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brainstorming magazine Mustafe Kameriæa 6 71000 Sarajevo Bosna i Hercegovina p: +387 33 471 326 p: +387 61 208 895 w: www.brainstorming.ba e: info@brainstorming.ba

Publisher DDS Idea is all Mustafe Kameriæa 6 Hadžisulejmanova 10 71000 Sarajevo Bosna i Hercegovina p: +387 33 471 326 p: +387 61 208 895 w: www.ideaisall.com e: info@ideaisall.com Editor: Rusmir Arnautoviæ | rusmir.arnautovic@brainstorming.ba Review editor: Ena Matkoviæ | ena.matkovic@brainstorming.ba Cover illustrator: DDS Idea is all "idea is all" is an digital design studio located in the Sarajevo area and serving clients worldwide. We have experience in Branding, Identity Design, Web Site Design, Graphic Design, Multimedia and Print Production. Our work has been recognized by a number of clients in various industries for exceptional performance, expert advice and quality services in the fields of design, information architecture, branding and development. INFO: http://www.ideaisall.com

We`re always on the lookout for new artist as well as established creatives - so if you`re interested in contributing to the magazine, please send some examples of your work to (e.) samples@brainstorming.ba


Welcome

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Advertising is a large and highly competitive industry occupying a very important position in most developing and developed economies. With a plethora of brands on offer, the need to inform, persuade and convince the customer is becoming increasingly important. And this is where the tools of Advertising and Advertising Agencies that use this tool step in!

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What is an Advertising Agency? An Advertising Agency or ad agency is a service provider that works for clients to create an effective and goal oriented advertising campaign aimed at representing the Company positively in the eyes of its target customers.

Meet the artists Interview with PeĂ°a KazazoviĂŚ

Meet the artists Perttu Murto

Hi there! My name is Pedja Kazazovic, and I consider myself to be a multimedia artist/designer/ producer. I studied a product design course at the Academy of Fine Arts in Sarajevo, and upon concluding my education, I started exploring new forms of expression.

A translucent monster roams the depths of the ocean, prying on small fish, crabs and squid, all equally as alien in appearance. This predatory fish is known as, Perttu Murto, and in a magnificent display...

Meet the artists Glenn Jones

Meet the artists Marc Simonetti

Glenn Jones is a graphic designer and illustrator from Auckland, New Zealand. The name GLENNZ mean GLENN from NZ, and is also his username at http://threadless.com where you can find some of his work.

Professional artist for 5 years now. I've been working on various fields such as cover arts, concept arts for video game companies and long feature films, and matte paintings for TV advertisements.

Meet the artists Luis Miguel Torres

Meet the artists Javier Pacheco

Hello, my name is Luis Miguel Torres, I'm 23 years old I'm a graphic designer from Mexico, I started making freelancing 3 years ago. Now i have a design studio (telaviv design. mexico).

I think it's really great when we get to see a set of illustration from the same artist, because we actually don't see that so often. So, I was looking for a print to buy at DeviantART the other day, and found this great spanish artist, Javier Gonzalez Pacheco.


CONTENTS NOVEMBER

9 Marketing Tips from a Six-Year Old’s Lemonade Stand

The Role of an Advertising agency Advertising is a large and highly competitive industry occupying a very important position in most developing and developed economies. With a plethora of brands on offer, the need to inform, persuade and convince the customer is becoming increasingly important. And this is where the tools of Advertising and Advertising Agencies that use this tool step in!

What is an Advertising Agency? An Advertising Agency or ad agency is a service provider that works for clients to create an effective and goal oriented advertising campaign aimed at representing the Company positively in the eyes of its target customers.

Here are nine lemonade stand tips that you can use to market your services: 1. Give people something for free and they will feel obligated to return the favor When you help someone, it creates a natural desire to return the favor. As a web designer, provide helpful tips on your blog, participate in forums offering advice and helping non-designers, share ideas on Twitter. In doing so, you’ll not only build trust, but also develop relationships with potential clients.

Businesses hire advertising agencies to connect with their target customers. In the face of stiff competition, every Co / brand wants to break through this clutter and create a favourable space for itself. Ad agencies help clients to do just this by creating attention grabbing, persuasive and unique ad campaigns that make the brand stand out in the minds of customers.

2. Give potential customers a taste of your offerings Offer free themes or templates with an easy upgrade to “pro” versions. Provide free stock graphics that hint at potential identity or branding packages while demonstrating your creativity.

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Page 25

5 Tips on How to Write a Killer Slogan

Are you

Slogans are memorable phrases often used in conjunction with company logos and in advertising campaigns.

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They are claimed to be the most effective means of drawing attention to one or more aspects of a product or brand. But how often do you see “serving you since 1982” or a similarly canned slogan under a beautifully designed logo? Too often. In this issue, we’ll discuss 5 essential tips on how to write a killer slogan and, if you feel you can’t manage it on your own, where to go to get them written for you. At the end of these tips, you’ll find a selection of famous slogans as well as an interactive showcase of famous slogans.

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ISSUE 02

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Page 19


Alex Forster It is difficult to always see the source of an artist’s inspiration, and with Alex Forster is no different, except that we know the source, its just hard to find. In the depths of the ocean lurks a creature mutable in both shape and color, a fantastic octopus that can transforms and mimic its surroundings. It is from this deep creature that Alex Forster must find inspiration for his changing, plastic images.

Page 105

Artist, Illustrators, Photographers, News Interview with Tomislav Može

Meet the artists Heru Suryoko

Hi my name is Tomislav Može I'm a 27 year old student from Zagreb, Croatia. After finishing my high school in Zagreb, I took almost any job I could find (from metalwork to building sound and light stages for concerts).

Digital imaging artist based in Jakarta, Indonesia.

Meet the artists Doucin Pierre

GoldenDrum

After about ten years dedicated to the culture of graffiti, SomeOne now works with digital format and has developed a personal and dynamic graphic universe. Open to any form of expression. SomeOne`s work as in the perpetual evolution.

Sixteen years have passed since the modest idea that many saw as bold and overreaching was born. Since then the Golden Drum International Advertising Festival has grown into not only a European manifestation but into an important event noticed throughout the world.

Meet the artists Fiero Animals

Interview with Marina Filipoviæ

FieroAnimals mostly gives services to a d v e r t i s i n g s e c t o r, a l s o t o magazines`ilustration and movie`s key art. Studio is specialized in the creation and manipulation of digital i m a g e s, b l e n d i n g o f p h o t o compositing, 3D and ilustration.

My name is Marina Filipovic, I’m 23 years old, I live and work both in Osijek and Zagreb. On the web I’m better known as Marinshe, a nickname my grandfather gave me when I was little. I finished high school in Osijek and am at the moment working toward a degree in economics at the University of Osijek.


Meet the Artist:

INFO: http://www.steverichard.com

Steve Richard Steve Richard has been plying his trade in the mysterious photographic arts for well over a quarter of a century. Steve is both a stills photographer and a cinematographer, thus bringing an unerring sense of style and composition to all of his work. Whether it is commercial, corporate, or fine art work, Steve?s visuals capture the imagination, challenge preconceptions, and merge a classical ethos with urban grit and 21st Century technosavvy.


The Role of an Advertising agency | ISSUE 02 | 06


Meet the Artist:

INFO: http://www.perttumurto.com/

Perttu Murto A translucent monster roams the depths of the ocean, prying on small fish, crabs and squid, all equally as alien in appearance. This predatory fish is known as, Perttu Murto, and in a magnificent display, when approaching for the attack, Perttu Mutro stuns its prey with a fascinating show of light and color generated from within its translucent form. While the prey is captured by the beauty, Perttu Mutro gobbles it up, and the light show ends. Deadly and beautiful is the art of Perttu Mutro.

07 | ISSUE 02 | The Role of an Advertising agency


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The Role of an Advertising agency | ISSUE 02 | 10


Are yo

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Advertising is a large and highly competitive industry occupying a very important position in most developing and developed economies. With a plethora of brands on offer, the need to inform, persuade and convince the customer is becoming increasingly important. And this is where the tools of Advertising and Advertising Agencies that use this tool step in!

What is an Advertising Agency? An Advertising Agency or ad agency is a service provider that works for clients to create an effective and goal oriented advertising campaign aimed at representing the Company positively in the eyes of its target customers. Businesses hire advertising agencies to connect with their target customers. In the face of stiff competition, every Co / brand wants to break through this clutter and create a favourable space for itself. Ad agencies help clients to do just this by creating attention grabbing, persuasive and unique ad campaigns that make the brand stand out in the minds of customers.

Duty & Role of Advertising Agencies : What does an Advertising Agency Do? A plethora of Businesses, Corporations, Government Organizations and Non Profit set-ups hire advertising agencies to advertise their products, brands and services to present and prospective customers. #1 Understand the Product / Company: An advertising agency begins by getting well acquainted with the client's goals, products & target audience. This knowledge proves beneficial in planning and creating an effective advertising campaign.

#2 Plan & Create an Advertising Campaign: Once an advertising agency understands its clients' needs, the process of brainstorming and planning begins. Keeping in mind the client's goals (which can range from * pushing sales of its products and services * introducing new products in the market * reiterating its brand's benefits * attracting new customers or keeping in touch with old ones the advertising executives work towards creating an effective advertising campaign (a single or a series of attention grabbing and unique ads) which is within the client's marketing goals and budget. This includes creating interesting slogans, attractive jingles and attention grabbing body copy for advertisements. The client has the final word and may ask for rework. #3 Strategize: Some Companies like to outsource their overall marketing responsibilities to advertising agencies. In such a case, the ad agency takes over the process of brand building, strategizing and pushing sales through other promotion techniques like sales promotions etc.


History George Reynell, an officer at the London Gazette, set up what is believed to be the first advertising agency in London, United Kingdom, in 1812. This remained a family business until 1993, as Reynell & Son, and is now part of the TMP Worldwide agency (UK and Ireland) trading under the brand TMP Reynell. Volney B. Palmer opened the first American advertising agency, in Philadelphia in 1850. This agency placed ads produced by its clients in various newspapers produce "photographs, ambrotypes and daguerreotypes. His ads were the first whose typeface and fonts were distinct from the text of the publication and from that of other advertisements. At that time all newspaper ads were set in agate and only agate. His use of larger distinctive fonts caused a sensation. Later that same year Robert Bonner ran the first full-page ad in a newspaper. In 1864, William James Carlton began selling advertising space in religious magazines. James Walter Thompson joined this firm in 1868. Thompson rapidly became their best salesman, purchasing the company in 1877 and renaming it the James Walter Thompson Company, which today is the oldest American advertising agency. Realizing that he could sell more space if the company provided the service of developing content for advertisers, Thompson hired writers and artists to form the first known Creative Department in an advertising agency. He is credited as the "father of modern magazine advertising" in the US.

Types of

advertising agencies Ad agencies come in all sizes and include everything from one or two-person shops (which rely mostly on freelance talent to perform most functions), small to medium sized agencies, large independents such as SMART and TAXI, and multi-national, multi-agency conglomerates such as Omnicom Group, WPP Group, Publicis, Interpublic Group of Companies and Havas.

Full-service agencies

Limited-Service Advertising Agencies

Most full-service agencies work on a combination of fee-based and commission based compensation. The fee is paid by the entity for which the marketing is being done. The commission is a payment from the media to the agency and is usually equal to 15% of the cost of the advertisement. The broadcast media, radio and television, traditionally pay a commission. Full-service, or media-neutral advertising agencies produce work for many types of media, creating integrated marketing communications, or through-the-line (TTL) advertising. The "line", in this case, is the traditional marker between the media that pay a commission to the agency and the media that do not.

Some advertising agencies limit the amount and kind of service they offer. Such agencies usually offer only one or two of the basic services. For example, although some agencies that specialize in "creative" also offer strategic advertising planning service, their basic interest is in the creation of advertising. Similarly, some "media-buying services" offer media planning service but concentrate on media buying, placement, and billing.

Full-service agencies are also known as traditional advertising agencies for the client, wherein the client satisfies almost all their advertising or promotional needs with the same organization. This type of agency provides advertising services such as strategic planning, creative development, production, media planning, media buying, and other related services such as sales promotionals, direct selling, design, and branding, etc.

When the advertiser chooses to use limited-service advertising agencies, it must assume some of the advertising planning and coordination activities that are routinely handled by the full-service advertising agency. Thus, the advertiser who uses limited-service agencies usually takes greater responsibility for the strategic planning function, gives greater strategic direction to specialist creative or media agencies, and exercises greater control over the product of these specialized agencies, ensuring that their separate activities are well-ordered and -coordinated.


Specialist Advertising Agencies In addition to the full-service, general-line advertising agencies, there are also agencies that specialize in particular kinds of advertising: recruitment, helpwanted, medical, classified, industrial, financial, directresponse, retail, yellow pages,theatrical/entertainment, investment, travel, and so on. Specialization occurs in such fields for a variety of reasons. Often, as in recruitment advertising, for example, specialized media or media uses are involved that require knowledge and expertise not ordinarily found in a general-line agency. In other cases, such as medical or industrial advertising, the subject is technical and requires that writers and artists have training in order to write meaningful advertising messages about it. Such specialist advertising agencies are also usually "full-service," in that they offer all the basic advertising agency services in their area of specialization plus other, peripheral advertising services related to their area of specialization.

In-House Advertising Agencies Some advertisers choose to set up an advertising agency function within their company. Sometimes the in-house advertising agency is established to provide basic advertising agency functions. It may also specialize in one or more advertising functions, such as planning and creating advertising or media planning, buying, billing, and paying. Advertisers who choose this option believe that the in-house agency can provide services equal to or better than those available from full- or limited-service agencies. In addition, some advertisers believe that they can provide such advertising services to themselves at a lower cost than would be charged by an outside agency.

Interactive agencies Interactive agencies may differentiate themselves by offering a mix of web design/development, search engine marketing, internet advertising/marketing, or ebusiness/e-commerce consulting. Interactive agencies rose to prominence before the traditional advertising agencies fully embraced the Internet. Offering a wide range of services, some of the interactive agencies grew very rapidly, although some have downsized just as rapidly due to changing market conditions. Today, the most successful interactive agencies are defined as companies that provide specialized advertising and marketing services for the digital space.

The digital space is defined as any multimediaenabled electronic channel that an advertiser's message can be seen or heard from. The 'digital space' translates to the Internet, kiosks, CD-ROMs, DVDs, and lifestyle devices (iPod, PSP, and mobile). Interactive agencies function similarly to advertising agencies, although they focus solely on interactive advertising services. They deliver services such as strategy, creative, design, video, development, programming (Flash and otherwise), deployment, management, and fulfillment reporting. Often, interactive agencies provide: digital lead generation, digital brand development, interactive marketing and communications strategy, rich media campaigns, interactive video brand experiences, Web 2.0 website design and development, e-learning Tools, email marketing, SEO/SEM services, PPC campaign management, content management services, web application development, and overall data mining & ROI assessment. The recent boost in the interactive agencies can also be attributed to the rising popularity of web-based social networking and community sites. The creation of sites such as MySpace, Facebook and YouTube have sparked market interest, as some interactive agencies have started offering personal and corporate community site development as one of their service offerings. It still may be too early to tell how agencies will use this type of marketing to monetize client ROI, but all signs point to online networking as the future of brand marketing and Interactive being the core of Brand´s Communication and Marketing Strategy. Due to the social networking explosion, new types of companies are doing reputation management. This type of agency is especially important if a company needs online damage control. If a customer becomes disgruntled, it is very easy to damage a companies reputation over social networking sites. Because of how rapidly the information spreads, it becomes absolutely necessary to address any rumors, gossip or other negative online press immediately.

Search engine agencies Lately, pay per click (PPC) firms have been classified by some as 'agencies' because they create media and implement media purchases of text based (or image based, in some instances of search marketing) ads. This relatively young industry has been slow to adopt the term 'agency', however with the creation of ads (either text or image) and media purchases, they do technically qualify as 'advertising agencies'.


Agency departments Creative department The people who create the actual ads form the core of an advertising agency. Modern advertising agencies usually form their copywriters and art directors into creative teams. Creative teams may be permanent partnerships or formed on a project-by-project basis. The art director and copywriter report to a creative director, usually a creative employee with several years of experience. Although copywriters have the word "write" in their job title, and art directors have the word "art", one does not necessarily write the words and the other draw the pictures; they both generate creative ideas to represent the proposition (the advertisement or campaign's key message). Creative departments frequently work with outside design or production studios to develop and implement their ideas. Creative departments may employ production artists as entrylevel positions, as well as for operations and maintenance. The Creative Process forms the most crucial part of the advertising process.

Account services The other major department in ad agencies is account services or account management. Account Services or account management is somewhat the sales arm of the advertising agency. An account executive (one who works within the account services department) meets with the client to determine sales goals and creative strategy. They are then responsible for coordinating the creative, media, and production staff behind the campaign. Throughout the creative process, they keep in touch with the client to update them on the ad's progress and gain feedback. Upon completion of the creative work, it is their job to ensure the ad's production and placement.

Media services The media services department may not be so well known, but its employees are the people who have contacts with the suppliers of various creative media. For example, they will be able to advise upon and negotiate with printers if an agency is producing flyers for a client. However, when dealing with the major media (broadcast media, outdoor, and the press), this work is usually outsourced to a media agency which can advise on media planning and is normally large enough to negotiate prices down further than a single

agency or client can. Modern agencies might also have a media planning department integrated, which does all the spot's planning and placements

Other departments and personnel In small agencies, employees may do both creative and account service work. Larger agencies attract people who specialize in one or the other, and indeed include a number of people in specialized positions: production work, Internet advertising, planning, or research, for example. An often forgotten, but integral, department within an advertising agency is traffic. The traffic department regulates the flow of work in the agency. It is typically headed by a traffic manager (or system administrator). Traffic increases an agency's efficiency and profitability through the reduction of false job starts, inappropriate job initiation, incomplete information sharing, over- and under-cost estimation, and the need for media extensions. In small agencies without a dedicated traffic manager, one employee may be responsible for managing workflow, gathering cost estimates and answering the phone, for example. Large agencies may have a traffic department of five or more employees. Advertising interns are typically university juniors and seniors who are genuinely interested in and have an aptitude for advertising. Internships at advertising agencies most commonly fall into one of six areas of expertise: account services, creative, interactive, media, public relations and traffic. An internship program in account services usually involves fundamental work within account management as well as offering exposure to other facets of the agency. The primary responsibility of this position is to assist account managers. Functions of the account management intern may include: • Research and analysis: Gathering information regarding industry, competition, customer product or service; as well as presenting findings in verbal/written form with recommendations • Involvement in internal meetings and, when appropriate, client meetings • Assisting account services in the management of creative projects Interns often take part in the internal creative process, where they may be charged with creating and managing a website as well as developing an advertising campaign. Hands on projects such as these help interns learn how strategy and welldeveloped marketing are essential to a sound advertising and communications plan. During their internship, the intern will experience the development of an ad, brochure and broadcast or communications project from beginning to end. During the internship, the intern should be exposed to as much as possible within the agency and advertising process.


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5 Tips on How to Write a Killer Slogan Slogans are memorable phrases often used in conjunction with company logos and in advertising campaigns. They are claimed to be the most effective means of drawing attention to one or more aspects of a product or brand. But how often do you see “serving you since 1982” or a similarly canned slogan under a beautifully designed logo? Too often. In this post, we’ll discuss 5 essential tips on how to write a killer slogan and, if you feel you can’t manage it on your own, where to go to get them written for you. At the end of these tips, you’ll find a selection of famous slogans as well as an interactive showcase of famous slogans. The first step is to decide whether or not you need a slogan. If you have a logo, you are already engaged in branding your product or your company. If you have already taken this step, you really should consider a slogan as well. Do you want to brand your product or company? That depends on the image that you are trying to project. If you want to attract larger corporate clients, branding is pretty much a necessity. They will want to see that you are as serious about your product as they are. If you prefer to work with mom and pop shops and want to appear as the helpful guy next door, you may not require this level of branding. The business model of your company determines your level of branding. If you want to take things to the next level, this is a good starting point.

1. Start From The Logo If your brand doesn’t have a logo yet, you should get that done first. A slogan works with a logo in order to promote brand identity. A slogan doesn’t really work without a logo unless your sole advertising medium is radio. The logo is the chicken, the slogan is the egg. If you are designing the logo and producing the slogan for a business, you have a unique opportunity to create both at once, which can allow you to better integrate the two as a final product. Remember that top brands change their slogans all the time, and you can do the same if you feel you need to five years down the line. No slogan is cast in stone.

2. Give the Project the Time It Needs You need one hour to research the company that you are doing the slogan for, 1-2 hours to brainstorm ideas after your initial research, and 1-2 hours for client consultation and editing. If you are drawing up a contract, make sure that you limit the amount of times that you “go back to the drawing board” so that the project doesn’t turn into an endless time suck. Coming up with a slogan isn’t easy, even for seasoned veterans, and takes at least one working day, so charge accordingly. On the flip side, if you are hiring a slogan writer, there needs to be an element of trust there before you hire them. 19 | ISSUE 02 | The Role of an Advertising agency

You have to trust that they really are going to come up with some great slogan ideas for you to choose from, and you can’t really keep going back and expect them to go through the process indefinitely after paying for an initial session. If you really don’t like the slogans that they give you, or feel that they misinterpreted your brand’s vision, most slogan writers will want to make it right within limits and these limits will usually be made very clear in your initial contract.

3. Keep It Simple A logo is only effective if your audience can understand it quickly. You only have a few seconds to impress, so a slogan like “the best in olfactory widgets since 1949” isn’t going to do the trick. Simplicity is what you’re aiming for. Slogans absolutely cannot go over one sentence and five dollar words such as “olfactory” should be avoided. Some rules are made to be broken; if there is a five dollar word that rolls up a few sentences of meaning in one word, go for it. The one sentence rule, however, should be adhered to at all costs. Simple slogan: Just Do It (Nike). Not simple enough slogan: Selling the Highest Quality Organic & Natural Products (Whole Foods).


4. Make It Funny, If You Can Where you can bring humor to a slogan, do it. A great example is Cracked.com’s slogan: “America’s Only Humor & Video Site, Since 1958”. This slogan packs in a few jokes including making fun of the usual “since such a year” slogan and claiming to be the only humour site in America. There is also a claim about being the only video site, and the fact that they couldn’t have been a website since 1958. All of this in eight words, if you count the “and” symbol. While they had to make their slogan funny, the same approach to slogan writing of injecting a joke or two is something that you should adopt when appropriate. If you can’t make it funny without making it lame, just drop the funny and go with your next best options.

5. Stay Honest and Don’t “Trump Up” Your Product Honesty is important. Can your business actually deliver on the promise that your slogan makes? If not, rethink the slogan. You’ll also want to stay away from slogans that incorporate language like “the best” or “#1 at what we do” because that kind of language is not only standard and boring, but hard to substantiate even if it is true. This is a fine line to walk because you still want to present the idea of a quality product without coming off as being too pushy, but a good slogan writer can manage it. If it seems too intimidating, don’t think of it as writing a slogan, think of it as writing a brand message. What would your product say if it could talk? Dishonest Slogan: Daz with the blue whitener washes cleanest (Daz) Example from p.186, Advertising as Communication, Gillian Dyer, 1988

Where To Find Slogan Writers This all depends on what you need them for. If you are a graphic designer that already does logos, you are better off working with a freelance writer. If you are a business client that needs a logo and slogan, you may want to use an advertising agency or a combination of a graphic designer and a freelance writer, depending on your budget. To truly get what you want out of either arrangement, come to the agency or writer with a list of your own brainstormed slogan ideas, all of the brochures and websites about your product that you can gather and an open mind for what they can create.

They will likely come up with something completely different, but this will give them an excellent starting point.

Advertising Agency An advertising agency will generally be very experienced in slogan writing as they deal with brand management on a day-to-day basis. Agencies do not come cheap, but are well worth the investment in terms of the quality provided for the dollar. Given the cost, mid-sized to large companies will want to consider agencies. If you have a larger budget, an agency will often be able to arrange market research testing for your slogan and logo that is also well worth the investment.

Freelance Writers Some freelance writers specialize in slogan writing, but really any freelance writer can manage this task. You’ll want to look for writers who have experience writing sales letters and promotional copy, as they are more likely to produce the results that you are looking for. While the experience level may not be the same as a top-level agency, the bill and the more personalized service that you will receive may be more of what you are looking for if you run a smaller business. If you are looking for a slogan writer, simply post an ad on CraigsList in your area and watch the responses come flooding in.

In-House This depends. Often sales managers and staff work so closely with the product that they have a hard time looking at it with a fresh eye. There are also interpersonal factors to consider; if you love the job your sales manager is doing but hate their slogan, you may find yourself in a difficult position. If you have a marketing writer on staff, they will usually be able to produce good slogans for you. A sales person or manager has a very specific skill set that generally doesn’t extend to creative. - Where do you want to go today? - Microsoft - Where’s the beef? - Wendy’s - There are some things money can’t buy. For everything else there’s Mastercard. - Mastercard - Sharp Minds, Sharp Products. - Sharp - Do you… Yahoo!? - Yahoo! - Because you’re worth it. - L’Oreal - The best a man can get. - Gillette - Come alive! You’re in the Pepsi generation. Pepsi Cola - No battery is stronger longer. - Duracell Batteries - Intel inside. - Intel

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20 Quick Tips For Aspiring Freelancers The last two years have been the most exciting of my life. I made the jump to freelance work, which has given me the freedom to work when and however much I want. The transition from a regular job to freelancing was not easy, but I managed it. This post is meant to help you bypass difficulties and maximize your productivity as you start your own freelancing career.

1. Don’t give up your day job! Your day job is your most important asset when switching from regular work to freelancing. You need to be able to support yourself on this new career path, so start off slowly and work in the evenings or on your lunch breaks. If you are a student, working around your studies can be quite lucrative; you can fill in those free periods with money-making design work! 2. Put an amazing portfolio together In the freelance business, having a solid portfolio is important. While many employers will accept your résumé, your portfolio is the bit of you that stands out. It shows employers what you can do and what you have done. Make it as creative as possible. Many people worry that they have no work to show potential clients. If that is the case, try redesigning your favorite website or rebrand your favorite company and mark it as a case study. While this work has not been commissioned, it does show off your skill, which will inspire much more confidence in your client if they find out they are your first client. 3. Do not buy any new gear This is a common pitfall for many freelancers. They think they need the best equipment to do the best job. Yes, tools help, but how you use them is what matters. As tempting as it is, you do not need the latest Macbook Pro; you can do the job just as well on your four-year-old PC. Why spend money when you want to make it? Of course, some things are essential, such as Photoshop, but try to get a student version or a discount. You do not want to let money slip through your fingers when you don’t have to. 4. Build your website Building your website before looking for work is also important. The first thing potential clients will do is look at your website. Your website conveys your attitude towards your work and your personality, so make sure it reflects how you want to be seen. Choose the words on your website carefully: do you want to be seen as formal or lighthearted? Also, do you want to emphasize form over function? All of this has to be conveyed in your design. 21 | ISSUE 02 | The Role of an Advertising agency

5. Set up a new bank account Keep your personal and work accounts separate. You do not want to give out your personal bank details, nor do you want to attach a PayPal business account to your personal account. While you may be able to get by at first using your personal account, you will run into problems down the road with taxes and client payments. In any case, at least you’ll be able to keep your personal PayPal account, for which you won’t be taxed for transactions! 6. Don’t be afraid to ask for help As with all things, starting off freelancing can be tough, but the freelance community is very friendly. While no one will build your website for you, people may help you with a snippet of code or give you feedback on your design. By asking for advice, you also make friends, which in time could lead to work. 7. Go back to school While you may think you know everything, you certainly don’t. Spend some time on tutorial websites or invest in taking a course to extend your knowledge. Any skill you can add to your toolkit will be valuable later in life. Learning a completely new skill, such as video editing and conversion, might also be a good idea. The web has become much more video-centric, so having skill in the field will enable you to offer more to clients, creating more profit for you. 8. Set up a home office Make sure you are able to concentrate on work and work alone. A space dedicated to work will help you get it done more quickly. The office does not have to be a room in your home; it could be outdoors or your local coffee shop: any place that does not have too many distractions and is well lit and inspires you to work. Working outside in the fresh air can help keep you alert and sustain your concentration. 9. Get an online Skype number One of my biggest problems starting out was the huge phone bills I racked up talking to clients and team members. If you face the same problem, you could either swallow the higher phone bills or get an online Skype number. Skype works through your computer, so working while talking on the phone is easy. But you can


also get a landline number with Skype, and clients might be reassured by the stability that this landline brings. Subscribing to a Skype plan can be especially helpful with international clients. 10. Blitz social media and promote your brand Knowing how to market yourself is your first step towards full-time freelancing. Keep updating your Twitter account and to regularly interact with online communities: clients can be found anywhere. Remember, though, anything you put online is not private, so make sure you show the face that you want other people to see. Be sure to share anything you find interesting, and re-tweet anything you find relevant. Clients may find you through a recommendation or piece of content of yours on a social media website, so keep updating and become a “sharer.” 11. Be patient Now that everything is set up, your number one rule is to be patient. Work will not come flooding in immediately. Take it slow, and take on jobs as they come in. Learning to be patient with clients also helps you communicate with them. Some will be rather aggravating to work with, and you have to learn how to remain calm and communicate with them at a level that satisfies both of you. 12. Promote your services with content The entire Internet is driven by content. Valuable free content goes a long way. Whether a free WordPress theme or a well-recorded screencast, publishing content is a great way to get your name out there. It will also promote your status as an expert and give potential clients something to play with and a chance to see how you work. 13. How to deal with job boards I would advise that you stay away from job boards. They seem to be overridden these days with people offering services for negligible compensation. You have to make a profit. But if you decide to look for work on job boards, make sure the job comes with a steady salary and not a one-time payment. Local jobs are better because developing a healthy relationship with local clients is easier and can lead to more work. 14. Finding jobs elsewhere To find jobs elsewhere, you must network. I found this to be the hardest part: you have to get out and pitch to businesses. Offering your services to friends and family may get you by for a while, but they will likely start asking for favorable treatment or rates, and when you are starting off, you cannot afford to be doing work for a steal. Upscale bars and city lunch spots are great places to meet people. Start talking to people while standing in queues, or go to social events in big cities. People love to show off what they do, so why shouldn’t you do the same?

15. Find your niche Most of my work came from finding a niche market and exploiting it. For example, if you have made a website for a soon-to-be-released novel, the project could serve as a template for websites that promote novels. If the website is efficient and profitable, you could ask other authors or publishing companies if they would like to invest in your tried and true method. 16. Creating steady work and revenue The problem with freelancing is that you have no job security whatsoever. So you need to create security. Instead of quoting a set price to a new client, try proposing a manageable monthly rate that includes website promotion, constant SEO monitoring and website maintenance. Not only will this generate revenue over time, the client may ask you for more services if they see it is working out well, at which point you can increase the rate. This supplementary revenue is less likely to materialize if you stick to one-time payments. 17. Dealing with bad clients You will inevitably come across bad clients. Bad clients either want to control too much of what you do or communicate poorly. If you land one, you have to step back and think whether the client is worth the trouble and whether they will give you repeat business. If not, then cut them loose. You will feel bad when you let a bad client go the first time, but remember that you have freed up your time to take on another better client. 18. Referrals and testimonials Once you have worked with some happy clients, ask them how they felt about the process and whether you handled it well and what you could have done better. While the responses may be useful as testimonials, you will also be showing clients that you are trying to improve your services, which may encourage them to tell others about their experience, leading to yet more clients for you. 19. Invest in invoicing and client management software As you gain more clients over time, you will need to know how to manage them. Signing up for invoicing software to automate recurring monthly invoices will be helpful. Also consider subscribing to something like 37 Signals’ Highrise software, or at least record in a document who your customers are, what work you have done for them and any details about them you may need to refer to in future. This will save you from administrative work down the road and also serve as a good trigger for your memory. 20. Quit your day job and have fun! If you have followed these steps, you should have sustainable income and be doing what you love as a profession. The purpose of freelancing is to have time to go where you want to go and do what you want to do. Make sure you enjoy your new lifestyle by traveling and getting out a bit more. You can work from anywhere in the world, so take advantage of that! The Role of an Advertising agency | ISSUE 02 | 22


How To Find Time For… Everything! Time management is one of the most important skills a freelance worker can learn. With a good time management system you can easily find the time to do the things that are important to you, whether in your professional or personal life. Successful time management can be challenging, especially to those who are new to freelancing or being self-employed. When you have a boss telling you what to do and when to do it by, it’s much easier to prioritize and figure out what needs to be done and when. But when you’re not only dealing with client deadlines but also all of the day-to-day parts of running a business, on top of trying to maintain some sort of life outside of work, time management gets a whole lot trickier. Below are ten tips to help you better manage your time and find the time to participate in the things that are important to you. Also included are some further resources to improve your time management. 1. Get Organized Taking time away from your work to find things, whether on your computer or your physical desktop, can be one of the biggest time-wasters out there. This is one of those things that varies a lot by industry and personal preference, but you absolutely need to have a system in place to handle the information, files, and data that comes your way each day. This might include folders and tags on your computers, or file-folders, piles, and inboxes in your physical workspace. Experiment with different organizational systems until you find one that really works for you. Personally, I have a folder called “work” on my desktop and within that I have folders for each client I work with on a regular basis. For one-off projects I’ll create a folder for that client while I’m working on the project, and then those folders will get moved into a “completed” folder once the project is over (and usually moved to my portable hard drive instead of remaining on my laptop’s hard drive). I have very little physical paperwork, so piles on my desk work just fine for me. 2. Separate Work Space from Everything-Else Space You need to have a dedicated workspace. If you work in an office, this is easy enough to manage. But if you work from home, you’ll need to put a bit more effort in. Here are a few tips for creating a workspace if you don’t have space for a dedicated office: * Get a desk. Don’t try to work from your coffee table or dining room table. It’s inefficient and you’ll constantly find yourself having to pick things up just to bring them back out later. It’s better to have a space where you can leave your work things set up all the time. * Go into “work mode” when you’re in your workspace. This might mean wearing “work clothes” when you’re working. Or it might mean putting shoes on when you’re at your desk (this is one I do most of the time). * Steal unused space. Is there an unused room, corner of a room, or even closet somewhere in your home? Is it big enough for a desk? If it is, then you might have just found your dedicated office. If your space is part of a 23 | ISSUE 02 | The Role of an Advertising agency

larger room, consider buying an office armoire to hide away your work stuff when you’re not using it. If it’s in a closet or other tiny space, a built-in desk and shelving might work best (otherwise you’re likely to waste space with a desk that’s smaller than the total space). Commandeer unused space in your home to carve out a dedicated work space. 3. Take Advantage of Time Management Tools There are hundreds of tools out there for organizing and managing your time. Whether you opt for a physical date book or calendar or go for an online app, take advantage of the ready-made tools available. I use a combination of tools. Remember the Milk keeps my todo list (with the Pro version you can also access it from an iPhone). I have a dry-erase calendar for my monthly schedule. And I flag emails that have important information in them until I’m done with that information. Previously, I’ve used those yellow Post-It notes to keep my to-do list organized (I’d stick them to my desk in front of my keyboard) and a pocket-size black Moleskine notebook. Both tools worked well, but I finally decided I wanted to have a to-do list I could access from anywhere. There are tons of other time management tools. Experiment with a few and see what seems to fit with the way you work. There’s no “one-size-fits-all” solution out there that will work for everyone. But there’s almost certainly a tool out there for everyone. 4. Set Goals Setting goals is one of the most important things you can do to manage your time. If you don’t have any goals, how do you know what’s important? What deserves your time and attention? The short answer is: you don’t. Goals don’t need to be formal. They don’t need to be long-term either (though long-term goals can also help). What they do need to do is focus your attention on what’s important. One of my goals might be to get all of my work done by Thursday so I can take Friday off, or use Friday to work on a personal project. What that goal does is get me to focus on working more


efficiently so I can finish my work in 80% of the time. Cutting 20% of my work time isn’t that big of a deal most weeks. Simply turning off TweetDeck while I work (or setting it to only pull updates every 30 or 60 minutes) can go a long way toward doing that. So can working through lunch or getting up a half hour earlier (or staying up a half hour later). Your goals should be attainable and specific. You can set recurring goals (”I want to take every Friday off.”) or one-time goals (”I want to finish my new website design by next Tuesday.”) or any combination of the two. You might write them down somewhere or you can just keep them in your head. Just make sure you always have a goal. Your goal could even be as simple as, “finish this logo mockup before lunch.” 5. Set Deadlines Deadlines are sort of like a built-in goal for a project. If you know something is due next Monday, then you’re more likely to structure your work on it to make sure it gets done by Monday. (If not, you definitely need this article more than most.) If you don’t have deadlines imposed by clients or a boss, then you’ll need to have self-imposed deadlines. Think about when you want to finish something or when you’d like to move on to the next project. Put that date in your calendar or mark it on your to-do list as the deadline for your current project. For added accountability, tell someone else about your deadline. I’ll sometimes post self-imposed deadlines on Twitter or Facebook so my friends there can hound me about it if I miss a deadline. Peer pressure can go a long way toward getting you to work harder. 6. Plan Ahead Keep some kind of big-picture plan. This might be monthly, bi-monthly, or yearly, depending on your industry and the particular types of projects you take on. As I mentioned before, I keep a dry-erase calendar with my monthly projects and deadlines. I can also mark down appointments, important dates, and other information that might interfere with my deadlines or regular work schedule. Most of my deadlines are on a weekly or semi-weekly basis, so a monthly calendar works great for me. If you have longer deadline periods (or shorter ones), you’ll need to adjust the amount of time you need to look at at once to get an idea of how much work you’ve committed yourself to at any one time. 7. Prioritize You have to prioritize the work you do. For the most part, work due immediately (or within the next few days) should be completed first. Then comes the work due within the next week or two, and then everything else. Don’t forget to include family priorities, too. Your child’s first soccer game is important, so make sure that gets on the list of top priorities. Doctor’s appointments, school plays, parent-teacher meetings, date nights, and parties also need to be taken into account when you’re planning your work schedule. Decide what things you absolutely must attend whether your work is finished or not (there shouldn’t be very many things on this list),

what things you want to attend if you get to a certain point in your work (and note what you need to have done in order to attend), and things that you may or may not attend if all of your work is finished. Set up a system of marking the priority of different items on your schedule. This might be using different-colored pens to write in different items, or it might be putting a star next to the most important things, or even keeping separate lists for each priority. Again, just make sure whatever you choose to do makes sense in your lifestyle. 8. Delegate or Outsource There’s nothing wrong with bringing in a little outside help once in awhile. This might mean delegating responsibility for a project to someone else in your office, or even to an assistant. It might mean outsourcing a certain aspect of a project (research, coding, etc.) to someone else so you can focus on the more important parts. You don’t necessarily need to outsource or delegate parts of your work to be more effective. Why not consider hiring a housekeeper to come in and clean your house once a week? Or getting someone else to wash and detail your car instead of spending Saturday afternoon doing it yourself? These kinds of outsourced services can free up your time for the important things you want to do (like hanging out with your significant other or your kids, or playing an extra round of golf). 9. Optimize Your Processes There are almost certainly things you do on a daily or weekly basis in the course of your work that you could streamline. It might be your billing. Or maybe your archiving. Or it could be something you do on almost every project you take on. These are the things you should streamline and optimize. Look at the way you’re currently doing things and see if there are steps you could combine or cut all together. If you’re a web designer, this might mean creating your own custom set of template files for developing sites. Or using an automated invoicing program for billing. Or any number of other things that can be made more efficient if you’re only willing to take the time to identify them. 10. Learn to Say “No” One of the biggest time-management pitfalls you can experience is taking on too much work. You have to learn to say “no” to some people. If you take on more work than you can handle, not only will you have problems meeting deadlines, but the quality of your work and your relationships (both personal and workrelated) will suffer. Before taking on any new work, look at your schedule. Do you really have time for another project? If not, simply explain to the client that you have too many projects going to devote the time necessary for their project. Most will thank you for it. And if you really can’t bring yourself to turn down work, give them a realistic timeline for when you can complete their project. Don’t say you can have it done the following week if you already have commitments taking up your time between now and then.

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9 Marketing Tips from a Six-Year Old’s Lemonade Stand Here are nine lemonade stand tips that you can use to market your services: Written by Jim Lodico. He is a freelance commercial copywriter and marketing consultant. You can learn more about his services at his website www.jalcommunications.com

1. Give people something for free and they will feel obligated to return the favor When you help someone, it creates a natural desire to return the favor. As a web designer, provide helpful tips on your blog, participate in forums offering advice and helping non-designers, share ideas on Twitter. In doing so, you’ll not only build trust, but also develop relationships with potential clients.

screaming “free lemonade” at passing cars. While it might seem extreme, it worked. How are you “screaming” about your business? 6. Be Persistent

2. Give potential customers a taste of your offerings Offer free themes or templates with an easy upgrade to “pro” versions. Provide free stock graphics that hint at potential identity or branding packages while demonstrating your creativity. Just be sure to make it good. When users are excited about the base product, they are much more likely to upgrade. 3. Make it “Extra Special” Don’t just offer lemonade. Put in that extra sprig of mint. Make everything you do something “extra special” and clients will take notice. Not only will they come back for more, they’ll tell their friends. 4. Don’t Be Afraid to Tell Your “Neighbors” (Network!) One of the first things my daughter did when she opened her stand was run next door and tell the neighbor. After getting his lemonade, he called two other neighbors to tell them about the lemonade stand – both of whom came right over with “donations”. Don’t be afraid to tell friends and colleagues about your services. You never know, they may talk to your next big client later that day. 5. Do What You Need to Do to Be Seen It wasn’t enough to just put up a sign. My daughter’s advertising consisted of jumping up and down 26 | ISSUE 02 | The Role of an Advertising agency

Even though most of the cars passed by, my daughter didn’t give up. Finally, after many failed attempts, one of them did stop—doubling her income for the day. 7. Build Anticipation My daughter’s first customer knew about her project and was there as soon as it opened. Don’t just launch your new web site, let people know it’s coming. Drop hints, show them screen shots, make them look forward to the big day. 8. Find Good Partners My daughter’s little brother kept drinking the lemonade – not the best partner. However, her friend from down the street was out there with her jumping up and down screaming, doubling their advertising efforts. 9. Advertise Your Popularity Once my daughter’s cup started filling with coins, people were more likely to “donate”. Don’t be afraid to advertise your popularity. Place download counters, comment counts and subscriber numbers in prominent places. Just make sure the stats are high enough to warrant a little bragging.


Interview with:

Pedja Kazazovic

art director from the Bosnian advertising agency Communis

1. Can you tell us a little about yourself?

2. How did you first get into graphic design?

Hi there! My name is Pedja Kazazovic, and I consider myself to be a multimedia artist / designer / producer. I studied a product design course at the Academy of Fine Arts in Sarajevo, and upon concluding my education, I started exploring new forms of expression. Since I also studied music for almost a decade - I combined the visual and the audible into multimedia art pieces.

Well, as product design is a broader area than graphic design, I started working on visual solutions during my course of study. We had to develop different presentations, graphic posters and other important items before any business pitch or presentation. As time went by, I got more and more proficient and my skills improved. The critical point, when I got really interested in graphic design, was when I discovered animation, film editing and other media, which incorporated the visual with sounds, music and other audible elements.

I am always about expressing ideas, concepts, thoughts, trying to reach out into the new and striving to tell stories to whoever would listen. I currently work as an art director for Communis, one of the leading advertising agencies in Bosnia and Herzegovina. I am also a President of The Organization for Multimedia Culture, called VIBE.

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3. What do you enjoy most about your work? The feeling when you transfer people into your fantasies, visions, when they feel instantly upon seeing your work what you felt during its creation - cannot be replaced by any other feeling. I had numerous people


calling me up, crying or being really upset by something I did. The warmth and the amounts of positive energy I get from everyone else is the main fuel for wanting to go even further.

4. What do you like least about your job? Having to work on unimportant stuff, like formatting newspaper ads and other things that take a lot of your energy, and which give you nothing spiritual in return. Also, working with ignorant people who have no decent understanding of the whole process, and who have no idea of how much energy and work it takes to create something new and unique. Also, I think that Bosnia and Herzegovina is still not ripe enough for any sort of creative leaps forward. People here are still afraid of new things and rely mostly on copying stuff from abroad.

first step in everything I do - thinking about the past, great artists and their works, replicating what has gone before in today's terms, etc. People and their behavior have always been a great source of inspiration as the final outcome will definitely have to communicate something to them. Observing how they behave under certain circumstances can tell you a lot even about yourself. Music is the source of great inspiration and I have no restrictions as to the genre, artists and performers. As long as it makes butterflies in my stomach, it is good enough.

5. What is your worst enemy of creativity? Tight deadlines and people with no basic education about design process. Having to work with these two is a sure road to mediocre solutions.

8. Did you start out with traditional mediums or digital? During my high school, which I attended in London, I was mostly classically trained. I painted a lot, did sculptures and even developed analog photographs. I think it is crucial to deal with the basics first in order to fully understand the capacity and possibilities of the digital era.

9. What programs do you favor when creating? 6. What do you do when you start a new project and you have NO ideas? It takes time to ferment your ideas. First of all, whatever I do, I never go to my work place and start doing it all at once. I understand that it takes time for everything good to emerge, so I basically just rest, take time off and let my brain move freely. I go to various places with people, as they are my true inspiration for everything I do. I just sit, observe or even listen to some music that gives me the feeling that I want to convey through the design piece. Then, ideas start flowing and it is just a question of filtering them and finding the one that gets you 'electric'!

7. What inspires you the most?

First of all, Photoshop is the program that is basic for everything I do. Illustrator is also useful, as sometimes vector art gives that something 'extra' to everything. I also use Premiere and After Effects, 3Ds Max, Soundbooth and Cubase.

10. When you sit down to start a new piece, what is your thought process? I always get nervous at the first instance. I always think 'Will I live up to my previous work?' I have that first period of creating various ideas that are just rough sketches of something that might work. This allows me to release thoughts and I always write down everything that comes up to my mind. Then, I put everything away to cool down a little after what I look at it and see clearly everything that was crossing my mind. This is the stage when I decide what solution is the best for the task.

It all comes basically down to several things: people, music, art and current trends. Art has always been the The Role of an Advertising agency | ISSUE 02 | 28


11. Do you work in a studio or anywhere exclusive to your work? Besides my normal work position as an Art Director, which gives me enough space for creative work, I also have a certain studio, set up at home that I use to work when I am chillin'. This can happen even at the midnight or early in the morning, depending on the outburst of inspiration.

12. Your blend of photographic and vector elements is quite unique. What process do you go through in pairing shapes with photographs? Well, if you look at my work, the main and essential characteristic of it is the use of photography. Collage is the main media, which I use, as it can give you freedom to express everything that comes to your mind. It doesn't have to have any sense or any logic behind it. It all comes down to the one essential question: 'Does it feel right, or not?' If I sense that these two different elements fit together, they stay. Sometimes I remove elements after a couple of days of being convinced that they fit. But that is all the question of creativity - you never know what might happen next.

13. Let's talk a little about color theory. How do you go about choosing the colours you use in your pieces?

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Color is very important as it can open up the whole design and release the emotion you want to convey, or it can damp the whole feeling. You have to be very careful with choosing color. In my case I analyze the emotions of the piece and go back to basic symbolic use of colors. Studying art and various artists has given me insight into what other artists considered some colors to represent certain feelings. Nevertheless I rely on my inner gut and I trust myself, as well. Cold and warm, distant and close, smart or stupid are all opposite examples, which require opposite colors to represent them.


14. Have you ever been printed or published? I have had opportunities to have my work printed and published. Also, as I am a multimedia designer, my short films have been published and promoted on different websites and I also had a substantial television promotion.

15. What artists do you look to for inspiration? Besides the traditional artists, great artists of the past eras, I look for outrageous individuals that stir up the present art scenery. David La Chapelle is a great individual whose work I truly admire. Testino is the other individual who I would also like to mention. Mr. Brainwash is a designer whose work is also inspirational in every form. There are many other individuals in various segments that inspire me, whether it is music, design, fashion, style or any other form of expression. First of all, knowing basic techniques of composition and assembling graphic items might be helpful, but not necessary. I think more important is letting go of the expectations what the final outcome should be and just freely experimenting until you surprise even yourself. You can create so many shapes, styles, messages and other compositions when preconceptions and expected solutions are neglected. Let your brain do the work and allow it to work freely.

17. What hobbies do you have? What do you do to unwind? My wide spectrum of interest gives me also a various ways of unwinding. It can be traveling, listening to music, going to see a play or a film, talking to close people and lots of observing. I like sitting in shopping malls and just looking at different things, from the way people dress to the way they interact between one another. This gives me enough inspiration and also takes my mind off some things that might trouble me at that very moment.

16. There are quite a number of people trying to get into the abstract design style. Can you give any suggestions or pointers on how or where to start in this growingly popular style? The Role of an Advertising agency | ISSUE 02 |30


Meet the Artist:

Glenn Jones

INFO: http://www.glennz.com/


Glenn Jones is a graphic designer and illustrator from Auckland, New Zealand. The name GLENNZ mean GLENN from NZ, and is also his username at http://threadless.com where you can find some of his work. Glennz has been working in the design industry for over 16 years focusing on packaging, corporate identity and illustration. After his success designing tees on Threadless he got the opportunity to create his own growing range of tees, that you can check out at glennz.com/.


Meet the Artist:

Heru Suryoko

INFO: http://herusuryoko.com digital imaging artist based in Jakarta, Indonesia e : heru.suryoko@gmail.com p : 0815 970 6219


Meet the Artist:

Doucin Pierre After about ten years dedicated to the culture of graffiti, SomeOne now works with digital format and has developed a personal and dynamic graphic universe. Opet to any form of expression. SomeOne`s work as in the perpetual evolution. He multiplies every experience and has mastered a unique style and technique of present-day design. INFO: http://www.soemone.com/


Meet the Artist:

INFO: http://marcsimonetti.artworkfolio.com

Marc Simonetti Professional artist for 5 years now. I've been working on various fields such as cover arts, concept arts for video game companies and long feature films, and matte paintings for TV advertisements.

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Advertising festival GoldenDrum The Event Sixteen years have passed since the modest idea that many saw as bold and overreaching was born. Since then the Golden Drum International Advertising Festival has grown into not only a European manifestation but into an important event noticed throughout the world. From Trieste to Vladivostok, from Helsinki to Tel Aviv, the Golden Drum is the biggest, the most important and the most noticed advertising overview and event of the year.

The Friendliest Festival Whoever has followed the Portoro탑 meetings over the last sixteen years has to admit that because of it countless friendly, professional and business ties were established. Today we know each other better in this 400 million people region that was blown together by the winds from all over. We know who is who, we can compare and judge each other and with this knowledge we can trade easier on the domestic and international stage.

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eurobest The 2nd European Advertising Festival

With more than 50 industry experts lined up to speak at 23 seminars and nine workshops, Eurobest 2009 is the year's most valuable learning opportunity, culminating in the grand Awards Ceremony on Friday 27 November at the Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam. Also on the menu are the Young Creatives Integrated Competition, Business Development opportunities and shortlist exhibitions – and, of course, Networking After Dark and the official Opening Party. WHAT'S NEW? Mark and Glenn Tutssel join the Eurobest seminar 2009 programme, Microsoft Advertising hosts a seminar and the full jury lists are announced. INFO: http://www.eurobest.com/

Eurobest - Advertising Awards and Festival Since its inception in 1988, Eurobest has been the premier awards for Europe's creative advertising industry. Eurobest is now the Eurobest Festival which, in this its second year, takes place from 25 to 27 November 2009 at the Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam. The Festival will provide three essential days of focus and debate for the European advertising and communications industry.

Eurobest Festival The Festival is organised by the International Advertising Festival, the team behind Cannes Lions, Dubai International Advertising Festival and Spikes Asia. The Eurobest Festival has a purely European focus and will engage the European creative community on the industry's most pertinent issues.

Eurobest Awards The Eurobest Awards now has 11 entry sections with the addition of Craft in 2009 to the existing sections of TV/Cinema, Print, Outdoor, Direct, Sales Promotion, Media, Interactive, Radio, Design and Integrated.

Judging The Eurobest Awards will be judged at the Eurobest Festival by panels of expert, high-profile jurors who 43 | ISSUE 02 | The Role of an Advertising agency

determine the shortlists and then award Grand Prix, Gold, Silver and Bronze trophies to Europe's best work.

Eurobest Awards Ceremony The Eurobest Awards will take place on the final evening of the Eurobest Festival, 27 November, at the Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam, and is followed by the Festival After Party.


Systematizing the Graphic Design Process

Unlike other forms of art, graphic design is not just about taking paper and pen and letting the work flow. Graphic designers have to help viewers get the message and help sell a service or product. Creating a design for a client with little or no strategy just doesn’t work. Unlike traditional art, graphic design has to convey a very narrow message. Developing a system for the graphic design process can help the designer achieve the best results. Systematizing any sort of project, whether graphic design, web design, programming or otherwise, gets the work done faster, keeps the project organized and yields better results. Here is a simple six-step graphic design process, which you may want to take wholesale or build on.

1. Collect the Necessary Information You might be tempted to jump right in and start designing, but collect the necessary information first. For most graphic designers, this information will come from the client. Even for your own projects, though, assembling the necessary information first is essential. Most clients will probably contact a graphic designer in this kind of way: I need a poster made for my new product X, [followed by project description]. We will be displaying them in location A and location B, and we need a talented graphic designer to make a poster that “sells.” The client would likely go on to ask for a quote and provide contact information. All is well from the client’s perspective, but you, the graphic designer, really have nothing to go on still.

audience from the line, “We will be displaying them in location A and location B,” but asking the client explicitly for this information will better define the target audience for you. Just because the posters will be put on college campuses, for example, we shouldn’t assume that the target audience will be college students in general. Does the client have a certain group or sub-population in mind? Design students? Engineering students? Faculty and staff? Information about the target audience should include age range, geographic location, interests and needs. Learn What the Exact Message Is For product advertisements, “Buy Me!” obviously isn’t going to cut it. Ask the client how the product, service or message should be conveyed. Does the product need the high-end treatment, or a more personal feel?

Some clients might leave you with more information, and some less. However much you get, though, will usually not be enough. Before providing an estimate and starting the project, make sure the following information is spelled out:

Every kind of graphic design—logos, posters, t-shirts, etc.—needs a message. Get this out of the client before moving forward.

The Target Audience

Technical Requirements

You might be able to get a good idea of the target

If it’s a poster, what are the dimensions, exact colors and number of copies needed. Would the client like to

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include any other elements in the design? If it’s a logo, have any colors or branding already been established? Does the client already have ideas for it? If it’s apparel, what dimensions, colors and templates are required? With any graphic design, you have to ascertain certain fundamentals before getting started. Forgetting something important could mean your having to redo a large part of the project… and earning less money than you had originally figured. Make sure to research and discuss all of these details before beginning the design phase. Budget and Deadlines You will also have to discuss the budget, deadlines and other business-related details that will go in your design proposal (discussed below). For one thing, this will weed out any misdirected clients right away: clients whose deadlines are too tight or whose budgets are ridiculously low. Be sure to share with the client your pricing structure and reasonable deadlines, and ask if they have any other requirements to discuss. You can add a firm quote and specific deadlines to the proposal later. Systematizing It To systematize this initial communication with the client, use a pre-set questionnaire. This should cover most of the bases and keep you from forgetting anything important. You can always customize the questionnaire to the project. The point is that the questionnaire is supposed to save you from having to rethink all of the basic questions for each client. It might also help to get the client involved in some sort of collaboration tool, such as BaseCamp or Google Docs. Sharing and discussing questionnaires can be much easier without email, and it can set a good precedent for managing the rest of the project.

2. Write Out a Proposal, Firm Quote, Contract and Plan You have a lot of ground to cover at this stage, but it doesn’t have to be a lot of work if most of it is systematized. All of these things (quote, proposal, contract and even the outline or plan) can come from templates that are slightly customized to the job. Systematization can take care of this portion of the project quickly and painlessly. If you don’t already have a system in place, you’ll have to create these documents as soon as possible. This will take quite a bit of work up front but will make your life much easier down the road. If you are employed by a company, you may already have access to some of

these templates already. Freelancers, though, will have to start on their own. Create templates for all of these documents, perhaps even basing them on templates that you find on the web. The ideal template would require you merely to fill in the client’s name and contact information. The Proposal The proposal is different because it will have to be customized for each client and project. Simply filling in the client’s name won’t work here. A graphic design proposal should tell the client what the process will be, the final deadline and budget information. It should also formalize the information from the questionnaire: target audience, objective, etc. It is the overall plan for the project. Templates will save time here, too, if section headings and routine bits are pre-written. Just add the content to the proposal and you’re done. A Personal Plan Your personal plan will contain much of the proposal but will be adapted to meet your needs. For example, while the proposal might state a certain date as being the deadline for the initial mock-up, your personal plan would include deadlines for certain milestones that you need to reach in order to meet the deadline in the proposal. This could include days for brainstorming, implementing the initial design and finalizing and organizing. You can use a template again, as long as you customize it for each project. The template is where you systematize the processes that work best for you. Think about the regular tasks that you do for every project, and systematize them to make them more efficient. Write out a step-by-step process that is organized and easy to follow. You’ll save time and minimize the chance of forgetting something.

3. Brainstorm, Research and Inspiration Many designers find that going straight to work after all the business details are taken care of doesn’t yield the best results. Rather, you might want to take time to find inspiration, research similar or competing designs and brainstorm freely. Without this part of the graphic design process, the designer may find himself continually starting over, or revising the same parts of the design, or just being inefficient. By taking the time to get inspired and organize our thoughts, you will actually work faster in the long run. The Role of an Advertising agency | ISSUE 02 | 46


Inspiration

4. Try Different Things

Inspiration is the first step and leads to the brainstorming and research. Below are some great ways to find inspiration:

Having collecting resources and researched styles, you’ve probably come upon new ideas. Try a few different things, using your original goal as your reference point. Don’t just jump in, create something and leave it at that. Not only will you learn something new, you will also have a few other ideas to show the client if they want to see variations.

- Read a book Many designers look to other graphic design or art for inspiration. One of my favorite ways to find it, though, is just by reading a book. Focusing on words alone makes your imagination do the work, and then you can transfer that creativity into your work. - Visit a museum This is a more visual approach to inspiration, and a fun one. But it doesn’t have to be an art museum. I find that going to any museum can bring me inspiration and help me unwind. - Free-write (yes, write) Like reading a book, writing can trigger the imagination in a way that the visual arts can’t. Many writers find inspiration by free-writing, which is writing without thinking, analyzing or planning. It is a great way to get your ideas down on paper and then build on them. - Unwind Unwind, take a walk, get out, have some fun. Not thinking about work is a great way to stop those old ways of thinking that were getting you nowhere. It can open your mind and help you discover new things. Once you’ve unwound, you can go back into design mode and bring your new ideas with you. Brainstorm Brainstorming is the process of taking inspiration and organizing it in a form that can be incorporated in a design. Ideas, styles and elements that you’d like to include in the design are all a part of the process, even if they are still a bit rough. Sketch some layouts, experiment with color schemes and typography, and try out different ways to present graphics. Sketching is a part of this phase, as is testing one’s creativity to the limit. This is when the general idea for the design comes into focus. Research This is when you research the final idea and how to make it happen. I like to collect examples of elements from other projects and see what works best. You could also look up tutorials on effects that the design calls for. This is a great way to try something new and get the perfect look. Collect resources and learn a few new things. Then you should be ready to create a draft for the client.

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5. The Revision Phase Many designers don’t appreciate the revision phase, especially if they feel a client has poor taste and wants to ruin the design they have worked so hard on. Don’t worry. It doesn’t have to be so painful. Share with the client your initial design or, as many graphic designers like to do, multiple options for designs. Make sure the client feels free to share what they would like changed or to mix and match features from the different options you present. It can be difficult to understand clients who don’t know what it is they don’t like about a particular design but just want “something different.” Keep showcases and examples for inspiration on hand for the client. So, if the client doesn’t like a font that you used for the logo, share a logo design showcase with them. Ask them to choose a few that they like, to get a better feel for their style; that might be easier than getting someone who has no background in design to explain what they mean. This part of the graphic design process requires the most attention and is the hardest to systematize, but keeping such resources on hand can help. Don’t be afraid to ask questions and collaborate with the client when they are being vague. Taking the time to tease out their thoughts is quicker than making revisions that they might not like anyway. Wrapping Up In systematizing any process, the tips we’ve shared can help. But you should also identify the tasks that you do regularly and figure out how to make them more efficient. Don’t let the process we’ve outlined stop you from asking yourself what is unique about your way of working. With a system, the correct tools and better overall organization, taking on more clients and getting projects done faster and with better results is possible. Businesses have to take advantage of the opportunities that systematization holds.


Brainstorming is the successful monthly spin-off of DDS “Idea is all”. Each issue gives you an in-depth guide to a different creative subject, and future issues will covere themes such as print design, web design, Photoshop, typography, packaging, creative advertising, and how to start your own design business. Inside every edition, you’ll find great step-by-step tutorials and tips from the best digital artists in the business, showcases and profiles of upand-coming talent and established creatives, as well as explorative features on the subject in hand.

Why Advertise on brainstorming.ba and brainstorming magazine?


Meet the Artist:

Bruno Dayan French photographer of international mode: Bruno Dayan. Collaborations with famous brands like Yves Saint Laurent or Louis Vuitton, and a shooting with the French actress Marion Cotillard for the magazine Mrs Figaro. INFO: http://www.brunodayan.com


Meet the Artist:

Anthony Giaco INFO

: http ://ag

iaco .net

Agiaco is the creative identity of self-taught freelance designer, Anthony Giacomino. Anthony is currently a twenty-year-old student pursuing a career in digital illustration and graphic design. Based in the United States, Anthony aims to provide top-notch designs in illustration and digital art. He has been published in Advanced Photoshop magazine four times, two of which are commissioned tutorials. Previous jobs include an internship with Clear Channel Outdoor designing billboards, transit ads and city bus ads. He has designed for professional athletes including Rafael Nadal, Amare Stoudemire, Mike Miller, Allen Iverson, Randy Moss and Shawne Merriman and Andre Iguodala.


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Meet the Artist:

Benjamin G端del INFO: http://www.hotelfox.dk/


Benjamin G端del is a very talented illustrator and comic artist based in Zurich. He has his roots in the underground comic world but he says he became an illustrator in order to earn a living. His dynamic and expressive drawings, which are mostly begun by hand and then finished digitally, can be seen in various Swiss publications such as Weltwoche, Soda and DU as well as gracing posters for the Berlin avant-garde theatre, the Schaub端hne."


Meet the Artist:

Benedict Campbell with 20+ years experience in advertising as a photographer and digital artist, Benedict Cambell has produced images for many of the worlds leading brands. He is renow for combining his skills as photograher and digital illustrator to create bold and often hyper-real images. With Benedecit`s creative origins very much grounded in photography, his use of computer generated imagery has been to enhance reality, rather than detract from it. INFO: http://www.benedict1.com/


Meet the Artist:

Sven Prim INFO: http://www.svenprim.com/


Sven Prim, a Swedisch Photographer/Manipulator, with an amazing portfolio full of inspiring work. I found his website on the Etcetering blog and I couldn’t resist to share this with all the PHASE02 readers. This guy has an incredible eye for photo manipulating and a extraordinary view on all kinds of stuff. I just can’t find words for all his interpretations, ideas, concepts and of course the way he executes them.


Meet the Artist:

INFO: http://couscouskid.co.uk/

Couscous Kid Couscous Kid is the work of Mathew Thomas, illustrator and designer based in Bath, UK. Mathew's illustrations lie somewhere between the cutting edge of the new breed in contemporary illustration and the tempting nipple of naive. Impossible to pigeon-hole, Couscous Kids' dream-like and innocent style leads us dancing eerily among the childlike leaves we cling onto through life to a deeper and darker space. A timeless place where fantasy and fairy tale doodles combine with intrigue, mystery and sex. At first glance all is as it seems with hints of sixties abandon, but closer inspection reveals a 21st century humour and physical freedom hidden among the sublime and ridiculous forms and characters. Recently Mat has been developing his unique style of image making by working with original sketches drawn by his wife Debra whom he lives together with their 2 children. Mathew's images find homes embodying and embracing beauty, fashion, nature, music and above all life. Investigate and explore!


Meet the Artist:

Ratinan Thaijareorn

INFO: https://dieeis.wordpress.com/


Ratinan Thaijareorn A.K.A."ISE" was born and raised in Bangkok,Thailand. She loves painting as her best friend and also love to draw fashion style female figure. She got her degree in visual communication art & design from Rangsit University. Now she work on illustrate field,freelance and open a clothing shop name Weisschwarz.


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40 Helvetica Excellent Logos Created with

It’s over fifty years old, it’s the most widely used font ever, and it has recently become the subject of its own movie.

Target

We’re talking about the world’s most recognizable font: Helvetica. Its relevance in design through the years and even today seems unbeatable. The appeal for a distinctive, professional and timeless typeface has never dwindled and it keeps gaining more followers day by day. Love it or hate it, with its multitude of styles and versions, Helvetica is here to stay. From airlines, to car companies to the largest software company, Helvetica’s use in logos throughout the world remains as strong as ever. In this article we’ll take a look at 40 excellent logos created using Helvetica.

Staples

BMW

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The North Face


Skype

Sears

Tupperware

Toyota

Post-it

Scotch

Panasonic

Oral-B

Olympus

National

Motorola

Microsoft

The Role of an Advertising agency | ISSUE 02 | 66


Mattel

Lufthansa

Knoll

Kawasaki

Jeep

JCPenney

Harley-Davidson

GM

Evian

Energizer

Dole

Digital

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CVS/pharmacy

Create/Barrel

Caterpillar

British Gas

Blaupunkt

Bell Atlantic

Basf

American Apparel

Agfa

American Airlines

Nestle

3M

The Role of an Advertising agency | ISSUE 02 | 68


CORNFIELD

Cornfield d.o.o. Pofalicka 3/1 | 71000 - Sarajevo| Bosna i Hercegovina telefon telefax

+ 387 33 658 177 + 387 33 658 117

web e-mail

www.cornfield.ba info@cornfield.ba


Meet the Artist:

INFO: http://cargocollective.com/avivdesign

Luis Miguel Torres Hello, my name is Luis Miguel Torres, I'm 23 years old I'm a graphic designer from Mexico, I started making freelancing 3 years ago. Now i have a design studio (telaviv design. mexico).


November 12, 2009 Creativity and innovation exist far beyond the realm of agency creatives. Today, marketers, interactive and tech visionaries, game creators, entertainment execs, directors, restaurateurs, artists, musicians and so many others are all deeply immersed in the business of creativity — and the IDEA Conference has become their lab.

Provocative thinking, shared experiences and inspired, workable business ideas are the earmarks of The IDEA Conference. Get ready for IDEA 2009 — and get ready for more. Currently Registered Companies Include @Radical.Media, AARP, AETN, Affinion Group, American Express, Arnold, Best Buy, Derse, DOG, Erwin-Penland, Euro RSCG, Furlined, Graphic Solutions, GSD&M Idea City, Hasbro, IMG, MediaCom, Meredith Corporation, Momentum WorldWide, Nike, Pendaflex, Razorfish, Redscout, Samsung Electronics, TRPB Advertising, USA Today

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Meet the Artist:

Ted Sabarese

Ted Sabarese is happy to be a photographer. Actually, he’s ecstatic and sometimes grins for no apparent reason. Before settling in to this career, he spent time as a college English teacher, graphic designer, fiction writer and advertising creative director. But always with a loaded camera around his shoulder. Seriously. Always. These diverse experiences—along with years of studying photography at the New School in New York City—helped to shape his visual style. Incorporating bits and pieces of learning from all of his previous “lives,” Ted’s work most often demonstrates a clean, graphic, character-driven narrative (Even if the character happens to be an inanimate object like a down-on-its-luck houseboat or a lonely set of microphones). His personal and fine art work have won wide, critical acclaim and have been exhibited in galleries in both the U.S. and abroad. This exposure compliments his many commercial advertising and editorial assignments and awards. Ted loves his wife Victoria and daughter Elle more than photography and The New York Times crossword puzzle combined. INFO: http://www.tedsabarese.com/


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Meet the Artist:

Jeffrey Vanhoutte Jeffrey Vanhoutte was born in Antwerp, Belgium. He got a diploma as a professional photographer and in the age of 21 Jeffrey opened a studio in Brussels, where he worked in the genre of food photography for a long time. In 1999 he started using digital cameras and collaborating with advertising agencies BBDO, Ogilvy, TWBA, Saachi. INFO: http://www.jeffreyvanhoutte.be/


Interview with:

Marina

Filipovicc

01. First of all, tell us a little bit about yourself. Where are you from? Where did you go to school? My name is Marina Filipovic, I’m 23 years old, I live and work both in Osijek and Zagreb. On the web I’m better known as Marinshe, a nickname my grandfather gave me when I was little. I finished high school in Osijek and am at the moment working toward a degree in economics at the University of Osijek. Beside photography, I have been practicing singing for well over 14 years and have worked in my high school and college web teams in web and graphic design. At 16 I even had my own web design company where I gained my first business experiences, as well as an interest in photography. 02. How did you get into photography? Spontaneously. I always liked photography. Since it wasn’t possible to share photos over the web or have them stored online, photos from my «analogue» period are safely kept in the family albums. As a child I took photos of flowers, nature and my friends. In the autumn of 2006. I started working with professional equipment, having bought a Fuji S3 Pro and my first Nikkor 50 mm f/1,4 lens. Then things started to get serious. I take photos every single day and publish them on my sites: the official site http://www.marinshe.com, my Croatian photo blog http://www.marinshe.bloger.hr and my deviantArt profile http://marinshe.deviantart.com. 79 | ISSUE 02 | The Role of an Advertising agency

03. How do you choose locations? Do you happen upon them by chance or do you do any exploring? Sometimes it happens spontaneously. While walking through the park, in the city, in the countryside, etc… I look at the world around me and find what’s interesting. When I work for clients then we try to find an appropriate location together. I prefer nature, open locations with lots of natural light and shadows. 04. Your selection of models, styling and scenery is impeccable. Are there shots primarily for fashion clients or are they purely artistics? Thank you. Well, I don’t differentiate between commercial and private work. My goal is that all my works have value as artworks and I think I achieve that most of the time. It’s hard, but I try as hard as I can. When you do a lot of creative work, there’s always the danger of getting into a routine and losing fresh ideas. Because of that I take a few days off to gather energy and new ideas. Every photographer that is any good, can find it’s way into the viewer’s heart and capture his or her imagination. Photos that I’ve taken for my own purposes have appeared as cover photos for magazines and books, as well as in exhibitions. 05. Do you shoot primarily with digital or film? What kind of gear do you use? Explain your process. I only shoot with digital, although I know how to work with


going in the next couple of years? What are some of your artistic hopes? I want to do a lot more in terms of my career in photography and I’m quite ambitious. I see myself at the very beginning of a long journey. 08. Let’s talk about color theory. How do you go about choosing the colors you see in your pieces. I choose colors spontaneously. I perceive them and then match them by feeling. My eye and intuition guide me in my work. It’s a creative process that emerges from the chaos of ideas. 09. Have you ever been printed or published? My photos have appeared on the covers of the french magazine PHOTO, Livingstone, Modra Lasta as well as several books from Algoritam. A lot of them were published in magazines: Extra, Livingstone, Digital Photo Mag, Bulb Magazin, Grazia, Veèernji list, Jutarnji list, Modra Lasta, etc. Some of them have even appeared on Croatian national TV as well as local Slavonian TV stations. Five works have apperaed as examples of various photographic theories in the official Mexican schoolbook for high schools. I’ve had four solo exhibitions and about ten group exhibitions. You can see my work on the web at http://www.marinshe.com. Thanks for the interview! Marina thank you very much for answering our questions film as well. I like taking photos with my lomo camera while travelling. As for my equipment, I have two cameras: a Fuji S3 Pro and Fuji S5 Pro. I use the following lenses: Nikkor 80-200mm f/2,8, Nikkor 50mm f/1,4, Nikkor 60mm f/2,6 Makro, Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6; as well as Nikon SB600 flash. Sometimes I use a Manfrotto stand while taking landscape photographs. My process starts with an idea or moment of inspiration when the photograph «appears» in my mind. After that I call a model, plan the makeup and styling and choose a location. After shooting I continue with the postproduction, for which I use Adobe Photoshop CS3. In it, I correct the colors and light until the photograph is what I’ve had in mind. 06. How much of your photography is storytelling? I feel like there’s a story begging to be told behind every photo. Exactly! Each and every photo I create has a message. Sometimes it’s the message that starts the creative process and sometimes it reveales itself only after the photograph is finished. I find stories in my own life as well as the life of loved ones, friends and society in general. I like creating positive stories, the ones that will make other people happy and help them feel better. There are too many sad stories in our world so I feel that my own work should be a relsease for both the eyes and the mind. 07. Where do you see your photography and art The Role of an Advertising agency | ISSUE 02 | 80


Meet the Artist:

Solve Sundsbo

INFO: http://www.artandcommerce.com/


Solve Sundsbo is one of the great innovators in contemporary image-making. His capacity for visual experimentation has brought him enduring respect within the industry. His advertising clients include Giorgio Armani, Bally, Boucheron, Etro, Givenchy, Gucci jewellery, Hermes, H&M, Iceberg, Lanc么me, Est茅e Lauder, Yves Saint Laurent, Levis, Nike, Sergio Rossi, Emanuel Ungaro and Puma. Sundsbo has also created editorials for Another Man, Dazed and Confused, Harper's Bazaar, i-D, Japanese Vogue, Numero, Pop, Visionaire, V and W. He has directed short films for Nike, Gucci and SHOWstudio. Solve Sundsbo was born and raised in Norway, and has lived in London since 1995. His photographs have been included in important fashion photography exhibitions including the Festival de Hyeres and The Archaeology of Elegance.


Meet the Artist:

INFO: http://pablodelapenya.tumblr.com/

Pablo de la Penya


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Meet the Artist:

Seagulls Fly Seagulls Fly is a young, creative and fast-paces company with a solid and successful history of servicing advertising agencies and companies with state-of-the-art digital manipulation, photo retouch, 2D and 3D illustration, animation, webdesign and post-production. INFO: http://www.seagullsfly.com/


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Meet the Artist:

Javier Pacheco

INFO: http://javiergpacheco.deviantart.com/


I think it's really great when we get to see a set of illustration from the same artist, because we actually don't see that so often. So, I was looking for a print to buy at DeviantART the other day, and found this great spanish artist, Javier Gonzalez Pacheco.


Meet the Artist:

Phillip Toledano Through an opening in a heavy door, a shaft of light falls onto the shining surface of the white linoleum floor of a pristine laboratory. The glowing shaft stretches wider and the black silhouette of Phillip Toledano moves into the room. Phillip Toledano is an experimental research scientist studying fantastic and absurd freaks. He sedates the creatures and removes them from their cages to pose them for archival photos. Somehow Creative Tempest got a hold of a few of these pictures, and we’re releasing them onto the web for you. INFO: http://www.mrtoledano.com/


Meet the Artist:

INFO: http://www.garysalter.com/

Gary Salter Gary Salter? More like Gary Sugar!” !WARNING! We hope you made it through that one just fine, and though we are sorry for the pun, we had to use it because Gary’s images are just so sweet! As well as firing off megatons of marvelous images into your minds, Creative Tempest just wants to make you smile everyday too, and we think Gary Salter’s photos do just the trick.

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Interview with:

Tomislav

Moze v

INFO: http://www.tomislavmoze.tk

1. First of all, tell us a little bit about yourself. Where are you from? Where did you go to school? Hi my name is Tomislav Mo탑e I'm a 27 year old student from Zagreb, Croatia. After finishing my high school in Zagreb, I took almost any job I could find (from metalwork to building sound and light stages for concerts). In that period I also got into mountain biking, I was one of the first mtb trial riders in Croatia, and founder of the first club for extreme bike disciplines. During my biking period I was competing in mtb freestyle and BMX street, got a few medals, at that period I've been one of the best riders here in Croatia. At the end of 2007 I decided to try to get in to the Academy of dramatic arts in Zagreb, cinematography section. I got in from my first attempt. Now, I'm on the third year. 2. How did you get into photography? My first real contact with photography was through various artists I watched on deviantArt, I stumbled upon them looking for illustrations and drawings which where my childhood hobbies. I took my first photo around 2006 for the needs of my biking club, not so long after that I had a knee injury, and I had to stop my bmx riding, this is where it all started. At the end of the 2006 I bought my self dslr canon 350d, it was really boldly of me, cause I didn't even know what slr means :).

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3. How do you choose your locations? Do you happen upon them by chance or do you do any exploring? Well, mostly I explore walking or riding my bike. I try to find as many interesting places, you never know when you're gonna need one :) 4. Your selection of models, styling and scenery is impeccable. Are these shots primarily for weddings clients or are they purely artistic? Well most of people think I do only weddings but that is maybe 30% of my photography interests and work, I do a lot of magazine interviews, fashion and conceptual stuff for myself and some projects for academy exams. So the right answer would be, half of my work is purely for my satisfaction, and the other part is for my clients. Although I try to put the same energy in both. Especially into my fashion editorials. 5. Do you shoot with primarily digital or film? What kind of gear do you use? Explain your process. Well I prefer digital I think it suits me better, I work on film also, but mostly for the need of academy assignments, I don't like the time consuming part of shooting on film:). From equipment I have: canon eos 5d, canon eos 350d, canon eos 1n, lubitel 2, fujica stx1 , canon 430 ex, canon 580 ex , ef 50mm 1:1.2 usm L, ef 17-40 1:4.0


usm L, ef 28mm 1:1.8 usm, ef 70-200 4L usm and datacolor spider3 elite to get the colors corectly. My process is based mostly on natural light, if the ambient allows me. I always plan my work if I do editorials, concepts or fashion, writing down and even drawing, if i'm trying to find a better angle, for most of my postprocess I use adobe camera raw + adobe bridge, and cs4 for retouching. 6. How much of your photography is story-telling? I feel like there's a story begging to be told behind every photo. I always try to tell a story with every photo I take, but I think most of photographers want that. I'm not sure in how many photos I succeed to make the story clear, but I give a lot of effort to find a way to tell it like nobody did before. 7. Where do you see your photography and art going in the next couple of years? What are some of your artistic hopes? First I'm planing to finish Academy. After that I'll see, I already work a lot, so probably that will have influence on my plans, my plan is to go to London and try to specialize for fashion photography but that is to far away in the future. I just hope to get more into fashion photography, and to work for some fashion magazines like 'Elle', 'Cosmopolitan' or something in that direction, for fashion is my favorite photography style because it gives me the opportunity to be creative.

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Meet the Artist:

INFO: http://fieroanimals.com/

Fiero Animals

FieroAnimals mostly gives services to advertising sector, also to magazines` ilustration and movie`s key art. Studio is specialized in the creation and manipulation of digital images, blending of photo compositing, 3D and ilustration.

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The Smashing Book is a printed book about best practices in modern Web design. The book shares technical tips and best practices on coding, usability and optimization and explores how to create successful user interfaces and apply marketing principles to increase conversion rates. It also shows how to get the most out of typography, color and branding so that you end up with intuitive and effective Web designs. And lastly, you will also get a peek behind the curtains of Smashing Magazine. * paperback, 300 pages, * full-color images on coated paper, * available worldwide, * free shipping to the US and Germany, * reduced shipping costs to other countries, * 30-day 100% money-back guarantee, The book has 300 pages in all, full of practical and useful knowledge for designers and Web developers. It contains 10 chapters and is printed in full color. The book is a paperback and is 8.27 × 5.5 inches (21 × 14 cm). The book contains colorful illustrations, created by Russian designers from SoftFacade (Anton Zykin, Dmitry Tsozik, Anna Myagkova). 97 | ISSUE 02 | The Role of an Advertising agency

The book is available exclusively from Smashing Magazine and nowhere else. This first and only Smashing Book looks at Web design rules of thumb, color theory, usability guidelines, user interface design, best coding and optimization practices, as well as typography, marketing, branding and exclusive insights from top designers across the globe. It was written by Jacob Gube (SixRevisions), Dmitry Fadeev (UsabilityPost), Chris Spooner (Spoongraphics), Darius A Monsef IV (COLOURlovers.com), Alessandro Cattaneo (with co-editing by Jon Tan), Steven Snell (VandelayDesign), David Leggett (UXBooth), Andrew Maier (UXBooth), Kayla Knight (regular writer on SM), Yves Peters (Typographica.org), René Schmidt (system administrator of our servers) and the Smashing Magazine editorial team, Vitaly Friedman and Sven Lennartz. Pre-order your Smashing Book now and save 20% off the regular price! INFO: http://shop.smashingmagazine.com/smashingbookdispatcher.php


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Vodka Absolut

s r te

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How to Sell an Advertising Idea

# Step 1

# Step 3

Organize your idea into an executable tool. An idea in and of itself will do people little good unless they know how to execute it. If your idea is for a business to advertise in a new coupon magazine, for instance, you will need to work out all the details of the magazine including, cost, distribution, circulation, time commitment and style.

Practice your presentation both by yourself and in front of an audience of peers so that you are fluent and can confidently present the material. Ask your peers to raise objections so you can practice overcoming them.

# Step 2 Turn your actionable idea into a refined sales presentation. Having a good idea is one thing, persuading people to spend money on your idea is quite another. Create a presentation to market your idea. In your presentation you will want to establish a need in the mind of the buyer, for instance a need for more customers. You will then want to convince them that your advertising idea is the solution they have been looking for. Finally, you will want to create a sense of urgency with the customer so he will be compelled to buy as soon as possible. Include any statistics you can find to support your idea and sales tools such as PowerPoint, poster boards and sample products to add to your presentation and customer testimonials if you have sold in the past.

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# Step 4 Discover your target customer. Figure out which customers will most benefit from your product. There would be no sense targeting a company that does not advertise, such as a commercial supplier, for your advertising idea.

# Step 5 Attend networking groups and make phone calls, including cold calls, to secure appointments. Be persistent and follow up until someone allows you to present your advertising idea.

# Step 6 Be prepared on the day of your scheduled meeting. Dress to impress, show up early, have all of your presentation materials and be confident. Pitch your advertising idea.

# Step 7 Close the deal or follow up if need be and enjoy the profits as you begin to sell your advertising idea.


Meet the Artist:

Alex Forster

INFO: http://www.vegaone.de/booyakasha/


It is difficult to always see the source of an artist’s inspiration, and with Alex Forster is no different, except that we know the source, its just hard to find. In the depths of the ocean lurks a creature mutable in both shape and color, a fantastic octopus that can transforms and mimic its surroundings. It is from this deep creature that Alex Forster must find inspiration for his changing, plastic images.


introduction in

How to

issue 03 Write

Know everything there is to know about what you're selling. Whether it's a product or service, you have to know what it does to sell it. Meet your target audience. Determine who benefits the most from the product you're selling. Look at gender, age and income range. Use the demographic information at your disposal to create the target customer. Write specifically to this imaginary customer.

Advertising Copy

Brainstorm, and then brainstorm some more. Nothing is as frightening as a blank page, so fill it instead. Free associate about your product and the customer. Write down every little idea, no matter how dumb or silly. Don't censor yourself. Bounce ideas off of other copywriters. List key features and features that the competition doesn't have.

Meet the artists Will Miller

Meet the artists Justin Thomas Kay

The online home of Will Miller, a designer in downtown Chicago area specializing in print, typography, motion graphics and other media types.

Justin Thomas Kay is a Brooklynbased art director and graphic designer with a strong focus in creating work based on basic explorations of shape, color and typography.

Meet the artists Marianne

Meet the artists Eurico Sá Fernandes

My name is Marianne. This is me, ¶. I have recently graduated from the Lincoln School of Art and Design with a first class honours in BA (Hons) Graphic Design. The end of art school has arrived quicker than expected but I am excited for whatever lies on the horizon.

My name is Eurico Sá Fernandes. I’m 18 years old and I live in Porto. I have finished the Graphic Design Course in the well known Vocational School, Escola Artística e Profissional Árvore in Porto and now I am actively looking for new opportunities in the world of design.

Meet the artists Stuart Gardiner

Meet the artists César Pesquera

My name is Stuart Gardiner and I run a creative studio in East London specializing in design for print. My work covers the traditional divisions of graphic design, illustration and printmaking, serving clients in the fashion and entertainment industries.

César Pesquera is a director, graphic designer and audiovisual artist. Pesquera is currently working as a director of commercials and music videos.


brainstorming magazine Mustafe KameriĂŚa 6 71000 Sarajevo Bosna i Hercegovina p: +387 33 471 326 p: +387 61 208 895 w: www.brainstorming.ba e: info@brainstorming.ba


Brainstorming magazine | issue 02