Page 1

General Information & Programs of Study

Dawson Viewbook

2012 – 2013


About Dawson Dawson College is committed to providing excellence in CEGEP education within a welcoming and stimulating learning environment. A diversity of languages and cultures is represented among its students, faculty and staff, reflecting the multicultural character of Montreal itself. This diversity greatly enriches the lives of all the members of the College community. Dawson College was founded in 1968 and opened its doors in the Fall of 1969 to 1,200 students as the first English-language CEGEP in the network. It is today the largest CEGEP in Quebec with nearly 7,800 full-time students and 2,500 part-time students enrolled in 25 programs covering 50 fields of study. The College is located in downtown Montreal in a historic building on 12 acres of land occupying a full city block, and is directly accessible through the Metro at the Atwater station. In 1988, Dawson College began to consolidate all its operations under one roof by moving into the Mother House of the Congrégation-de-NotreDame. After extensive renovations and expansion, the building today houses one of the most attractive and well-equipped colleges in the country. In 2007, the final phase of construction was completed with the addition of a new theatre on campus and the expansion of the Atrium.

Mission Statement As a College in the province of Quebec, aware of its responsibility to contribute to the intellectual, economic and social development of our society, Dawson College believes that it is equally important to prepare students for further academic education and for immediate employment.

Therefore, the Mission of Dawson College is: •

to provide a sound education in English to the broadest possible student population;

to value the ethnic and cultural diversity of our College and to celebrate this diversity within the context of an English education;

to maintain standards of academic excellence essential to our students’ future success and to provide the appropriate programs, services and technology to ensure that any student admitted has the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to achieve these standards;

to continue to develop innovative and flexible educational approaches to serve the needs of our students;

to affirm that the College, as a community, requires the participation and representation of all its members – students, staff and faculty – in its governance;

to encourage the personal and social development of Dawson students through activities outside the classroom;

to develop the role of the College as a community resource and as a centre for life-long learning.

Discover Dawson. Discover your potential.


Table of Contents About Dawson

1

Mission Statement

P r e - U ni v e r sit y P r o g r ams

Social Science

General Information Dawson at a glance

4

Important dates 2011 – 2012

5

Campus map Split between pre-university & career / technical

6

Enrollment by program 2010 – 2011

28

General Studies Commerce Environmental Studies International Business Studies

Average Sec V marks incoming 2010

7

Admission Requirements

8

A Year in Your Life: Choosing a CEGEP

9 11

Psychology

Graduation

52

Academic Advising

54

Student Government Counselling and Career Development

31

Academic Skills Centre Peer Tutoring

32

Travel & Tourism Studies Liberal Arts

51

Student Affairs

30

North-South Studies

Breakdown by age

Special Areas of Study

Helping You Succeed 29

Child Studies

Law, Society & Justice

Breakdown by gender

General Education

Social Science & Business Technologies

Mentor Program Library

32

Ombuds Services Student AccessAbility Centre

C a r ee r / T echnica l P r o g r ams

Social Service

34

Student Health Services

Science, Medical Studies & Engineering

Community Recreation Leadership Training

35

Locker / Lock Rentals

P r e - U ni v e r sit y P r o g r ams

Accounting & Management Technology

36

Housing

Business Management (Marketing)

37 38

Améliorez vos connaissances : Centre d’aide pédagogique

56

Computer Science Technology

Fees, Financial Aid & Employment

57

Athletics

58

Frequently Asked Questions

60

Science

14

First Choice Science Pure & Applied Science

Creative & Applied Arts

Health Science

P r e - U ni v e r sit y P r o g r ams

Environmental Science Developmental Science

16

Explorations Science

Creative Arts, Literature & Languages Literature

C a r ee r / T echnica l P r o g r ams

Biomedical Laboratory Technology

17

Diagnostic Imaging

18

Radiation Oncology

19

Physical Rehabilitation

20

Nursing

21

Laboratory Technology – Analytical Chemistry

22

Civil Engineering Technology

23

Mechanical Engineering Technology

24

Electronics Engineering Technology

25

Dawson Library

26

40

Arts & Culture

41

Languages Cinema/Video/Communications

42

Visual Arts Fine Arts

43

C a r ee r / T echnica l P r o g r ams

Professional Theatre

44

Illustration & Design

45

Interior Design

46

Professional Photography

47

Graphic Design

48

Industrial Design

49

3D Animation & Computer Generated Imagery

50


General Information


Dawson at a glance

Some history Dawson College is named after John William Dawson who was McGill University’s longest serving principal from 1855 to 1893. He was a world-famous geologist who founded Canada’s first science museum, the Redpath, and who 150 years ago discovered the fossils at Joggins, Nova Scotia, now a UNESCO world heritage site. He also established Quebec’s Protestant school system and was knighted in 1884. In 2009 – 2010, the statue of Notre Dame-de-la-Garde that sits atop the dome was taken down to be completely refurbished to repair extensive damage to the 102 year-old figure of Madonna and Child.

Heritage site The site of Dawson College was declared a heritage property in 1977. For this reason, extensions to the building in the form of additional wings and renovations had to adhere to strict guidelines for preserving the integrity of the structure, including maintaining sight lines and the preservation of trees, many of them over 100 years old. The site has now achieved the limits of expansion, and no more additions can be made. In the 1990s the gyms had to be built deep into the bedrock, and in 2007 the new theatre was constructed between two existing wings.

An urban landscape Dawson College: • occupies

a full city block, between Sherbrooke and de Maisonneuve, Atwater and Wood

• across

the street from the old Forum where for the first time this year, classes will be held to accommodate the overflow of students

• sits

on 12 acres of green space

• interior

space: 1 million square feet/91,000 square meters

• approximately

laboratories

1,500 rooms, including classrooms and


Important Dates

Campus Map

2011 – 2012

Getting here’s easy

Monday, August 8 and Tuesday, August 9 Orientation Wednesday, August 10 to Thursday, August 18 Welcome Week Wednesday, August 10 to Thursday, August 18 Internet Registration Regular Day Division Tuesday, August 2 to Sunday, August 21 Internet Registration Continuing Education Wednesday, August 24 Fall Term classes begin Monday, September 5 Labour Day (no classes) Wednesday, September 7 Parents’ Night Monday, October 10 Thanksgiving Day (no classes) Friday, October 14 Pedagogical Day (no classes) Sunday, October 23 OPEN HOUSE Tuesday, November 1 Deadline for application, Winter 2012 Friday, December 9 Last day of Fall Term classes Monday, December 12 to Wednesday, December 21 Final examination period

Thursday, January 5 Orientation Second week in December to second week in January (dates to be confirmed) Internet Registration Regular Day Division Third week in December to second week in January (dates to be confirmed) Internet Registration Continuing Education Wednesday, January 19 Winter Term classes begin Wednesday, February 8 Information Session for March 1 applicants Tuesday, March 1 Deadline for application, Fall 2012 Monday, March 12 to Friday, March 16 Study Break Friday, April 6 to Monday, April 9 Easter Holiday Thursday, May 10 Last day of Winter Term classes Monday, May 14 to Thursday, May 24 Final examination period Monday, May 21 Victoria Day Third week of June Convocation, Place des Arts

Dawson is the only college in the network that is directly accessible through the Métro system, at the Atwater station on the Green line.

Dawson College wings

STM bus routes

Métro stations


Split between pre-university and career/technical programs Breakdown by age 22 21

Pre-University

Career/Technical

5,512 Students

2,287 Students

20 19 18 17 16 2,500

2,000

1,500

1,000

Split between pre-university Breakdown by gender and career/technical programs

500

Data provided by the Office of Institutional Research

Men 40.3%

Women 59 .7%

Pre-University

Career/Technical

5,512 Students

2,287 Students

Average Sec V marks incoming 2009 95 -100

BETWEEN

90 - 95 85 - 90

Breakdown by gender

80 - 85 75-80 70 - 75 65 - 70 60 - 65 50 - 60 30 %

6

25 %

20 %

15 %

10 %

5%

Men 40.3%

Women 59 .7%


Enrollment by program 2010 – 2011 Pre-university Programs (Total: 5,512) 975

Creative Arts, Literature and Languages

91

Fine Arts

131

Liberal Arts

1,065

Science Social Science

3,250

Career/Technical Programs (Total: 2,287) 87

Biomedical Laboratory Technology

104

Diagnostic Imaging Radiation Oncology

39 308

Nursing

119

Civil Engineering Technology

Students graduate from Dawson every year

Total enrollment full‑time students, 2010 – 2011

113

Mechanical Engineering Technology

2,500

7,799

67

Laboratory Technology - Analytical Chemistry

85

Electronics Engineering Technology

125

Social Service

(includes 189 Accueil/Transition students)

111

Community Recreational Leadership Training

266

Business Administration

111

Computer Science Technology

86

Professional Theatre

141

Illustration & Design

123

Interior Design

136

Professional Photography

152

Graphic Design Industrial Design

49

3D Animation & Computer-Generated Imagery Data provided by the Office of Institutional Research

65

7


Science Environmental Science

200.H1/P1

First Choice

200.H2

Health Science

081.62

Explorations Science

081.01

081.64

Developmental Science Social Science

300.EA

General Social Science

300.EB

Commerce

300.EE

Child Studies

300.EG

Environmental Studies

300.EH

International Business

300.EK

Law, Society & Justice

300.EM

North-South Studies

300.EP

Psychology

300.ET

Travel & Tourism

500.A1

6 -4 0

55

540

4

or 5

58 or 5 nc e Sc ie

nc e Sc ie

Ph

ys

ic s

55

55

350

840

4

4

4 150 55

m i st ry Ch e

57

6 -5 0 65 or 5

56

450

6

or 5 6 M at h

M at h

56

440

4 340

56

Applicants to any DEC program must have the Quebec Secondary School Diploma (DES), including: Secondary V Language of Instruction; Secondary V Second Language; Secondary IV Science; Secondary IV Mathematics; Secondary IV History; or, academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

Pure & Applied Science

081.01 300.A0

65

ts re m en ui eq

Pre-University Programs

200.E2

200.P2

-4 0

2

Dawson Number

200.B0

-4 0

6

Ministerial Number

M at h

lR ec ia Sp

Admissions Requirements *

1. Portfolio 2. Interview

Creative Arts, Literature & Languages 500.D1

Arts & Culture

3. Letter

500.D2

Literature

500.D3

Languages

4. Audition

500.D4

Cinema/Video/Communications

500.D5

Visual Arts

5. Placement at the preparatory level or higher in English and/or French

510.A1

510.A0

Fine Arts

1

700.B0

700.B1

Liberal Arts

3

6. Math 504 or higher is strongly recommended to improve chances of success

Ministerial Number

Dawson Number

Career Programs

140.B1

140.B1

Biomedical Laboratory Technology

2, 5

142.A0

142.A0

Diagnostic Imaging

2, 7

7. Eligible to take College English 603-101 and Basic French 602-100 (testing may be required)

142.C0

142.C0

Radiation Oncology

2, 7

144.A0

144.A0

Physical Rehabilitation

180.A0

180.A0

Nursing

210.AB

210.AB

Laboratory Technology - Analytical Chemistry

221.B0

221.B0

Civil Engineering Technology

241.A0

241.A0

Mechanical Engineering Technology

243.B0

243.B0

Electronics Engineering Technology

388.A0

388.A1

Social Service

2

391.A0

391.A0

Community Recreation Leadership Training

2

410.B0

410.B0

Accounting and Management Technology

410.D0

410.D0

Business Management (Marketing)

420.A0

420.A0

Computer Science Technology

561.C0

561.C0

Professional Theatre

570.82

570.82

Illustration & Design

570.E0

570.E0

Interior Design

570.F0

570.F0

Professional Photography

1

570.A0

570.A0

Graphic Design

1

570.C0

570.C0

Industrial Design

574.B0

574.B0

3D Animation & Computer Generated Imagery

3, 6, 9

4 1 1, 3

1, 3, 8

8. Entrance Drawing Test 9. Placement at College-level English, 603-101 * Admission requirements for students graduating as of June 2010. For students who graduated prior to this, consult the admission requirements listed on specific program pages.


A year in your life: Choosing a CEGEP Whether you are graduating from high school or you have decided you want to continue your studies at CEGEP, now is the time to start making some important decisions about your education. When choosing a college, you should be aware of everything it has to offer, both inside and outside the classroom. That includes the programs, the teachers, the facilities and the services. This viewbook aims to give you an overview of what Dawson College has to offer you.

You’re ready to start considering your CEGEP options. Now what? Viewbook Well, if you are reading this, you have started off on the right foot. Review this viewbook, especially the programs that may interest you. It is broken down in sections so you can follow along in order or go directly to your areas of interest, although taking a good look at the whole viewbook will give you a better overall picture of Dawson College. After you have read about the services we offer and looked through the program descriptions, you should have a pretty good idea about what kind of place Dawson College is.

Website You can consult Dawson’s website for more information at dawsoncollege.qc.ca .

Now, you would probably like to get a look at the College. Open House Come to Open House on Sunday, October 23, 2011 between 1 and 5 p.m. This is the biggest event of the year for Dawson College when we open our doors to thousands of prospective students like you, and your families. You can spend the afternoon exploring the campus on your own, or you can take a guided tour and visit its labs and classrooms, art studios and theatre, the impressive library and amazing gym facilities.

Many current students, teachers and other staff members are on-site to answer any question you may have about Dawson. Academic advisers will be on hand to provide you with admission and program information; counsellors will be available to tell you about the services that help students succeed; and current students will be present to tell you what student life at Dawson College is all about. Information about Open House can be found on the website, and ads will also run in the newspapers.

There is so much to consider when choosing a CEGEP.

Which program should I choose? Will someone help me figure out which one is best for me?

Where is the school located? Will it be easy to make new friends? Will it take me a long time to get there? What happens if I have a problem? Will my friends go there too?

Will I fit in?

9


High School Visits and College Tours

Orientation

Some of our teachers and academic advisers may come to visit you at your school or at career fairs. You should take the opportunity to meet with them and ask questions.

At Orientation, academic advisers will explain program requirements and the registration process and teachers will talk to you about programs. The staff of Student Services will welcome you and talk to you about the transition from high school to college and the range of activities and services Dawson has to offer. You will also have the opportunity to get first-hand information from current students enrolled in your program.

If you didn’t get a chance to come to Open House and we haven’t come to your school, ask your high school guidance counselor to call Dawson to arrange a College Tour for you and some of your classmates. We’ll be happy to show you around. The phone number is 514 931-8731, ext 1275.

Application Deadlines You must apply by Tuesday, November 1, 2011 for Winter 2012 and by Thursday, March 1, 2012 for Fall 2012. Not all programs accept new students in the Winter term. Check the program pages in this viewbook or go to the website to find out when applications are accepted for the program you are interested in.

Orientation takes place in May, August and December, depending on your program and when you are accepted. After Orientation, you will be equipped with all the information and tools you will need to help you succeed during your time at Dawson. In August, students are invited to participate in Welcome Week to become more familiar with the school. Registration is done online. However, in-person registration takes place before the start of classes.

Welcome to Dawson College. You’ve made a great choice. There are several ways to apply to study at Dawson: 1. Apply online at: •

commonapplication.qc.ca

2. Contact us by:

Before Applying If you are applying by November 1, make sure you come to Open House. If you are applying by March 1, come to our Open House and also, Dawson will host a special information evening on Wednesday, February 8, 2012 between 4 and 7 p.m. In both cases, this is your chance to ask those last-minute questions or receive reassurances that you are making the right choice. Teachers and academic advisers will be available to give you guidance. Visit the website at dawsoncollege.qc.ca for more information about both events.

Getting a Reply Once your application is deposited with the College by the application deadline, you can expect to receive a reply anywhere between early April and late May, although some acceptances are processed throughout the summer. November applicants can expect a reply before the December break. Your letter of acceptance will be followed up with a letter from the College welcoming you to Dawson and inviting you to visit, or to attend Orientation.

10

Dawson College Viewbook

Telephone 514 933-1234

Fax 514 931-1602

admissions@dawsoncollege.qc.ca

3. Visit us: Dawson College Registrar Office Room 2D.6 M-F 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 4001 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West •

4. Through your high school guidance counselor Applications received before or by the deadline are given first priority for admissions to programs, provided they meet all the admission requirements.


General Education To graduate from Dawson College, every student must complete the General Education requirements. These are also called Core courses and include English, French, Humanities and Physical Education. All students must take four English, three Humanities, two French and three Physical Education courses to meet the graduation requirements of the General Education portion of their College education. Two complementary courses are also required for graduation.

Complementary courses are given in the following domains: • Social

Science

• Science

and Technology

• Language • Modern • Arts

of Mathematics and Computers

Languages

and Aesthetics

Students must select complementary courses from one or two domains accessible to their programs and from disciplines outside those in their fields of concentration. In addition, all students must pass the Examination of College English (épreuve uniforme) or English Exit Test to graduate, which is given by the Ministère de l’Éducation in May, August and December.

English The English component of General Education is intended to help students learn to be effective readers, writers, listeners, and speakers. The required English courses will also acquaint students with significant literary works from a variety of genres and periods. The four required General Education English courses are Introduction to College English (ICE), Literary Genres, Literary Themes, and Applied Themes in English.

Extra help in English (Preparatory Arts) Preparatory Arts is a one-year course of study for students who show potential for academic success and whose performance suggests they would benefit from an intensive study of English during their first two semesters. Small English classes and individual attention ensure maximum opportunity for each student to discover his or her potential. To develop the reading, writing, and thinking skills essential for all college courses, students take a two-semester double-credit course in English with labs conducted by the Academic Skills Centre (ASC). They are free to choose additional courses from the mainstream offerings in their respective programs.

In the Fall term, each Preparatory Arts student will take the following two courses: Introduction to College English and Literary Themes, which are intended to provide an introduction to college-level literary studies with a strong emphasis on basic textual interpretation and the construction of the literary essay. The main objective of these courses is to foster language development by emphasizing written responses to specific texts. In the Winter term, all Preparatory Arts students will take the following two English courses: Literary Genre and Applied Themes in English. The Academic Skills Centre continues to provide labs to students

11


French

Humanities

Physical Education

The acquisition of French as a second language permits students to participate more fully in the cultural and professional life of Quebec. In general, students leaving high school have a good grasp of oral French. Instruction of French as a second language at the college level aims to develop the four aspects of language acquisition – speaking, listening, reading and writing – with the focus on reading and writing.

Humanities is a multidisciplinary exploration of human civilization, including its accomplishments, failures, abilities, creations, ideas, beliefs and values. As part of the General Education curriculum, Humanities is intended to promote personal and social development and to give students a foundation that will help them understand their roles in contemporary society as individuals, as workers and professionals, and as citizens of their country and the world.

Physical Education courses at Dawson College promote a healthy, active lifestyle. Specific goals include the establishment of the relationship between one’s lifestyle habits and health, the exploration of and improvement in specific physical activity skills, and the promotion of students’ self-responsibility for their personal health, fitness and positive lifestyle choices.

French courses will teach you to communicate, express yourself in a structured manner, learn and work in a group, develop critical thinking, and solve problems. The language laboratory is an integral part of French courses at Dawson. Students may also seek individual assistance by using tools and media resources in CLÉO (Centre de Langue Écrite et Orale).

L’apprentissage du français langue seconde permet à l’élève de s’exprimer en français afin de participer à la vie culturelle et professionnelle au Québec. À la sortie du secondaire, les élèves sont, en général, plus compétents en matière d’expression orale. La formation collégiale en français langue seconde portera sur le développement des quatre habiletés langagières (parler, écouter, lire et écrire), mais elle mettra surtout l’accent sur la lecture et l’écriture. Dans les cours de français, on apprend à communiquer, s’exprimer de façon structurée, apprendre et travailler en groupe, développer la pensée critique, et résoudre des problèmes. Le laboratoire de langues fait partie intégrante des activités des cours de français. Les élèves peuvent aussi, sur une base individuelle, se prévaloir de l’aide, des outils et de la documentation médiatique disponibles au CLÉO (Centre de Langue Écrite et Orale).

12

Dawson College Viewbook

The required courses in Humanities propose frameworks for understanding the experiences, ideas and values of humankind and their diversity. They are aimed at developing critical thinking, reinforcing the skills involved in careful reading, organized writing and well-developed oral presentations, and where appropriate, improving media and computer literacy.

Learning environments and areas of curriculum include aquatics, dance, combative sports, individual sports, team sports, fitness activities, outdoor education and stress management. Dawson College has excellent facilities, including three gyms, an indoor rock climbing wall, weight rooms, dance/combat rooms, general fitness rooms and multi-activity areas. Off campus, students have access to rental facilities in various outdoor locations, such as a swimming pool, tennis courts and a rowing basin.


Science, Medical Studies & Engineering


200.B0 P re - U niversity P rogram

Science

Dawson College’s Science Program cultivates student curiosity, motivation and academic excellence.

The program is student-centered and aims to: • Provide

students with a well-rounded general and scientific education;

• Prepare • Foster

students for university-level Science studies;

the student’s view of herself/himself as a scientist;

• Encourage

original academic achievement through in-class assignments and various Science-centered activities, and celebrate it by supporting such presentation and publication venues such as DrJES and SPACE.

• Encourage

student involvement in the wider scientific community and in society at large.

Profiles of study in the Science Program

Developmental Science Program

The Science Program offers three (3) profiles of study which qualifies students for admission to university.

The Developmental Science Program is a one-year program preparing students for entry into Dawson College’s Science Program and is for students whose grades in at least one of the Science pre-requisites do not meet admission requirements for the Science Program.

• Pure

and Applied Science emphasizes preparation for the Physical Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics;

• Health

Science emphasizes preparation for the Biological Sciences, Medicine and Dentistry;

• Environmental

Science emphasizes preparation for the Biological Sciences as well as the Environmental Sciences and Ecology.

Admission to the Science Program

Important: Regardless of which profile of studies is chosen, completion of a Diplôme d’Études Collègiales (DEC) in the Science Program at Dawson allows entrance into any university program.

Conditional admission to Dawson’s Science Program requires that a student obtain acceptable grades in the following Science pre-requisites:

First Choice Science

• Mathematics

Science and Technology 564-506 OR Mathematics Science 565-506

• Chemistry

551-504

• Physics

553-504 OR corresponding content

Conditional admission is based on Secondary IV final and Secondary V mid-term grades. Final admission into the Science Program is contingent on obtaining a Diplôme d’Études Secondaires (DES), which includes the pre-requisite courses with appropriate grades. The number of students that Dawson College can accept in the Science Program is limited; therefore students with the highest grades in high school have a better chance of being admitted. Applications must be received by: • March

1 for admission into the Fall semester

• November

14

1 for admission into the Winter semester

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

In addition to being in a profile, a Science student is in one of two streams: • Regular • OR

Science

First Choice Science

First Choice Science (FCS) offers an enriched curriculum – one that provides the opportunity to delve deeper into the subject material, visit more topics, or explore connections across the disciplines, for example. In addition, FCS students are exposed to advanced ideas through a seminar series where speakers from academia and industry make presentations on current progress in the sciences. Attendance at these seminars is compulsory for FCS students. FCS students are grouped in their science and math courses, so they have the opportunity to develop a camaraderie and ésprit-de-corps. The groupings also afford them the opportunity to participate together in activities sponsored by the Science Program and the College.

Successful completion of Developmental Science qualifies the student for admission to pre-university or technical programs. Students must apply to and meet the criteria for transfer into the program in which they wish to continue their studies.

Explorations Science Program Explorations Science Program is a one-year program preparing students for entry into Dawson College’s Science Program and is designed for students whose overall average meets the requirements for admission into the Science Program, but who did not complete one or more of the Science pre-requisites in high school. Successful completion of Explorations Science qualifies the student for admission to pre-university or technical programs. Students must apply to and meet the criteria for transfer into the program in which they wish to continue their studies.

Science Program Courses Students take a total of 26 courses in the Science Program over two years (four semesters). These courses are divided between General Education (English, French, Humanities, Physical Education and Complementary) and Science as follows:

14 General Education courses • 4

English

• 3

Humanities

Admission to FCS is by invitation only and is based on outstanding Secondary V grades.

• 2

French

• 3

Physical Education

Students already in the Science Program may apply for a transfer into FCS by making a formal program transfer request to the College as well as to the First Choice Science Coordinator.

• 2

Complementary (any non-science discipline)


Students admitted into the Science Program will be required to take English and French Placement Tests so as to be placed in the appropriate levels of English and French instruction. Placement Tests are scheduled by Dawson College and are by appointment only; the appointment letter is included in the acceptance package mailed to students after their request for admission has been granted.

9 Compulsory Science Courses (regardless of profile) • 1

Biology course (General Biology I)

• 2

Chemistry courses (General Chemistry; Chemistry of Solutions) Mathematics courses (Calculus I; Calculus II; Linear Algebra)

Pure & Applied Science Profile

Health Science Profile

Environmental Science Profile

1st Semester - 7 courses

1st Semester - 7 courses

1st Semester - 7 courses

• Calculus

I Chemistry • Mechanics

• Calculus

I Chemistry • Mechanics

• Calculus

• General

• General

• General

English Humanities Physical Education Complementary Course

English French Humanities Physical Education

English French Humanities Physical Education

2nd Semester - 7 courses

2nd Semester - 7 courses

2nd Semester - 7 courses

• Chemistry

• Chemistry

• Chemistry

of Solutions

I Chemistry • General Biology I

of Solutions

of Solutions II • Mechanics

• 3

• Calculus

II • Waves, Optics & Modern Physics

• Calculus

II • General Biology I

• Calculus

• 3

English French Humanities Physical Education

English Humanities Physical Education Complementary Course

English Humanities Physical Education Complementary Course

3rd Semester - 6 courses

3rd Semester - 6 courses

3rd Semester - 6 courses

• General

Biology I & Magnetism • Linear Algebra

• Organic

Chemistry I Optics & Modern Physics! • General Biology II

• Organic

• Electricity

• Waves,

• Waves,

English Physical Education Complementary Course

English French Physical Education

English French Physical Education

4th Semester - 6 courses

4th Semester - 6 courses

4th Semester - 6 courses

• Science

Option Option • Science Option

• Linear

Algebra & Magnetism • Science Option

• Linear

• Science

• Electricity

• Electricity

• Introduction

English French Humanities

English Humanities Complementary Course

English Humanities Complementary Course

* Note: Students who have taken a complementary course in Computer Science cannot take this course.

Courses in bold show differences between the Health Science, Environmental Science and Pure & Applied Science profiles. In addition to these courses, students in the Science Program must pass a Comprehensive Examination and an English Exit Test in order to graduate.

Physics courses (Mechanics; Waves, Optics & Modern Physics; Electricity & Magnetism)

Selection of Science Option Courses • Pure

& Applied Science students are free to choose their three option courses.

• Health

Science students are required to do General Biology II and Organic Chemistry I and have one free option course.

• Environmental

Science students are required to do General Biology II, Organic Chemistry I and Environmental Biology.

List of Science Option Courses • General • Human

Biology II

Anatomy and Physiology

• Environmental • Organic • Organic

Biology

•  Probability •  Calculus

and Statistics

III

•  Astrophysics

Chemistry I

•  Engineering

Chemistry II

•  Physical

Physics

Geology

to Computer Programming in Engineering and Science *

Chemistry I Optics & Modern Physics • Environmental Biology

Algebra & Magnetism • General Biology II

S cience , M edical S tudies & E ngineering

15


081.64 P re - U niversity P rogram

081.62 P re - U niversity P rogram

Developmental Science

Explorations Science

Conditional admission to Dawson’s Developmental Science Program requires that a student’s passing grades are too low for direct admission to a regular pre-university science or technical program in the following Science pre-requisites:

Conditional admission to Dawson’s Explorations Science Program requires that a student obtain acceptable grades in the following Science pre-requisite:

• Mathematics

Science and Technology 564-506 or Mathematics Science 565-506 (or corresponding content)

• Chemistry • Physics

551-504 (or corresponding content)

553-504 (or corresponding content)

Conditional admission is based on Secondary IV final and Secondary V mid-term grades. Final admission into the Developmental Science Program is contingent on obtaining a Diplôme d’Études Secondaires (DES), which includes the pre-requisite courses with appropriate grades. Applications must be received by March 1 for admission into the Fall semester.

• Mathematics

Science and Technology 564-406 or Mathematics Science 565-406 (or corresponding content)

Conditional admission is based on Secondary IV final and Secondary V mid-term grades. Final admission into Explorations Science Program is contingent on obtaining a Diplôme d’Études Secondaires (DES), which includes the pre-requisite courses with appropriate grades. Applications must be received by March 1 for admission into the Fall semester. There is no admission into Explorations Science in the Winter semester. Course grid – note that courses will depend on the student’s placement and completion of high school mathematics and science courses.

There is no admission into Developmental Science in the Winter semester. Course grid – note that courses will depend on the student’s placement and completion of high school mathematics and science courses.

1st Semester – 6 courses

2nd Semester – 7 courses

1st Semester – 5 or 6 courses

2nd semester – 7 courses

• Remedial

• Calculus

• Remedial

• Calculus

• Remedial

• General

• Remedial

• General

• Remedial

• Mechanics

Activities for Sec V Mathematics OR Calculus I Activities for Sec V Chemistry OR General Chemistry Activities for Sec V Physics OR Mechanics

Physical Education Humanities English

I OR Calculus II Chemistry OR Chemistry of Solutions OR Waves, Optics and Modern Physics

Physical Education Humanities English French

Courses in bold contribute towards graduation in the pre-university Science Program.

16

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

Activities for Sec V Mathematics OR Calculus I Activities for Sec V Chemistry AND Remedial Activities for Sec V Physics OR Remedial Activities for Sec IV Science

Physical Education Humanities English

I OR Calculus II Chemistry OR Remedial Activities for Sec V Chemistry

• Mechanics

OR Remedial Activities for Sec V Physics Physical Education Humanities English French

Courses in bold contribute towards graduation in the pre-university Science Program.


140.B1 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Biomedical Laboratory Technology The Biomedical Laboratory Technology program is a three-year program designed to give you the knowledge and skills to work as a medical technologist. As a healthcare professional, a medical technologist contributes to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease by providing laboratory services to physicians and other clients.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

What will you learn?

• Anatomy

• Introductory

• To

& Physiology • Introductory Hematology & Clinical Biochemistry • Laboratory Quality Assurance • Laboratory & Professional Practice Humanities French English

Year 1 Term 2

Molecular Biology • Clinical Microbiology II • Clinical Biochemistry III • Special Hematology • Procurement Stage (intensive) • Transfusion Science Practices I Physical Education Humanities English

• Histology

Year 3 Term 5

• Introductory

• Histopathological

Microbiology • Clinical Biochemistry I • Introductory Organic Chemistry Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

Year 2 Term 3 • Immunology • Clinical

Microbiology I Biochemistry II • Routine Hematology & Hemostasis • Applied Biochemical Techniques • Clinical

Physical Education French English

Techniques Laboratory • Transfusion Science Practices II • Seminar • Core

Year 3 Term 6 • Histology/Molecular

Biology Stage (Online) • Clinical Microbiology Stage • Clinical Biochemistry Stage • Hematology/Hemostasis Stage • Transfusion Science Stage • Pharmacology

perform a wide range of laboratory analyses including analyzing body fluids and cells, identifying infectious organisms that cause disease, preparing surgical and autopsy tissues for microscopic examination and testing for compatible blood transfusions

• To

use highly specialized laboratory instruments and techniques

• To

correlate laboratory results with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and medical conditions

• To

develop interpersonal skills allowing you to interact in a team and collaborate with other healthcare professionals

• To

apply technical and communication skills in procuring specimens from patients

Where will this program lead you? • There

are a multitude of jobs in clinical diagnostic laboratories, including hospitals, clinics and private laboratories, as well as research centres, pharmaceutical companies and biotechnology research centres

• Many

universities across Canada accept Biomedical Laboratory Technology graduates into their degree programs and in some cases, advance credit is given

What will you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Mathematics • Chemistry

564-406 or 565-406 *

551-504 *

• An

interview is required to assess the candidate’s readiness to pursue Biomedical Laboratory Technology studies.

• Candidates

who place below the preparatory level in both English and French will not be admitted into the program.

* For students graduating before June 2010 or from an Adult Education Centre, the prerequisites are Physics 534, Chemistry 534 and Mathematics 526.

What else should you know? • In

the summer between the second and third year, students can earn experience in hospital clinical labs as paid externs.

• In

the third year, students intern full time for 26 weeks in accredited hospitals and rotate among clinical laboratories.

• The

Pharmacology course in the third year is given on-line while students are in their internship.

• Graduates

of the program can become nationally certified by passing the certification examinations of the Canadian Society for Medical Laboratory Science (CSMLS).

• Graduates

can join the Ordre Professionnel des Technologistes Médicaux du Québec (OPTMQ).

• For

American certification, graduating students may write the exams for the American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP) or the National Certification Agency (NCA) for Medical Laboratory Personnel.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session. S cience , M edical S tudies & E ngineering

17


142.A0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Diagnostic Imaging Diagnostic Imaging is a three-year program designed to provide you with the necessary skills to work as a diagnostic imaging technologist. You will operate x-ray equipment used to diagnose disease or injury in patients. Working in a clinic or hospital as a health care professional, you will care for patients undergoing examination and will provide the radiologist with the necessary images to make diagnoses.

What will you learn? • To

position patients on radiographic equipment

• To

determine and set the exposure factors on an x-ray generator unit

• To

process analog and digital images for the radiologist to interpret and diagnose

Where will this program lead you? work in a hospital or clinic as a diagnostic imaging technologist

What else should you know?

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

• In

• Anatomy

• Radiobiology

your third year, you will gain valuable clinical experience by working and studying in a hospital or clinic.

• Upon

graduation, you can become a registered technologist by successfully completing the certification exam of l’Ordre des technologues en radiologie du Québec, allowing you to work across Canada and in many other countries.

• To

• To

work in other specialized areas such as ultrasound, computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Mathematics • Science

564-406 or 565-406 or Mathematics 436

558-404 or 558-402 or Physical Science 436

• Interview • Must

be eligible to take College English 603-101 (Testing may be required).

• Must

be eligible to take Basic French 602-100 (Testing may be required).

• Immunization

requirements and certificates of medical health once admitted.

18

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

of Diagnostic Imaging • Patient Care & Health Safety • Basic Radiographic Imaging • Introduction to Radiology/Clinical I • Physics of Radiology Physical Education Humanities French English

Year 1 Term 2 of Radiology & Digital Imaging I • Image Quality • Radiography I (Extremities)

& Protection of Systems I • Radiography of Systems II • MRI/US/CT & Interventional • Radiography

Physical Education English Complementary

Year 3 Term 5 • Clinical • Clinical

III IV

• Biology

• Apparatus

Physical Education Humanities English

Year 2 Term 3 • Apparatus

& Digital Imaging II II (Trunk) • Radiography III (Skull) • Clinical II (Intensive) • Radiography

Humanities French English Complementary

Year 3 Term 6 • Integration: • Clinical

V • Clinical VI

Part A & B


142.C0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Radiation Oncology Radiation Oncology is a three-year program designed to provide you with the necessary skills to work as a radiation oncology technologist. You will work in a hospital setting using sophisticated equipment to treat malignancies in patients. As a health care professional, you will care for patients undergoing radiation therapy over the course of their treatment.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

• Safety

• Radio-Oncology

& Patient Care • Introduction to Radiology/Clinical I • Physics of Radiology • Psychology & Social issues in Radiation Oncology Physical Education Humanities French English

Year 1 Term 2 • Biology

of Radiology & Data Processing in Radiation • Oncology I • Properties of Ionizing Radiation • Clinical II • Image

Physical Education Humanities English

Year 2 Term 3 • Oncology

II

• Apparatus • Dosimetry • Clinical

I

III

Humanities French English Complementary

• Dosimetry

Protection

II

• Simulation

Physical Education English Complementary

Year 3 Term 5 • Clinical

IV • Clinical V

Year 3 Term 6 • Clinical

VI VII • Integration & Professional Plan/Clinical VIII • Clinical

What will you learn?

What else should you know?

• To

• In

• To

• Upon

safely use ionizing radiation for the treatment of malignancies safely operate sophisticated equipment that delivers high energy radiation

• To

use radiation oncology to cure or improve the quality of life of patients

Where will this program lead you? • To

work in a hospital or clinic as a Radiation Oncology Technologist

your third year, you will gain valuable clinical experience by working and studying in a hospital or clinic. graduation, you can become a registered technologist by successfully completing the certification exam of l’Ordre des technologues en radiologie du Québec, allowing you to work across Canada and in many other countries.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

• To

work in other specialized areas, such as treatment planning and simulation, dosimetry and brachytherapy

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Mathematics • Science

564-506 or 565-506 or Mathematics 526

558-404 or 558-402 or Physical Science 436

• Interview • Must

be eligible to take College English 603-101 (Testing may be required).

• Must

be eligible to take Basic French 602-100 (Testing may be required).

• Immunization

requirements and certificates of medical health once admitted.

S cience , M edical S tudies & E ngineering

19


144.A0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Physical Rehabilitation Physical rehabilitation therapists work with physicians and/or physical therapists to aid in the recovery of patients by taking part in a treatment program, making decisions regarding the means of treatment and providing the treatment for a patient. This program will offered for the first time at Dawson College in the Fall term, 2012.

What will you learn? As health care professionals, physical rehabilitation therapists combine in-depth knowledge of the human body with specialized hands-on clinical skills to intervene in cases of illness, injury and/or loss of normal function in the neurological, musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary systems. Their goal is to obtain optimal functional performance regarding a patient’s strength, movement, mobility and overall well-being.

Where will this program lead you? Employment is usually found in clinics, hospitals, and rehabilitation centres in every area (public and private) of the healthcare field.

What else should you know?

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

• Following

• Introduction

• Orthopedic

admission to the Physical Rehabilitation Program, all students must submit a health certificate and immunization record in order to complete clinical placements.

• To

practice as a physical rehabilitation therapist, graduates of a college program must become members of the Ordre professionnel de la physiothérapie du Québec. There is no certification exam for graduates to become a member of the Ordre.

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Secondary

IV Mathematics: Cultural, Social and Technical Option 563-404

• Secondary

V Physics: 553-504

• All

candidates must submit a 200-300 word letter of intent, handwritten, stating their reasons for wishing to study physical rehabilitation. They should cite personal or work experience including volunteerism, interests and hobbies.

20

English French Complementary

Year 1 Term 2 Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

to the Profession & Auxiliary Care • Human Biology I • Anatomy I: Osteology & Arthrology • Physics for Physical Rehabilitation Therapy

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

• Human

Biology II • Anatomy II: Myology • Physiology • Human Biomechanics English French Physical Education Humanities

Year 2 Term 3 • Pathophysiology

in Physical Rehabilitation Therapy • Intervention: Loss of Function • Intervention: Loss of Mobility • Intervention: Loss of Muscle Function • Intervention: Pain & Circulation • Electrotherapy • Kinesiology Physical Education English

Rehabilitation: Extremities • Orthopedic Rehabilitation: Spine and Pelvis • Communication & Interpersonal Interaction • Neurology and Geriatrics • Clinical Education I English Humanities

Year 3 Term 5 • Intervention:

Vascular & Respiratory Conditions • Physical Rehabilitation & Geriatrics • Physical Rehabilitation & Therapeutic Relations • Special Topics in Physical Rehabilitation • Clinical Education II • Complementary Physical Education Humanities

Year 3 Term 6 • Internship • Internship

I II


180.A0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Nursing Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

• Human

Body for Nurses I • Introduction to Nursing

• Human

English French Humanities Physical Education

OR

Year 1 Term 2

Body for Nurses IV Nursing

• Medical / Surgical

• Maternal / Child

• To

• Promoting

• Human

Humanities Physical Education

• Internship

Body for Nurses III Nursing

OR • Maternal / Child

Autonomy • Sociology of Healthcare

Year 3 Term 6

• Medical / Surgical

Health

• Nutrition

English Humanities Physical Education

Health

communicate effectively with clients, their families, and health professionals

English Complementary

Year 3 Term 5

Year 2 Term 3

• To

• To

• Nursing

English French Complementary

What will you learn?

• Pharmacology

• Human

Body for Nurses II the Hospitalized Adult • Health Assessment • Psychology: Human Development

The Nursing program at Dawson College is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to become a nurse in the province of Quebec. The program has been recently revised to include new courses in the areas of health assessment, nutrition and pharmacology, deemed relevant for new practitioners. The new program also provides more flexibility in that students may now choose to complete the program in three years or four years, as well as more support for students requiring extra assistance with French. As a nurse, you will work in a healthcare setting and deliver quality nursing care based on the knowledge, skills and professional attitudes developed over the course of study.

analyze and interpret data, based on scientific and disciplinary foundations solve problems and make decisions leading to effective actions

• To

demonstrate professionalism and personal growth through attitude and conduct

Where will this program lead you? • To

work in hospitals, which remain the primary employers of nurses, as patients of all ages require your abilities

• To

work in ambulatory care settings, patients’ homes and industry, both locally and internationally

• To

a university nursing program, if you choose to continue your studies at the baccalaureate level

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

All candidates must: • have

completed the science pre-requisites within the last five years

• submit

a letter of Intent: 200-300 words, handwritten, outlining reasons for wishing to study nursing and how this idea may have developed; citing personal or work experience including volunteerism, interests and activities

• submit

a health certificate and immunization record following admission

• complete

the Order of Nurses of Quebec (O.I.I.Q.) nursing student registration application, following admission

Did you know? Dawson College has developed an integrated DEC-BAC program in partnership with McGill University’s School of Nursing. This partnership between the CEGEP Nursing program and the university Baccalaureate degree in Nursing aims to coordinate learning at these two levels.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Science

558-404 or 558-402 or Physical Science 436

• Chemistry

551-504 or Chemistry 534

• Must

be eligible to take College English 603-101 (Testing may be required).

C reative and A pplied A rts

21


210.A0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Laboratory Technology - Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Technology-Analytical Chemistry is a three-year program designed to prepare you to work in an industrial chemical laboratory. As a technologist, you will work in a lab environment where you will collect and analyze chemicals using conventional and modern instrumental methods, including gas and liquid chromatographs, auto-analyzers, ultraviolet and infrared spectrophotometers and other state-of-the-art instruments. The first half of the program provides a solid foundation for the applied courses given in the second half of the program. Courses in Mathematics and Physics are tailored to the needs of the program in that many of the learning activities are integrated with other courses.

What will you learn?

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Mathematics • Chemistry

564-506 or 565-506 *

551-504 *

• To

* For students graduating before June 2010 or from an Adult Education Centre, the prerequisites are Physics 534, Chemistry 534 and Mathematics 526.

• To

What else should you know?

perform basic lab operations such as weighing, measuring precise volumes and heating test for harmful micro-organisms that are found in industrial samples

• To

help create products available in the marketplace

• To

properly maintain laboratory equipment

Where will this program lead you? • To

work as a laboratory technologist in areas such as pharmaceuticals, agriculture and food, petrochemicals, pulp and paper, biotechnology, chemical testing laboratories, and the environment

• In

your third year, you will gain valuable laboratory experience by participating in a training internship that will allow you to apply your skills in the field

• Upon

graduation, you can become a member of the Chemical Institute of Canada

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

• To

work in other specialized areas such as quality control, research and development, and biotechnology

• Some

graduates continue their studies in chemistry at the university level

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

22

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

• Applied

• Microbiology

Mathematics • Introduction to Statistical Methods • General Chemistry • Introduction to Laboratory Technology Humanities English Complementary

Year 1 Term 2 • Calculus

I • Chemistry of Solutions • Physics for Technology I • Preparation of Solutions Physical Education Humanities English

I Chemistry Techniques II • Physical Chemical Measurements II • Organic Chemistry Techniques I • Analytical

Humanities French English

Year 3 Term 5 • Microbiology

II Chemistry Techniques III • Organic Chemistry Techniques II • Chemical Processes for Technologists • Analytical

Physical Education French

Year 3 Term 6 Year 2 Term 3 • Organic

Chemistry I • Physics for Technology II • Analytical Chemistry Techniques I • Physical Chemical Measurements I Physical Education English

• Analytical

Chemistry Techniques IV Chemistry Techniques III • Comprehensive Project • Industrial Stage • Organic

Complementary


221.B0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Civil Engineering Technology Civil Engineering Technology is a three-year program designed to provide students with the skills necessary to become a civil engineering technologist. You will be trained in the management and design of construction projects, in surveying, in environmental studies, and in the laboratory techniques used in testing concrete, asphalt, soils and crushed stone.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

What will you learn?

• Introduction

• Estimating

• To

to Applied Mathematics • Civil Engineering Drawings I • Construction I • Surveying I • Health and Safety • Technology of Aggregates

I • Bituminous Mix • Structural Analysis • Stage Preparation • Municipal Engineering II

Physical Education English

Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

Year 1 Term 2

Year 3 Term 5

• Civil

• Estimating

Engineering Physics I • Soils I • Construction II • Surveying II Humanities French English Complementary

Year 2 Term 3 • Civil

Engineering Physics II • Civil Engineering Drawings II • Concrete • Specifications • Municipal Engineering I Physical Education Humanities French English

prepare engineering drawings using both the computer and drafting table

• To

estimate quantities and costs for construction projects

• To

examine environmental measures to minimize environmental impact

• To

manage and schedule construction projects

• To

design and inspect buildings and infrastructures

• To

perform quality control testing of engineering materials for buildings and road infrastructure projects

II • Project Management I • Roads I • Reinforced Concrete • Stage Evaluation • Soils II • Physical Environment

• To

Year 3 Term 6

• To

• Steel

Structures Structures • Inspections • Roads II • Building Systems • Project Management II • Engineering & Environment • Wood

perform design calculations for steel, concrete and wood structures

Where will this program lead you? • To

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Mathematics • Science

564-506 or 565-506 or Mathematics 526

558-404 or 558-402 or Physical Science 436

What else should you know? • Graduates

may enter the labour force directly or choose to pursue further studies in engineering at the university level.

• Depending

on the university chosen, you may be granted extra credits toward your degree program.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

work for consulting engineers

• To

work in the public sectors – federal, provincial or municipal level work in laboratories

• To

work for general contractors, manufacturers or fabricators of construction products

• To

work independently as an entrepreneur

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

S cience , M edical S tudies & E ngineering

23


241.A0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Mechanical Engineering Technology Mechanical Engineering Technology is a three-year program designed to provide you with the skills necessary to work in the design, development and implementation of engineering projects. The program focuses on theory and practice in the design, construction, installation, control and use of machines and mechanical devices in the manufacturing of goods. In your final year, you will choose between the following two options: Mechanical Design: Apply basic principles of design – with the help of Computer-Aided Design – to the development of manufacturing equipment and processes.

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

Automated Manufacturing: Use robotics, PLCs and microprocessor-controlled equipment in manufacturing applications requiring automation.

• Mathematics

What will you learn?

* For students graduating before June 2010 or from an Adult Education Centre, the prerequisites are Physics 534 and Mathematics 526.

understand the relationship and role of all parts/ components in a mechanical assembly

• Physics

564-406 or 565-406 *

553-504 *

• To

• To

interpret mechanical drawings

• To

use industrial grade software

• To

program a Numerical Control (NC) lathe and mill

• To

prepare detail and assembly drawings

• To

design mechanical devices of moderate complexity

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

Where will this program lead you? • To

work in mechanical drafting or Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (CADD)

• To

work in estimating, inspecting and testing

• To

work in research and development

• To

work in technical sales

• To

work in the servicing and testing of materials and components

• To

work in the installation and maintenance of automation equipment, including robotics, Numerical

• Control

and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM).

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

24

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

Year 1 Term 1

Year 3 Term 5

• Engineering

MECHANICAL DESIGN SPECIALIZATIOn *

Mathematics I to CIM • Introduction to Mechanical Engineering Technology • Metrology • Engineering Graphics • Engineering Materials • Introduction

Physical Education English

Year 1 Term 2 • Engineering

Physics I • Machine Tools I • Mechanical Components I • Quality Control • CAD I • Heat Treatment French English

Year 2 Term 3 • Engineering

Mathematics II II • Machine Tools II • Manufacturing Processes • CAD

Physical Education Humanities English

Year 2 Term 4 • Engineering

Physics II Manufacturing • CNC Operation • Mechanical Components II • CAD III • Tooling

Humanities French

• Pneumatic

Systems Design • Sheet Metal Design • Design Modification • CAD IV • System Design I • Machine

Physical Education Complementary

Year 3 Term 6 • Emerging

Technologies Modelling • System Design II • Design Project • 3D

Humanities English Complementary

Year 3 Term 5 Automated Manufacturing Specialization * • Design

Modifications Tooling • Production Planning • NC Lathe • Automated Circuits I • Industrial Automation • Production

Physical Education Complementary

Year 3 Term 6 • Graphic

Programming Circuits II • Industrial Systems • Manufacturing Project • Automated

Humanities English Complementary * In your final year you will choose either Mechanical Design Specialization or Automated Manufacturing Specialization


243.B0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Electronics Engineering Technology Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

• Introduction

• Calculus

• Applied

• Sequential

to the Occupation Mathematics • Combinational Circuits • Direct Current Circuits

I

• Alternating

Circuits Current Circuits

Humanities French English

Humanities Physical Education French English

COMPUTERS & NETWORKS

TELECOMMUNICATIONS

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 3

• Networking

Fundamentals • Integrated Logic Circuits • Linear Circuits • Wireless Fundamentals • Unix I

• Networking

Physical Education English

Physical Education English

Year 2 Term 4

Year 2 Term 4

• Power

Supplies System Programming • Telephony • Network Routing • PC Hardware & Software • Unix II

• Power

• Embedded

• Embedded

English Complementary

English Complementary

Year 3 Term 5

Year 3 Term 5

• Electronic

• Electronic

Fundamentals • Integrated Logic Circuits • Linear Circuits • Wireless Fundamentals • QA/QC

Electronics Engineering Technology is a three-year technical program designed to provide you with a solid foundation in the theory and practice of electronics. This newly revised program has been redesigned to reflect the changes in the telecommunications, computers and networks industry. The new program prepares students for important industry certification (Cisco’s CCNA and/or CompTIA’s A+). In your second year, you will choose between the following two options: Computers & Networks: microprocessors and networking Telecommunications: radio, television, microwave, fiber optics and satellite technology

What will you learn? • To

install, configure and service a computer and its peripherals

• To

install and configure various operating systems and network-related devices to operate within a local area network environment

• To

Techniques • Embedded System Hardware • LAN Switching & Configuration • Client Based OS & Server Environment • Fundamentals of Web Servers • Wireless LANs Physical Education Complementary

• Network

Humanities

Physical Education Complementary

• Telecommunications

Project

Planning Security • Wide Area Networks • Communication in the Workplace • Network

Techniques • Embedded System Hardware • Fundamentals of Fibre Optics • RF Systems • Telephone Systems

Year 3 Term 6

Year 3 Term 6 • Computer/Network

Supplies System Programming • Telephony • System Analysis • Digital Modulation • Analog Modulation

Project • New Wireless Systems • Fibre Optic Systems • Installation of Systems • Electromagnetic Fundamentals • Communication in the Workplace Humanities

identify, interpret and adhere to quality standards during assembly and integrations of a telecommunications system

• To

produce technical reports

Where will this program lead you? • To

work as an engineering assistant in a development lab

• To

work as a network technician

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Mathematics • Science

564-406 or 565-406 *

555-404 or 557-406 *

* For students graduating before June 2010 or from an Adult Education Centre, the prerequisites are Physical Science 436 and Mathematics 436.

What else should you know? • Demand

for individuals trained in computers and telecommunications is high. Graduates of this program typically work for companies that use, manufacture, sell or service electronic equipment and computers of all types.

• Many

students pursue studies at the university level. Depending on the university chosen, students may be granted extra credits toward their degree program.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

• To

work as a quality control/testing officer using computer-controlled equipment

• To

work as a system troubleshooter with industrial control equipment

• To

work as a sales representative for manufacturers

• To

work as a field representative handling the installation and maintenance of computers or communications equipment

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History S cience , M edical S tudies & E ngineering

25


Dawson Library The CEGEP system is secular, but the building that houses Dawson College has a strong connection to one of the most influential teaching orders in the history of Quebec, the Congrégation-de-Notre-Dame. Many of the library’s artifacts remain: • The • It

building was opened in 1908.

served as the Mother House of the order for eight decades.

• The

statue that sits on top of the dome is Notre-Dame-de-laGarde, the Madonna holding the Christ child.

• The

dome is made of solid copper.

• Dawson’s

library is the building’s former chapel. It is adorned with large light fixtures in the shape of a cross, lit only for special occasions, as they were when the Sisters lived here.

• The

stations of the cross can still be seen around the perimeter of the room.

• The

circulation desk is located where the altar once stood.

• In

1982, Marguerite Bourgeoys, founder of the order, was canonized by Pope John Paul II. When he came to Montreal in 1984, he paid a visit to what is now Dawson College.

• Marguerite

Bourgeoys’ remains were buried on the property for nearly 75 years. When the building was acquired in the early 1980s as the eventual site of Dawson College, her remains were relocated to Notre‑Dame-du-Bonsecours chapel in Old Montreal.

• The

pipe organ’s ornamental pipes remain on the second floor at the back of the room, although the actual organ was donated to a church.

• The

large staircase leading to the second floor did not exist in the original chapel, but it was constructed of wood reclaimed in the renovations.

26


Social Science & Business Technologies


300.A0

P re - U niversity P rogram

Social Science Social Science is an exciting and broad-based two‑year pre-university program that prepares students for university studies in the social sciences, as well as law, education and business. The largest program at Dawson, students may choose General Studies for the widest range of subjects, or concentrate their studies within a thematic profile of courses integrated around a central theme.

What will you learn? The Social Science program seeks to develop the abilities of students to research, analyze, and communicate within the context of a wider awareness of the world. All students in the program must take required introductory courses in Economics, History, and Psychology. And then, throughout their studies in Social Science, students explore a range of subjects which include courses in Anthropology, Biology, Business Administration, Classics, Economics, Geography, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Religion and Sociology.

Where will this program lead you? A Diploma of College Studies (DEC) in Social Science allows students to pursue university studies in any social science field, provided you have the appropriate pre-requisite courses. Graduates then go on to rewarding careers in archeology, business, criminology, development, education, journalism, law, politics, psychology, tourism and environmental studies, among many others.

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Mathematics

563-404 * is required for General Social Science, Child Studies, Environmental Studies, Law, Society and Justice, North-South Studies, Psychology, and Travel and Tourism

• Mathematics

564-506 or 565-506 or Mathematics 536 (or 526) is required for the Commerce and International Business profiles.

* For students graduating as of June 2010.

Application deadline is March 1 for the Fall session, November 1 for the Winter session.

28

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

300.EA

General Studies General Studies is designed for students interested in exploring a wide variety of social science fields and areas such as business, education and law. In addition to economics, history and psychology, students must choose courses in three of the following disciplines: Geography, Classics, Biology, Anthropology, Political Science, Sociology, Business Administration, Religion, Mathematics and Philosophy.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 4

Required Courses (choose two):

Required Course:

Required Course:

Required Course:

• Research

• Quantitative

• Integrative

• General

Psychology (100-Level) • Western Civilization (100-Level) • Introduction to Economics (100-Level) 100-Level Option Course (choose one): • Anthropology • Biology • Business Administration • Classics • Geography • Mathematics † (Calculus I) • Philosophy • Political Science • Religion • Sociology Physical Education Humanities French English † You may take one, two or three Math courses in your program: Calculus I (100-Level), Linear Algebra (200-Level), Calculus II (300-Level).

Methods

Required Courses (choose one): • General

Psychology (100-Level) • Western Civilization (100-Level) • Introduction to Economics (100-Level) 100-Level Option Course (choose one from list) 200-Level Option Course (choose one from a 100-Level discipline previously taken) Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

Methods

Seminar

100-Level Option Course (choose one from list)

200-Level Option Course and 300‑Level Option

200-Level Option Course and Option 300‑Level Course (choose one from 100-Level disciplines previously taken)

Course (choose one from 100-Level disciplines previously taken)

French English Complementary

400-Level Option Course (choose one from a discipline in which you have previously taken a 200-Level or 300-Level Course) * Physical Education Humanities English * If you take two or three Mathematics courses, not including Statistics for Social Science, you do not take a 400-Level course.


300.EE

300.EB

Commerce Profile

Child Studies Profile

The Commerce profile is designed for students interested in studying commerce, management, economics, or any business-related field at university. This profile is structured so that students take relevant courses in Mathematics and Business Administration while exploring the diversity of the social sciences. These courses are central to the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for future studies and careers in such diverse fields as business, law, economics and journalism.

The Child Studies profile is designed for students who want to pursue university studies leading to careers that involve working with children, such as counselling, teaching, social work, or as sociologists or psychologists. Students take part in field work, as volunteers, in their second and fourth semesters. Field work placements include elementary and high schools, scouting organizations, and children’s hospitals. The program focuses on children and their role in the family and in society, and includes courses in Anthropology, History, Psychology and Sociology.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 4

Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 4

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Course

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Courses

• Calculus

• Western

• Linear

• Integrative

• Western

• Introduction

• Developmental

• Integrative

I

OR • Calculus

I Enriched (100-Level) • General Psychology (100-Level) • Introduction to Economics (100-Level) • Introduction to Business (100-Level) Physical Education Humanities English

Civilization (100‑Level) • Basics of Marketing (200‑Level) • Calculus II or Calculus II Enriched (300-Level) • Research Methods Physical Education French English

Algebra

OR • Linear

Algebra Enriched (200-Level) • Quantitative Methods 100-Level Option Course (choose one) • Anthropology • Biology • Classics • Geography • Philosophy • Political Science • Religion • Sociology 200-Level Option Course (choose one from a 100-Level discipline previously taken)

Seminar

300-Level Option Course Physical Education Humanities French English Complementary

Civilization (100-Level) • General Psychology (100-Level) • Individual & Society (100-Level) Physical Education Humanities French English

to Anthropology (100-Level) • Introduction to Economics (100-Level) • Cognitive Development (300-Level) • Research Methods Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

Psychology (200-Level) • Education (200-Level) • Quantitative Methods 100-Level Option Course (choose one) • Biology • Business Administration • Classics • Geography • Mathematics (Calculus I) • Philosophy • Political Science • Religion

Seminar

• Anthropology

of Parenthood (200-Level) • Applied Social & Economic History (300-Level) 400-Level Option Course (choose one) • Advanced Studies in Psychology OR • Advanced

Studies in Sociology

Physical Education Humanities English

French English Complementary

Humanities English Complementary

S ocial S cience & B usiness T echnologies

29


300.EG

300.EH

The Environmental Studies Profile provides students with the opportunity to learn about the dynamic relationship between society and the environment and the environmental impact of resource development. Students will also address and debate issues relating to environmentally sustainable growth in an increasingly global marketplace. The profile blends theory and practice through a problem solving approach that encourages students to reflect on the call to action: Think globally, act locally. The selection of courses is designed to give student access to university-level programs of environmental study.

The International Business Studies profile is designed for Social Science students interested in global markets. Students explore a variety of issues affecting international trade. The profile includes courses in Economics, History, Psychology, Business Administration and Mathematics. Graduates may pursue university studies in a variety of fields such as business, international relations, development and economics, industrial relations, and communications.

Environmental Studies Profile

Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Courses

• Introduction

• General

• Economics

to

Geography & the Environment (100-Level) • Western Civilization (100-Level) • Introduction to Economics (100-Level) Physical Education Humanities French English

Psychology (100-Level) • Natural Environment (200-Level) • Research Methods 100-Level Option Course (choose one) • Individual & Society • Introduction to Anthropology • Introduction to Business • Introduction to World Religions • Mathematics † Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

& the Environment (200-Level) • Environmental Issues (300-Level) • Quantitative Methods 100-Level Option Course (choose one) • Administration (100-Level) • Anthropology (100-Level) • Biology (100-Level) • Classics (100-Level) • Mathematics † • Philosophy (100-Level) • Political Science (100-Level) • Religion (100-Level) • Sociology (100-Level) English French Complementary

Year 2 Term 4 Required Course • Integrative

Seminar

• Advanced

Environmental Studies * (400-Level)

200-Level Option Course (choose one) • Social Problems • Sustainability & Business • Business Law

30

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

International Business Profile

• Mathematics:

Linear Algebra (200-Level)

OR any other Social Science 200-Level Option from 100-Level disciplines you have passed. 300-Level Option Course (choose one) • Topics in Religion • Contemporary Anthropology • Applied Social & Economic History • Mathematics: Calculus II (300-Level) OR any other Social Science 300-Level Option from 100-Level disciplines you have passed. Physical Education Humanities English † You may take one, two or three Math courses in your program: Calculus I (100-Level), Linear Algebra (200-Level), Calculus II (300-Level). * If you take two or three Mathematics courses, not including Statistics for Social Science, you do not take this course.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 4

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Course

Required Course

• Calculus

• General

• Quantitative

• Integrative

I (100-Level) • Western Civilization (100-Level) • Introduction to Economics (100-Level) • Introduction to Business (100-Level) Physical Education French English

Psychology (100-Level) • International Business (200-Level) • Linear Algebra (200-Level) • Research Methods Physical Education Humanities English

Methods

100-Level Option Course (choose one) • Introduction to Geography and the Environment • Introduction to Politics 300-Level Option Course (choose one from a 100-Level discipline previously taken) Humanities English French Complementary

Seminar

Required 200-Level Course (choose one) • Microeconomics • Economic Geography 300-Level Option Course (choose one from a 100-Level discipline previously taken) Physical Education Humanities English Complementary


300.EM

300.EK

Law, Society & Justice Profile

North-South Studies Profile

The Law, Society & Justice profile will be of interest to students who have academic and career goals relating to the legal and forensic professions, as well as to journalism, civil service, and public interest advocacy organizations. The profile offers a coordinated group of courses that examines the relationship between law and society.

The North-South Studies profile is designed for students interested in exploring the living and working conditions of the developing world. This profile is unique in that students can choose to participate in a field trip to a developing country, usually in Central America. During the trip, students live with a host family, attend conferences, and participate in community projects. Graduates of North-South Studies pursue university studies in a variety of areas including international development, education and business.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 4

Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 4

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Course

• Western

• Introduction

• Canadian

• Integrative

• Western

• General

• Economic

• Integrative

Civilization (100-Level) • General Psychology (100-Level) • Individual & Society (100-Level) Physical Education Humanities French English

to Economics (100-Level) • Introduction to Politics (100‑Level) • Sociology of Law (200-Level) • Research Methods Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

History (200-Level) • Psychology & the Law (200-Level) 100-Level Option Course (choose one) • Anthropology • Biology • Business Administration • Classics • Geography • Mathematics (Calculus I) • Philosophy • Religion French English Complementary

Seminar • Canadian Democracy (300‑Level) 300-Level Option Course (choose one from a 100-Level discipline previously taken) 400-Level Option Course (choose one from a discipline in which you have previously taken a 200‑Level or 300-Level Course) * Physical Education Humanities English * If you take two Mathematics courses, not including Statistics for Social Science, you do not take a 400-Level course.

Civilization (100-Level) • Introduction to Anthropology (100-Level) • Introduction to Economics (100-Level) Physical Education Humanities French English

Psychology (100-Level) • Introduction to Politics (100-Level) • Third World History (200-Level) • Research Methods Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

Development (200-Level) • Quantitative Methods Required Courses (choose one): • Preparing

for Field Trip (300-Level) • Contemporary Anthropology (300-Level) 100-Level Option Course (choose one): • Biology • Business Administration • Classics • Geography • Mathematics (Calculus I) • Philosophy • Religion • Sociology French English Complementary

Seminar

200-Level Option Course (choose one from a 100-Level discipline previously taken) 300-Level Option Course (choose one from a 100-Level discipline previously taken) OR • Field

Trip Experience in a Developing Country

400-Level Option Course (choose one from a discipline in which you have previously taken a 200‑Level or 300-Level Course)* OR • Statistics

for Social Science

Physical Education Humanities English * If you take two or three Mathematics courses, not including Statistics for Social Science, you do not take a 400-Level course.ary Anthropology (300-Level)

Note: Mathematics pre-requisites are necessary for university business studies.

S ocial S cience & B usiness T echnologies

31


300.EP

300.ET

700.B0 P re - U niversity P rogram

The Psychology profile is structured to permit students to explore a number of areas in psychology. It prepares students for university-level studies in psychology, as well as a variety of social science fields. Students take four sequenced Psychology courses and are required to take a Human Biology course. You may also opt to take a Statistics for Social Science course that will help prepare you for university studies.

The Travel & Tourism profile prepares students for university studies in transportation, hospitality and tourism, as well as geography, marketing and business. This profile aims to give students a better understanding of the economic, social and cultural impact of the contemporary travel and tourism industry.

Liberal Arts at Dawson College is a two-year pre-university Honours program. The liberal arts are based on the belief that disciplined learning is the road to freedom in one’s personal intellectual life and career. The program emphasizes wide and critical reading, and the effective expression of thought in writing and oral argument.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 3

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 3

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Courses

Required Courses

• General

• Human

• Introduction

• Introduction

• Introduction

• Quantitative

Physical Education Humanities French English

French English Complementary

Psychology Profile

Psychology (100‑Level) to Economics (100-Level)

100-Level Option Course (choose one) • Anthropology • Business Administration • Classics • Geography • Mathematics (Calculus I) • Philosophy • Political Science • Religion Physical Education Humanities French English

Year 1 Term 2 Required Courses • Western

Civilization (100‑Level) • Individual & Society (100‑Level) • Research Methods

Travel & Tourism Profile

Biology (100-Level) Methods

200-Level Option Course (choose one from a 100-Level discipline previously taken) 300-Level Option Course (choose one): • Human Sexual Behaviour OR • Applications

of Psychology

French English Complementary

Year 2 Term 4 Required Course • Integrative

Seminar

Required 400-Level Courses (choose one) * • Statistics for Social Science OR • Advanced

Studies in Psychology

200-Level Option Course (choose one) • Developmental Psychology

200-Level Option Course (choose one from a 100-Level discipline previously taken)

OR

300-Level Option Course (choose one from a 100-Level discipline previously taken)

• Abnormal

Psychology

Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

Physical Education Humanities English * If you take two or three Mathematics courses, not including Statistics for Social Science, you do not take a 400-Level course.

32

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

Note: Mathematics pre-requisites are necessary for university business studies.

Liberal Arts

What will you learn?

to Geography & the Environment (100-Level) • General Psychology (100‑Level) • Introduction to Economics (100-Level)

to Business (100-Level) • Economic Geography (200‑Level) • Applied Geography (300‑Level) • Quantitative Methods

The curriculum is composed of required courses and seminars in classics, English, history, humanities and philosophy, as well as options in other disciplines. This broad survey of the history and intellectual and creative heritage of our civilization is designed to provide you with a strong foundation of knowledge and skills appropriate to university studies.

Where will this program lead you? Graduates of our Liberal Arts Program have pursued a wide variety of university programs in Canada and abroad, including the following areas of study:

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 4

• Arts

Required Courses

Required Courses

• Commerce

• Western

• Global

Marketing Studies in Geography • Integrative Seminar

• Communications

• Tourism

• Advanced

200-Level Option Course (choose one from a 100-Level discipline previously taken)

• Management/Administration

Physical Education Humanities English

• Diploma

Civilization (100‑Level) (200-Level) • Research Methods Required 100-Level Course (choose one) • Anthropology • Biology • Classics • Mathematics (Calculus I) • Philosophy • Political Science • Religion • Sociology Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

Note: Students in Travel and Tourism Studies may take one, two or three Mathematics courses. If you take two Mathematics, Calculus I and Linear Algebra, you do not take 320-201 or 320-401. If you take two Mathematics courses, Calculus I and Calculus II, you do not take 401-305 or 320-401. If you take three Mathematics, Calculus I, Calculus II and Linear Algebra, you do not take 320‑201, 401-305 and 320-401.

and humanities

• Journalism • Law

What do you need to apply to this program? of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES.

• Mathematics

563-404 *

• Graduating

average and grades in English, History, Social Science and language courses of 80% or more.

• Letter

of Intent explaining your academic interests.

* For students graduating as of June 2010.

Application deadline is March 1 for the Fall session, November 1 for the Winter session.


Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 4

• Introduction

• English:

• English:

• English:

• Modern

• Humanities:

• Humanities:

to College English

• Humanities:

Medieval Civilizations Philosophy • Graeco-Roman Civilization • Sacred Writings • Research in Liberal Arts Disciplines • Ancient

Physical Education

Introduction to Poetry Philosophy • Post Classical History • Renaissance to Baroque Art • Principles of Mathematics & Logic Group 1 Option * French Physical Education

Themes in Drama Moral Knowledge • Modern History: 19th & 20th Century • Science: History & Methods Group 1 Option* Group 2 Option* French

The Novel Moral Issues in Law • Integrative Seminar for Liberal Arts Group 2 Option * Group 3 Option * Group 4 Option * Physical Education

The Option courses are offered by other pre-university programs and represent a large variety of disciplines related to the Liberal Arts required courses. These are organized into four groups. Students have six Option courses to choose: two courses from Group 1, two courses from Group 2, and one course each from Groups 3 and 4. However, students who take a 75‑hour course (e.g., Mathematics), are limited to five Option courses, and do not take a Group 4 Option. Usually, students start taking option courses in the second or third term of the program. However, students who wish to continue Mathematics (Calculus I) may elect to do so in the first term, in which case they should alert the Academic Advising office of their intention before registration begins, preferably at their program orientation in May or August. Students may take no more than four courses in any one discipline.

The following is the list of options. Please note that not all courses are offered every semester.

Group 1 Options • Calculus

I or Calculus I Enriched Biology • Introduction to Geography • General Psychology • Introduction to Anthropology • Introduction to Economics • Introduction to Politics • Individual & Society • Introduction to Business • Newswriting • Visual Culture • Drawing & Creative Expression • Exploring Drawing • Photography: Themes & History • Images & Sounds • Understanding Media • Alternative Media • Documentary • Film Styles • Communication & Culture • Classical Music History • Introduction to Guitar Techniques • Introduction to Vocal Techniques • Theatre: Plays & Playwrights • Literature & Culture • Literature & the Arts • Biography, Autobiography & Blogs • Spanish I • Spanish for Hispanics • Italian I • Italian Mother Tongue I • German I • Hebrew I • Chinese I • Greek I • Human

Group 2 Options • Calculus

II or Calculus II Enriched or Chemical Bonds & States of Matter or Quantitative Methods • Economic Geography • Tourism • Dynamic Human Environments • Natural Environment • Canadian History • U.S. History • Quebec History • 20th Century History • Third World History • Social & Economic History • The Medieval World • Greek Civilization • Roman Culture & Society • Aegean Civilizations • Egyptian Legacy • Ancient World • Developmental Psychology • Abnormal Psychology • Psychology & the Law • Topics in Psychology • Religions of the East • Universe of the Bible • Encountering the Holy • Religion & Literature • The Holocaust • Human Evolution • Development of Civilization • Peoples of the World • Microeconomics • Economic Development • Money & Banking • Canadian Economic Policy • Quebec Economy • Economics of World Issues

• Comparing

Countries Politics & Government • Social Problems • The Family • Education • Sociology of Law • Basics of Marketing • International Business • Business Law • International Law • Cross-Cultural Management • Feature Writing • Interactive Web Art & Culture • Painting: Colour & Composition • Photo Art & Creative Expression • 16th Century to Modern Art • Scriptwriting • Animated Film • Video Workshop • Film & Culture • Digital Culture • Music Appreciation • Guitar: Musical Expression • Voice: Musical Expression • Theatre: Concept & Craft • Literature into Film • Spanish II • Italian II • Italian Mother Tongue II • German II • Hebrew II • Chinese II • Greek II • U.S.

Group 3 Options • General

Biology I Algebra • Linear Algebra Enriched • Chemistry of Solutions • Mechanics • Applied Geography • Environmental Issues • Geography of International Relations • The Business of Geography • Applied Canadian History • Applied U.S. History • Applied Quebec History • Applied 20th Century History • Applied Third World History • Applied Social & Economic History • Myths in Classical Society • Conflict in the Ancient World • Ancient World Archaeology • Ancient Trade & Commerce • Interaction & Communication • Human Sexual Behaviour • Cognitive Development • Psychology in Business • Applications of Psychology • Religious Cults & Sects • Life, Death & Beyond • Topics in Religion • Eastern Religions & the Arts • Race & Racism • Amerindians • Contemporary Anthropology • Archaeology • Culture, Exchange & Globalization • Macroeconomics • Current Economic Issues • Linear

• International

Economics Democracy • Global Politics • Culture & Media (Sociology) • Sexuality & Society • Race & Ethnic Relations • Global Sociology • Applied Sociology • Global Marketing • Managing International Organizations • Computer Communications of Arts & Literature • Computer Graphics & Web Design • Study of Language • e-Journalism • Sculpture & 3D Composition • Computer Art • Printmaking Techniques • Painting & Creative Expression • Art: Icons & Ideas • Canadian Art in Context • Communication Studies • Film & Social Issues • Communication Practices • Animation Production • Media Production • Jazz & Blues • Guitar: Musical Interpretation • Theatre Practice • La francophonie • Literary Criticism • Creative Writing • Spanish III • Italian III • German III • Canadian

Group 4 Options • Statistics

for Social Science Studies in Geography • Advanced Studies in History • Advanced Studies in Classics • Advanced Studies in Philosophy • Philosophy of Art • Advanced Studies in Psychology • Advanced Studies in Religion • Advanced Studies in Anthropology • Advanced Studies in Economics • Advanced Studies in Politics • Advanced Studies in Sociology • Advanced Studies in Business • Culture & Media (Languages) • Artists’ Books & Graphic Novels • Drawing/Painting Studio • Sculpture Studio • Sculpture & Creative Expression • History of Contemporary Art • Multimedia Production • Cinema: Selected Topics • Film Theory & Criticism • Experimental Film & Video • Multimedia Creation • Guitar: Musical Performance • Voice: Musical Performance • Theatre Performance • Voice: Musical Interpretation • Theatre of the Western World • Dance: Technique & Style • Creative Writing Workshop • Special Studies in Literature • Journalism Workshop/The Plant • Spanish IV • Italian IV • German IV • Advanced

S ocial S cience & B usiness T echnologies

33


388.A0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Social Service

Social Service is a three-year program designed to prepare students for a career in human services, or for further studies in social work at the university level. You will be trained to work with individuals of all ages and with families, groups, and communities experiencing social problems. These problems, linked to living conditions and social inequality, often involve poverty, unemployment, family and spousal violence, adjustment difficulties, loss of autonomy, isolation, suicide and substance abuse. Social service workers help these individuals, families and communities to meet their needs adequately, to defend their rights and to promote social change.

What will you learn? • To

understand how the problems in society affect individuals and communities

• To

develop awareness of yourself and your impact on others

• To

develop values that are part of the social service profession

• To

carry out psychosocial interventions with individuals and families

• To

help form a helping relationship

• To

conduct an effective interview and to facilitate groups

• To

work with communities on social issues and problems

Where will this program lead you? • To

work in agencies maintained by the Ministère de la Santé et des services sociaux, such as health and social services (CSSS), residential care and long-term facilities, rehabilitation and senior centres, youth protection agencies and some hospitals

What do you need to apply to this program?

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

• Diploma

• Introduction

• Fieldwork

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Interview

(reading comprehension and writing tests)

What else should you know? Throughout your three years of study, you will participate in training internships that will allow you to apply your knowledge and skills in the field.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

work for the Ministère de l’Emploi et de la solidarité and for various school boards

to the Social Service Practice • Resources for Human Needs • Communication Skills in Social Service Practice • Addressing Social Problems I • Social Welfare & Legislation • Human Development Physical Education English Complementary

Physical Education Humanities French English

Year 1 Term 2

Year 3 Term 5

• Fieldwork

• Fieldwork

I • Groupwork I • Addressing Social Problems 2 • Abnormal Psychology • Introduction to Intervention Physical Education Humanities French English

• To

• To

work with community organizations such as youth centres, community centres, shelters, senior centres, self-help groups, advocacy groups and popular education groups

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

4 Intervention • Intervention with Mandated Clienteles • Practice Models • Crisis

Year 3 Term 6 • Fieldwork

5

• Developing • Community

Year 2 Term 3 • Fieldwork

2

• Groupwork

2

• Understanding

Families I with Individuals • Health, Illness & Aging: Topics in Understanding Intervention I • Intervention

Humanities English Complementary

34

3 Service Research • Multicultural Montreal • Understanding Families 2 • Addiction, Disability & Homelessness: Topics in Understanding Intervention 2 • Social

Services & Resources Intervention


391.A0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Community Recreation Leadership Training Community Recreation Leadership Training is a three-year program which will prepare you to work in the field of leisure and recreation. It focuses on teamwork, outdoor and environmental education, communication techniques, promotion and fundraising, group dynamics and program planning skills. The program offers a balanced approach to theory and practice, and you will be given the opportunity to field test your leadership skills in internships with organizations and institutions across Quebec.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

What will you learn?

What else should you know?

• Leisure

• Fieldwork

II • Organization & Management of Recreation Programs • Program Design I • Winter Outdoor Experience • Principles of Fundraising

• To

By the time you complete the program, you will have accumulated over 550 hours of work experience.

• To

evaluate the success of a program

Humanities French English

• To

lead small and large groups

• To

organize events

• To

speak publicly

Year 3 Term 5

Where will this program lead you?

• Program

• To

Behaviour • Recreation & Society • Recreation Leadership I • Environmental Issues in Outdoor Recreation • Health & Safety • Introduction to Leisure • Techniques of Communication for the Recreation Professional Physical Education English

Year 1 Term 2 • Fieldwork

I

• Creativity • Group

Leadership: Theory & Practice I • Clientele: Consumer Needs • Business Administration in Recreation Physical Education French English Complementary

Design II • Project Management • Supervision of Human Resources • Entrepreneurship • Plan/Design & Maintenance of Recreational Facilities • Public Relations Humanities Complementary

Year 3 Term 6

analyze the leisure needs of a particular group and develop an intervention plan

• To

plan and implement a program, and oversee its budget

work with federal, provincial and municipal recreation agencies

• To

work for institutions, boards of education, athletic associations and facilities

• To

work in treatment centres, community centres, homes for the aged and special needs clients, as well as special event organizations

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

Year 2 Term 3

»» Secondary

IV Science

• Research

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

Methods for Recreation • Promotion of Recreation Services • Leadership of Recreation Activities • Environmental Leadership Experience • Group Leadership: Theory & Practice II • Workplace Management Physical Education Humanities English

• Internship • Integrative

Seminar

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Interview

S ocial S cience & B usiness T echnologies

35


410.B0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Accounting & Management Technology The Accounting & Management Technology program is one of two Business Administration programs at Dawson. This three-year career program places particular emphasis on applied business methods to develop and foster critical thinking, analysis and problem solving skills, as well as using computer applications to process and analyze financial and business information.

What will you learn?

Where will this program lead you?

• To

In accounting, graduates provide technical support for accounting tasks including the implementation of accounting systems, internal controls, budget planning, estimates of manufacturing costs, measurement of liabilities, as well as taxation.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 3 Term 5

• Introduction

• Accounting

• Business

• Human

In finance, graduates provide technical support in capital funds, treasury, financial analysis, and the evaluation of investments and their return.

Physical Education Humanities English

develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills to select, analyze and interpret information

• Fundamental

accounting principles and practices

• In-depth

perspective of quantitative analysis enabling you to develop, organize and strengthen the skills needed for effective financial analysis.

• Management

skills to broaden your understanding of business in addition to working effectively in a business environment.

• Relevant

computer skills to make use of business application software to perform various tasks

What’s new? The Work-Study Option Students in the Accounting & Management Technology program have the opportunity to complete their program in six terms or choose the Work-Study profile which allows them to have two paid work sessions. The Business Administration programs at Dawson have privileged relationships with large federal and provincial governmental agencies, small and medium-sized enterprises as well as with large multinational corporations. The Work-Study profile offers several advantages to students including: • Acquisition

of extensive, relevant and practical business experiences;

• Application

of the acquired knowledge and skills in a real business setting;

• Identification

of professional strengths;

• Acquisition

of important skills such as communications, team work, cooperation, and interpersonal skills essential to today's work environment;

• Financial

incentives given that the Work-Study program offers students the opportunity to earn an income during their studies.

In management, graduates perform tasks related to the human, financial and material resources of a company. Their responsibilities may involve the management of supplies, sales and projects, international commercial transactions, and supervision of employees, to name a few. Many students choose to go on to university for further study.

What will you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Mathematics

564-406 or 565-406 or Mathematics 436

* For students graduating before June 2010 or from an Adult Education Centre, the prerequisite is Mathematics 436.

to Economics Communications • Introduction to Business • Introduction to Computers

Year 1 Term 2 • International

Business to Marketing • Business Law • Principles of Financial Accounting • Introduction

Physical Education Humanities French English

Year 2 Term 3 Statistics • Career Management • e-Commerce • Accounting I • Finance I • Business Computer Applications English Complementary

Year 2 Term 4 • Computerized

Accounting I

• Taxation • Accounting • Finance

II

II

Physical Education French English

36

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

Humanities Complementary

Year 3 Term 6 • Negotiations • Management • Operations

& Inventory Management

• Investments • Computerized

Project

• Stage

WORK STUDY OPTION

• Business

• Entrepreneurship

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

III Resource Management & Supervision • Management & Cost Accounting • Financial Planning • Computerized Accounting II • Business Analysis

Year 3 Term 5 • Accounting

III Resource Management & Supervision • Management & Cost Accounting • Financial Planning • Computerized Accounting II • Business Analysis • Stage • Human

Humanities Complementary

Year 3 Term 6 (Fall Term) • Negotiations • Management • Operations

& Inventory Management

• Investments • Computerized

Project


410.D0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Business Management (Marketing) Business Management (Marketing) at Dawson College is one of two Business Administration programs. This threeyear program prepares students for a career in marketing. With the rapid development of the Internet and the trend toward globalization, two of the program’s primary focuses are on e-Marketing and International Business to give you the tools and knowledge to work in an evolving global marketplace.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 3 Term 5

What will you learn?

Where will this program lead you?

• Introduction

• Observation

• Various

Business Management (Marketing) graduates assume numerous responsibilities related to the activities of planning and executing, and the conception, pricing, promotion and distribution of products. They can be responsible for supervising a sales team and/or managing a business. Typically, they work for retailers, wholesalers or establishments specializing in the sale of products and services.

to Economics • Business Communications • Introduction to Business • Introduction to Computers Physical Education Humanities English

Year 1 Term 2 • International

Business • Introduction to Marketing • Business Law • Principles of Financial Accounting Physical Education Humanities French English

Year 2 Term 3 • Business

Statistics • Career Management • Marketing Research • Finance I • Business Computer Applications

Retail Stage

• Advertising • Human

Resource Management & Supervision • Sales Management • e-Marketing Humanities Complementary

Year 3 Term 6 • Marketing

Strategy • Operations & Inventory Management • Negotiations • Management • Stage WORK STUDY OPTION

Year 3 Term 5 • Observation

Retail Stage

• Advertising

English Complementary

Resource Management & Supervision • Sales Management • e-Marketing • Stage

Year 2 Term 4

Humanities Complementary

• International

Marketing Marketing • Retail Marketing • Integrated Marketing Communication • Consumer Behaviour • Services

Physical Education French English

• Human

Year 3 Term 6 (Fall Term) • Marketing

Strategy

• Operations

& Inventory Management • Negotiations • Management

marketing research methods to gain better understanding of the customers’ needs and their competitive environment

• Consumer

behaviour

• The

marketing mix (product, price, promotion and distribution)

• Management

skills

• Communication • Global

skills

management knowledge and skills

• Quantitative

skills to establish budgets, measure performance and assess the impact of planned marketing efforts

• Computer

skills

What’s new? The Work-Study Option Students in the Business Management (Marketing) program have the opportunity to complete their program in six terms or choose the Work-Study profile which allows them to have two paid work sessions. The Business Administration programs at Dawson have privileged relationships with large federal and provincial governmental agencies, small and medium-sized enterprises as well as with large multinational corporations. The Work-Study profile offers several advantages to students including: • Acquisition

of extensive, relevant and practical business experiences;

Many students choose to go on to university for further study.

What will you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Mathematics

563-404 *

* For students graduating before June 2010 or from an Adult Education Centre, the prerequisite is Mathematics 436.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

• Application

the of acquired knowledge and skills in a real business setting;

• Identification

of professional strengths;

• Acquisition

of important skills such as communications, team work, cooperation, and interpersonal skills essential to today's work environment;

• Financial

incentives given that the Work-Study program offers students the opportunity to earn an income during their studies. S ocial S cience & B usiness T echnologies

37


420.A0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Computer Science Technology The Computer Science Technology program is a three-year career program that will prepare you to work as an entry-level programmer-analyst in small, medium or large enterprises involved in e-business. Course content is constantly being reviewed, in consultation with industry, to ensure that graduates are able to respond to changing market demands. The program encompasses two areas of programming: personal/small systems and networks. Network programming will familiarize you with Internet and web-oriented client/server concepts and practices.

What will you learn?

What else should you know?

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

• To

• While

• Logic

• Programming

• Internet

• Internet

Physical Education Humanities English

Humanities French English Complementary

Year 1 Term 2

Year 3 Term 5

• Programming

• Programming

use state-of-the-art computer and business management techniques

• To

use programming languages such as JAVA and Visual Basic

• To

employ database management systems such as ACCESS and Oracle

• To

use Oracle Database Management System for client/ server application programming

• To

understand operating systems such as UNIX and Windows 2000 as well as distributed systems (Internet/Intranet)

the Computer Science Technology program will prepare you to enter the work force immediately after graduation, many students pursue studies at university in various Computer Science options. Some Mathematics pre-requisites may be required.

• Depending

on the university you choose, you may be granted up to nine credits in a degree program upon completion of Dawson’s Computer Science Technology program.

• An

exciting new website has been developed to answer all your questions about an education and career in computer science. Visit whycomputerscience.com.

Where will this program lead you? • To

work as a programmer

• To

work as a web-page designer

• To

work as a junior network administrator

• To

work as a PC support technician

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

Graduates are employed in financial, banking, transportation, manufacturing, insurance, health care, government, education and research environments.

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Mathematics

38

564-506 or 565-506 or Mathematics 526

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

of Programming Applications I – Intro to the Internet • Fundamentals of the Computer • Business Administration

I – Java I • Database I – Intro to Database Management Systems • Operating Systems I – Linux • Linear Algebra Physical Education French English

IV – VB.net II Applications II – Web Development I • Database III – Oracle I

V – Java III Applications III – Web Development II • Database IV – Oracle II • Data Communications & Networking • Internet

Humanities Complementary

Year 2 Term 3

Year 3 Term 6

• Programming

• Internet

II – VB.net I • Programming III – Java II • Database II – Database Theory & SQL • Statistics for Computer Science Physical Education English

Applications IV – Web Development Project • Operating Systems II – Windows Server • Psychology – Human Relations • Internship


Creative & Applied Arts


500.A1 P re - U niversity P rogram

Creative Arts, Literature and Languages Creative Arts, Literature and Languages at Dawson is a two-year program that prepares students for university studies in the creative arts, literature or languages. You may choose to study within any one of the following five profiles: Arts and Culture, Literature, Languages, Cinema/Video/Communications and Visual Arts. Except for students in the Languages Profile, students may take a “minor” in journalism, music or theatre by choosing to follow those courses each term through their course options. Students also have the opportunity to pursue studies in depth by taking several courses in a discipline of your choice. Note: Students who register for their first term in a Winter session of the CALL Program will not have the regular choice of courses available to students whose first term is in the Fall. As they will be “out of sync” throughout their studies in the CALL Program, they will not have as wide a choice as regular students who first register in the Fall term.

What will you learn? The following subjects are offered in the Creative Arts, Literature and Languages program. Read about individual profiles to learn the specific track your studies will take.

Where will this program lead you? • Philosophy

• Music

• Religion

• Theatre

• Computer • Studio • Art

Science

Art

History

Courses

What do you need to apply to this program? of Secondary Studies (DES), including: V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

Application deadline is March 1 for the Fall session, November 1 for the Winter session.

40

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 4

Required Courses:

Required Courses (choose one):

Required Courses (choose one):

Required Courses:

• Interactive

• Film

• Introduction

to Arts & Culture

Choose one: • Classical

Music History • Philosophy: Ideas & Culture • Stone Age to Renaissance Art Humanities French English

• Drawing

Communications

»» Secondary

Year 1 Term 1

• Documentary *

This program prepares you for further education in arts-related fields, including art history, cinema, communications, cultural studies, drama, education, humanities, international careers, journalism, languages, the liberal arts, linguistics, literature, translation and visual arts.

• Diploma

This profile offers students the flexibility to explore the creative arts without focusing on any one discipline, although you may choose to concentrate on only a few. This is a good choice for students wanting to achieve a solid background in the arts without specializing in any one subject at this point in their education.

• Drama *

• French

• Multidisciplinary

Arts & Culture Profile

Profile Recommended Courses (choose one):

• English

• Cinema/Video/

500.D1

& Creative Expression * • Photography: Themes & History * • Alternative Media * • Film Styles Program Option Courses (choose one): • Biography,

Autobiography & Blogs • Communication & Culture • Computer Communication of Arts & Literature • Culture québecoise • Exploring Drawing • Intro to Guitar Techniques • Intro to Vocal Techniques • Newswriting • Religion: Sacred Texts & Secular Images • Theatre: Plays & Playwrights

& Culture

Web Art

• Scriptwriting • 16th

Century to Modern Art

& Social Issues • Art: Icons & Ideas • Jazz & Blues • Sculpture & 3D Composition

Physical Education French English Complementary

Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

Profile Recommended Courses (choose one):

Profile Recommended Courses (choose one):

• Video

• Philosophy:

Workshop * • Film & Culture • Literature into Film Painting: Colour & Composition • Animated Film • Poetics Program Option Courses (choose one): • Digital

Culture Writing

• Feature

Communication, Interpretation & Meaning * • Creative Writing * • Animated Production • Communication Practices • Computer Art • Media Production • Printmaking Techniques

• Guitar:

Musical Expression Appreciation • Philosophy, Literature, & Life • Poem & Song • Theatre: Concept & Craft • Voice: Musical Expression • Western Religions & the Arts • Music

* Recommended for students who wish to take the maximum number of courses in their own profile or discipline.

Program Option Courses (choose one): • Canadian

Art in Context • Computer Graphics & Web Design • Eastern Religions & the Arts • e-Journalism • Guitar: Musical Interpretation • Painting & Creative Expression • Theatre Practice • Voice: Musical Interpretation • La francophonie

• Integrating

Activity

Required Courses (choose one): • Creative

Writing Workshop • Theatre of the Western World • Drawing/Painting Studio • Multimedia Production • Sculpture Studio Physical Education Humanities English Profile Recommended Courses (choose one): • Film

Theory & Criticism * • Philosophy of Art * • Cinema: Selected Topics • Experimental Film & Video • History of Contemporary Art • Special Studies in Literature Program Option Courses (choose one): • Artists’

Books & Graphic Novels • Dance: Technique & Style • Guitar: Musical Performance • Journalism Workshop/The Plant • Multimedia Creation • Sculpture & Creative Expression • Theatre Performance • Voice: Musical Performance


500.D2

500.D3

The study of literature emphasizes the diversity of both the many voices that create stories and the forms, genres and styles they use to tell those stories. Students study drama, fiction, novels, film, essays, and literary criticism and poetics; a wide array of optional courses allow students to enrich and diversify their literary studies through courses in film, popular culture, theatrical and musical performance, the visual arts and other creative arts.

The Languages profile at Dawson offers as many as six languages: Spanish, Italian, German, Greek, Hebrew and Chinese, and students specialize in two or three languages. Typically, students go on to university to study languages, translation, literature, interpretation, tourism, journalism, media and communication studies, and education.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 4

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

Required Courses:

Required Courses:

Required Courses:

Required Courses:

• Languages

• Languages

• Study

• Culture

• Literature

• Poetics

• Literary

Criticism

• Integrating

• The

Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

Choose one:

Literature Profile

& Culture

Humanities French English Profile Recommended Courses (choose one): • Literature

& the Arts * • Classical Music History • Images & Sounds • Philosophy: Ideas & Culture • Stone Age to Renaissance Art Choose one: • Drama * • Alternative

Media • Documentary • Film Styles • Drawing & Creative Expression • Photography: Themes & History Program Option Courses (choose one): • Communication

& Culture

• Computer

Communication of Arts & Literature • Culture québecoise • Exploring Drawing • Intro to Guitar Techniques • Intro to Vocal Techniques • Newswriting • Religion: Sacred Texts & Secular Images • Theatre: Plays & Playwrights

Novel

Physical Education French English Complementary Program Option Courses (choose one): • Digital

Culture • Feature Writing • Guitar: Musical Expression • Music Appreciation • Philosophy, Literature, & Life • Photo Art & Creative Expression • Theatre: Concept & Craft • Voice: Musical Expression • Western Religions & the Arts * Recommended for students who wish to take the maximum number of courses in their own profile or discipline.

Languages Profile

Profile Recommended Courses (choose one): • Creative

Writing * • Animation Production • Philosophy: Communication, Interpretation & Meaning • Communication Practices • Computer Art • Media Production • Printmaking Techniques Program Option Courses (choose one): • Canadian

Art in Context • Computer Graphics & Web Design • Eastern Religions & the Arts • e-Journalism • Guitar: Musical Interpretation • Painting & Creative Expression • Theatre Practice • Voice: Musical Interpretation • La francophonie

Activity

• Creative

Writing Workshop • Theatre of the Western World Physical Education Humanities English Program Option Courses (choose one): • Special

Studies in Literature * • Cinema: Selected Topics • Experimental Film & Video • History of Contemporary Art • Philosophy of Art • Film Theory & Criticism Program Option Courses (choose one): • Artists’

Books & Graphic Novels • Dance: Technique & Style • Guitar: Musical Performance • Multimedia Creation • Sculpture & Creative Expression • Theatre Performance • Voice: Musical Performance • Journalism Workshop/The Plant

Required Courses:

in the Community

Humanities French English • Language • Language

Level I Level I

& Cultural Currents

Physical Education French English Complementary • Language

Level II • Language Level II

of Language

& Media Activity

Humanities Physical Education English Complementary

• Integrating

• Language

• Language

• Language

Level III Level III

OR • Language

Physical Education Humanities English • Language

Level IV Level IV

OR

Level I

• Language

Level II

Program courses Choose one (taken in Term 1):

Students have the opportunity to specialize in two or three languages of the six that are offered:

• Newswriting

• Spanish

• Biography,

• Italian

Autobiography & Blogs • Communication & Culture • Computer Communication of Arts & Literature • Culture québécoise • Exploring Drawing • Introduction to Guitar Techniques • Introduction to Vocal Techniques • Religion: Sacred Texts & Secular Images • Theatre: Plays & Playwrights

• German • Greek • Hebrew • Chinese

(Mandarin)

Students may choose from either option 1 or option 2: • Two

languages to level IV (Spanish, Italian or German

or: • One

language to level IV (Spanish, Italian or German), and two consecutive courses in any two of the other languages

C reative & A pplied A rts

41


500.D4

500.D5

Cinema/Video/Communications Profile

Visual Arts Profile

The Cinema, Video and Communications Profile prepares students for university studies in media, journalism, cinema, animation, film studies, communications, design, art history, and many other emerging arts. Students take 17 concentration courses and a number of courses in Fine Arts, Art History, Religion, Music, Drama, French and Philosophy to round out their profile.

This profile prepares students for university or related studies in fields associated with the visual arts. It provides a broader base of knowledge than the Fine Arts program, allowing for many choices in other disciplines. Many students choose this profile to acquire skills and knowledge necessary for the preparation of a portfolio for further studies related to the visual arts field.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 4

Year 1 Term 1

Year 1 Term 2

Year 2 Term 3

Year 2 Term 4

Required Courses:

Required Courses:

Required Courses:

Required Courses:

Required Courses:

• Scriptwriting

• Multimedia

• Visual

Required Courses (choose one):

Required Courses

• Understanding

Required Courses (choose one):

• Sculpture

• Integrating

Humanities French English

Physical Education French English Complementary

Profile Recommended Courses (choose one):

Profile Recommended Courses (choose one):

• Alternative

• Animated

Media • Images & Sounds

Media * • Documentary * • Film Styles * • Drama • Drawing & Creative Expression • Photography: Themes & History Program Option Courses (choose one): • Biography,

Autobiography & Blogs • Computer Communication of Arts & Literature • Culture québecoise • Exploring Drawing • Intro to Guitar Techniques • Intro to Vocal Techniques • Newswriting • Religion: Sacred Texts & Secular Images • Theatre: Plays & Playwrights

42

Film * • Film & Culture * • Video Workshop * • Literature into Film • Painting: Colour & Composition • Poetics Program Option Courses (choose one): • Feature • Guitar:

Writing

Musical Expression • Music Appreciation • Philosophy, Literature & Life • Photo Art & Creative Expression • Poem & Song • Theatre: Concept & Craft • Voice: Musical Expression • Western Religions & the Arts

• Communication

Studies & Social Issues

• Film

Physical Education Humanities English Complementary Profile Recommended Courses (choose one): • Animation

Production *

• Communication

Practices * Production * • Philosophy: Communication, Interpretation & Meaning • Computer Art • Creative Writing • Printmaking Techniques • Media

Program Option Courses (choose one): • Canadian

Art in Context • Computer Graphics & Web Design • Eastern Religions & the Arts • e-Journalism • Guitar: Musical Interpretation • Painting & Creative Expression • Theatre Practice • Voice: Musical Interpretation • La francophonie

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

Production • Integrating Activity Physical Education Humanities English Profile Recommended Courses (choose one): • Cinema:

Selected Topics * • Experimental Film & Video * • Film Theory & Criticism * • History of Contemporary Art • Philosophy of Art • Special Studies in Literature Program Option Courses (choose one): • Artists’

Books & Graphic Novels • Dance: Technique & Style • Guitar: Musical Performance • Journalism Workshop/The Plant • Sculpture & Creative Expression • Theatre Performance • Voice: Musical Performance * Recommended for students who wish to take the maximum number of courses in their own profile or discipline.

Culture • Stone Age to Renaissance Art Humanities French English Profile Recommended Courses (choose one): • Literature

& the Arts • Images & Sounds • Classical Music History • Philosophy: Ideas & Culture Choose one: • Drawing

& Creative Expression * • Photography: Themes & History • Alternative Media • Documentary • Film Styles • Drama Program Option Courses (choose one): • Biography,

Autobiography & Blogs • Communication & Culture • Computer Communication of Arts & Literature • Culture québecoise • Intro to Guitar Techniques • Intro to Vocal Techniques • Newswriting • Religion: Sacred Texts & Secular Images • Theatre: Plays & Playwrights

• 16th

Century to Modern Art • Interactive Web Art & Culture Physical Education French English Complementary Profile Recommended Courses (choose one): • Painting:

Colour & Composition * • Animated Film • Film & Culture • Literature into Film • Poetics • Video Workshop Program Option Courses (choose one): • Digital

Culture Writing

• Feature • Guitar:

Musical Expression Appreciation • Philosophy, Literature, & Life • Poem & Song • Theatre: Concept & Craft • Voice: Musical Expression • Western Religions & the Arts • Music

& 3D Composition

Physical Education Humanities English Complementary Choose one: • Printmaking

Techniques * • Computer Art * Program Option Courses (choose one): • Computer

Graphics & Web Design • Eastern Religions & the Arts • e-Journalism • Guitar: Musical Interpretation • Theatre Practice • Voice: Musical Interpretation • La francophonie

Activity

Physical Education Humanities English Choose one: • Sculpture

Studio

• Drawing/Painting

Studio

Profile Recommended Courses (choose one): • History

of Contemporary Art * • Cinema: Selected Topics • Experimental Film & Video • Film Theory & Criticism • Philosophy of Art • Special Studies in Literature Program Option Courses (choose one): • Artists’

Books & Graphic Novels • Dance: Technique & Style • Guitar: Musical Performance • Journalism Workshop/The Plant • Multimedia Creation • Theatre Performance • Voice: Musical Performance *  Recommended for students who wish to take the maximum number of courses in their own profile or discipline.


510.A1 P re - U niversity P rogram

Fine Arts

Fine Arts is a two-year pre-university program that prepares students for further studies in the arts. It focuses on painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, computer art, and the history of art and aesthetics. Emphasis is placed on the cultural and historical context of creation, and the communicative significance of images, symbols and visual metaphors. Through training and studio assignments, you will gain an understanding of the formal structure of artmaking in two and three dimensions, as well as concepts which reflect current technologies. Through diverse study methodologies and studio practices, the Fine Arts graduate acquires a discriminating ability for visual expression and creative processes, culminating in the production of a portfolio of original artwork.

What will you learn? • To

use technical processes and procedures to create a piece of art

• To

produce two- and three-dimensional works of art

• To

use the computer to produce artwork

• To

interpret works of art in relation to their original context

• To

recognize works of art made by Quebec artists from different eras

Where will this program lead you? Graduates typically pursue university studies in the arts or education (for example, art history, art education, early childhood education, museology, etc.). Studio work – the production of paintings, drawings, prints, sculpture and multimedia work – is the ultimate goal of many Fine Arts graduates. Other possibilities include careers in art restoration/conservation, advertising, communications, photography, cinema, television and theatre. Some graduates freelance as illustrators or designers.

Additional admission requirements: • Portfolio

review: Eligible applicants will be interviewed and required to present a portfolio of at least 20 recent original works. This portfolio can include drawings, paintings or prints as well as slides or photographs of sculpture or ceramics. Some work should be in colour and at least half should be from direct observation (still lifes, landscapes, figure studies or portraits). Submission of a sketchbook is also desirable. You should not submit your portfolio with your applicants, but you must bring it with you when invited for an interview.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 3

• Visual

Language I (2D & 3D) from Observation • Techniques & Materials • History of Art & Aesthetics I

• 2D

• Drawing

• 3D

Physical Education French English

Physical Education Humanities English Complementary

Studies Studies • Applied Techniques I • Art & the Computer

Year 1 Term 2 • Visual

Language II (3D Design) • Colour I (Design) • Drawing Techniques I • Colour II (Painting) • History of Art & Aesthetics II Physical Education Humanities French English

Year 2 Term 4 • Drawing

II Expression • Sculptural Expression • Applied Techniques II • Art in Quebec • Pictorial

Humanities English Complementary

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

C reative & A pplied A rts

43


561.C0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Professional Theatre Professional Theatre is a three-year career program designed to train students to work as professional actors. The program offers training in a wide range of acting techniques, and allows students to apply acquired skills in classroom workshops, as well as in studio and theatre productions in Dawson’s new theatre.

What will you learn? • To

analyze a script

• To

explore your creativity and imagination

• To

speak effectively, dance and carry out combat sequences

• To

understand the cultural and sociological context of roles

Additional admission requirements:

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

• Audition

• Movement

• Movement

(one Shakespearean monologue, one monologue from any contemporary play and a short, unaccompanied song)

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

• To

create believable characters on stage and before the camera

Where will this program lead you? To work with professional theatre companies and/or in radio, television and film

What do you need to apply to this program? • •

Diploma of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

I • Improvisation I • Voice I • Acting I • Text I • History & Literature of Theatre I French English Complementary

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

IV IV • Acting IV • Acting Lab II • Text IV • History & Literature of Theatre IV • Voice

Physical Education Humanities English

Year 1 Term 2 • Movement

II • Improvisation II • Voice II • Acting II • Text II • History & Literature of Theatre II Physical Education French English

Year 3 Term 5 • Movement

V

• Improvisation

V V • Acting V • Acting Lab III • History & Literature of Theatre V • Voice

Complementary

Year 3 Term 6 Year 2 Term 3 • Movement

III • Improvisation III • Voice III • Acting III • Acting Lab I • Text III • History & Literature of Theatre III Physical Education Humanities English

44

IV

• Improvisation

• Movement

VI VI • Acting VI • Acting Lab IV • History & Literature of Theatre VI • Voice

Humanities


570.02 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Illustration & Design Illustration & Design is a three-year career program that trains students to work as professional illustrators or designers. It concentrates on the development of illustration techniques and visual concepts in distinct areas such as advertising, editorial, animation and technical illustration.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

What will you learn?

• Visual

• 3D

• To

Language I (2D & 3D) • Drawing from Observation • History of Art & Aesthetics I • Technical Drawing I • Materials I • Visual Presentation Design I

Studies • Technical Drawing III • Graphic Research I • Visual Presentation I • Visual Presentation Design IV

Physical Education English Complementary

Humanities French English Complementary

Year 1 Term 2

Year 3 Term 5

• Visual

• History

Language II (3D DES) I (Design) • History of Art & Aesthetics II • Drawing & Rendering • Technical Drawing II • Materials II • Visual Presentation Design II • Colour

Physical Education French English

Year 2 Term 3 • 2D

Studies III • Lighting in Visual Presentation • Visual Presentation Design III • Materials

Physical Education Humanities English

of Commercial Art (Presentation Design) • Technical Drawing IV • Professional Practice • Visual Presentation Design V • Graphic Research II Humanities

Year 3 Term 6 • Visual

Presentation II • Visual Presentation Design VI • Presentation Drawing • Conceptual Drawing • Multimedia

produce a variety of illustrations in media such as pencil, ink, pastels, markers, watercolour, acrylics, etc.

• To

produce computer-generated artwork

• To

complete simple animation projects

• To

produce technical and architectural illustrations from specifications or sketches

Additional admission requirements: • Portfolio

review: approximately 25 pieces of artwork, 10 of which should be in colour. A handout regarding portfolio requirements is available by e-mail or mail. Contact (514) 931-8731 ext. 3200 to order your copy.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

Where will this program lead you? To work in a variety of fields including, advertising studios or agencies, animation studios, art departments of retail stores, architectural and engineering firms, manufacturing industries, printing companies, television studios or for yourself as a freelance illustrator. Some students choose to go on to university for further study.

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Secondary

V Art highly desirable

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570.E0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Interior Design

Interior Design is a three-year career program that prepares students to work as professional interior designers. Graduates may work for interior design firms or related businesses of the building trade. They may also establish their own businesses.

What will you learn? • To

understand and apply design fundamentals

• To

plan two-dimensional space

• To

develop three-dimensional designs

• To

produce technical drawings (by hand and on AutoCAD)

• To

select and apply colour, light, materials, and electrical and mechanical elements

• To

apply relevant laws, codes, standards and regulations

Where will this program lead you? • To

work in interior design offices, architectural firms, the field of interior design contract sales or as a freelance/self-employed interior designer.

Additional admission requirements:

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

• Letter

• Drawing

• Interior

of Intent (to be included with application form)

• Portfolio

(to be submitted to the Interior Design department by the March 1 application deadline)

• Applicants

are required to submit a portfolio of their work consisting of 10 reproductions on 8.5” x 11” format. Include technical drawings, sketching, painting (watercolours, coloured pencils, and acrylic), printing, photography, collage, etc. The portfolio will be evaluated on its creativity, quality and variety.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

• Jobs

typically relate to the design of offices, stores, restaurants, schools, hotels and recreational facilities, and residential design.

• Some

graduates choose to go on to university for further study.

from Observation • Visual Language 2D • Visual Language 3D • Materials I • History of Art & Aesthetics I • Interior Design I • Technical Drawing Physical Education English

Physical Education Humanities French English

Year 1 Term 2

Year 3 Term 5

• History

• 3D

of Art & Aesthetics II II • Interior Design II • Presentation Techniques I • CAD I • Colour & Lighting I • Materials

Physical Education French English

What do you need to apply to this program?

Year 2 Term 3

• Diploma

• Interior

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

46

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

Design IV Documents II • Presentation Techniques III • Building Systems, Environmental Design • Construction

Design III Documents I • Presentation Techniques II • CAD II • Colour & Lighting II • Design Theory: 19th Century to Present • Construction

Humanities English

Studies Design & Construction • Interior Design V • Construction Documents III • Human Factors: Code, Accessibility, Ergonomics • Furniture

Humanities Complementary

Year 3 Term 6 • Interior

Design VI Documents IV • Professional Practice: Theory • Professional Practice: Experience • Construction

Complementary


570.F0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Professional Photography Professional Photography is a three-year career program that trains students to work as photographers. It offers a balance of theory and practice, as well as intensive training in areas such as advertising illustration, editorial photography, photojournalism, portraiture, fashion photography, photo lab technology and electronic imaging.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

What will you learn?

• Image

& Ideas • Photo Studio I • Camera Works I • Digital Lab I • Photo Technologies • Photo Occupation

• Photo

Studio IV • Digital Lab IV • Photo Location II • Concepts in Commercial Photography • Professional Practices I

• To

Physical Education English

Humanities French English

• To

manage, manipulate and archive digital imagery

• To

set up, manage and promote a photography business

Year 1 Term 2 • Imaging

Themes & the Creative Process • Photo Studio II • Camera Works II • Digital Lab II • Imaging

Physical Education French English

Year 2 Term 3 • Dynamics

of Advertising Photography • Photo Studio III • Digital Lab III • Photo Location I • Commercial Photographic Styles Physical Education Humanities English

Year 3 Term 5 • Photo

Studio V • Digital Lab V • Photojournalism • Photo Production I • Production Printing I • Promotion Design I Humanities Complementary

Year 3 Term 6 • Business

Practices • Photo Studio VI • Digital Lab VI • Promotion Design II • Professional Practices II • Photo Production II • Production Printing II Complementary

use professional digital cameras and accessories

• To

use natural and artificial lighting in the studio and on location

• Photographic

techniques and strategies for specific photo specialties

• To

create and design a variety of marketing pieces such as portfolios, websites and books

• To

develop creativity strategies

Where will this program lead you? You will be qualified to work for advertising studios or agencies, public relations agencies, portrait studios, editorial offices of magazines and publishers, photo labs or for yourself as a freelance photographer. Some graduates choose to go on to university for further study.

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

Additional admission requirements: • Applicants

should assemble a portfolio of 20 photographs as a Google Picasa Web Album and “share” it online with the chair of the Professional Photography Department by using photochairdawson@gmail.com in the Picasa web album “share” dialogue box.

• Portfolios

must be shared by April 1st.

• Portfolio

image must be jpeg files with the longest dimension of the image measuring 1600 pixels in length.

• Picasa

and instructions on using Picasa to create and share Web Albums are available at http://picasa. google.ca

• A

letter of intent in the form and an email should be submitted at the same time as the portfolio. Send it to photochairdawson@gmail.com. The letter of intent should briefly describe the applicant’s level of skill, experience and ambitions concerning a career as a Professional Photographer. Please note: applicants should have a basic familiarity with digital cameras and computers.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

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570.A0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Graphic Design Graphic Design is a three-year career program that trains students to work as graphic designers. It introduces you to major movements in art and design, teaches you to communicate effectively using graphics, illustration, photography and typography, and builds problem-solving and project management skills.

What will you learn? • To

produce publications

• To

produce advertising

• To

produce multimedia projects

• To

develop technical production skills

• To

handle multimedia software

Where will this program lead you? You will be qualified to work in graphic design studios, advertising agencies, multimedia studios, publishing houses, printing companies, art departments in large corporations, government agencies or for yourself as a freelance graphic designer. Some students choose to go on to university for further study.

Additional admission requirements:

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

• Portfolio

• Basic

• Semiotics

of assigned pieces of work and a sketchbook that demonstrates that you draw regularly. The assignments will be judged on quality, originality and motivation. Previous visual arts background should include work in various media (pastels, coloured pencils, collage, printmaking, sculpture, photography, ceramics, for example).

• A

handout regarding portfolio requirements is available by e-mail or mail. Contact (514) 931-8731 ext. 3200 to order your copy.

Application deadline is March 1. This program only accepts applications for the Fall session.

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Secondary

V Art highly desirable

Drawing Studies • 2D Foundation Studies • History of Visual Communication • Letterform & Type Studies • Introduction to Page Layout Software • Basic Design Studies • Introduction to Pre-press Procedures Physical Education English Complementary

Year 1 Term 2 • Life

& Still Life Drawing Studies • 3D Foundation Studies • Camera Usage & Processing Techniques • Studies in Expressive Type • Typographic Grids • 2D & 3D Basic Design Studies • Raster Image Scanning & Treatment Physical Education French English

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

Humanities French English

Year 3 Term 5 • Communication

& Management Applications • Teamwork in Video Production • Information Design • Packaging Design • Promotional Design Applications • Multimedia Software Usage • Technical Production for Print • Illustration

Humanities

Year 3 Term 6 • Multimedia • Publication

Year 2 Term 3 • Illustration

Techniques Symbol Design • Lighting in Lens Media • Explorations in Photographic Illustration • Explorations in Type • Design Explorations • Paper & Printing Processes • Pictorial

Physical Education Humanities English

48

in Visual Communication in Printed Illustration • Sequencing in Lens Media • Explorations in Logotype Design • Explorations in Visual Communication • Explorations in Promotional Design • Pre-press Image Treatment • Explorations

Design Identity Design • Promotional Design • Technical Constraints • Design Project Management • Corporate

Complementary


570.C0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

Industrial Design Industrial Design is a three-year career program that trains students to work as professional industrial designers/ technicians or to pursue further studies in design at university. The program concentrates on design development, ideation, sketching, 3D modelling and rendering techniques, presentation and communication skills, ergonomics, aesthetics and technical documentation.

Year 1 Term 1

Year 3 Term 4

What will you learn?

• Design

• Design

• To

identify project constraints

• To

collect and analyze relevant data and information

• To

participate in concept and product development

• To

produce technical drawings

• To

build models

Studio I • Materials and Manufacturing I • Presentation Layout I • 3D Computer Modeling I • Product Design Aesthetics • Prototyping I English Humanities

Year 1 Term 2

Studio IV • Design Studio IV Support • Presentation Layout IV • 3D Computer Modeling IV • Product Ergonomics • Prototyping IV • Product Design Semantics English French

• Design

Year 3 Term 5

• Materials

• Design

Studio II & Manufacturing II • Presentation Layout II • 3D Computer Modeling II • Manufacturing Fieldtrips • Prototyping II English French Humanities

Year 2 Term 3 • Design

Studio III • Design Studio III Support • Presentation Layout III • 3D Computer Modeling III • Materials, Processes & Sustainable Design • Prototyping III English Physical Education Complementary

Studio V Technologies • Art and Aesthetics in Product Design • Product Usage & Demographics • Product Optimization • Product Costing • Manufacturing

Humanities Physical Education

Year 3 Term 6 • Design

Studio VI • Professional Portfolio • Presentation Layout V • 3D Computer Modeling V • Prototyping V Physical Education Complementary

Where will this program lead you? • To

work in consumer product design consultancies, aviation/transportation industries, toys and sporting equipment, model-making and prototyping, lighting exhibitions and displays, and packaging design manufacturing companies.

• To

pursue further studies in related fields such as undergraduate studies in industrial design, architecture or engineering, and computer modeling and animation.

What do you need to apply to this program? • Diploma

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

»» Secondary

V Second Language

»» Secondary

IV Science

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

• Science

555-404 or 557-406 *

• Mathematics

564-506 or 565-506 *

* For students graduating before June 2010 or from an Adult Education Centre, the pre-requisites are Physical Science 534 and Mathematics 436.

Application deadline is March 1. This program accepts applications only for the Fall session.

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49


574.B0 C areer / T echnical P rogram

3D Animation & Computer Generated Imagery 3D Animation & Computer Generated Imagery is a three-year DEC program offered at Dawson since Fall 2008. It is the only program of its kind in an English-language CEGEP in Quebec. This innovative course of study will teach you to apply academic, technical and general education skills to enter the workforce as a 3D computer graphic artist as part of a production team in the animation industry.

What will you learn? • To

analyze the characteristics and requirements of a project

What do you need to apply to this program?

Year 1 Term 1

Year 2 Term 4

• Diploma

• Perspective

• Storytelling

of Secondary Studies (DES), including:

»» Secondary

V Language of Instruction

• To

produce a prototype or layout of the animation

»» Secondary

V Second Language

• To

model characters, props and the environment

»» Secondary

IV Science

• To

apply textures and colors to the models

»» Secondary

IV Mathematics

»» Secondary

IV History

• To

add lighting to the scene; animate the characters and incorporate other graphic elements to render the final versions of scenes and characters

• To

produce digital visual effects and compositing, and work with motion capture data

Where will this program lead you? The 3D Animation and Computer Generated Imagery program is designed to facilitate entry into a career as a 3D computer graphic artist in the 3D animation industry. Upon graduation, graduates may choose to work as part of a production team as one of the following specialists: • Modeller:

translating concept art into 3D models of creatures, humans, and other physical objects, like vehicles, furniture, trees, buildings, using 3D application software.

• or

academic background judged equivalent to the DES. Students with a DES missing any of the above subjects may be admitted, space permitting, but may be required to complete remedial courses.

Additional admission requirements: • Portfolio • Letter

Drawing test

Application deadline is March 1. This program only accepts applications for the Fall session.

• Animator:

applying movement to human and animal models infusing them with subtle gestures and personalities. Animators can also animate other objects such as vehicles and spacecraft.

• Texture

Artist: putting the final touches on gray scale models. Texture artists design the visible surfaces that cover the architecture, environments, creatures and objects.

• Lighting

and Visual Effects Specialist: creating the ambiance in an animated film. These specialists are called upon to create the effects of light and shade that make sets look real. Special effects animators produce special effects, such as tornadoes, or asteroids, simulating the actions of air, fire, water and wind.

50

of Intent

• Entrance

For more information about these programs visit dawsoncollege.qc.ca

Drawing Techniques • Drawing Anatomy & Expression • History of Visual & Graphic Arts • Introduction to Preproduction • Principles of Animation I • Introduction to 3D Animation Physical Education English Complementary

Year 1 Term 2 • Sculpting

Human Anatomy • History of Film Production Techniques • Principles of Animation II • 3D Animation Techniques • Digital Video & Photography • Sketching Techniques for Animation • Digital Colours & Textures Physical Education French English

Year 2 Term 3 • Controlling

3D Movement Design • Matte Painting • Virtual Worlds • Modelling Props • Lights, Camera & Rendering I • Character

Physical Education Humanities English

Techniques in Animated Films • Expression & 3D Movement • Storyboard • Character Modelling • Character Rigging • Lights, Camera & Rendering II Humanities French English

Year 3 Term 5 • Acting

for Animation Effects • Non-linear Sound & Video Editing • Preproduction • Production Pipeline • Character Animation I • Visual

Humanities

Year 3 Term 6 • Postproduction

of Visual Effects Project • Character Animation II • Career Development • Production

Complementary


Special Areas of Study Some students choose to direct their studies toward specific disciplines or themes. Dawson offers the following five choices:

Reflections

Jewish Studies

This course of study provides a small-group approach to concentrated study in the liberal arts. It offers challenging seminars in English, Humanities, Psychology, History and complementary courses. The courses are designed to provide students with general knowledge and skills appropriate to most university arts and social science programs.

This course of study aims to familiarize students with the contributions of the Jewish people to the world’s religions, thought, philosophy, languages, literature, and political theory. The courses highlight both universal and unique elements of the Jewish experience, and are designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills appropriate to a variety of university programs.

Women’s Studies This course of study addresses the social, psychological, spiritual, economic and political realities of women’s lives throughout history and in many cultures. Courses are offered in disciplines as diverse as English, Psychology, Humanities, History and Art History, among others. The courses are designed to provide students with general knowledge and skills appropriate to most university arts programs.

New School

Hellenic Studies This is an interdisciplinary grouping of courses designed to help students develop an understanding of Greek language, traditions and history, which are at the root of Western civilization. Students take specially selected courses and participate in the varied activities of the Hellenic Studies Centre. Those who complete the prescribed number of these courses are awarded the Hellenic Studies Certificate upon graduation.

This course of study is based on the principles of humanistic education. The course grouping offers credits in English, Humanities, Religion, and other disciplines when available. Previous graduates have established themselves in professions and careers as diverse as law, medicine, education, social work, business, film-making, writing and publishing, research, art, theatre, communications, and a variety of community-based jobs.

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51


Graduation Each year Dawson graduates approximately 2,500 students. The annual Convocation ceremony is held in June at Place des Arts, where graduates, family and friends are invited to celebrate the success of the graduating class in the presence of Dawson faculty, administration and governance.

Along with the presentation of diplomas and awards, the evening includes an address from a distinguished guest. Speakers have included Professor Stephen Toope, Father Emmett “Pops” Johns, Richard Pound, Stephen Lewis, and Danièle Sauvageau, Head Coach of the first Canadian Olympic hockey team to win gold in 50 years.

52


Helping You Succeed


Helping You Succeed Dawson has been graduating students for over 40 years. In that time, we have developed important tools to help you succeed in your CEGEP education. These are some of the services we offer our students.

Academic Advising

Student Affairs

Dawson’s academic advisers answer all kinds of questions every day. Questions like, will I find CEGEP difficult? Do I need Math for CEGEP? If I am in a technical program, can I still go to university? What do I need to register for next semester? Can I take university pre-requisites while I am doing a technical program? How do I get into business studies at university?

The staff of Student Affairs provides advice and support to students, and designs activities that enrich academic and extracurricular life at Dawson College. The philosophy of Student Affairs is to focus on student development beyond the classroom through activities that offer educational, recreational and leadership opportunities.

Academic advisers offer an important service to students, whether you are applying to CEGEP for the first time or wondering where your college choices will take you. Advisers provide information to students on academic matters and assist with all facets of educational planning. Potential students have the opportunity to see advisers at high school visits, application workshops, the College Open House or at drop-in times.

Among the activities coordinated by Student Affairs are student leadership, awareness and educational opportunities, campus entertainment, academic and computer support, student exhibitions and special events.

There are three ways to meet with an adviser:

The Dawson Student Union (DSU) represents all students at the College, with elected members working on your behalf. The student union has representation on the Board of Governors, Senate, Student Services Council, among others, giving students a voice in school policy‑making.

• Individual • For

appointments

quick questions, there are drop-in hours on most days

• Advising

workshops

Academic Advising also arranges for universities to visit Dawson each semester to help students with their university planning. Universities from Quebec, the Maritimes, Ontario, British Columbia and the United States come to the College every year. Making effective use of the Advising service is the key to success in college. For more information or to speak to an adviser, please call 514 931-8731, ext. 1176.

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Dawson College Viewbook

Student Government

The DSU provides services to students, such as peer tutoring, and funds campus activities from the student activity fee, such as clubs, associations, committees, special events, and the student newspaper and campus radio station. Students are encouraged to drop by the DSU offices at the top of the escalator on the second floor to learn more about their student union.

Getting information about what you need to know at Dawson College Inside Dawson College, there are bulletin boards all around the school, electronic TV screens throughout the building with continuous information about class cancellations, deadlines and activities. The information booth at the top of the escalator on the second floor has qualified staff to help you. That’s where you can pick up the Daily Bulletin that lists events in and around the College, and important deadlines for course change, course drop, attendance verification, awards and scholarships, and other useful information. The Dawson website is available 24/7 to give you information of all kinds. The Plant is the student newspaper published weekly during the school year; the student radio station CIXS broadcasts daily in common areas.

Counselling and Career Development The professional counsellors who staff the counselling centre are available to help you with social, academic and career development, such as adjustment to college life, managing stress, and resolving conflicts. They can also provide support for students with family or personal problems. Another important tool at your disposal is the Career Resource Centre, where you can consult college, trade school and university directories and calendars. You can also get information about summer travel/study, work and volunteer projects in Canada and abroad.


Academic Skills Centre

Library

Student AccessAbility Centre

Everybody needs a little help with their studies sometimes, especially in the transition from high school to college. The Academic Skills Centre can assist you in improving learning, reading and writing skills.

The Dawson Library is unlike any library you have ever seen. The building was the home of the teaching order of sisters, the Congrégation-de-Notre-Dame and the library used to be the chapel, you shouldn’t be surprised to see cathedral ceilings, ornamental lighting fixtures, stained glass and even organ pipes. But, the 100-year old chapel is completely wired for the latest in library technology and offers students a wide range of books, MP3s, audio and video material, CD-ROMs, audio CDs, DVDs, periodicals, magazines, and other specialized materials.

Students who require specialized services and are registered for either full- or part-time studies are eligible for assistance. Services for hearing, visual or motor/coordination impairment, documented learning disability or chronic medical condition are available. Students who have temporary disabilities resulting from accidents or illness may also use the service.

You can meet with Academic Skills Centre staff on an individual basis, or in small groups for workshops to help you identify your needs or so they can suggest ways to improve your academic performance. Students can also take computer-aided instruction in the Centre’s study room. If French is your first language, and you think you might need some additional help adjusting to English-language instruction, turn to page 56 for more information.

Peer Tutoring At some point in your studies, you may feel you need extra help with a particular subject or course. Dawson’s peer tutoring program can pair you with a tutor to help you succeed in a wide range of subjects. Applications are available through the Academic Skills Centre.

The Mentor Program Sometimes you just need a place to go, to ask a question or just to sit down and talk with someone who will listen. Dawson’s mentor program aims to provide such a place by pairing up new students with a teacher or staff member who has volunteered to help them through the transitional first semester.

The Main Desk, a large reading room, carrels equipped with multimedia equipment, as well as most of the specialized collections, are on the first level. The Reference Desk, book stacks, reference collection, periodicals (paper and microfilm), computers, photocopiers, microfilm readers and printers, as well as reading and study areas, are on the second level. There are also several areas for group study and a newspaper reading room located on the upper level. Dawson On-Line Library System (DOLLS) is the library’s Web-based catalogue, accessible via the Internet at dolls.dawsoncollege.qc.ca. It provides access to the library’s collection as well as to its database subscriptions, the Internet, and other resources available via the Web.

Ombuds Services Ombuds Services provide an independent and confidential service to ensure that every member of the Dawson College community receives fair and equitable treatment within the College system. Qualified Ombuds staff hear student concerns and are in a position to investigate complaints, facilitate or negotiate a resolution, advise students and teachers on College policies, and assist students in meeting their obligations and ensuring that their rights are respected, especially through the appeal process of a decision on any academic or disciplinary matter.

Students who require specialized services should inform the College before registration so that the necessary resources are made available to them, such as pre‑registration, access to specialized equipment, exam services and note-takers.

Student Health Services A full-time nurse staffs a drop-in centre you can visit if you are not feeling well or if you have any health questions or concerns you want to discuss. The nurse is available for consultation on health counselling and education programs for individuals or groups. Referral to other agencies or appropriate medical specialists can be arranged.

Locker/Lock Rentals Small, large and portfolio lockers are available to students at a nominal fee with the rental of locks. It is recommended to apply for lockers early as there are many more students than there are lockers. It is best if you double up with a friend.

Housing Dawson College has no on-campus residences, but Student Affairs does provide some assistance to students seeking housing.

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Améliorez vos connaissances Les étudiants de niveau collégial qui éprouvent des difficultés dans leurs cours ont souvent besoin d’aide supplémentaire, et surtout à la transition du secondaire au cégep. Le rôle du Centre d’aide pédagogique à Dawson est d’aider les étudiants à améliorer leurs connaissances, et accroître leurs capacités à lire et à écrire l’anglais. Les étudiants peuvent rencontrer le personnel et les tuteurs du centre sur une base individuelle, ou dans de petits groupes et ateliers.

Nous travaillons avec les étudiants pour identifier leurs besoins et pouvons suggérer plusieurs façons d’améliorer leurs performances. Les étudiants peuvent utiliser notre salle d’étude et ses ordinateurs

Le tutorat de pair en anglais : Les étudiants inscrits dans la section du cours d’anglais BXE qui prépare des tuteurs sont jumelés à des étudiants qui souhaitent améliorer leurs habiletés de parler, lire et écrire l’anglais. L’étudiant aidé s’engage à participer chaque semaine à une rencontre individuelle d’une durée d’une heure.

Nos services réguliers incluent :

Les ateliers d’anglais : Des petites sessions de groupe se réunissent régulièrement pour aider aux étudiants à améliorer leurs capacités de parler l’anglais.

Les heures du « Drop-in » : Les étudiants qui ont des questions qui n’exigent que de brèves réponses ou de petits conseils peuvent rencontrer un professionnel sans rendez-vous n’importe quand entre 11 h 00 et 15 h 00. Les rendez-vous individuels : Les étudiants peuvent fixer un rendez-vous avec un professionnel du centre pour discuter et travailler sur des projets de formation particuliers. Les tuteurs en anglais : Des sessions individuelles peuvent être prises tout au long de la journée avec des professionnels qui sont engagés spécifiquement pour aider les étudiants à organiser leurs devoirs et à atteindre un niveau passable d’écriture et de rédaction.

Les groupes « Speak / Read / Write » : Des petites groupes informels se réunissent régulièrement pour aider aux étudiants d’anglais langue seconde ou francophone à améliorer leurs compétences an anglais. La préparation pour l’examen ministériel d’anglais : Les étudiants qui se préparent pour l’examen ministériel sont invité participer a une série d’ateliers qui sont offertes dans le mois précédant l’examen. Stratégies d’étude : Des sessions individuelles et de groupe sont offerts à travers le semestre qui traitent de la gestion du temps, de la prise de notes, des techniques d’apprentissage, et de la préparation aux examens. Le tutorat par les pairs : Des tuteurs qualifiés fournissent de l’aide aux étudiants inscrits dans des cours spécifiques tels que les mathématiques, les sciences, les sciences humaines, les langues, et plusieurs cours spécialisés comprenant l’administration des affaires, l’informatique, la technologie de l’électronique et les soins infirmiers. Les tuteurs de pair travaillent avec les étudiants individuellement. De l’instruction de groupe dans certaines matières est fournie.

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Dawson College Viewbook

Pour apprendre plus au sujet de nos services, entrez en contact avec le Centre d’aide pédagogique 514 931-8731, poste 1488, ou par courriel au : asc@dawsoncollege.qc.ca, ou consultez le site Web du centre au : dept.dawsoncollege.qc.ca/lc/index.html Les heures d’ouverture du Centre (Salle 4E.3) sont les suivantes : Du lundi au jeudi de 8 h 30 à 19 h 00 vendredi de 8 h 30 à 16 h 30


Fees, Financial Aid & Employment Tuition is free for Canadian citizens or landed immigrants with permanent residence in Quebec taking at least four courses per semester or 180 hours. There is a non-refundable $30 application fee and about $200 in student activity fees are charged to each student per year.

Books and supplies cost between $500 and $1,000 per year, although materials for the visual arts tend to be more costly. The Financial Aid Department provides financial assistance services to students who are enrolled full-time in a program at Dawson College. Loans and bursaries help students who wish to study full-time, but who do not have the financial means to do so. Students registered on a full-time basis in a program (minimum of 180 hours per semester) may apply to the Quebec Loans and Bursaries Program. Applications may be submitted throughout the year; however, it takes approximately six to eight weeks to process applications for the Fall or Winter semester.

To Qualify for Financial Assistance You must be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, and be a resident of Quebec to qualify. Similar aid is available from your home province or state if you are not a resident of Quebec. Application forms for government aid are usually available in April for students planning to attend Dawson College in the Fall. Throughout the semester, you will find selected information pertaining to Financial Aid on the Financial Aid Bulletin Board and advertised in the Daily Bulletin. The deadline for application is March 31 of the current academic year. A valid Dawson College ID card is necessary for any disbursement of funds. It is recommended that students fill out applications early. Forms, deadline dates, information, and assistance can be obtained through the Financial Aid Office or by telephone at 514 931-8731, ext. 1186.

Student Employment

We have students experiencing all levels of financial need, and a significant number of them rely on the support of the Financial Aid Office. Whether it’s government loans, emergency funds, or even just a nutritious snack, we do what we can to allow them to focus on their studies, rather than money problems.” Yvonne Dudley, Dawson’s Financial Aid Officer

The Student Employment Centre assists students in finding employment, either for part-time work on and off campus, or for permanent positions, particularly for graduates in the technical programs. Employment counsellors provide students with information regarding the job market and can help you develop job search skills, including resumé writing and interview techniques. All government programs geared to helping students find summer employment are publicized through the Centre.

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Athletics Dawson College has one of the largest Athletics programs in Canada. With 20 intercollegiate and competitive teams, there are approximately 400 athletes who call themselves a 'Blue'. The on-campus facilities are among the best in Quebec, offering a wide variety of recreational programs. Be healthy, be proud.

Our teams Basketball Dawson's men are ranked as the number one CCAA team in Canada, having represented Quebec at least 15 times at National competitions, coming home with five National titles. The Women’s team has come into its own with two consecutive National bronze medals and is looking forward to joining our men’s rankings as one of the top teams in Canada.

Hockey The Dawson Women’s Hockey team was started in 1998 as a club team and has since gone on to capture one gold and two silver medals at the Provincial Championships. Rosters have included Olympic Gold Medalists Marie-Philip Poulin and Catherine Ward. The Dawson Men’s Hockey team was reintroduced in 2011 as a club team.

Soccer The Dawson soccer program has grown to be one of the best in the province. In 2010-2011, the men’s soccer team captured the title of Provincial champions for the first time and the women’s team placed first in the season and captured the silver medal at the Provincial championship.

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Basketball Men’s Div 1

Women’s Div 1

Men’s Div 2

Women’s Div 2

Men’s Div 3

Hockey Women’s

Men's

Soccer Men’s Div 1

Women’s Div 1

Catherine Ward (left) and Marie-Philip Poulin, who both attended Dawson and were on the Dawson Blues women’s hockey team, went on to win gold medals with the Canadian national women’s hockey team at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. Poulin scored both of Canada’s goals against the US team in the final winning game.

Men’s Div 2

Volleyball Women’s Div 2

Multi Co-ed

Rugby Men’s

Women’s

Badminton Mixed Div 2

Rowing Team

Lacrosse Men’s

Cheerleading Div 2

Cross Country & Track and Field Team

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Frequently Asked Questions

Why choose Dawson?

Can I visit the school?

How do I get to Dawson College?

Dawson College was the first English-language CEGEP when it was founded in 1968, and is today the largest English-language college in Quebec and the largest in the CEGEP network.

Yes, it’s the best way to really get a feel for the place. Here are a few options:

Dawson College is centrally located in downtown Montreal. We have entrances at 3040 Sherbrooke West and 4001 de Maisonneuve West, between Wood and Atwater.

We offer a wide range of programs, covering just about every field you might be interested in as a career or for further study at university. We have interesting courses, great student life, a spectacular library and other facilities, like labs, gyms, fitness and combat rooms with the latest in technology and equipment. We’re centrally located downtown. In bad weather, you can step right out of the Métro at Atwater and into the building without ever having to go outside. But when the weather is good, you will want to take advantage of a fantastic green campus. Dawson College is designated a CÉGEP-Vert meaning that our environmental policies meet stringent green criteria for recycling and environmental initiatives. We have great teachers, dedicated staff, and thousands of graduates who have gone on to great careers, or to university, and then on to great careers.

Open House is the day we throw open the doors for the whole community. You can visit the building, try out the facilities, look at the displays, talk to teachers and current students, participate in activities and ask advisers for tips on choosing a program. Open House will be held on Sunday, October 23, 2011. If you miss Open House, we conduct tours of the College throughout November. Ask the guidance counselor at your high school to arrange a tour or call 514 931-8731, ext. 1275. If that’s not possible, you can visit on your own or with your family by checking in with Admissions (2D.6) or the Communications Office (4A.1). If someone is available to lead a mini-tour, we will be happy to do it. It’s best to call ahead though. Remember that you can only drop in on days when the College is open and you cannot skip school to come to visit. Each February, Dawson holds a special information evening for students considering applying to CEGEP by the March 1 deadline. Visit the school speak to teachers and advisers, and current students. The special session will be held on Wednesday, February 8, 2012 between 4 and 7 p.m. Public Events at Dawson College: You can come to Dawson to watch sports events, to visit the art gallery, to attend guest lectures, or to participate in special activities organized for the general public. Or you can catch a play in the new theatre on campus.

The Atwater Métro station on the Green Line is directly connected to Dawson. In the ticket hall, you will see the entrance to Dawson. There are several bus lines that serve the Atwater Metro station. For a full list, go to stm.info. We don’t recommend taking a car because parking can be a real challenge, but if you must, Dawson is easily accessible via the Ville Marie Expressway (Aut. 720) at the Atwater exit, or by one of the two major arteries that bound the College building, de Maisonneuve Blvd. and Sherbrooke Street.

What is student life like at Dawson? Dawson College offers individuals and groups a wide range of services, programs and activities, from academic support to recreation. Check the website at dawsoncollege.qc.ca for information about athletics and recreation, student services and student affairs, student government (DSU), and different kinds of activities.

What kind of help is available to me at Dawson should I need it? Dawson College can help you if you encounter specific problems in your academic or personal life, or just provide you with information to make your time with us less stressful. See the section called “How does Dawson help you succeed?” in this viewbook to read about all our services or check the website at dawsoncollege.qc.ca.

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Dawson College Viewbook


What programs does Dawson offer? The CEGEP system offers full-time students two options: threeyear Career/Technical programs or two-year Pre-University programs. At Dawson, we offer 20 career programs that prepare you for an exciting career or open the door to further studies at the university level, which in some programs is made easier through special agreements with certain universities. Dawson’s Pre-University programs are among the finest in the network. These programs can prepare you for university studies in any discipline that can then lead to a rich and fulfilling career in any field. All our programs are described in this viewbook and you should go to the website at dawsoncollege.qc.ca for more information. We also offer credit courses through Continuing Education and non-credit courses through the Centre for Training and Development. Consult the website for more information about these courses.

How can I prepare for my future after Dawson while I am still a student? Successful students prepare in advance for what comes next in their lives. At Dawson, we have several resources to help you plan for a future at university or in the workplace. Students interested in learning more about career planning should visit Counselling & Career Development in 2D.3. For educational planning, students may take an appointment with academic advisers in 2D.4 and for students who would like to consult college, trade school and university directories and calendars, they should visit the Career Resource Centre in 2D7.

If I don’t have all the pre-requisites for the program I’m looking for, how do I get them? Specific pre-requisites of Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics or Physical Science can be taken at a CEGEP, Continuing Education, in high school, or at adult education centres. Please note that students cannot use the courses taken at a CEGEP to complete their Diploma of Secondary Studies. If you are currently in high school, please contact your guidance counsellor as soon as possible to be able to complete the pre‑requisites of the program of your choice.

If I don’t have all the pre-requisite courses for the program I selected, can I complete them during the summer?

When is the deadline to submit an application for a DEC program? The deadline to submit an application for a DEC program is March 1 for the Fall session, and November 1 for the Winter session. Please ensure that your application is submitted by the deadline. Applications received before or by the deadline are given first priority for admissions to programs, provided they meet all the admission requirements. Some programs do not accept applications for the Winter term. Consult this viewbook or the website to make sure you don’t miss the deadline.

I am not from Quebec – what should I know before I can apply to Dawson College? Consult the website at dawsoncollege.qc.ca, search Admissions to find the information you need, or call 514 933-1234.

Yes you can, but you need to remember that: The summer session is very short and intensive, and some courses may not be offered during that session, or you may not find space available in a given course. If you are applying to a competitive program, there is a risk that the program will be filled before the summer session is over. Priority is given to applicants who have completed or are in the process of completing all the pre-requisites by the time they submit their application.

The Student Employment Centre assists students in finding employment, either for part-time work on or off-campus, but also for permanent positions for graduates in the career/technical sectors. The Centre is located in 2E.7.

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This document is produced by the Communications Office of Dawson College. For more copies, contact 514 931-8731 x1032. Editor Donna Varrica Design Tom Crilley, Visual Communication Source Photography Roger Aziz, Myriam Galarneau, Jonathan Perlman

About this Viewbook The information contained in this viewbook was as accurate and complete as possible at the time of publication. Dawson College reserves the right to make changes to various fee schedules, courses, programs and College policies without prior notice. Prospective students should consult the website regularly for important updates: dawsoncollege.qc.ca


Dawson Viewbook Dawson College 3040 Sherbrooke St West Montreal, Quebec H3Z 1A4 T 514 933 1234 dawsoncollege.qc.ca

Dawson College Viewbook 2012-2013  

Dawson College Viewbook 2012-2013

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