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COUNTY PLANNING DEPARTMENT - “WhyDEPARTMENT Build Green?” Panels RSTON COUNTY PLANNING DEPARTMENT - “Why BuildPermit Permit Center Panels OSAL: THURSTON COUNTY PLANNING -Green?” “Why-Center Build Green?” Permit CenterCenter PanelsPanels PROPOSAL: THURSTON COUNTY PLANNING DEPARTMENT “Why Build Green?” Permit tor Coordinator elly, Kelly, ProjectProject Coordinator Zeta Coordinator 753-5817 Discovery . Solution . Implementation . Support om | 360-753-5817 lly@gmail.com | 360-753-5817 zetakelly@gmail.com | 360-753-5817

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The Artisans Group

Portfolio Display Panel Brochure Website

P.11 FUNK RESIDENCE

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Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs Biannual Publication Part 2: How Guestwork Programs Operate

T

he United States currently has two guestworker programs under which employers can import unskilled labor for temporary or seasonal work lasting less than a year: the H-2A program for agricultural work and the H-2B program for non-agricultural work.

PARTNERS IN E NEED TO START CHANGING THE STORIES This kind of story line promotes a sense of helplessness. SOCIAL we tell about sexual violence. Imagine telling a Even if we see what is going on, no one will do anything. W story that would give people hope that they can make a In fact, this is exactly the story that we read about in the difference, and that they have a responsibility to CHANGE at least media. In the now famous 1964 Kitty Genovese tragedy, Joan Tabachnick, DSM Consulting

try to make a difference.

Although the H-2A and H-2B programs offer different terms and benefits, they are similar in one significant way: Both programs permit the guestworker to work only for Center, dedicated to the employer who petitioned the Department of Labor technical (DOL) for his or her services. If the work situation is abusive Federal law and DOL providing regulations contain several assistance to those or not what was promised, the worker has little or no provisions that are meant to protect H-2A workers from engaged in sexual recourse other than to go home. That puts the worker at a exploitation as well as to violence ensure prevention that U.S. workers are Washington State such as the distinct disadvantage in terms of future opportunities in shielded from the potentialinadverse impacts, the United States, because his ability to return during any downward pressure on wages, associated with the hiring subsequent season depends entirely on an employer’s of temporary foreign workers. SPRING 2010 WASHINGTON COALITION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT PROGRAMS willingness to submit a request to the U.S. government. practical terms, it means that an employee is much less H-2A workers must be paid wages that are the highest of: Volume XIII In Issue 2 likely to complain about workplace safety or wage issues. www.wcsap.org a. the local labor market’s “prevailing wage” for a particUnder federal law, employers must obtain prior approval ular crop, as determined by the DOL and state agenfrom the DOL to bring in guestworkers. To do that, cies; employers must certify that: b. the state or federal minimum wage; or » there are not sufficient U.S. workers who are able, willing, qualified and available to perform work at the c. the “adverse effect wage rate.” place and time needed; and,

A Publication of the Sexual Assault Prevention Resource Center, dedicated to providing technical assistance to those engaged in sexual violence prevention in Washington State

The stories we choose to tell and the stories that fully grab attention will have a deep and meaningful impact Volume XIVour Issue 1 upon the way we live our lives. www.wcsap.org

“Stories are how people make sense of themselves and their worlds. For this reason, stories are political. Whose stories get told? What can those stories mean? Who benefits from their telling? These are political questions because they… determine how we live together...” (Shannon, 1995).

According to the media reports at the time, 38 men and women witnessed the assault and did nothing to help. This case prompted the coining of the term “the bystander effect” and launched a great deal of research into the question of why people respond (or don’t respond) to a situation. A recent analysis of this 1964 case showed that some of the neighbors did in fact do something – some called the police, others yelled out the window -- but their actions only stopped the attack for a few minutes. None of this information about what the neighbors did try to do was reported in the original story. While these actions did not save Ms. Genovese, the fact that people did respond is important. If we recognize that people did want to help, then we would begin asking new questions such as, “What else could the neighbors have done?”, “What would have been effective?” and “Why didn’t the police come to investigate the calls, even if they were ambiguous?”

Bystanders:

Agents of Primary Prevention

The story that is told about bystanders to violence is fairly simple, and I believe, is totally wrong for this day and age. The story line is classic and is told over and over again: “When x happened, no one did anything...” Whenever I give a workshop about bystanders, I am always struck by the strong social expectation we all seem to hold: when faced with a crisis, no one will step out of his or her comfort zone to offer help. WINTER 2010

Working with

Schools (What You Should Know About the Healthy Youth Act) WCSAP Prevention Resource Center

Migrant Workers and Prevention

PARTNERS IN SOCIAL CHANGE

A Publication of the Sexual Assault Prevention Resource Center, dedicated to providing technical assistance to those engaged in sexual violence prevention in Washington State

the media reported that a young woman was raped

and murdered outside ofWINTER her New2010 York City apartment. WASHINGTON COALITION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT PROGRAMS

1

The H-2A program provides significant legal protections for foreign farmworkers. Many of these safeguards are similar to those that existed under the widely discredited bracero program, which operated from 1942 until it was discontinued amid human rights abuses in 1964. A Publication of the Unfortunately, far too manySexual of theAssault protections — as in the bracero program — exist only on paper. Prevention Resource

PARTNERS IN SOCIAL CHANGE

TELLING A STORY

to Inspire Action

THE H-2A PROGRAM

» the wages and working conditions of workers in the

WASHINGTON COALITION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT PROGRAMS

United States similarly employed will not be “adversely affected” by the importation of guestworkers.

The H-2 visas used by guestworkers are for individuals only and generally do not permit them to bring their families to the United States. This means that guestworkers are separated from their families, including their minor children, for periods often lasting nearly a year.

9

www.wcsap.org

This has been reprinted with permission from Southern Poverty Law Center. You can access the full report online at www.splcenter.org/pdf/static/ SPLCguestworker.pdf.

Working With Schools

SPRING 2010

What would it look like if we began to retell stories of victimization with the expectation that people do try to help? The story would begin “When x happened, I did not

WWW.WCSAP.ORG

Discovery . Solution . Implementation . Support

FALL 2009

Volume XIII Issue 1

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FALL 2009

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The Healthy Youth Act and your community

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Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs Letter from the Editor

Biannual Publication

Trisha Smith, Advocacy Specialist, WCSAP

T

here is no denying that the media is a powerful force in contemporary society. With the daunting combination of seemingly endless resources and control over access to information, the media offers us a blueprint for how to act and what to think. Whether you are online, watching TV, or listening to music, you are vulnerable to an onslaught of messages that you may not even be aware of. Their influences are so ingrained in our daily life that they often go unnoticed.

Volume XII

Confronting media’s use of power and manipulation is an important aspect of anti-sexual violence work. It can take many forms, but I think songwriter Jello Biafra said it best, “Don’t hate the media. Become the media.” This issue of Connections aims to celebrate that very sentiment.

A Biannual Publication of Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs

Volume XIII

This issue shares insight from programs that are empowering youth to become media savvy not only by giving them the tools to be critical consumers, but also by giving them a voice. These programs are radical in that they creatively challenge the status quo by giving youth the ability to honestly and accurately express their life experiences, as well as walk out into the world knowing about the manipulations they face daily. We hope you will find the programs as inspiring as we did.

WINTER 2010

MEDIA SAVVY

SMYRC Presents . . . • Definitions and Vocabulary • Interrupting Problematic Language • 15 Ways to Create Safe Spaces for LGBTQ Identified People!

Setting the Stage: STRATEGIES FOR SUPPORTING LGBTIQ SURVIVORS

This is why media literacy is so imperative. We are often surrounded by messages that promote a victim-blaming mentality, sensationalize sexual violence, support rigid gender roles, and encourage negative stereotypes of those outside the mainstream of society. And there is no population more strongly targeted than our youth, who are rarely taught the critical thinking skills they need to deal with media messages. While there is debate as to whether media is influencing society or society is influencing media, in the end it feels like a moot point. There is a reciprocal relationship, and if we can change one it will influence the other.

YOUTH

Jennifer Y. Levy-Peck, Program Management Specialist at WCSAP, served as co-editor for this issue of Connections.

the Crime Victims Compensation Program

SPRING 2010

Trisha Smith, WCSAP Advocacy Specialist, had the opportunity to connect with two Crime Victims Compensation Program (CVC) staff members: Janice Deal, Policy and Outreach Coordinator, and Maty Brimmer, Claims Unit Supervisor, to discuss the different options survivors have in accessing long-term health care services with CVC benefits.

Dismantling Rape Culture Messages Through Song Media Responsibility

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Volume XII

Challenging Pop Culture Messages that Contribute to Sexual Violence

Before referring someone to CVC, it is important to make sure that he or she meets the requirements for the program. The program does require some involvement with the criminal justice system, which may be a barrier for some survivors. However, it may be helpful for survivors to hear that the benefits are not tied in any way to the outcome of a case nor to what is done with the report of the crime.

The Road to Recovery: Mental Health Needs of Sexual Abuse and Assault Survivors

- Jello Biafra

Youth Media Educates

In the Years After: A Look at Survivors’ Long-Term Physical Health Needs

WIDENING OUR SCOPE:

Meeting The Long-Term Health Care Needs 11 of Survivors CONNECTIONS

A Holistic View Of Long-Term Recovery

Please note that survivors do not need to fill out an application to cover the cost of a SANE exam; this is automatically covered by the CVC program. Applications for benefits relate only to support services needed beyond the scope of the medical forensic exam.

Navigating the Crime Victims Compensation Program

www.WCSAP.org

Rape Victim’s Choice: WINTER 2009 Risk AIDS or Health Insurance? Women Servicemembers Face Sexual Assaults and Inadequate Health Care Beyond the Forensic Exam: Consider These Resources for Survivors

No More Denying: Facing Woman-to-Woman Sexual Violence

How Advocates Can Address The Long-Term Health Care Needs of Survivors

Program Spotlight: Oasis

Discovery . Solution . Implementation . Support

C

rime Victims Compensation (CVC) is a program that is most often associated with payment for medical forensic exams following a sexual assault. A Biannual Publication However, this program has much to offer,ofand it may be a great resource for people affected Washington Coalitionbyofthe mental and physical effectsSexual of sexual abuse or assault. As Assault Programs CVC states, “the goal of this program is to work to reduce the financial impact of violent crime on eligible families, working in partnership with victim-assistance communities.” WINTER 2009

Who is eligible?

Take Action! “Don’t hate the media. Writing to Editors Become the media.”

Sound Relationships Nutritional Label

Q&A

Trisha Smith, Advocacy Specialist

The Power of Media Literacy for Girls

A Media Literacy Approach to Teaching Kids About Violence in Media

Quick Tips: Trans Inclusion A Guide for Service Providers

Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) Protocol for Working with Lesbian, Bisexual, Gay, Transgender, Intersex, & Queer Survivors of Sexual Violence

 NAVIGATING

25 Positive Hip Hop and Rap Songs

Practical Tips for Working with Transgender Survivors of Sexual Violence

Let’s Have A Word: Taken Aback, or Takin’ It Back?

A Biannual Publication of Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs

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Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs

IPSV What About Confidentiality? Confidentiality is of the utmost importance when working with sexual abuse survivors. Advocates and therapists alike are held to very strict confidentiality requirements. However, when you are talking about children and teens, procedures around confidentiality can differ. Advocates should encourage their clients to talk to any therapist they are interested in seeing about their confidentiality procedures.

INTRODUCTION Sometimes we are so busy walking the path of our daily lives that we don’t have the time to go exploring for resources. We hope this resource guide will support you in your journey working with children and teens who have been sexually assaulted and their nonoffending family members. The resources in this guide were A supplied Sexual Assault Therapy byAbuse therapistsand across the state doing this work.

RESOURCE GUIDE For convenience, we have chosen to use the word “parent” to

describe nonoffending parents, caregivers or anyone functioning in

Working withroleChildren, Adolescents, and Families a parental to children or teens who have been abused.

Some of the resources are designed to help therapists expand their own knowledge, while others are intended to be read, viewed or used by clients (or the parents of clients) themselves. Many therapists find that being able to recommend books, articles, or videos to clients augments the therapy process and helps people to have the knowledge that supports their recovery. These resources are the ones that the therapists involved in this project have found to be most useful for themselves and their clients. It is our hope that professionals will find this guide to be a helpful tool in their work. This document will also be on our website (www.wcsap.org). While you are on the website, please check out the library resources available to WCSAP members.

INTRODUCTION

If a therapist is seeing a child or teen, what access does the parent have to the file? RCW 71.34.530-Minors may receive outpatient mental health treatment if they are 13 years of age or older without the consent of a parent or What Advocates To Know guardian. The parent willNeed not be notified without the minor’s consent.

ABOUT I want toTHERAPY let you to know that talking with a therapist is your

choice, it is a confidential setting. Since you are 13 you can Working with Children, Adolescents, and Families freely communicate your thoughts with the therapist and trust that it be kept private. Legally, nonoffending parents have complete access to their child’s file if the child is under the age of 13. It is important to identify the child’s legal guardian and not just assume that the person bringing the child in for advocacy or therapy services is in fact the legal guardian. The therapist must determine under what circumstances information should be shared with parents, balancing the importance of maintaining the trust of a child client with the need to involve parents in a child’s recovery. It is a good idea for therapists to talk to the parents of these children and explain why confidentiality is so important. If a child expresses concern about his or her parents knowing what is said in therapy, the advocate may tell the child that he or she can discuss this concern with the therapist. In some circumstances, the therapist may ask the parents if

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Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs

What Advocates Need to Know ABOUT THERAPY

Intimate Partner Sexual Violence

I

ntimate Partner Sexual Violence (IPSV) is a comprehensive term that includes not only marital rape, but all other forms of sexual assault that take place within a current or former intimate relationship, whether the partners are married or not. Sometimes referred to as “sexual assault within the context of domestic violence,” IPSV is a complicated, heart-wrenching form of abuse that has often been overlooked by the general public, law enforcement, and human service providers. IPSV is at the intersection of domestic and sexual violence, and is now the focus of attention of programs in both of those movements.

IPSV

In Washington State, the Office of Crime Victims Advocacy (OCVA), established in 1990, provides recognition of and response to the needs of crime victims. In 2005, OCVA began coordinating a multiagency initiative under the auspices of the federal to Encourage Arrest Policies and Enforcement A PublicationGrants of Protection Assault Programs Coalition of Sexual of Washington Orders program, targeting sexual assault and stalking within the context of domestic violence. Initially working with victim service agencies, prosecutors, and law enforcement agencies in four Washington counties, OCVA expanded the SEXUAL ASSAULT IN THE CONTEXT OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE project to include statewide resources as well as the Second Edition National Stalking Center. The goal is to provide a more vigorous and effectively coordinated response from the criminal justice system and agencies working with survivors in order to ensure that IPSV is treated as the serious and pervasive problem it is.

Intimate Partner Sexual Violence

This publication was developed in the context of the innovative statewide and national approach to IPSV that is emerging from the collaborative work of project partners. First published as an edition of the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs’ quarterly newsletter, Connections (edited by Kathleen Arledge), this compilation of articles represents a wide spectrum of information and practical advice for assessment, intervention, and systems change. Thanks to the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs for their support of this project. 8

Z IPSV is both sexual assault and domestic violence. Z Survivors often have difficulty identifying this form of sexual violence as a crime, and they have special needs for assistance and recovery. Z IPSV often occurs repeatedly within a relationship. Z Sexual assault is common within violent relationships. Z IPSV affects people of all ages, ethnicities, sexual orientations and gender identities.

Considering the Differences:

ZIntimate IPSV has beenSexual overlooked Partner Violenceby criminal justice system until inthe Sexual Assault and Domestic recent years.

Violence Discourse

Z Specialized knowledge of IPSV will help criminal justice Advice for Criminal Justice Staffand human services professionals and/or Advocates to Aid to assist survivors and to hold offenders legally responsible. IPSV Survivors

Making the Connections: Advocating for Survivors of Intimate Partner Sexual Violence Making Marital Rape A Crime: A Long Road Traveled, A Long Way to Go Prosecuting Intimate Partner Sexual Assault

Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs

A Guide for Developing Tools to Assess for Sexual Assault Within the Context of Domestic Violence Successfully Investigating IPSV: Considerations for Law Enforcement

Resource Guides Discovery . Solution . Implementation . Support

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Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs Resource Guides

THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK

SECTION 1

TABLE OF CONTENTS

IPSV SUPPORT GROUPS

Introduction ............................... CSA Overview ............................. System Coordination .................... Information and Referral ............... Crisis Intervention ........................

SECTION 1

General Advocacy ........................ Medical Advocacy ........................

Guide

Legal Advocacy ...........................

FROM

IPSV Support Group A Guide to Psychoeducational Support Groups for Survivors of Intimate Partner Sexual Violence

References ..................................

HURT TO HOPE

Acronyms/Definitions ................... Appendices ................................

1 7 23 33 41 51 71 91 121 123 125

A Child Sexual Abuse/Assault ADVOCACY GUIDE copyright © 2009 all rights reserved cover and layout design by Debi Bodett

Hope

Circle of

This manual may not be reproduced without permission of:

A Supplement to Circle of Hope

WASHINGTON COALITION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT PROGRAMS 4317 6th Ave. SE, Suite 102 Olympia WA 98503 360. 754. 7583 360. 709. 0305 TTY 800. 775. 8013 www.wcsap.org

Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Program | www.wcsap.org

Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Program | www.wcsap.org

3

Design and printing of this project were supported by Grant #09-31110-010 awarded by the Office of Crime Victim’s Advocacy. Points of view in this document are those of the authors and do not represent the official position of the funder.

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Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs

WASHINGTON COALITION OF SEXUAL ASSAULT PROGRAMS

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Bunnell Street Arts Center

JANuARY - APRIL, 2009 ARTIST IN THE SCHOOLS

BUNNELL STREET ARTS CENTER 2009 WINTER/SPRING CALENDAR OF

EvENTS

EXHIBITIONS Jan 16 - Jan 31 Excerpts, selections from Words and Pictures reception January 16, 5 - 7 pm; reading at 6 pm Jan 16 - Jan 31 Life Drawing Group Showing Exhibition reception January 16, 5 - 7 pm; talk at 6 pm Feb 6 - Feb 27 Ken Gray Retrospective reception February 6, 6 - 8 pm; talk at 6 pm Mar 6 - Mar 31 Spill, 20th Anniversary of the Exxon Spill Exhibit reception March 6, 6 -8 pm; talk at 6 pm Apr 3 - Apr 29 Alaskan Abstract Painting reception April 3, 6 -8 pm; talk at 6 pm

BUNNELL STREET ARTS CENTER 2009 SUMMER CALENDAR OF

EVENTS

EXHIBITIONS May 1 - June 3 Linda Infante-Lyon, paintings reception May 1, 5-7pm; talk at 6pm June 5 - July 1

Skin Sisters: Influenced by Fran Reed and Countenance: Modern Masks of the North reception June 5, 5-7pm; talk at 6pm

July 3 - Aug 2

Deland Anderson, paintings and Kate Boyan, beaded works reception July 3, 5-7pm; talk at 6pm

Aug 4 - Aug 15 Photo Fest 2009 Portfolio Winner Exhibition reception August 7, 5-7pm; talk at 6pm

One of my first memories as a child is of two large posters of John James Audubon’s bird paintings posted above my crib. This was the beginning of a lifelong passion for art and natural history. Birds are frequent protagonists in my paintings. There is something pleasing and at the same time haunting about birds. I want my paintings to attract the viewer and produce a feeling of tranquility, as well as a disconcerting jolt of the unknown.

Jan - Apr Jan - Apr Winter/Spring

2009Jan - Apr

Gallery Hours: 10-5 Mon-Sat 18 30 January 16 - Jan April

JUNE 5 – JULY 1 | SKIN SISTERS

Jan 28 Feb 28

Skin Sisters features the work of eight artists who participated in a fish skin sculpture workshop with the late Fran Reed last summer. Fran Reed reached international acclaim in galleries, museums and juried shows. She brought innovation to a traditional medium in Alaska and shared that passion through workshops and lectures. Skin Sister artists, including Audrey Armstrong, Annette Bellamy, Kathy Smith, Rika Mouw, Judy Dickson, Janelle Matz, Lucie Charbonneau and Gina Hollomon, incorporate fish skin sculpture into their own body of work, seeking to deepen their own individual expressions, while exploring a medium that spans cultures and eras.

Mar 24

Bunnell Street Arts Center Aug 19 - Sep 2 Minsu Yang, video installation and Jahyoung Park, jewelry reception August 19, 5-7pm; talk at 6pm

CONCERTS AND SPECIAL EVENTS

SummerMay 1

2009May 14

May 13 - 31

Anchorage International Film Festival Screening, 8pm Spill opens in Cordova Miranda Weiss reading, Tide, Feather, Snow, 7pm

newsletter

Apr 24

Articles & Calendar of Events

Gallery Hours: Mon-Fri 11-6,May Sat2310-6, SunAtz 12-4 Kilcher and Jane Ferman, concert May 15 - September 15

June 3- 4

TBA Mar TBA Apr TBA

JUNE 5 – JULY 1 COUNTENANCE: MODERN MASKS OF THE NORTH

Curated by Elizabeth Eero Irving, Countenance features selections of a Well Street Art Company exhibit in Fairbanks shown in January of 2009. In her curator’s statement, Irving says, “I invited artists and craftspeople that differed in background, training, materials and methods. My hope was to bring together a diverse group of artists to showcase a multitude of approaches to this one tantalizing subject. My request was that they express their own highly individual interpretations of world history, cultural values, identity, personal demons and angels, political leanings, religious beliefs and artistic passions. In this aim, I believe they were beautifully successful.” Artists include: Erin Anderson, Nancy Burnham, Laura C. Hewitt, Elizabeth Eero Irving, Robert Maxwell Jones, Margo Klass, Sakura Koretsune, Jean Lester, David Mollett, Gail Murakami, Anna Ramsburgh, Glen Simpson, Todd Sherman, Hanna Stevenson and Kes Woodward.

Painting Workshop with Linda Lyons June 3, 7:30pm, June 4, 9-11am

June 15 & 17

Encaustics Workshop with Ann-Margret Wimmerstedt

June 21

Summer Solstice concert and Creole buffet with Radoslav Lorkovic

July 3

Spill opens at Artworks, Soldotna

Jun 29 - Jul 31 Arts Camp for Youth July 25

Hallie Hudson, Marshal Hawkins and Marcus Burger Jazz concert

July tba

Hallie Hudson youth concert

Aug 4 - 9

Photo Fest 2009

Aug 15

Homer Artist Studio Tour, 1-5pm

Aug 21

Spill opens at MTS Gallery in Anchorage

2

newsletter

JANuARY - APRIL | SuNDAYS 12-4 ARTHAVEN WORKSHOPS

Articles & Calendar of Events

TAMI JO PHELPS | “Eternity in Prince William Sound” | SPILL, MARCH ArTIsT In schOOls West homer Elementary/lynn naden AIs spring 2008

1

Radoslav | JULY DELAND ANDERSON | “Cape Douglas”

Bunnell’s sun filled and artful gallery space can host your SAKURA KORETSUNE | Countenance | JUNE intimate event, meeting, fundraiser or a community gathering. Bunnell accommodates 70 people with chairs, tables and linens. Gallery rental rates are $175 per event, subject to approval with respect to the current art exhibit. Ask about Non-profit and member rates.

Artist in Schools Life Drawing Group Wednesday, 6:30 - 9 pm, $5 Art Haven Workshops Sundays, 12 - 4 pm Concert, Easton Stagger Phillips, 6 pm gutter poetry with Whipsaw roots Kristina Wong, Performance Artist “Wong Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”, 7:30 pm Triple Blak & The Black Feather Poets Spoken word and poetry, 7 pm Spill Vigil with Music, Poetry and Theater, 7 pm Remembering the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Under 30, Evening of Alaskan Performance Art from Out North Jose Torres Tamas, Cone of Uncertainty The Plate Project Annual Membership drive Classical Concert: Goldenberg Duo, piano and violin

Since October over a dozen artists have led Sunday ArtHaven workshops in Bunnell’s gallery space. Workshops have included crystal wire-wrapping, beading lessons, the healing aspect of art, crocheting and watercolor classes to name a few. Workshops are open to all community members and extend a special welcome to clients and staff of Haven House who are invited to attend free of charge. All art materials as well as refreshments are provided to workshop participants and no experience is necessary. The goal of ArtHaven workshops is to foster healing creativity and strengthen our community at a deeper level. Art Haven is supported by the Jensen Fund of the Homer Foundation.

Lorkovic had a foothold on a classical music career when at age fourteen he was sidetracked by a blues scale that a friend had taught him. Born in Croatia, his earliest influences were the folk songs and classical piano of his grandmothers. His music refines a wild mix of classical and jazz, blues and country, Tex-Mex and Zydeco into his distinctive piano style.Twenty years of touring from the taverns of the upper Mississippi to the castles of Italy to Alaskan villages and Carnegie Hall have resulted in five solo albums and many collaborations with other artists. The longest summer day cannot contain this performer’s boundless musical energy. Join us for a creole buffet and summer refreshments.

may 2 - June 4 | gIna Hollomon

BUNNELL STREET GALLERY 2008 SPRING/SUMMER CALENDAR OF

EXHIBITIONS May 2 - June 4 Gina Hollomon reception May 2, 6 – 8 pm; talk at 6 pm June 6 - July 2 Don Weir and Steven Godfrey reception June 6, 6 - 8 pm; talk at 6 pm July 4 - July 30 Ron and Turid Senungetuk reception July 4, 6 - 8 pm; talk at 6 pm

may 3 | SpRIng ClaSSICal SoIRée

Aug 1 - Sept 3 Wendy Croskrey and Elizabeth Aero Irving reception August 1, 6 -8 pm; talk at 6 pm

May 3

Classical Soirée with Juliana Osinchuk & Friends, 8 pm

May 10

Curated by Hal Gage and Bruce Farnsworth of Anchorage, this exhibition includes selected works from the 46 visual artists and writers in the Words and Pictures exhibit at MTS Gallery in November/DeTIM FOOTE cember, 2008.

Bunnell Street Arts Center . Winter/Spring 2009

Features anchorage musicians, mari Jamieson, viola, karl pasch, clarinet, and artistic director of aFm, Juliana osinchuk, piano. mari Jamieson has played numerous years with the anchorage Symphony and anchorage opera orchestras, and maintains a full time teaching studio. Karl Pasch presently plays first chair with the anchorage Symphony. He was the music director and conductor for many years of the anchorage Civic orchestra, and recently conducted Saint-Saens’ Carnival of the animals for the anchorage Classical Ballet. the program will feature the sensuous E flat Major Sonata for Clarinet & Piano by Brahms, and Rebecca Clarke’s impressionistic Sonata for Viola & Piano. the second half will feature two works for the unusual combination of clarinet, viola and piano: Mozart’s “Kegelstatt” Trio, and Schumann’s Fairy tales. $20 gen/$18 members. youth 8-18 free when accompanied by a ticketed adult.

Bunnell Street Gallery CONCErTS aNd SpECIal EvENTS

2008May 16 and 17

“Of Birds and Spring: Sunrise Sjoberg & Friends,” 8 pm

Tickets at Homer Chamber of Commerce Jazz Soiree

Gallery Hours: with Cantrell Maryott, vocals, and Johnny B, piano 10-6 Mon-Sat 12-4 Sun, starting May 11th May 16, Concert with dinner catered by Maura, 7pm, $50 pp

Classical Soirée with Outstanding Young Alaskans, 8 pm Sponsored by Anchorage Festival of Music

June 14

Grand Inspirations Fundraiser at the Gallery; Classical theme Artsongs performed by Sylvia Daumchien Dinner catered by Maura, $50 pp

Aug 4 - 8

Summer Fine Arts Camp for Kids age 8 and up In collaboration with Homer Council on the Arts

Aug 16

Homer Artists Studio Tour, 2 - 6 pm 6 studios, transportation provided $25 pp

annette Bellamy’s Studio Halibut Cove

Ron meyeRS Fish Basket

newsletter

Articles & Calendar of Events

May 17, Concert, 8pm, $22 general, $20 members

June 1

Clay WoRkSHop with Ron meyeRS June 5, 6 , 7, 8

Bunnell Street Arts Center . Summer 2009

I am a self-taught clay artist and feel that it has given me the freedom to test all boundaries, make up my own rules and explore new ways to make my visions realities. My style of “Raku firing” feels well-suited for my life-sized animal and bird sculptures. my education is in biology and my love of all things feathered and furred drives my creative spirit. my inspiration comes from my volunteer work with the Bird treatment and learning Center and International Wildlife Rescuers. each week I care for sick and injured wild birds. most recently I washed and helped bring back to health 30 eagles that were slimed in a fish processing plant’s dump truck in kodiak. my art is an extension of my heart and all the living beings that occupy its walls. I have envisioned ceiling hung, 3-dimensional, flying birds for a couple of years but this body of work is a brand new direction for me.

EvENTS

Spring/SummerFolksongs and poetry Shorebird Fundraiser; January 16 - January 31 WORDS AND PICTuRES SANDRA HARRINGTON CuRATED BY HAL GAGE AND BRuCE FARNSWORTH The Abstract Show | APRIL

JUNE 21 | SUMMER SOLSTICE CONCERT AND CREOLE BUFFET WITH RADOSLAV LORKOVIC

GALLERY RENTAL

Quarterly Newsletter

Bunnell Street Arts Center CONCErTS aNd SpECIal EvENTS

MAY 1 – JUNE 3 | LINDA INFANTE-LYONS PAINTINGS

Bill Bowers opened our season of Artist in Schools (AIS) at Fireweed Academy with a week-long residency featuring Mime in September, 2008. All other AIS programs are taking place between January and April of 2009. These programs are DElAnD AnDErsOn providing a mid-win- “Footprint,” tempera on wood ter spark to light the featured in Spill | MARCH schoolrooms. Eddie Wood will conduct a Latin Partner Dance program at Homer Middle School starting January 5. Deland Anderson will instruct a tempera painting workshop at West Homer Elementary beginning January 7. Lynn Naden will teach a sculpture workshop at Homer High starting January 19. Flex High School has selected Homer filmmaker Michael Walsh for a camera-less film class starting February 16th. This class will collaboratively construct a new film from found, altered, handscratched and painted 16mm film. Paul Banks Elementary has not yet selected an Artist in Schools, but is scheduled to do so.

June 4, slide talk by Ron meyers 3 pm, Bunnell Street gallery workshop cost $475

June 6 - July 2 | Don WeIR Since my show at Bunnell three years ago, there has been a slow but steady change in my perspective as to how I regard the paint surface. that change in perspective has led me to a point where color has become the centerpiece of the painting process. as part of this shift in perspective, experimentation in the field of color has become key and the work in this show reflects that change in direction. the three areas which occupy me in my work (the collage process, abstract color experimentation and a much more simplified and minimalist view of the subject matter) have been merging over time into a new painting style and, subsequent to that, a new perspective on the possibilities of painting itself. my show this summer at Bunnell documents that journey.

June 6 - July 2 | Steve goDFRey

tuRID Senungetuk | Wreath Pin | JULY

there is a tradition in jazz in which a musician entitles a recording in tribute to a friend, mentor, producer or relative. I imagine these songs beginning from a surge of inspiration, quickly developing into a composition using educated improvisation. as the song emerges, so does a blurry portrait in the musician’s

gIna Hollomon | Eagle | MAY

Bunnell Street Arts Center . Summer 2009

Asia Freeman | Sky Diver | January

KEN GRAY RETROSPECTIVE | Excerpts from “Communications Engineer” | FEBRUARY JAHYOUNG PARK | Slumped Glass Jewelry | AUGUST

ESTHER HONG | Words and Pictures | JANUARY

MINSU YANG | “Motion Crafted” | AUGUST

KATE BOYAN | Beaded Works | AUGUST

Discovery . Solution . Implementation . Support

Don WeIR |Juneau Ice field | JUNE

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Kachemak Heritage Land Trust

Director’s Column

M

Director’s Column

Kachemak Heritage Land Trust Celebrating 20 Years of Protecting Land in Perpetuity That summer they initiated a recycling program, began our annual summer program of events, and by July had built a bank balance of $5,174. By the next year, we had 94 members as the KHLT puzzle quickly grew.

Marie McCarty EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

I

invite you to celebrate Kachemak Heritage Land Trust’s 20th anniversary. Our anniversary year presents an opportune time to reflect upon our past, and consider our future. It’s also a time to thank you for the part you play in helping us grow into a healthy, vibrant organization able to protect land in perpetuity.

During that same year, the Alaska legislature debated the Uniform Conservation Easement Act, which would allow conservation easements to exist in Alaska. Former state legislator and longtime Kachemak Heritage Land Trust supporter Arliss Sturgulewski sponsored this legislation, so critical to private land protection in Alaska. Kachemak Heritage Land Trust laid our first middle piece with Yule Kilcher’s donation of a conservation easement on hisSPRING/SUMMER 613-acre homestead property in February 1991. The Kilcher conservation easement was the second conservation easement in the state, and the first held by a private land trust in Alaska. The year before, the National Park Service had accepted a conservation easement on former Governor Jay Hammond’s 66 acres across Cook Inlet.

LANDMARKS 09 Newsletter for Kachemak Heritage Land Trust I imagine the land trust as a giant jigsaw puzzle with the borders representing the organization framework, and the middle pieces representing the landscape we protect. With the help of many hands, we linked that first border piece to the second, then to a third, carefully building the frame for an organization capable of perpetually preserving land. Once the framework was created, we began placing pieces in the middle one at a time as we conserved parcels of land.

Kachemak Heritage Land Trust Celebrating 20 Years of Protecting Land in Perpetuity On January 3, 1989, Janice Schofield, Jon and

Nelda Osgood, Roberta Highland, Robert Archibald, Mary Pearsall, Toby Tyler, Diane McBride, Devony Lehner, and Daisy Lee Bitter sat in a room in Homer considering the role a land trust could play in the community, and the need for a public vehicle to hold title to land and conservation easements. Their IN THIS ISSUE: impetus was the imminent State-Native land trade across Kachemak Bay. This small group Thank You, Dale Bondurant was the first in Alaska to birth the concept of a land trust into an organization. In doing so, these foresighted people set down the “Adopt-A-Property” corners of the puzzle.

Greening Up KHLT Office 1

Because we continue to build the puzzle strategically and carefully, we have become a strong, resilient organization, able to steward significant pieces of conservation land. As you travel from beyond the end of the road in Homer across the Kenai Peninsula, there are pieces of the puzzle on the rivers, on the coast, in wetlands, and on high ground, all forming important parts of the larger puzzle we intend to see completed for conservation. Thank you to each and every one of you who has played a role in this important conservation effort. We look forward to filling in more pieces of the puzzle with you in the years to come.

Marie McCarty Executive Director

KHLT Board Members Dotti Harness, President Roger Pearson, Vice President Larsen Klingel, Treasurer Scott Connelly, Secretary Marian Beck John Mouw Shirley Schollenberg

KHLT Staff Marie McCarty, Executive Director Dorothy Melambianakis, Land Manager Nina Daley, Development Assistant Sheryl Ohlsen, Accounting Manager

KHLT Contact Information Kachemak Heritage Land Trust 315 Klondike Avenue Homer, AK 99603 (907) 235-5263 www.KachemakLandTrust.org

Credits Cover Photo | Dorothy Melambianakis Layout Design | Debi Bodett

CONTENTS 1 DIRECTOR’S COLUMN 2 THANK YOU, DALE BONDURANT 3 “ADOPT-A-PROPERTY” GREENING UP KHLT OFFICE 4 KHLT COMMUNITY GARDEN POTATO PROJECT INDIVIDUAL GARDEN PLOTS 5 JULY & AUGUST EVENTS 6 TWO BITS FOR LAND 7 PLANNED GIVING 8 ROTARY FOR TREE SALE HOMER THEATRE HELPS KHLT STAFF VEHICLE

Kachemak Heritage Land Trust Celebrating 20 Years of Protecting Land in Perpetuity

O

Dot to Dot: Building on Success National Trails Day Celebration

Dotti Harness, President Roger Pearson, Vice President Larsen Klingel, Treasurer Scott Connelly, Secretary Marian Beck Sam Means John Mouw Shirley Schollenberg

KHLT Staff Marie McCarty, Executive Director Dorothy Melambianakis, Conservation Director Nina Daley, Development Assistant Sheryl Ohlsen, Accounting Manager

Quarterly Newsletter

KHLT Contact Information Kachemak Heritage Land Trust 315 Klondike Avenue Homer, AK 99603 (907) 235-5263 | (907) 235-1503 (fax) www.KachemakLandTrust.org

Credits

Director’s Column I

Cover Photo | Steve Baird, Kachemak Bay Research Reserve Layout Design | Debi Bodett

CONTENTS 1 DIRECTOR’S COLUMN 2 BONDURANT KENAI RIVER PROPERTY FOR SALE 3 POND ADDED TO GILL CONSERVATION EASEMENT DOT TO DOT: BUILDING ON SUCCESS 4 NATIONAL TRAILS DAY CELEBRATION 5 DONATING NON-CONSERVATION LAND

7 DIFFERENTIATING DONATIONS HELP KHLT GO GREEN 8 WELCOME SHERYL OHLSEN COVER PHOTO SUMMER PROGRAM THANKS TECHNOLOGY ASSISTANCE 9 KHLT MEMBERS HELP COLUMBIA LAND TRUST BE INVOLVED: VOLUNTEER! 10 2009 BUSINESS MEMBERS HERITAGE CLUB HONORS

KHLT Board Members

am honored to be the land trust’s new executive director. With your support, and that of our dedicated board of directors and talented staff, and thanks to the hard work of Barb SeaMarie McCarty man and her preExECutivE DirECtor decessors, I am taking the helm of a wonderful organization poised to enter our twentieth year. What an exciting time to be a part of Kachemak Heritage Land Trust.

Cathedral Grove, I noticed a “please be silent” sign. Although many languages had fluted the air, as we wandered through this area people became quiet. Native silver salmon smolt swam in the stream and a crayfish crept out from under stream detritus. Water striders, always my favorite, skittered on the water below young redwoods shaded by their ancestors. Parents looked up; kids quieted and investigated the small details of the forest.

As we begin this journey together, join me briefly on my summer vacation, one with ripe peaches, redwood trees, a huge white cargo van, and thoughts about our future.

My afternoon trip to Muir Woods brought home how the foresight of one man one hundred years ago impacts thousands of people annually. Muir Woods reminded me to again say thank you to each and every one of you for your selfless generosity and foresightedness in seeing the need to preserve the most significant pieces of private land for the future.

Muir Woods is just miles from San Francisco. The Bay Area is home to roughly 7 million people. On an Alaskan scale, Muir Woods is tiny; but to the visitors it serves, it’s an important reminder of the former complexion of California’s coast.

LANDMARKS 08 FA L L / W I N T E R

Newsletter for Kachemak Heritage Land Trust After several days exploring San Francisco’s diverse neighborhoods and eating many ripe peaches (a rarity in Homer), my husband IN THIS ISSUE: and I rented the last vehicle in town, a huge white cargo van, and rattled over Golden Gate Bridge. After a brief time lost in Sausalito, we KHLT Welcomes reached Muir Woods National Monument at New Executive Director noon on a Sunday in August, joined by thousands of other tourists.

Beluga Wetlands and I was introduced to the story of Anchor RiverThat LandSunday Protected

William Kent, a politician, businessman, and philanthropist. In 1905, alarmed by wide-

Extended Federal spreadLaw logging, he and his wife Elizabeth Thatcher Kent bought one of the last remainGives Tax Break ing uncut groves of coast redwoods. Three years later, Kent donated 295 acres of these Talley Houseancient Sale redwoods to the federal government to be protected, and President Theodore Roosevelt declared it a national monument. The “Dots” Initiative Muir Woods National Monument now encompasses 554 acres, an area smaller than KHLT’s Donating Non-Conservation Land largest conservation easement.

Whether you are the donor of a conservation easement, or a parcel of conservation or trade land, or are a financial donor, your gift is like that of William Kent. One hundred years from now the properties we have protected will be increasingly rare for their scenic qualities and as wildlife habitat, and for some parcels, as quiet places for people to walk. So, thank you again for all you do for Kachemak Heritage Land Trust. I look forward to traveling with you. Best wishes,

KHLT Staff Marie McCarty, Executive Director Dorothy Melambianakis, Land Manager Nina Daley, Development Assistant Yvonne Prucha, Accounting Manager

KHLT Contact Information Kachemak Heritage Land Trust 315 Klondike Avenue Homer, AK 99603 (907) 235-5263 www.KachemakLandTrust.org

Credits Cover Photo |Wild North Photography Layout Design | Debi Bodett

CONTENTS 2 DirECTOr’S COlumN 3 BEluGA WETlANDS AND ANCHOr riVEr lAND PrOTECTED 4 ExTENDED FEDErAl lAW GiVES TAx BENEFiT TAllEy HOuSE SAlE 5 THE “DOTS” iNiTiATiVE DONATiNG NON-CONSErVATiON lAND 6 BOArD mEmBErS/STAFF 7 2008 SummEr PrOGrAm 8 ANNuAl AuCTiON/ mEmBErSHiP mEETiNG WiSH liST CHriSTmAS TrEE OrNAmENT FuNDrAiSEr

FuNDErS/BuSiNESS mEmBErS

Marie McCarty Executive Director

10 lANDmArK CirClE mEmBErSHiP DONOrS 11 HOW CAN yOu HElP?

Membership Meeting 2

LANDMARKS • NEWSLETTER FOR KACHEMAK HERITAGE LAND TRUST • FALL/WINTER 08 • www.KachemakLandTrust.org

Differentiating Donations

Wish List

Volunteer Opportunities

Christmas Tree Ornament Fundraiser

Two Bits for Land

Dotti Harness, President Roger Pearson, Vice President Larsen Klingel, Treasurer Lois Bettini, Secretary Marian Beck Scott Connelly John Mouw Shirley Schollenberg

9 COmmuNiTy GArDEN/ PlATT PrOPErTy ClEAN uP

As we walked along the wide path entering Annual Auction

Donating Non-Conservation Land

Potato Project July & August Events

Marie McCarty Executive Director

ur last issue included a thank you to all of our current and past board members for their dedicated efforts on behalf of KHLT. We were embarrassed to find after publication that the list of board members had been truncated in a cut and paste process, and we had failed to catch Spectacular the Bondurant error in our proof. We apologize to those who were inadvertently dropped from the list, and Kenai River Property for Sale wish to assure them and their families that their efforts are very much appreciated!  Peggy Tener, Toby Tyler, Vicki Van Fleet, Olga Von Ziegesar, Betsy Webb, Charlie Welles, Toby Wheeler, Andy Wills, Mike Yourkowski.

Wildlife Pond Added to Gill Conservation Easement 1

KHLT Board Members

6 PLATT PROPERTY POTATO PROJECT

Correction to Spring Newsletter IN THIS ISSUE:

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

LANDMARKS • NEWSLETTER FOR KACHEMAK HERITAGE LAND TRUST • SPRING/SUMMER 09 • www.KachemakLandTrust.org

KHLT Community Garden

Newsletter for Kachemak Heritage Land Trust

10 VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES SCIENCE CONFERENCE

two things are not mutually exclusive. We work with landowners to decide how best to meet their practical needs and their desire to preserve the conservation values of their properties. It’s a way for landowners to maintain homes and essential property rights, and “rule from the grave” with recorded conservation easements that stay with properties in perpetuity. The cover of the September issue of National Geographic shows Manhattan now and as imagined in the 1600’s. It’s hard to project that level of development onto the Kenai Peninsula four hundred years from now. However, as one of our board members reminds me, land is a perishable product. What seventeenth century inhabitant of the land that became Manhattan could have FA L L / W I N T E R imagined the level of development there today? Those of you fortunate enough to own those true jewels of land on the Kenai Peninsula, imagine the future you want here. You may want to consider working with us to preserve your property’s important conservation values. For those who don’t own those unique parcels, you are still key to our future. You can help out as volunteers and as financial contributors, so our collective efforts ensure that the Kenai Peninsula of the future is one that remains the special blend of community and nature that we cherish. 

LANDMARKS 09

FUNDERS/BUSINESS MEMBERS 9 25 YEARS OF PARTNERSHIP FOR COASTAL CONSERVATION

Marie McCarty EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

y family has a motion and heat sensing camera tied to a tree in the woods near our house. It’s the kind of thing you might have if your spouse is a biologist. This year our camera snapped a photo of two yearling black bear cubs trying to eat it (pink mouth shots of blurry teeth), many bears and cubs, scores of snowshoe hares, four bears on a mission together, lots of moose with gangly calves, and our kids on an Easter egg hunt in the snow. Most of the photos were snapped in daylight. The camera is 100 yards from our house in a grove of young spruce. I had no idea there was that level of activity during the day so close to home. One of the best parts of life in Alaska is the proximity of people to nature. For many of us, it’s why we love it here. Honoring people’s ability to live tucked into the woods while respecting the natural world is an important value to Kachemak Heritage Land Trust, and likely to you too. Most of the properties we protect through conservation easements encompass people’s homes while permanently preserving the properties’ conservation values. These

Kachemak Heritage Land Trust Celebrating 20 Years of Protecting Land in Perpetuity

How Can You Help?

Planned Giving 25 Years of Partnership for Coastal Conservation

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K A C H E M A K H E R I T A G E L A N D T R U S T • V O L U N TA RY L A N D P R O T E C T I O N F O R A L A S K A ’ S K E N A I P E N I N S U L A

Kachemak Heritage Land Trust

Kachemak Heritage Land Trust

Kachemak Heritage Land Trust 315 Klondike Avenue Homer, Alaska 99603 (907) 235-5263 www.KachemakLandTrust.org

Preserving, for public benefit, land on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula with significant natural, recreational, or cultural values by working with willing landowners. cover photo © Wild North Photography

315 Klondike Avenue Homer, Alaska 99603 (907) 235-5263 www.KachemakLandTrust.org

Celebrating the First 20 Years of Kachemak Heritage Land Trust:

Protecting Land on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula

Kachemak Heritage Land Trust preserves, for public benefit, land on the Kenai Peninsula with significant natural, recreational, or cultural values by working with willing landowners.

Marie McCarty Interim Executive Director Marie@KachemakLandTrust.org

315 Klondike Avenue | Homer, AK 99603 (907) 235-5263 phone | (907) 235-1503 fax

To join Kachemak Heritage Land Trust, visit our webiste at:

www.KachemakLandTrust.org

Kachemak Heritage Land Trust

www.KachemakLandTrust.org

Kachemak Heritage Land Trust

Marketing Packet

www.KachemakLandTrust.org

K

achemak Heritage Land Trust has worked since 1989 with Kenai Peninsula landowners to conserve the places they love.

K A C H E M A K H E R I T A G E L A N D T R U S T • V O L U N TA RY L A N D P R O T E C T I O N F O R A L A S K A ’ S K E N A I P E N I N S U L A

Kachemak Heritage Land Trust

Preserving, for public benefit, land o recreational, or cultural va

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Debi Bodett Portoflio