  providing  new  insight  into  universal  experiences,   contributing  to  a  wider  dialog  and  forming  a  stronger  sense  of  community  and  family.   Photography  credit:  Benjamin  Rinehart            


Coley Rupprecht,  Palm  Coast,  FL    

  Geneva,  Thomas,  Eleanor   Journals  on  wood  mounts  (audio  component  in  interior)  headphones  below   12"x20"x3.5"   One  of  a  kind  set  of  three     This  piece  explores  objects  that  have  no  inherent  value  through  the  manipulation  of  journals.  The   journals  are  from  estate  sales.  The  only  information  given  about  the  authors  is  that  they  are  no   longer  living.  The  intimate  records  of  their  daily  lives  were  discarded.  Their  families  abandoned   the  personal  objects,  they  hold  emotional  weight.  They  hold  sentimental  significance  regardless   of  a  personal  connection  to  the  reader.  They  are  the  last  written  records  of  the  author’s  existence.   Each  journal’s  content  has  been  redacted  in  different  ways,  commonly  used  to  dispose  of   personal  information.  The  only  thing  left  of  the  content  is  what  can  be  made  out  of  the  recordings   and  what  remains  of  the  journal.  There  is  no  video  or  photo  documentation  during  or  prior  to   their  destruction.  The  recordings  pique  the  interest  of  the  viewer  but  allow  for  no  resolution.  The   destruction  of  the  journals  forces  the  viewer  to  experience  longing  for  objects  that  are  far   removed  from  their  own  experiences.   Photography  credit:  Coley  Rupprecht  


Joe Sanders,  Columbus,  GA    

pulp  therapy   Handmade  paper   22’  x  5’  x  0"   Each  sheet  unique     This  recent  body  of  work  in  pulp  painting  represents  a  more  improvisational  direction  for  my   work,  in  which  play  and  risk-­‐taking  take  on  a  much  larger  role.  The  forms  and  their  relationship   to  one  another  grow  out  of  an  ongoing  interest  in  natural  science,  and  combine  with  organic   pattern  and  expressive  color  sensibility.  The  modernist  grid  structure  presents  a  non-­‐linear   narrative  that  may  be  arranged  and  reconfigured  like  musical  notes  in  a  composition,  while  the   individual  works  evoke  a  sense  of  an  exploded  book  form  through  compositional  reference  to  a   bisected  rectangle   Photography  credit:  Sammie  Saxon  


Jaime Shafer,  Fallon  NV    

  Old  Geiger  Grade   Artist  Book:  letterpress  printed  from  handset  metal  type   Edition  of  52     Old  Geiger  Grade  was  inspired  by  Geiger  Grade  Road  and  the  history  of  the  Comstock.  It  places   readers  in  the  steep,  dangerous  terrain  of  the  1860s  as  they  travel  to  Virginia  City  where  they   hope  their  fortunes  might  be  found.   Photography  credit:  Jaime  Shafer  


Lynn Skordal,  La  Conner,  WA    

  I  Had  This  Dream     Unique  altered  book     I  live  and  work  in  La  Conner,  a  historic  little  town  in  the  Far  Northwest  on  the  banks  of  the   Swinomish  Channel,  near  the  beautiful  Salish  Sea.  After  retiring  from  the  practice  of  law  in  2008,  I   began  making  artist’s  books  and  small  works  on  paper.  Old-­‐style  cut  &  paste  collage  has  been  and   remains  a  favorite  medium,  and  I  frequently  also  incorporate  sewing  techniques,  thread,  fabric,   metal,  wood,  and  other  materials  into  my  pieces.  For  me,  collage  is  about  juxtaposition  -­‐-­‐  in   materials,  methods  and  content  -­‐-­‐  and  there’s  always  a  story  with  a  little  bit  of  mystery  to  it.  I   often  mix  historical  images  and  popular  culture,  with  a  little  dash  of  magical  realism.  The  goal  is   always  to  startle,  amuse  or  provoke.  My  work  has  appeared  in  book  arts  and  collage  exhibitions   across  the  country,  in  magazines  and  on  several  book  covers.  I  publish  some  of  my  personal   collage  work  at  regularpaper.blogspot.com  and  maintain  a  portfolio  of  book  arts  and  mixed   media  works  at  lynnskordal.paspartout.com.   Photography  credit:  Lynn  Skordal    


Nikki Thompson,  Sacramento,  CA    

Collapse   Letterpress,  silkscreen   Edition  of  20     While  my  art  is  mainly  autobiographical,  it  touches  an  essence  every  person   experiences.  In  Collapse  five  poems  describe  failed  relationships  using  metaphors   from  engineering  and  construction.  Each  poem  is  an  individual  book  sewn  to  an   accordion  structure  that  allows  the  book  to  open  dramatically.  The  sumptuous  wine   red  Shindanshi  paper  and  dark  red  book  cloth  create  a  brooding  mood  of   heartbreak.   Photography  credit:  Nikki  Thompson        


Donna Webb,  Akron,  OH    

Water     Book,  watercolor,  porcelain     Water  molecules  are  mysterious  and  compelling  forms.  They  are  everywhere  on  our  planet,  on   our  bodies,  in  our  atmosphere  and  perhaps  on  other  planets  as  well  and  yet  they  remain   mysterious.  How  do  they  drive  our  biology,  our  weather  and  our  geology?  We  don’t  know  exactly   what  they  look  like.  Because  they  are  smaller  than  most  molecules  our  understanding  of  them   comes  from  diagrams  and  models  that  represent  them  as  all  being  exactly  alike.  What  if  they   vary?  What  if  water  molecules  like  most  other  forms  in  the  universe  have  been  formed  by  a   process  of  repetition  and  variation?  In  that  case  all  of  our  forms  and  processes  would  be  driven  at   the  most  elementary  level  by  variations  among  the  water  molecule  forms.   Photography  credit:  Donna  Webb  


Invited Artists.     Jurors  for  The  Book  as  Art  v.6:  Pulp     were  invited  to  submit  work  for  the  exhibition.     Lisa  Beth  Robinson,  Greenville,  NC   INVITATIONAL    

  Spaceship   Handmade  paper,  French  paper,  letterpress,  hand-­‐composed  typographic  constellations   Poems  by  Landon  Godfrey     Photography  credit:  Lisa  Beth  Robinson            


Stephanie Smith,  Decatur,  GA   INVITATIONAL    

  Hambidge  Reflections   Set  of  5  unique  artist  books  with  gouache,  ink,  acrylic,  letterpress     Photography  credit:  Stephanie  Smith                        


Cynthia Nourse  Thompson,  Philadelphia,  PA   INVITATIONAL    

Conceal  

Letterpress printing and archival pigment print on handmade paper  

Photography credit:  Cynthia  Thompson  

Profile for Decatur Arts Alliance

The Book As Art: PULP  

Book As Art: Pulp is the sixth edition of this critically acclaimed artist book exhibition established by the Decatur Arts Alliance in 2013....

The Book As Art: PULP  

Book As Art: Pulp is the sixth edition of this critically acclaimed artist book exhibition established by the Decatur Arts Alliance in 2013....

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