Issuu on Google+

THE

Davis

Wildcats look for revenge Against East High, Page B1

Clipper 50 Cents

10 years of beauty at Lamplight Gallery, Page C1

Vol. 120 No. 47

Davis County gala Page A3

Thursday, SEPT. 15, 2011

Familiar faces draw for voters Incumbents fare well in several council primaries BY MELINDA WILLIAMS

with 72 votes did not make it past the primary.

Clipper Staff Writer

MAP of alternative routes A and B for the West Davis Corridor. Courtesy art

New road alteratives may save homes BY MELINDA WILLIAMS Clipper Staff Writer KAYSVILLE — More than half the homes slated to be demolished in west Kaysville and Farmington to make room for the West Davis Corridor would be saved under a proposed plan unveiled by the Utah Department of Transportation last week. That’s good news for residents in the two cities where 137 upper-middle class homes were in danger of being torn down to make room for the four-lane highway. However, some residents are still wary, given the alternatives are not final. Kaysville Mayor Steve Hiatt said in the original alternatives, the Utah Department of Transportation had designated some lands as wetlands, which “after further study were determined not to be wetlands.” Under the new plan, the corridor will be built west of the power lines through Kaysville, the area the city originally set aside for the four-lane road. “We’re happy about (plans for the road to be built west of the power lines), but those plans still are not final, so we’re still holding our breath,” said Kaysville resident Julie Olsen, who was among protesters at a meeting held in February at the Legacy Events Center. Olsen’s home was not one slated to be demolished, but others in her neighborhood were. Hiatt said that after the original alternatives were announced, residents in the area got together, telling UDOT officials they didn’t think the area was all wetlands. “To UDOT’s credit, they listened,” Hiatt said, and conducted additional studies. UDOT worked with the Army Corps of Engineers and Environmental Protection Agency in the study. Hiatt is adamant that the city doesn’t want wetlands forgotten. “We want to protect the wetlands and wildlife habin See “NEW ROAD” p. A4

DAVIS COUNTY— City council incumbents fared well in south Davis County in Tuesday’s primary election, with incumbents in five cities advancing to the general election slated for Nov. 8. While primary elections generally don’t bring out as may voters as general elections, Centerville’s primary seemed to have drawn the most interest among voters with 13.7 percent of all registered voters showing up at the polls. The following is a list of the cities and the candidates: In each city, three council seats are up for election.

In Fruit Heights, council candidates were chosen Tuesday night by the city’s local Sagebrush and Pinecone parties. Winning from the Sagebrush party were incumbent Craig Hill, Diane Anderson and James Biorge. Candidates selected by the Pinecone Party include incumbent Chris Christensen, Michelle Cox and Ilene Moss. The six will run for three open council seats. Kaysville: Ron Stephens (I), 796 Susan Lee, 767 Mark D. Johnson, (I) 738 Ronald Barton, 694 Brett Garlick (I), 620 Orwin F. Draney, 550 Richard D. Rosier with 361 votes, Stroh L. Decaire with, 269 votes and Christine Nielsen, with 70 votes, did not advance.

Centerville: Lawrence Wright (I), 599 John T. Higginson, 552 Kay Ashton, 449 Kevin Daly, 471 Annadel Nelson, 416 Ken Averett (I) 410 McKay Christiansen, with 380 votes, will not advance to the general election.

West Bountiful: James Ahlstrom, 312 James Bruhn (I) 243 Debbie McKean, 187 Scott Strong, 173 Laura Charchenko, 136 Alan Malan, 95 Steve Schmidt with 80 votes, and Brady Tracy, with 54 votes, lost their bid for city council seats.

Farmington: Nelson Michaelson, 410 James M. Young, 368 Cory R. Ritz (I), 339 Dustin Siler, 274 Tyler Turner, 143 Justin LeCheminant, 76 Raymond M. Walsh,

SHERRI STRINGHAM, with daughters Amanda and Kyra (in stroller), casts her vote at Centerville Elementary Tuesday. The Centerville primary drew the most response out of any in the county, bringing out more than 13 percent of voters. Photo by Louise R. Shaw

Location change sought for transfer station BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer

NORTH SALT LAKE — Though a transfer station is still likely coming to North Salt Lake, its exact location is still up in the air. After protests from the city about the intended location, 1080 W. Center St., city and Wasatch Integrated Waste Management district officials have drawn up an agreement that allows six months to look for an alternate location that would work for both parties.

Index

“I think it’s in everyone’s interest,” said North Salt Lake Mayor Len Arave. “They’re trying to provide a service that would be very good, but a transfer station at that location would be adding to a problem we already have.” The problem for city officials is the current amendments to the general plan that the city is working through, which have been shaped with resident input throughout much of this past year. Some of the goals for the new general plan include

Business............................... B8 Calendar.............................. C2 Church life........................A15

revitalizing the city’s major thoroughfares and bringing in more commercial areas, and North Salt Lake’s west side has been one of the major areas of focus. “We think it will be a decent commercial hub,” said Arave, who added that the city is working with UDOT to get the area a connection to Legacy Parkway as well. At the moment, however, the real question is zoning. Wasatch Integrated bought the property for the transfer station two years ago for $1.8

Davis Life............................. C1 Horizons............................A10 Health............................... B10

million, intending to build a facility that would offer source separated recycling, household hazardous waste drop-off, electronic waste drop-off, solid waste drop off, and the compost/wood chip sales for all south Davis cities except Bountiful (which is in a separate district). Though the area is zoned for incinerators – Stericycle is nearby – it isn’t specifically zoned for transfer stations. “If we’re going to try and n See

“LOCATION” p. A4

Obituaries.........................A13 Sports.................................. B1 Youth..................................A9


A2

1

Briefs CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Police seek man who led chase

WEST BOUNTIFUL — Deputies are still looking for a man who led them on a high speed chase on Monday. Davis County Sheriff’s Sgt. Susan Poulsen said that police haven’t found Chad W. Palmer, 29, of Morgan, who they say led deputies on a chase in which speeds exceeded 100 mph. Poulsen said Palmer is wanted after a deputy signaled Palmer to pull over for traffic violations in West Bountiful. “He didn’t pull over, instead he just took off,” Poulsen said. Deputes chased Palmer onto I-15 heading south, where he was driving on the shoulder in the dirt, Poulsen said. He then cut across the freeway in front of a semi-truck. At that point deputies ended the pursuit. A warrant has been issued for his arrest on the chase, and a second warrant was issued after Palmer failed to appear in court on unrelated charges. He is described as 6-feet tall, 170 pounds, with blue eyes and brown hair, was driving a 2005 blue Monte Carlo. Anyone with

will be the featured guest at an open house set for Tuesday, Sept. 20 in Centerville. The public is invited to meet the governor and ask questions from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Centerville Library, 45 S. 400 West.

information on Palmer’s whereabouts is asked to call 801-451-4151.

2

Freeze may face federal charges

FARMINGTON — A former South Davis Metro Fire Agency captain won’t be arraigned until Oct. 6, as federal charges could be filed in the sex abuse case against him. Bradley Dean Freeze, 42, Centerville, a 15-year veteran of the fire service, was in 2nd District Court Monday, where he waived his preliminary hearing. Freeze faces three firstdegree felony counts of aggravated sexual abuse of a child and two seconddegree felony counts of sexual exploitation of a minor. Court documents indicate that a girl, younger than 14, told her mother that Freeze had inappropriately touched her and took photos of her over the course of 11 months beginning in September 2010. He also allegedly had the girl touch him inappropriately. He is being held in lieu of $100,000 bail. Freeze resigned from the fire agency

5 Cones and cars continue Kaysville tradition Cool cars and cold cones kept both sides of Main Street in Kaysville hopping last week, continuing a tradition that evolved from a neighborhood party to a city event. For many years, Gordon Christensen once invited neighbors over to celebrate the creation of the ice cream cone. That later morphed into a city-wide party, with cars added to the mix. This year, while the Glass Onion, an Ogden band, entertained car aficionados, scouts from Troop 518 scooped cones on the city block east of Main (above). Photo by Louise R. Shaw two weeks ago.

3

Trial set for local man Jan. 11

FARMINGTON — Andrew James Lukenbach, accused of assaulting his wife with nunchucks, will

go to trial Jan. 11. Lukenbach, 30, is charged with two counts of aggravated assault and one count of domestic violence in the presence of a child, all third-degree felonies. He was in 2nd District Court on Monday. The Centerville man was arrested June 11 in front of his home after he allegedly hit his wife and her male friend. Police say

three children, ages 7, 10 and 11 were home at the time.

4

Open house features governor

CENTERVILLE — Governor Gary Herbert

Northam arrested for gunfire

KAYSVILLE — A man who allegedly fired a 9mm handgun inside a garage here last week was arrested on misdemeanor charges. Police say that Jeremy Nelson, 24, was arrested on charges of reckless endangerment and discharging a firearm inside the city limits. Police were called to the home on Thursday after residents called saying they could hear gunshots. When police arrived, they reportedly found 10 shell casings — five inside, and five outside the garage. Nelson allegedly told police the gun had jammed and he was trying to clear it. He was arrested without incident and later bailed out of jail.


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

News

A3

Gala fetes county, helps fund 4-H All-day softball to raise funds

BY LOUISE R. SHAW

Clipper Staff Writer LAYTON — Mayors and commissioners, business owners and school officials, state leaders and county supporters dressed up and stepped out to help Davis County children last week. Built around a “glitz and glam” theme from old Hollywood, the eighth annual Davis County Gala also had a philanthropic aim: to benefit the county’s 4-H after school programs. “It’s my personal philosophy that it’s better to put prevention before intervention,” said Rachel Rudd, USU 4-H extension agent, in thanking participants and donors. “If we catch kids early, it’s an investment in our kids’ future. “I wish we could always have a parent at home,” she said, “but 62 percent of families have both parents working. “We try to supplement some of the learning after school and give them somewhere they can go.” Classes offered through the program range from cooking and sewing, to robotics and sciences such as the study of wind power. “It’s overwhelming,” she said, of the large crowd and the donations. “We’ll work to make the best better.” The evening also included a tribute to Haven J. Barlow, who was honored with the “Heart of Davis” award for his contribution

CENTERVILLE —A softball tournament to benefit Davis Education Foundation will run throughout the day Saturday, Sept. 17, at Centerville Softball Park. The “Midnight madness” event, this year titled “Go mad or go home,” is sponsored by MountainStar Lakeview Hospital and runs from 10 a.m. to midnight. Teams can sign up in a “just for fun” category, or as serious competitors, with a prize of $1,000 set for the winners in the

FUNDS RAISED at this year’s Davis County Gala were dedicated to after school 4-H programs. Cooper Carlston was one of two youngsters representing Davis County students in accepting $10,000 donations from Target and Chevron. Photo by Louise R. Shaw to the county. “He does what needs to happen,” said Louenda Downs, commission chair, in presenting the award. “No one has contributed more, no one is more deserving.” Barlow served in Utah’s Legislature for 42 years, representing Davis County in both the House and Senate and supporting many developments and improvements in education and applied technology. He said he was humbled by the award, and thanked his friend and associate, Wayne Winegar, for his

work in ensuring completion of the road to Antelope Island, what some had called at the time, “the road to nowhere.” Barlow was honored in program notes for his “lifelong dedication toward making Davis County a better place to live and to work,” and for being “a tireless advocate and support for a great variety of worthwhile projects, people and causes.” More than 700 people attended this year’s gala, and county officials said that while the numbers are still being tallied, they expect to raise around

New jobs being created in county BY TOM BUSSELBERG

Clipper Editor FARMINGTON— At about 7 percent, Davis County’s unemployment rate is more than 2 percent lower than the national average, and also below that of the state. But Davis County Economic Development Director Kent Sulser wants to see it much below that. He continues to work with officials from the county’s cities and others to create SURE or “job ready” sites that can quickly be developed by a business. Pointing to a map of the county during a recent interview with the Clipper, he said “each year we’re seeing new housing smattered all over.” Emphasizing he’s not opposed to more places to live, he said “we’re trying to prevent so much commuting,” provide more “life-sustaining jobs” and “job centers” for residents. That’s in an effort to counter the current need for 46 percent of residents to leave the county every workday for jobs, mostly in Salt Lake County. “If we did nothing, it (vacant land) would all fill up with houses,” Sulser

said. In conjunction with cities, five economic development-related districts have been created. Those include Station Park in Farmington, and related development, from new housing to retail and office space – a project that can readily be seen from I-15 that has received lots of attention. The adjacent Park Lane Commons, which will include professional office space, is the site of “really strong activity, some interest already” from potential tenants, Sulser said. That category would also include the Larry H. Miller Megaplex theater development in Centerville, which is due to open soon. Not so noticeable is the 900 acres near the 500 South Legacy Parkway interchange. That project is a partnership between Woods Cross and West Bountiful, as well as Davis County. It has been designated as a CDA (community development area), with tax increment financing to support business growth. The Eaglewood Village development on U.S. Highway 89 in North Salt Lake has curb, gutter, roads and other infrastructure in

place, as the Clipper has previously reported, with no “building permits” yet announced, Sulser said. “Marketing material” is being provided for that development, Sulser said, with it geared to a campus setting for digital media, IT, and small to mediumsized businesses, with limited commercial/retail spaces. Others include the mammoth Falcon Hill Business Park, where construction continues on a multi-story building that will house an aerospace manufacturer tied to the base, with work expected to start soon on a security forces building nearby – with more anticipated to be announced shorty, Sulser said. The Eagle Gate Business-Research Park is developing, as well, in northeast Layton. There is also a business park area in South Weber and about 1,100 acres in Syracuse, West Point and Clearfield that is available for development. “In regard to project development, Davis County is the only county where we need to enlarge our (Rocky Mountain Power service) capacity,” said Steve Rush, Northern Utah RMP manager.

$40,000 through the event. Both Target and Chevron were honored for donating $10,000 each to the afterschool programs. lshaw@davisclipper.com

competitive category. Winners playing for fun, will be treated to a pizza party. Proceeds of the event will go not only to the education foundation, but to local high school programs, to support programs not paid for with tax dollars. More information on shirts, teams, food and prizes associated with the tournament is available at www.lakeviewhospital. com. lshaw@davisclipper.com


A4

News CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Park donation funds improvements Location change sought BY LOUISE R. SHAW

Clipper Staff Writer KAYSVILLE — Upgrades to Heritage Park, which would otherwise have been out of reach for the cash-strapped city, are now in the works thanks to an anonymous donation. “It was really probably one of my greatest surprises,” said Vance Garfield, parks and recreation director for the city. “You never get that phone call.” But when it did come, with an offer that now stands at $280,000, it marked the largest donation Garfield ever remembers. He said the family told him, “We love Kaysville and we want to give something back to the community that has given so much to us. We trust you and we know you’ll do the right thing with our money, we just want to help families.” After looking at options and price tags, the family opted to fund restrooms and a splash pad for the park. “We’ve always dreamed of a splash pad at Heritage Park,” said Mayor Steve Hiatt. “Kaysville leaders are fiscally conservative, and we knew the only way this dream would become

PLANS FOR A SPLASH PAD and restrooms in Heritage Park are coming to fruition thanks to a large donation from a family that asked to remain anonymous. Photo Courtesy a reality is through contributions.” Much of the park has been built by degrees thanks to donors, including trees and benches that line the park that are dedicated to family members or organizations. Just over a year ago, Zions Bank made the

walking trail and lighting around the park possible with a $100,000 donation. Further plans include a playground and pavilion. Garfield said the parks department hopes to have work on the new improvements completed by Memorial Day and open for the city’s second Arts

New road alteratives may save homes in Kaysville Continued from p. A1

tat,” he said. Those living on Kaysville’s west side, said they purchased their homes with the understanding the West Davis Corridor would be built to the west of their homes and the power lines. While the original plans called for demolition of up to 137 homes, that number has dropped to between 42-69 with alternative A and 25-44 using alternative B. “The feedback (received from residents) has been very helpful, as we tried to minimize the impacts,” said Randy Jefferies, UDOT project manager. In addition to thousands of comments received through the process, UDOT formed residential working groups in areas with homeowners’ associations, and sought representatives in areas without associations. “We learned a lot and feel better about the alternatives,” Jefferies said, adding UDOT was able to incorporate some of the suggestions they received into the plan.

One of the proposed alignments would have the West Davis Corridor connected to Legacy Parkway at Glovers Lane. The other would have them connect at Shepard Lane. Hiatt supports the Glovers Lane proposal, pointing out that alternative would endanger no homes, while the Shepard Lane alternative would take out 12. The Glovers Lane alternative would affect 10 additional acres of wetlands, but Hiatt said the owner of the Buffalo Ranch area wants to sell UDOT 75 acres of wetlands, netting UDOT 65 acres. Hiatt also said that with the Shepard Lane proposal, the corridor would be an elevated highway, “and no one wants to live with a highway above their home.” With the Glovers Lane alternative, “There would be more wetlands and the homes would be saved,” Hiatt said. The Glovers Lane alternative would give the cities, “the best of both worlds.” UDOT will now begin to prepare the draft Environ-

mental Impact Statement and develop plans for the road. Jefferies said both alternatives will be studied in the draft EIS, along with a third, “no build alternative.” Jefferies emphasized that no decision has been made and that UDOT staffers will continue to meet with residents, cities and farmers as the process continues. The draft EIS will be available to the public in the summer of 2012, and the final decision on the road won’t come until 2013. “With each step we get closer and closer to the final plan. “The bulk of the work will be done between now and 2012,” Jefferies said, as his team works on the EIS, and later develops plans for the road. Even then, the road may face a budgetary roadblock. Currently, there is no funding designated for the project, nor is there any guarantee the money will be there when UDOT is ready. “We’re doing the environmental study in good faith,” Jefferies said.

We LOVE our carriers! The entire Clipper staff would like to thank our army of hard-working, dedicated newspaper carriers. We appreciate all that you do!

Thank you!

r

Clippe

Readers, if you’d like to pass on a kind comment or thank you to your carrier, please e-mail Jorgina at jhancock@davisclipper.com. She’ll make sure they receive your message! Tips are always appreciated, too.

If you’re interested in becoming a carrier, please call 801-295-2251 ext. 120 or email jhancock@davisclipper.com

in the Park held in June. “We’re doing a lot of research, a lot of fact finding,” he said, before taking the final plans to the city council. Splash pads, where jets of water shoot up in different types of spray and features, can either utilize recycled water or go to drains. Recycled water requires extensive monitoring and filtering to ensure its purity, much as with a swimming pool, Garfield said. They found in Alpine, a system that passed the water through but pumped it into the secondary water system for sprinklers, an idea that he said got their interest. “We couldn’t be more pleased with this very generous contribution to Heritage Park,” said Hiatt. “It is just another testament to the wonderful things happening in Kaysville City. This family has come in and made the impossible, possible. To top it off, they want to remain anonymous, which is the purest form of charity.”

for NSL transfer station

Continued from p. A1

redevelop the west side, we don’t want to continue having things we really don’t want there,” said Arave. Wasatch Integrated’s executive director Nathan Rich said that he doesn’t see much of a difference between an incinerator and a transfer station, but agreed to both the delay and an optional six month extension. “It’s less intrusive than a smoke stack,” said Rich. “But I don’t want to fight with a member city.” The agreement also states that, if the transfer station site remains in the city, Wasatch Integrated would be held to current zoning standards rather than any changes made in the current crop of amendments. Arave said that the city already has a few other possible locations for the transfer station in mind, though they haven’t

The property • The site originally planned for the transfer station is at 1080 W. Center St. • The waste district paid $1.8 million for the property two years ago. yet been discussed with Wasatch Integrated. If no agreement is made after a year, however, Wasatch Integrated’s conditional use permit will be restarted along the process and will be dealt with purely on zoning terms. “We’ll have done our due diligence,” said Rich. “I do think the services we’re talking about will be services that all the people of South Davis County will be interested in.” Tom Busselberg contributed reporting


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

‘No Parking’ signs to be installed BY TOM BUSSELBERG

Clipper Editor BOUNTIFUL — Some Bountiful LDS Temple patrons may have to walk a little bit farther, soon. That’s because the City of Bountiful is due to post signs asking that temple visitors not park on the east side of Bountiful Boulevard from the cul-de-sac on the north to the first road that comes around behind the temple. Tuesday night, the city council approved sign placement following complaints and a petition from several Bountiful Boulevard residents. “With the closing of the Ogden Temple, the number of potential patrons has nearly doubled,” City Engineer Paul Rowland said. That traffic increase is coupled with LDS Church work on the temple parking lot. “There will probably be about four signs,” said City Council member Tom Tolman, who also chairs the city’s safety committee. “We’re hoping the good temple patrons will pay attention to that. It won’t

Clipper Staff Writer

do anything with the west side. People can still park on the west,” he said. “We just need to be sensitive to residents’ needs.” Parking can encroach on homeowners’ ability to get into their driveway, or make it impossible for postal carriers to deliver mail, he said. “The residents will know it’s not enforceable. We have no idea who parks there, whether they go into the temple or not. There’s going to be no way

to enforce that. It’s just an honor thing,” Tolman said. “They’ll (temple patrons) be made aware when the signs go up. The city is paying for them. If that (honor) system doesn’t work, we may have to do something else.” That could mean working with the temple president to have the Bountiful Boulevard gate closed until the Ogden Temple re-opens in a couple years, Rowland said. “We did that on the west

side of Temple View Drive (about 11 years ago), and it seemed to curtail those activities very well. It’s not like there isn’t enough parking. There’s plenty underneath (in underground parking) and above,” Tolman said. “It’s convenient (to park on Bountiful Boulevard), because there’s a gate in front of the temple on that east side, instead of walking a few hundred yards with parking on the north side,” he added.

Hatch: Prez ‘doubling down on same policies’ BY TOM BUSSELBERG

Clipper Editor WASHINGTON, D.C. — “His (jobs) plan is nothing new. It doubles down on the same policies,” Sen. Orrin Hatch said Wednesday morning. In a statewide newspaper and radio press conference, he said “when the New York Times has a front page story saying his (President Obama’s) plan won’t help job creation, we’ve got a real problem (that paper is generally perceived as pro-Democrat). Speaking of some of the specifics in the President’s plan, Hatch said “tax hikes on energy producers, that was defeated by Democratic lawmakers from energy-rich states. “We should make it (energy costs) less expensive, if we want to keep our

top position in the world,” Utah’s senior senator said. As far as taxing the wealthiest Americans, Hatch recalled that “last December the President said we should not be raising taxes on anyone with the economy as weak as it is. “Unemployment is at 9.1 percent (nationally), and the economy is terrible. (Some) 800,000 small businesses would be affected” by a tax hike. “To me, that’s crazy,” he said, especially as they are reportedly responsible for creation of about 70 percent of the nation’s jobs. The President should sign trade agreements with South Korea, Colombia and Panama, that have “languished” for the past four years, Hatch said, adding, “That would create about 250,000 more jobs and provide a $14 billion

net worth to the economy.” Asked by the Clipper about what seems to be deadlock in Congress, centered more on politics than the public good, the veteran of nearly 35 years in Washington said: “There are an awful lot of partisan battles. That’s been the case since the beginning of the country. “There is an awful lot of partisanship back here right now. Right now the attitude is that you shouldn’t compromise on anything,” Hatch said. “We intend to win this,” he said of seeking a seventh term next year. “Utah will never get another chair of the finance committee,” a post he could acquire with a Republican Senate majority. “That’s where all these problems are (handled),” Hatch said, referring to everything from Medicare

The Davis Clipper Clipper Publishing Co., Inc.

Circulation Department: 801-295-2251 ext 119 or 120 Didn’t get a paper? Please call before 2 p.m. Friday for a replacement: 801-295-2251 ext. 119 Volume 120 Number 47 September 15, 2011 THE DAVIS CLIPPER (ISSN 1061-1223) is published once weekly, on Thursday, for $35 per year by Clipper Publishing Co., 1370 South 500 West, Bountiful, UT 84010-8141. Periodicals Postage Paid at Bountiful, UT and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Davis Clipper, Circulation Department, P.O. Box No. 267, Bountiful, UT 84011-0267.

MAIN TELEPHONE............ 801-295-2251

FAX LINE......................... 801-295-3044

ADMINISTRATION R. Gail Stahle............... Publisher/ext. 114 John Buist............................. CFO/ext. 117

ADVERTISING Reed Stahle........Ad Coordinator/ext. 137

EDITORIAL Tom Busselberg.................Editor/ext. 118 OFFICE Annette Tidwell..... Office Manager/ext. 113

PRODUCTION Clark Stahle....Production Manager/ext. 116 CIRCULATION Jorgina Hancock....Circulation Mgr./ext. 120 Cindi Scott..... Subscriptions Mgr./ext. 119

and Medicaid spending to Social Security.

A5

Police looking for man accused of stealing safe BY MELINDA WILLIAMS

NO PARKING SIGNS will be installed by Bountiful City on the east side of Bountiful Boulevard in the Bountiful LDS Temple area, after complaints from some area residents. Photo by Louise R. Shaw

News

FARMINGTON — A warrant has been issued out of 2nd District Court for a man police believe stole a safe containing nearly $200,000. Wayne Jerry Clark, 24, Salt Lake City, has been charged with seconddegree felony theft and burglary of the safe and money from a West Bountiful garage. Court documents say Clark is suspected of helping Steven Kent Hogge, 41, of Murray take the safe on Sept. 1. Hogge appeared in 2nd District Court earlier this week, also with theft and burglary charges. He was arrested and booked into the Davis County Jail and later posted a $10,000 bail. A third suspect, Joshua Watts, 19 of West Valley City, was arrested last week at a Layton area motel on the theft and burglary charges. He was also released from jail after posting a $20,000 bail. A probable cause statement says Watts went to the victim’s home on Aug. 31 with two others. On Sept. 2, the two others and the

victim told him about the burglary. Watts denied being involved, but said Clark had told him about a “big job,” and wanted to know “if he was in.” Clark denied any involvement when he was interviewed by police. The two who told Watts about the burglary called police on Sept. 7 to say Watts had been flashing $100 bills around. According to the probable cause statement, Kaysville Police and officers from West Bountiful were at the Kaysville police station that same day, when a man anonymously turned in some receipts. The man said a couple had checked into a Layton hotel, paying cash for the room. The court documents say the couple had neither a car or luggage. That evening, hotel staff called police when Watts checked back in. With a search warrant, police found new clothes, electronics and other merchandise. They also confiscated 13 $100 bills allegedly found in Watts’ pants. Watts told police Clark and Hogge gave him the money to keep him quiet. mwilliams@davisclipper.com


A6

Viewpoint CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Inside story

Davis County is a job creation area

D

economic development avis County appears director, and Marlin Eldred, to be a veritable jobdepartment assistant, have creating machine. worked hard to include all In the last eight months, cities in a pro-active process. nearly 6,000 new jobs have That has meant creating been added to the county’s SURE sites, or those areas job force. That’s either through expansion of existing that are prime for development for manufacturing, businesses or the arrival of commercial, office or retail new enterprises. uses. And while the county’s When the Governor’s joblessness still stands at Office of Economic Develabout 7 percent, that is still opment contacts the county better than the state level, about possible sites, it can which is just a bit higher. quickly draw on this ready And it certainly portrays a much better employment pic- reference of possible places. ture than the national average “There have been thousands of acres of ground of 9 percent-plus, and even that have been rezoned with higher in some areas. the intent to Credit for preserve for this job growth, development,” of course, must Sulser says. be attributed to “Davis many different County is movpeople, agening forward in cies and factors. great strides As was with support noted in a Tuesfrom local comday afternoon munities we meeting of the are positioning Davis Uniourselves for fied Economic new growth; we Development are a big part of group (DUED), just being in TOM BUSSELBERG the Utah story,” he adds. Utah, these days, Clipper Editor Earmarkhelps attract potential expanding businesses. ing of those sites has helped stem piecemeal subdivision That’s because of such development. Yes, housing is often repeated factors as vital. But now there is also a the relatively high educaplace in the planning fabric tion level attained by many residents, the work ethic, and to provide what hopefully will be life-sustaining jobs, cheap electric power. close to home. It also helps that the County commissioners typical Utah/Davis County wage rate is about 10 percent have also put their weight behind economic developbelow the national average. ment, creating such grassThat helps make the state roots groups as DUED. Its very “business friendly.” members range from bank But Davis County and presidents to the chamber of its 15 cities also work very commerce CEO, contractors, closely on seeking to bring education and government new business to the county, as well as assist the backbone officials, to the convention & visitors bureau CEO. of business that is already As noted in a news article here. in this issue, such develop It’s just another positive ments as Farmington Station reason for which the county and the Larry H. Miller is known — as a place that Megaplex, along with others, works together rather than are not the norm, either in North vs. South or one city Utah or across the country. against another — as often In fact, Steve Rush, the happens in other places Northern Utah manager for across the state. Rocky Mountain Power, who Creation of the Davis also is a Layton resident and County Department of very involved in the county, Community & Economic cited the county’s growth as Development several years a reason the utility needs to ago showed commitment by county leaders to building the continue to upgrade its power supply network and infraarea’s jobs and tax base. structure. Being such a residential/ Davis County is taking bedroom community means pro-active measures in line a greater portion of the with the growth in population property tax burden is borne by homeowners than in many it has experienced. It still can be a “bedroom community,” other counties, such as Salt but also provide the jobs, recLake or Weber, which have reation, and services needed more of a manufacturing/ retail and industrial tradition. for a population that now exceeds 300,000 people. Kent Sulser, the county’s

Letters policy

All letters must (1) be signed, (2) be brief (generally under 300 words in length) (3) list the author’s city, and (4) give the writer’s telephone number. We reserve the right to edit all letters for length or content. For letters arriving by e-mail, we will use the author’s e-mail address in lieu of a signature. Letters without proper identification will not be printed.

Cyclops

Here are other sensible actions The views expressed in this column are the opinion of the writer and not necessarily those of the ownership or management of this newspaper.

A

t a time when many of us shake our heads at some of the reports we hear on the news or comments made on talk radio, it’s refreshing to mention sensible actions. Last week, for instance, I gave credit to Attorney General Mark Shurtleff for supporting the Washington, D.C. directive to focus the illegal immigration fight on gangbangers and criminals, not the cook in the local restaurant or the family picking peaches in Brigham City. (A handful of you objected, saying this sets a precedent. But our police officers already have set this standard, placing a greater emphasis on locking up murderers than on motorists who drive 10 miles over the speed limit. We utilize our resources and our manpower on areas we deem most important.) Here are other recent examples of actions that make sense: CANCELLING CLASSES ON MAJOR FOOTBALL WEEKNIGHTS – When the University of Utah football team plays a home Thursday night game, the transportation system becomes clogged

and parking becomes a nightmare (along with the fact that many students opt to attend the game and miss the course). With more than 40,000 people driving to the game (and searching for parking) or taking student space on TRAX, the university decided to cancel afternoon and evening classes on the one or two nights a season when the Utes play a weeknight home game. Despite the howls of a few professors who think their words of wisdom are more important than anyone else’s, the new policy makes perfect sense. Missing one class in an online age is not going to plunge a student into illiteracy; any good professor can fine-tune his or her lesson plan. In previous times, the public school system cancelled classes for “deer hunt day,” recognizing that a large number of students would miss class anyway. The university policy on Thursday football is a similar, sensible step to solve a problem. POLICE STILL FOCUS ON JOSH POWELL IN SUSAN POWELL’S DISAPPEARANCE – The Powells think they are being “picked on,” but I cannot fault law enforcement. There is no inkling that Susan left on her own accord. Women don’t normally desert their

BRYAN GRAY young children, and fathers don’t typically cart their 2-year-old and 4-year-old sons on a camping trip in freezing weather. Combine that with a tense marriage and a fatherin-law who creepily admits to “flirting” with the missing woman, it is not surprising that police are putting their money on the Powells rather than Big Foot or the Green Lantern. KEEPING ‘COMMUNITIES OF INTEREST’ INTACT FOR REDISTRICTING – In other words, the “Donut Hole” approach makes more sense. The idea, for instance, of putting Bountiful and Rose Park in a Utah Senate district is pure gerrymandering; the residents have little in common socially, politically, or income-wise and this move would disenfranchise Rose Park voters. Similarly, rural Utahns deserve a rural representative, not a Salt Lake City lawyer. The Cyclops Column will continue to be a Common Sense Zone where realism and pragmatism are rewarded.

Letters Thanks for Clipper support Editor: Dear friends at the Davis County Clipper, thank you very much for your support of the 23rd Bountiful/Davis Summerfest International. Your support has made sure that Summerfest was a great success this year. The Davis County Clipper has been a valuable partner of Bountiful/ Davis Art Center in bringing Summerfest

to the community. Your support is much appreciated and we hope that you receive a measure in return for your generosity. Certainly it is gratifying to bring such a wonderful cultural arts event to the community. The lives of 20,000 people have been enriched because of our combined efforts and the ripples of friendship and goodwill touch almost every corner of

the world and return back to us again. Thank you for your part in presenting such a positive experience for the international performers from Australia, Basque France, Bulgaria, Indonesia, Italy and Romania and for the volunteers and attendees of the festival. The coverage of the festival was particularly grand this year. Thanks to Jennifer Wardell and

Rob Miller for all their capable assistance. I’m sure this coverage makes a huge difference in the attendance at the festival. We look forward to working with you again next year as we prepare for the 24th year of the festival. Emma J. Dugal Executive Director Bountiful/Davis Art Center


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Letters Solar panels may not bring savings Editor: In the Sept. 1, 2011 issue of The Davis Clipper, there was an interesting reporting by Tom Busselberg on how Weber State University (WSU) will be saving us money by installing solar panels. While the subject of the article was solar panels, the article highlighted what is wrong with our education system and our Congress. According to the article, it is estimated that the panels will save the school $4,000 in electrical bills each year. However, I didn’t see a word on what it will require to maintain the system. As with all outdoor systems, one can expect damage to the panels from the elements such as wind, hail, snow and the sun. Also don’t forget the normal electrical mortality factors. And they do need to be cleaned periodically to keep the efficiency up. Thus, I would estimate the yearly return on the system to be considerably less than the $4,000 quoted. The life of the system was not mentioned, but I would expect it to last at least 10 years. Assuming we have a perfect system with no failures and that it lasts 10 years, the savings should reach $40,000. This sounds

like a great accomplishment until one reads the whole article and realizes that the cost of the system was $136,000. Of course the WSU officials will be quick to point out that the money to build the system didn’t come from Utah taxpayers. From whence did the money come? Oh yes, a dysfunctional Congress that spends money it doesn’t have and one that strongly encourages utility companies to finance loss programs like this. One would thing our clueless educators must have skipped Economics 101. I would go so far as to hypothesize that the money for the system came from Utah taxpayers via Federal income taxes and local utility payments. It gives one a warm angry feeling to know that there are those who take our money and think nothing about blowing it. Willey Sutton would be proud of WSU. Remember the quote, “You can fool some of the people all of the time and all the people some of the time but you can’t fool all the people all the time”. Maynard B. Morris Kaysville

Cannon off mark with school lunch Editor: I was appalled to learn that Peter Cannon in his bid for the legislative seat representing Fruit Heights suggested that children receiving free lunch at schools receive only peanut butter sandwiches for their lunch in place of the regular hot lunch meal.

Even more appalling is that he lost his bid for office by a single vote!  What is happening to the voters in Davis County that they would even consider electing such a Scrooge as their representative ?   Athleen B. Godfrey Bountiful

No need to be afraid of snakes Editor: I think that people have no reason to be afraid of snakes. Some people think that snakes are creepy because of the fact that they have no arms or legs. Some think that they are scary because of what they eat or they think that snakes are slimy. Snakes are living things and like most living things they have to eat. What they eat might seem nasty to us but to them it could be like us eating ice cream. Snakes aren’t actually

slimy they actually have thousands of tiny scales that provide a small bit of protection. These scales are on soft skin so they won’t feel very hard but it protects them from rocks pretty well. The way they are shaped also makes them look slippery or slimy. Next time you see a snake think of them as something you shouldn’t bother but you shouldn’t be scared of them either. Richard Deinert Bountiful

Appreciate dignified anthem Editor: Thank you to the young lady from Farmington, Tori Allen, who sang the Star Spangled Banner at the Davis County Fair Rodeo Saturday night, Aug. 20, 2011. That

was the first time I have heard it sung with dignity and respect for 20 years, instead of sounding like a wounded hyena. Rex Gibson Bountiful

Opinion/News

A7

Possible cougar sightings in Bountiful BY TOM BUSSELBERG

Clipper Editor BOUNTIFUL— Several cougars have “reportedly” been seen in Bountiful. But whether what people think they’ve seen (or more often heard) is actually a cougar or not is still in question, two officials said early this week. “Over the last several weeks we’ve had several calls. We’ve responded, but people are not sure what they’re hearing,” said Wildlife Specialist Arlo Wing with the Division of Wildlife Resources. “We’re not getting it (information) first-hand. We’re getting it second or third-hand,” he said. For example, one man “insisted” he “heard something hit his fence and land on the other side,” but could provide no evidence. About two weeks ago, the neighbor of someone who claimed to “have seen a cougar lying in their yard” called Bountiful Police, who reportedly couldn’t find a cougar. A DWR technician searched, as well, and a camera was installed, all showing nothing. “We weren’t able to confirm” that there was a cougar sighting, Bountiful Police Chief Tom Ross said. “It’s unusual to have an animal come that far into the city limits. Typically they’re found more in the foothills (if at all) in the ‘B’ area,” and in the past have been seen east of Bountiful Boulevard. Ross said such reports typically are, at most, one

THOUGH POLICE and DWR techs haven’t yet been able to confirm them, the city continues to get reports of cougars in the Bountiful area. Stock photo or two a year, and may only occur once every two years or more. City Manager Tom Ross also said he’d heard of reports of a sighting by Tolman Park, one south of Bountiful Ridge Golf course, and another near Millcreek Reservoir. “The chance of an attack (by a cougar) is pretty slim,” Wing said. “You’re more likely to be attacked by a neighborhood dog than a cougar. “What we need is if people actually see one, to give us a call as soon as they see it,” he emphasized. “Up and down the Wasatch Front, people call us two or three days later. There’s not much we can do” at that point, Wing added.

Presidential hopefuls don’t get it Editor: Have people noticed that the eight GOP wannabe president hopefuls’ debates have all focused on the economy, unemployment, and job creation to the exclusion of the no win, deadly, super expensive wars in Iraq and Afghanistan initiated by G.W. Bush and sustained by Barack Obama? Don’t they realize that there is no way the economy can be fixed or spending curtailed as long as we’re spending billions a year on these fruitless wars? Why, even I can figure this out. Also, notice that Bush clone, Texas governor Rick Perry jumped to the top of the polls immediately upon entering the race. What this means is that he will be the GOP presidential nominee backed by big business, Texas oil money, and the Tea Party movement, i.e., the same people that got G.W. Bush the presidency. Perry and The Tea Partiers are all anti-

letters@davisclipper.com

health care, anti-Social Security, anti-union, anti-global warming, etc., i.e. everything the GOP and big business stand for. Utahns Romney and Huntsman just don’t get it. The American people will not tolerate a Mormon GOP nominee much less a Mormon president. Romney should have learned this the last time he tried it. Gil Montano Layton

During business hours, people should call the Ogden DWR office at 1-801-476-2740, or their police department if it’s after hours. Information about what to do if you meet an aggressive cougar is provided by the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, which says they rarely cause problems for humans. But if they do: • Do not run from a cougar. Running will provoke an instinctive response and the cougar may pursue you. • Make yourself look intimidating. Make eye contact with the cougar, which cougars consider a threat. Make yourself look big by opening your jacket, raising your arms and wav-

ing them. Speak loud and firm to the cougar. • If you have children, pick them up. Try to pick up children before they panic and run. When you are picking children up, keep eye contact with the cougar and try not to bend over too far or turn your back to the cougar. • If you’re attacked, fight back! Protect your head and neck, as the neck is the target for the cougar. If the cougar thinks it is not likely to win its fight with you quickly, it will probably give up and leave. In addition, DWR advises making your yard “deer proof.” If landscaping is attractive to deer, cougars will follow the deer and hang close to your property.

Clearfield City seeking commission members CLEARFIELD — City officials are currently seeking those who might be interested in joining the city’s parks and recreation commission board. The Commission is made up of up to nine appointed Clearfield citizens and acts as the eyes and ears of the community for issues that pertain to parks and recreation. Commissioners are ap-

pointed by the Clearfield City Council and serve a three-year term. There are currently four openings on the Commission. If you are interested in being appointed as a Commissioner please submit a letter of intent to Eric Howes, Community Services Director, 55 S. State Street, by Friday, Oct. 21, 2011. news@davisclipper.com

Family Vision Care of Bountiful is proud to announce that Dr. Adam Rudd has joined our eye care practice! d • Dr. Dr. Adam Rud

70 North Main Street Bountiful, Utah 84010 801-292-1408

Daniel Pace

Our family serving your family since 1967

Present this coupon and recieve 15% off exam and glasses or $25 off non prescription sunglasses when you order a one year supply of contact lenses!* *When paid in full at time of service. Other restrictions may apply. Expires September 30, 2011


A8

News CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Event to help teen receive needed transplant BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer

KAYSVILLE — Even hope needs all the help it can get. This Saturday, county residents can offer that help during a full-day benefit event set for Sept. 17 from 8 a.m. to noon at Davis High School and restarting again at 6:30 p.m. at the Ed Kenley Amphitheater in Layton. The event, which will feature a fun run, auctions, bake sales, a car show, a concert, and plenty of other activities, will raise funds to help ease the costs of a bone marrow transplant for 18-year-old cancer patient Daniel Leech. “It’s hard enough to face cancer once, let alone relapse and have to do it again,” said Sheila Leech, Daniel’s mother. “He’s astounding.” The transplant, which is scheduled for Sept. 21, will cost roughly $250,000 even with the family’s insurance. The Sept. 17 event, which is being organized with the support of the non-profit group Anything for a Friend, will start with a fun run at 8 a.m. (registration

DANIEL LEECH with his family’s pet dogs during a break from the hospital. The benefit event will raise funds for his bone marrow transplant. Courtesy photo for the run starts at 7 a.m.), at Davis High. Breakfast will follow at 9 a.m. Afterward, there will be a variety of auctions and raffles, along with a bake sale, a kids’ corner, and a car show. The Utah Jazz bear is also expected to make

Alice Wynn, LPC announces the addition of

Glen Hammond, LPC Ryan Sowell, MSW, CSW

Sunrise Therapy Counseling all ages for: • Anxiety and panic • Depression • Post Tramatic Stress • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder • Addiction • Sexual Abuse • Grief and Loss • Domestic Violence • School Adjustment and Success • ADHD and Asperger’s Syndrome Group Therapy for: • Social Skills for Youth • School Adjustment and Success • Trauma Survivors • Life Changes • Grief and Loss • Addiction

845 S. Main, Suite A-3, Btfl.

801-298-0232

Leave a message if we are in session.

an appearance, and there will be a balloon launch as well. Lunch will also be available for purchase, and

debit cards can be used in all areas of the event. At 6:30 p.m., the event will move north to Ed

Kenley Amphitheater with a concert by the bands Code Blue and Midlife Crisis (both of which include local doctors among the band members). Tickets are $5, and can be purchased at the door. Daniel, who has Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), was first diagnosed with the cancer in July 2007 and started his high school years while undergoing chemotherapy. He was taught at home during ninth grade, then went to school part time during 10th and 11th grades. He was officially declared in remission in late 2010, and was hoping to be able to focus on the rest of his senior year. Unfortunately, he relapsed in April, and has spent all but about four weeks since then in the hospital. “Through his determination and the support of his family and teachers, he graduated with the rest of his class,” said his mother.

The cancer and other medical issues have made the last few years less than easy for the family, but with the relapse this past summer it has been especially difficult. Sheila has been coming home from the hospital at 5 a.m. to shower, change, and head for her job, after which she immediately turns around and heads back for the hospital again. “I wouldn’t have it any other way,” said Sheila. “I have to be with him.” Daniel, who also recently earned his Eagle, will have to go through several days of radiation and preparation for the transplant surgery. Still, the people around him help him continue to push forward. “I have been blessed to have a very supportive and caring family,” said Daniel. “I don’t know what I would have done without them.” jwardell@davisclipper.com


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

In Education

training for teachers. She says test scores from China can’t be compared with U.S. scores, KAYSVILLE — When because students who Sharon Gallagher-Fishdon’t do well academically baugh talks about educaare tracked into technical tion, she uses the words professions rather than “collaboration” and “colcontinuing education. laborative” a lot. “We are educating Gallagher-Fishbaugh is every child not the president just top stuof the Utah dents. That’s Education what makes us Association great,” she said. (UEA), and Gallagherwas in Davis Fishbaugh County redecries the cently to meet amount of time with teachers teachers must and admintake out of istrators at class time for several schools, testing, when and to discuss they could be the needs in teaching. education. “We need to “Teachbe afraid,” she ers are under said. “We’re abattack,” she solutely focused said. “They’re on the wrong working as things.” hard as they SHARON GALLAGHER-FISHBAUGH, president of UEA, talks with Aaron Hogge, In defending possibly can principal at Centennial Junior High in Kaysville, and Joel Briscoe, executive director a criticism levconsidering the of DEA recently, as the UEA Road Trip toured Davis County. Photo by Louise R. Shaw eled at educaconstraints. Utah tor’s unions, teachers do so money the state provides work together collaboraGallgher-Fishbaugh denies much under such difficult per pupil stays at the tively rather than have to that the union protects bad circumstances. We have charter school. She is con- compete. teachers. phenomenally amazing cerned that those charter “If we help teachers “We agree that the teachers in this system.” schools have different improve, if we help them evaluation process needs Everyone is accountstandards than their more get better, we will help stuto be more rigorous, but able for educating our traditional counterparts. dent achievement improve. it needs to be something children, said GallagherGood teachers mean good meaningful,” she said. “We Fishbaugh, from the Legis- She is concerned when do not want bad teachers. lature to the school boards, online courses take money education,” he said. from public school classes. He pointed out that Why would we want to to the administrators, the While Gallagher-Fishthe first things the district support bad teachers? We teachers and parents. baugh attended a private cut when funds were lost just want a fair and valid Education by its nature parochial school herself, due to the recession, were and reliable evaluation is collaborative, she said. she remembers her father teacher development and tool. Gallagher-Fishbaugh teaching her that it was mentoring programs. “Ninety percent of our taught school in Salt Lake still necessary to pay taxes He also suggested that teachers do an amazing City for 31 years, includto support public schools. a focus on merit pay would job,” she said, “we all have ing special education and “He said to me, ‘That’s change teachers relationto be accountable for maksecond grade. our choice (to attend ships from collaborative to ing this a great system.” She is one of 166 teachprivate school), but we competitive. She wants teachers to ers in Utah who have all benefit from a well Gallagher-Fishbaugh have a fair wage so they received their national educated populace and we has studied education in can support their families board certification and was all have a responsibility other countries, and points on income competitive honored as Utah Teacher to pay taxes to the public out the successes in counwith other professions. of the Year in 2009. education system,’” she tries like Finland, where “Even those who don’t Her work now, is to said. there is no standardized have children in the system support public schools and “What has made our testing and where there is are stakeholders,” she said. teachers. country great is that we a great deal of respect for “When did teachers have educated every child the profession of teaching, lshaw@davisclipper.com become the enemy?” she for the past 200 years, ” said as well as a great deal of asked. Clipper Staff Writer

Car wash benefits soccer team BOUNTIFUL — Members of the girls’ soccer team at Viewmont High are holding a fund-raising car wash this Saturday, Sept. 17, from 8 a.m. to noon. The car wash will be held at Centerville Junior High, 625 S. Main, and cost $5 per vehicle. The team is comprised of 34 girls, freshmen through seniors, and is coached by Eric Landon. They are currently undefeated in their region.

PRESTON VANCE, a student at Mueller Park Junior High, was a semi-finalist in a nation-wide science and math competition. Courtesy photo

Vance named to semi-finals BOUNTIFUL — Preston Vance was one of only 300 that made it to the semi-finals of the Broadcom MASTERS competition, held for middle school students across the United States. Vance competed against 1,476 other entrants in the competition, which is held to promote studies in science, technology, engineering and math. Besides writing a report on his science project, Vance answered a long series of questions for the competition. The Broadcom Foundation and Society for Science and the Public is a non-profit public benefit organization that works toward “igniting a personal passion for science, engineering and innovation through a competition that exposes (students) to independent research, scientific inquiry, hands-on learning and teamwork.” More information is available at www.broadcomfoundation.org/masters.

Volunteers to improve parks ANTELOPE ISLAND — Antelope Island is one of many parks around the country that will get a sprucing up on National Public Lands Day. Sept. 24 has been set aside as the nation’s largest one-day volunteer event in support of public lands. Organizers estimate that the one-day efforts of volunteers will equal more than $15 million in improvements. They plan for students, teachers 4-H and scout groups around the country to help in parks both large and small, from neighborhood green spaces to wildlife sanctuaries and national parks. At Antelope Island, volunteers will be working to enhance the grounds and structures, remove weeds and debris. They will also be asked to help prepare and paint sign posts and rake a dirt barn floor. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., and volunteers are asked to bring gloves, water and snacks and dress appropriately for the weather, with layering a wise option. Those interested in registering for the project or obtaining additional information can contact robinwatson@utah.gov. lshaw@davisclipper.com

A9

Needs of teachers top UEA concern BY LOUISE R. SHAW

VIEWMONT HIGH’s soccer team will hold a car wash to raise funds this Saturday. Courtesy photo

Youth/Education

She is concerned about legislation that would take money from schools by giving tax breaks to families with students in private schools. She is concerned when students start the year at charter schools and then return to public schools, while the

Gallagher-Fishbaugh. Dan Paver, president of the Davis Education Association, accompanied Gallagher-Fishbaugh in her visits to Davis schools. He too emphasized the importance of collaboration, speaking specifically of the need for teachers to

Homework ideas for parents at seminar LAYTON — Parents can attend a free seminar titled “Win the homework war, sharing control through choices,” next week in Layton. Sponsored by the Sylvan Learning Center, the workshop will cover learning styles, values, how to offer choices and how to have open communication with children, according to Rose Romero, director. The class will be held Thursday, Sept. 22 at 6:30 p.m. at 70 S. Fairfield Road, and will run an hour. It is open to parents of students of all ages. Those interested are asked to RSVP through 801-543-4400 or davis@ sylvan-utah.com.

In support of Reality Town Centerville Junior High received a gift of $1,000 from Wayne Woolston (center) of Allstate Insurance Co., earlier this month. The gift will be used to sponsor Reality Town, a program that gives kids a chance to experience “real life” by seeing how their current grades impact their future jobs, by writing checks and by seeking loans. “This really helps,” said Jeni Davis (right), who coordinates the program for seventh graders at the school. She said the money normally comes out of the limited budget the school counselors receive. Principal Spencer Hansen (left) was also on hand to accept the donation. Photo by Louise R. Shaw


Wedding A10

Birthday

Anniversary

Horizons CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2011

ButlerSmith

Thomas Henry Smith and Angela Butler will be married Sept. 16, 2011 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple.Angela’s grandfather, Bob Durrans, will perform the sealing. Tom’s parents are Richard and Cathy Smith.Tom graduated from Bountiful High, Weber State and Utah State University with a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling. He is currently employed with the state of Utah as a rehab. counselor. He served an LDS Curitiba, Brazil Mission. Angela’s parents are Kim and Sheri Butler.Angela graduated from BYU and the U of U in nursing. She is cur-

HepworthWilliams

Catie Hepworth and Tyson Williams will be married Sept. 17 at Eaglewood Reception Hall.A reception will be held at 7 p.m. at Eaglewood. Catie is the daughter of Paul and Mary Hepworth. She graduated from Bountiful High in 2005 and is employed as a medical assistant. Tyson is the son of Steve and Stacey Willams. He is employed at Papillon Airways. Following a honeymoon to Jamaica, they will make their home in Williams,Ariz.

80th: Egbert

Robert Clifford Egbert will celebrate his 80th birthday on Sept. 16, 2011. Happy birthday Dad Love your family. You’re the best!

Robert Clifford Egbert

Angela Butler Thomas Henry Smith rently employed at Intermountain Medical Center in the infant critical care. Angela and Tom will make their home in Salt Lake City.

Scout Peterson

Catie Hepworth Tyson Williams

We know gray seeds are ripe when feathered messenger arrives, bringing his mate. They chatter and chew their summer-simmered feast. We garner nature’s gems, await another April, wrapped in winged September warmth when blue jays come.

Cameron Bennion

Annie M. Salmon Blake G. Beyer Following a honeymoon to Cancun, they will make their home in Bountiful.

21 N. Main,Kaysville • 546-3400 •Listings for Sept. 16-22 *No passes or special offers Transformers: Dark of the Moon (PG-13) Fri: 7:30 pm Sat: 12:50, 3:45, 7:30 pm M-Th: 7:30 pm Monte Carlo (PG) Fri: 4:30, 7 pm Sat: 12:20, 2:30, 7 pm M-Th: 7 pm Kung Fu Panda 2 (PG)* Fri: 4:50, 7:15 pm Sat: 12:40, 2:40, 7:15 pm M-Th: 7:15 pm Super 8 (PG-13) Fri: 9:15 pm Sat: 4:30, 9:15 pm M-Th: 9:15 pm Zookeeper (PG) Fri: 9:20 pm Sat: 4:40, 9:20 pm M-Th: 9:20 pm

CINEMARK BOUNTIFUL 8

Shelby Lea Woodal Eric Scott Jensen The couple will make their home in Bountiful.

206 S. 625 W., Bountiful • Listings for Sept, 16 Apollo 18 (PG-13) 2:20, 4:35, 7:10, 9:40 pm Joseph Smith-Volume 1: Plates of Gold (PG) 1:30, 4, 6:40, 9:20 pm The Help (PG-13) 3, 6:30, 10 pm Rise of the Planet of the Apes (PG-13) 1:50, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10 pm The Smurfs (PG) 1:40, 4:20, 6:50, 9:30 pm

Congratulations to you both! You have been an incredible example to all of us.We love you and look forward to your next milestone!

April seed transforms to summer giant nine feet tall. Heavy-headed blossom disk turns to the sun, nods to nearby cucumbers, as day by day embedded infant seeds swell the smiling womb atop a massive stalk.

Cameron Matthew Bennion, son of Matthew Bennion and Stephanie Bennion, grandson of Sue and Dave Bennion, Cassie Smith and Diane and Ronald Smith, celebrates his first birthday Sept. 16, 2011.

KAYSVILLE THEATER

Bob and Jane Hipley

SUNFLOWER DAYS (by Edith Baker)

Cameron Matthew Bennion

Davis movies

Bob and Jane Hipley are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary.They were married Sept. 16, 1961 at Our Lady of Peace Catholic Church in Columbus, Ohio. They are the proud parents of three daughters; Kimm (Pat), Liz (Mike), and Laurie (Zane).Their current pride and joy are their nine grandchildren: Preston, Brian, Kevin, Kendrick, Ciarra, Brendan, Sam, Miles and Ani. The entire Hipley clan gathered in Surfside Beach, S.C. this summer for a fun family week at the beach and to honor our parents/grandparents.

Rhyme and Reason

Scout Peterson

WoodalJensen

Shelby Lea Woodal and Eric Scott Jensen will be married Sept. 17, 2011 in the Bountiful LDS Temple.A reception will be held that evening at the Oswald residence in Centerville. Shelby is the daughter of Sherilyn Woodal. She graduated from Bountiful High School in 2009 and is employed at Consulmed. Eric is the son of Brian and Diana Jensen. He served in the Oregon Eugene Mission and is employed at Lite Trax and Delv International.

1st Birthday

Scout Peterson, daughter of Barrett and Allison Peterson, granddaughter of Larry and Brenda Moore and Leon and Karen Peterson, celebrated her first birthday Aug. 5, 2011.

SalmonBeyer

Annie M. Salmon and Blake G. Beyer will be married Sept. 16, 2011 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple.A reception will be held at the groom’s parents home that evening. Annie is the daughter of John and Myra Salmon. She is a Bountiful High School graduate and is attending Weber State University studying to be a radiology tech. Blake is the son of Richard and Sally Beyer. He graduated from Bountiful High and served in the Madagascar Mission. Blake is a graduate of the University of Utah in accounting and finance and is employed at REAL Salt Lake in accounting.

50th: Hipley

Straw Dogs (R) 1:55, 4:40, 7:30, 10:15 pm The Lion King (G) 1:45 pm The Lion King 3D (G) 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 pm

CINEMARK FARMINGTON AT STATION PARK 900 W Clark Lane • Listings for Sept. 16 The Debt (R) 11:05 am, 1:35, 4:15, 6:55, 9:40 pm Our Idiot Brother (R) 12:40, 3, 5:20, 7:40, 10:05 pm The Help (PG-13) 11:55 am, 3:20, 6:45, 10:10 pm Rise of the Planet of the Apes (PG-13) 11:35 am, 2:20, 4:55, 7:25, 10 pm Cowboys & Aliens (PG-13) 11:10 am, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10 pm Crazy, Stupid, Love (PG-13) 11:20 am, 2:50, 7, 9:50 pm Captain America: The First Avenge (PG-13) 11 am 1:50, 4:35, 7:25, 10:15 pm Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (PG13) 11:50 am, 3:15, 7:10, 9:55 pm Warrior (PG-13) 11:40 am 3:05, 6:50, 9:55 pm Drive (R) 11:25 am, 2:15, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10 pm I Don’t Know How She Does It (PG-13) 12, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45 pm The Lion King 3D (G) 1:55, 4:25, 7:05, 9:35 pm The Lion King (G) 11:15 am Straw Dogs (R) 11:25 am, 2:05, 5, 7:35, 10:15 pm Contagion (PG-13) 11:30 am, 2, 4:45, 7:30, 10:05 pm

The Utah State Poetry Society, Rhyme & Reason chapter, is national and state affiliated and is supported in part by the Utah Division of Arts and Museums with funding from the state of Utah and the National Endowment for the Arts. Chapter meetings are usually held on the second Wednesday at 7 p.m. and the fourth Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. at the Bountiful Davis Arts Center.Visitors are always welcome. For additional information go to www.utahpoets.com or call 801-292-0283.

Wedding deadline: Monday, noon WHO WILL LOOK AFTER YOUR CHILDREN? • If you’re leaving on vacation? • If you become disabled? • If you die? Knowing that you’ve protected your loved ones is priceless!

rowe & walton pc Robyn Walton Attorney

915 South Main Street Bountiful, UT 84010

801-298-0640 FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION

We accept most major insurance plans and all major credit cards

Trust or Will(with support for minor or disabled children) Medical Power of Attorney(covers your minor children) Durable Power of Attorney(authorizes temporary guardian to handle education) MENTION THIS AD AND RECEIVE 10% OFF


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

News

A11

Movie Beat

Two good movies fight it out in ‘Warrior’

T

he real magic of a sports movie is the pure ability it gives us to cheer for a clearly defined hero, in a battle where each rise and fall is clearly and easily understood. We know instantly whether the good guy is winning or not, and can pour our hearts into cheering or booing accordingly. Hollywood’s latest heartstring-tugging movie, “Warrior,” knows how to marshal that magic excellently. Unfortunately, it’s also a beautiful, messy, wrenching portrait of the love that exists within a completely shattered family, the kind of movie where everyone is good and bad at the same time and there’s too much pain and emotional shrapnel for a pure win to ever really be possible. Though the movie has moments of startlingly beautiful excellence that suggest it could have been either a marvelous sports movie or realistic family drama, the two genres make completely opposite demands of both the characters and audience. Trying to fit them both on the screen at the same time

results in a powerful, divided movie that can never quite be great. In its heart, I suspect that “Warrior” is really the heartbreaking family portrait. Nick Nolte’s raw performance as a recovering alcoholic who is desperate for his two grown sons to forgive him is subtle, nuanced, and so utterly realisticseeming that it can be almost physically painful to watch. He started the crack that eventually broke the bond between his two sons, fighterturned-teacher Brendan Conlon (Joel Edgerton) and damaged war hero Tommy Conlon (Tom Hardy). Brendan, a family man who has money troubles due to a daughter’s medical bills, is the most stable of the three. Edgerton plays a man with a deep, old well of anger he’s learned to live with, eased enough by the love for his wife and children that leaves him almost affable and beloved by all his students. In a pinch, though, he goes back into the ring, fueled by the survivor’s instinct of a per-

WARRIOR Stars: Rated: PG-13

(For a lot of pretty brutal MMA fighting, language, and traumatic life situations such as super-angsty drunken stupors) petual underdog who refuses to give up. Tommy, a deeply damaged vet, gets a few too many secrets piled on his shoulders than either he or the movie needs. Hardy plays him like a man barely holding himself together, anger and rage serving as a solid, impenetrable shield to hide the enormous emotional fractures you can constantly see widening behind his eyes. He’s capable of being almost frightening, the rage striking out without anything to hold it back, but the biggest worry is that he’ll shatter completely before anyone can break through the anger to get to him. The movie rests on the push and pull of anger, love, and the

yearning for forgiveness between the three men, rebuffed offers for coffee and silent anguish in the eyes of men who barely know how to give words to it. The final fight, between the two brothers, is as painful as a no-holds-barred therapy session, and though the end brought tears to my eyes there’s about a dozen plot threads left that are simply hanging as the credits role. Admittedly, real relationships are far too complicated to ever be resolved in a big finale, but here it seemed more like the end point was chosen as a nod to the dramatic final shot in a sports movie than an acknowledgement of real-life messiness. Which, in the end, is the problem. The movie has all the training montages, shots of cheering loved ones, and athletic bonding moments you would expect of an actual sports movie, and does them well. Even better, it gives you more than one edge-of-your-seat, full-throated cheer-inducing

JENNIFFER WARDELL

fight, including a knock-down, drag-out with the heavily-favored, terrifying world champion that ends up being just as richly satisfying as the ending of any movie I’ve ever seen. In “Warrior,” though, it isn’t the ending — it’s the second-tolast fight, and in the final battle between the brothers there’s not a shred of the go-fight-win dynamics that makes a good sports movie such a crowd pleaser. It’s horrible watching the brothers beat up on one another, horrible seeing the pain on their faces as they both slowly realize that neither of them wants to be there any more than we want to be seeing it. And in the end, you know full well that it doesn’t matter which one of them wins the fight. The only thing that will seem like victory is a little bit of forgiveness between them. jwardell@davisclipper.com

Local learning garden offers last free summer class BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer

LAYTON — Summer might be almost gone, but that doesn’t mean the flowers have to be. The Weber Basin Water Conservancy District is wrapping up their 2011 season of free landscape classes with a workshop on favorite perennials, set for Sept. 17 from 10-11:30 a.m., at the district’s learning garden in Layton (2837 East Highway 193). “This time of year people are interested in their landscapes again,” said Dave Rice, the conservancy programs coordinator for Weber Basin Water. The Sept. 17 class, taught by Barney Barnett of Willard Bay Gardens, will touch on the perennials with color that adapt best to the local environment. Rice expects anywhere from 20-30 people to attend. “Perennials are one of our more popular topics,” he said. That number has been less steady, however, for some of the district’s other

garden’s website, http://weberbasin.com/conservation, along with other information about the garden and its programs. The site has recently been redesigned, and Rice urges those who had been

THE SEPT. 17 CLASS at the garden will discuss perennials that will do well in the Utah climate, such as these fallblooming asters. Stock photo classes this summer, which have ranged from native plants to drip irrigation basics and everything in between. “Some of them have been really well attended,” said Rice. “Others haven’t been.” Among the less wellattended classes were two of this season’s experimental offerings, touching on landscape photography and still-life painting outdoors. “They were a little out of

the norm,” he said. Once the current crop of classes wrap up, Rice will get in touch with some of the people who attended this year’s classes to help determine which ones should make it onto next year’s schedule. “I like to get some feedback about what they enjoyed,” he said. “I hope to have next year’s list out by January.” Once the schedule is completed it will be posted online at the learning

put off by the old incarnation to give the new one a try. “For anyone who went there before, it’s much improved,” he said. “It’s a lot more user-friendly.” Organizers ask that

those who attend the free classes call ahead to make sure they have a seat reserved. For those looking to attend the Sept. 17 class, call 801-771-1677. jwardell@davisclipper.com


A12

News CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Neighborhood gives big to Bountiful food pantry BY TOM BUSSELBERG

Clipper Editor BOUNTIFUL — A southeast Bountiful neighborhood has given the Bountiful Community Food Pantry a giant “shot in the arm.” The 11,000-lbs.-plus donation from the Elk Hollow neighborhood and LDS ward comes just before the Sept. 24 Alliance for Unity Food Drive that seeks support in Davis County and beyond. Food Pantry Executive Director Lorna Koci, in expressing appreciation for the big contribution said it equals more in food and other goods than the pantry typically receives from drop-offs in an entire month. “We so appreciate the generosity of our community, and hope they will be able to help us as they have in the past, on Sept. 24,” Koci said. “Really, it probably came down to an awareness,” said Jolene Gardiner, who serves as ward primary president. “I don’t think most people even knew we had a Bountiful Food Pantry,” she said, with the wishlist Jaynann Johnson (JJ) pantry provided giving a focus that got young and old moving, That list of essentials includes so many items most people take for granted, such as detergent from the dollar store, ketchup, mustard, sugar, salad dressing, tuna fish or peanut butter or regular butter, or popcorn as a treat, particularly

‘Night to Recovery’ Saturday CENTERVILLE — “A Night to Recovery” will be held Saturday, Sept. 17, 7 p.m. at the Davis Center for the Performing Arts, 525 N. 400 West, here. LDS Addiction Recovery facilitator Rachelle Call will present the program that will include music performed by Call and artists Jessie Clark Funk and Jen Marco. In addition, recovery addiction specialists will also present stories. The program is designed to accelerate the recovery process by focusing on the hope and healing part of recovery rather than the “victimhood,” provided material says. Tickets are $5 at the door.

VOLUNTEERS UNLOAD the recent food donation (above and right), which totaled more than 11,000 lbs. School items were also donated. Courtesy photos for the kids. “Whenever they get a pound of butter they’ll open it, give one cube per family. It’s a huge treat,” Gardiner said. “I think when we started seeing that they serve over 600 families, who just don’t have (even) their basic needs” it made a difference. Gardiner said. “I don’t think people realize that.” Awareness was combined with a big meeting where all groups received assignments and started collecting.

For example, primary children brought items each week that were collected in a basket, as well as setting up lemonade and bake sale stands young men and women collected items that would be needed in a backpack for kids returning to school. The goal of 50 filled backpacks was beaten by at least 25, Gardiner said. Walmart donated a $300 gift card, and athleticallyminded neighborhood kids made sure some sports equipment was part of the mix.

“One night we gathered everything and were really short of sugar,” she said. A trip was arranged to the Centerville LDS canning center, where more than $600 worth of sugar was prepared. Delivery night to the pantry had young men acting as runners, with trucks and trailers filled with the equivalent of 5 1/2 tons of goods. The task took about two hours, thanks to

many hands, Gardiner said. “We want it to be ongoing, especially now with Christmas coming up,” she said of the group’s involvement with the pantry. The BCFP serves residents in need from Farmington south to the county line. The Family Connection Center Food Bank in Layton covers the county, Kaysville north, and also will participate in the Alliance for Unity drive.


Va lu e S pe ak

Rushing in when others rush out t’s the middle of the day. “He knows that there are You’re walking – or driving angels out there that saved his life,” his uncle said.“People or working or bicycling – came together, risked their along a busy highway that lives, to save him.” borders a university campus He paused, then added: when you come upon a seri“Just . . . thank you . . . from all ous traffic accident that has of us in the family.” just occurred.A motorcycle is In my mind, there were lying on the roadway, in two remarkable things that flames.A badly damaged happened in those few anxautomobile is stopped near ious moments from the time the motorcycle, and the accident occurred the fire is beginuntil the time the ning to spread to young motorcyclist the car. was dragged to safeSuddenly you ty. First was the notice that someheroic rush of peoone – probably ple – more than one the motorcycle dri– to offer assistance ver – is pinned despite the very underneath the car. real possibility of He isn’t moving. harm to themFor all you know, selves. I think of he might already the gallant police be dead. But you officers and fire don’t know for fighters who sure.And the fire By Joseph Walker rushed IN to the is spreading twin towers on 9/11 when toward him. everyone else was rushing What are you going to do? OUT, the office workers on For 14 or so passers-by the upper floors who ran Monday, the answer was UPSTAIRS to help others immediate and unflinching: instead of following their natthey rushed in to help.They ural self-protective impulses tried to get him out from to rush DOWN. I’m awed and under the car, but he was inspired by such compassionstuck under there, and the fire ate courage. I don’t know that was moving ever closer.A few I possess it – and quite frankly, people tried to lift the car, but it’s OK with me if I never find barely moved it.There was a out for sure – but I’m grateful moment of hesitation, and to live in a world in which so then a larger group — includmany do. ing several hard hat-wearing The second remarkable construction workers — thing that happened that moved as one to the side of morning was that all of these the car, and with all their colbrave, caring people managed lective might they lifted the to work together to save a life. 3,000-pound burning vehicle It would not have happened if up onto two wheels while they had not. One or two peoanother construction worker ple couldn’t lift that car. Even pulled the unconscious young six or seven – they tried. It motorcycle driver out from took all of them pushing under the car. together to get the car up on I’m not making this up. two wheels so the injured Google “burning car lifted off young man could be moved trapped man.” You’ll see it’s out of the way.There’s a lestrue. son in that for all of us, I And please notice the think. No matter how strong flames lapping at the young we are individually, we are man’s foot as they drag him to infinitely stronger in the face safety. of adversity if we work Miraculously, the young together. man survived, with only broLike the young man’s ken bones, some road rash uncle said:“A lot of times and a few bruises to show for things happen these days that his brush with death. shake our faith in humanity. Oh, and he has one other But here we have not one thing: a thankful heart. person, not two people, but A day after his dramatic nearly a dozen people rushing rescue he was still in the hostogether to a burning scene to pital recuperating from his lift a thousand-pound car. injuries. But he sent his uncle That is absolutely incredible.” out to thank the people who You don’t have to Google risked their lives to save his. that to know it’s true.

I

Caregiver classes start next week DAVIS COUNTY — An eight session Caregiver Educational Classes series begins next week at a couple locations around the county. The free classes are offered by the County Health Department’s Caregiver Support Program. It is for those caring for family members who are older or frail. Topics range from how to pay for long-term care, creating boundaries, stress, caregiver burnout and assistive devices. Classes will be offered Tuesdays, starting Sept. 20, at the Legacy Village Retirement Living Center dining room, 1201 N. Fairfield Road, Layton, at noon; and Fridays starting Sept. 23 at the Golden Years Senior Activity Cen-

ter, 726 S. 100 E., Bountiful, at 11:30 a.m. The topic for the first class will be “How to Pay for LongTerm Care,” presented by Jared Nye of the Legacy Village Assisted Living Center. Future topics include creating boundaries, stress, positive ways to overcome trials, caregiver burnout, a windowinto the world of Alzheimer’s and Dementia and caregiver rejuvenation. A complementary lunch is provided but an RSVP is needed by each Monday at noon to receive a meal. No RSVP is needed to attend the class only. For more information or to RSVP for lunch, call Megan Forbush at 801-5255088.

O b it ua r y

CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Christine Brown 1928-2011 “Chris”

Joyce Emeline Turner 1937-2011 Joyce Emeline Turner passed away Sunday, Sept. 11, 2011 at her home in Woods Cross, Utah. She was born June 5, 1937 in Ogden, Utah the daughter of Percy and Matilda Hayes Bond. Married Steven L. Turner

Jimmy Bruce Parker 1939-2011 BOUNTIFUL — Jimmy Bruce Parker left this life and peacefully passed into the next on Friday, Sept. 9, 2011. He was born on Feb. 8, 1939 to Gerald Edward and Ida Eleanor (Tilford) Parker in Caldwell, Idaho. He attended public schools in Homedale, Idaho where he met his eternal sweetheart, Sherlene (Sherry) Byington. They were married on Aug. 29, 1958 and sealed for time and eternity in the Salt Lake Temple on Nov. 25, 1959. Jimmy graduated from BYU with a bachelor’s degree in secondary education, a major in physics and a composite minor in math and chemistry. He taught at Central Jr. High and Bonneville High Schools in Idaho Falls, Idaho for a short time before beginning his career in family history on July 3, 1963 at the Genealogical Library of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints. In the beginning of his career, he traveled to many different locations in the United States and Canada, gathering records for the library. He served in many positions in the family history department, including the research department and priesthood genealogy department. He was the manager of the Family History Library for five and a half years and retired in December of 1999. He served as a missionary in Family History and Worldwide Support from June 2007 to December 2009. He was a well-known writer and a great educator, teaching all over the North American Continent at the National Genealogical Conferences and BYU Education Week. He served on the board of The International Commission of the Accreditation of Professional Genealogy, president of the National Genealogical Teachers of America, Association of Professional Genealogist and President and Fellow of The Utah Genealogical Society. He was accredited in many areas of North

Oct. 4, 1954 in the Salt Lake Temple. Joyce was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latterdays Saints, Woods Cross 1st Ward. She served in many callings, but den mother was her favorite. She loved being with her family. She is survived by her husband Steven; children Jeffery (Barbara) Turner, Kaysville, UT; David (Heather) Turner, West Jordan, UT; Carrie (Lowell) Kamerath, Washougal, WA; Leslie (Michael) Brinkerhoff, Bountiful, UT; 15 grandchildren; four greatgrandchildren; brothers Vern (Phyllis) Bond, Stephen (Marylynn) Bond and sister Janet Hansen. Preceded in death by her parents and brother Dean. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15, 2011 at the Woods Cross 1st Ward Chapel, 2064 S. 800 W. Friends visited Wednesday from 6-8 p.m. at Lindquist’s Bountiful Mortuary, 727 N 400 E. and Thurs. from 12:45-1:45 p.m. at the church prior to services. Interment Bountiful City Cemetery. Condolences may be shared at www.lindquistmortuary.com

American Research. His great love of family history and temple work has been passed on as a legacy to his family. Jimmy was a wonderful husband and father. He and Sherry spent many happy moments together doing their family history and working at the branch library helping others. He lovingly taught many of his children and grandchildren math and other subjects at the kitchen table over the years. He will be greatly missed by his family and many friends and associates. Jimmy is survived by his eternal companion and sweetheart, Sherry, his dear sister, Janet (Ron) Martin, 11 of his 14 children, Tauna Hinckley, Tara (Blaine) Scott, Jamie (Scott) Robinson, Trudi (Kevin) O’Brien, Kerrie (Kent) Jones, Trina (Brad) Lemmons, Matthew (Michelle) Parker, Becky (Arden) Godwin, Maralee Croft, Amy (Joseph) Recksiek, Joshua Parker. He is also survived by 34 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren and numerous other extended family. He was preceded in death by three children, two great-grandchildren and his parents. A special thank you to Rocky Mountain Hospice, Dr. Regina Klein and all other medical personnel who lovingly contributed to his care. The following words by Ralph Waldo Emerson sum up Jimmy’s life. To laugh often and much; To win the respect of the intelligent people And the affection of children; To earn the appreciation of honest critics And endure the betrayal of false friends; To appreciate beauty To find the best in others; To leave the world a bit better Whether by a healthy child, A garden patch or a redeemed social condition’ To know that one life has breathed easier Because you lived here, This is to have succeeded. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m., Thursday, Sept. 15, 2011 at the Bountiful 43rd Ward, 990 North 100 West. Friends and family called Wednesday evening from 68 p.m. at Russon Brothers Bountiful Mortuary, 295 North Main, and Thursday morning 9:30-10:30 a.m. at the church prior to services. Interment-Bountiful City Cemetery. Online guest book at www.russonmortuary.com

Our beloved wife, mother, grandma and friend, Virginia Christine Berry Brown passed away Sept. 11, 2011 from Alzheimer’s; she was 83. Chris was born July 18, 1928 in Algoma, Mississippi to Dock Middleton Berry and Carrie Mae Watson Berry. She was one of 15 children. She married Vern Gary Brown on Aug. 11, 1951 in Memphis, Tennessee. Their marriage was later solemnized in the Idaho Falls LDS Temple. She and Vern were very much in love and celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary shortly before Vern passed away on Sept. 4, 2001.

Carl W. Feller 1924-2011 Carl W. Feller, born April 13, 1924, was received into our Savior’s loving arms and reunited with his sweetheart, Helen, sons Scot and Brad, parents, and family, Sept. 11, 2011. He will be dearly missed by his living legacy, P. Jack and Margo Feller, Rhonda (Feller) Williams, Kris Bauer, Kelly and Rebecca Feller, Jalair and Scott Janke. Heidi and Terren Hallows and 57 grandchildren and 55 greatgrandchildren. Carl was raised in Bountiful, Utah and graduated from Davis High School. He was a veteran of World War II. He married Helen Hodson, June 11, 1948. They were sealed in the Salt Lake LDS Temple,

Obituary

A13

They were the parents of four sons: Dennis (Doris) Brown of Kaysville, Utah; John (Susan) Brown of Defiance, Missouri; Gary (Lora) Brown of Centerville, Utah and Mark Brown of Cottleville, Missouri. Chris was active in the LDS church and served faithfully in many callings. She enjoyed golfing, quilting, gardening and being with her family. She was a very devoted wife, mother and grandmother. She is survived by her four sons; 14 grandchildren; 11 greatgrandchildren; three sisters, Jeanette Bryson, Bobbie Soelberg and Shelby Howell and numerous nieces and nephews. She is preceded in death by her parents, husband, grandson, Joseph Brown and several brothers and sisters. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2011 in the LDS Chapel at 950 North Main in Centerville, Utah. A viewing was held Tuesday from 6-8 p.m. at Russon Brothers Bountiful Mortuary, 295 North Main and Wednesday morning from 9:4510:45 a.m. at the church prior to services. Interment-Centerville City Cemetery. Online guestbook at www.russonmortuary.com . “We Love You Mom!”

June 25, 1956. They lived in Syracuse and later settled in Bountiful. He was the son of Parley Jack Feller and Mary Delilah Warner. He is survived by a sister, Colleen (husband Glenn) Buhler of Centerville, Utah and Glenna Feller of Salt Lake City, Utah. He served his Father in Heaven in many capacities including Priesthood Quorum Leadership, Bishopric, Scoutmaster for many years, Stake Missionary Service, faithful Home Teacher (a calling he dearly loved) and for the last 11 years (up until last Friday) as a Service Missionary at Welfare Square. His greatest attributes were his eternal optimism, unwavering faith and compassionate service. He was happiest when he was with his family or helping others. He was the owner and manager of Feller Precooked Meats until he retired. He will be remembered for his honesty, hard work, boundless energy and love of life. He loved BYU football and his cats, Tom and Tom. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m., Friday Sept. 16, 2011 at the North Canyon 5th Ward, 2505 South Davis Blvd. Friends and family may call Thursday evening from 6-8 p.m. at Russon Brothers Bountiful Mortuary, 295 North Main and Friday at the church 9:3010:30 a.m. prior to services. Interment-Bountiful City Cemetery. Online guest book at www.russonmortuary.com .

Obituary deadline: Wednesday, 10 a.m. Camelot Homeowners Association is sponsoring their annual

Flea Market/Baked Goods Sale Sept. 24th from 8am to 1pm There will be hot dogs and drinks for sale along with a raffle for gift baskets. The raffle tickets will be $1 each or 6 for $5.

Camelot Club House • 655 N. Hwy 89, NSL

Bountiful Memorial Art Co. Get the word out!

E E R F , T N E V E R LIST YOU Deadline: Fridays, 4pm

FOR ALL YOUR CEMETERY NEEDS

If your group or organization has an event coming up, let people know with the Clipper Calendar. E-mail the details, such as date, time, place, cost, etc. to rjamieson@davisclipper.com, or bring the info to the Clipper office, 1370 S. 500 W., Bountiful.

Call 295-2751

Calendar listings will be published at our discretion on a space-available basis.

2010 South Main Bountiful THE BOTTS

David, Robert, Jason, Ammon, and Josh

• Serving all of Davis County and the Intermountain West • Buy direct from us and • Granite and Bronze Markers avoid paying commission to a salesman of all kinds and colors • The finest workmanship • Pet Memorials in the country • Address Signs


A16

News CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Parenting

Helping your children figure out ‘Why?’ W hy? If you’re the parent of a preschooler, that’s probably a question you hear quite a bit. There’s no denying that children are infinitely curious about the world around them, constantly wondering about how things work and why things happen the way they do. Early childhood is the perfect time to take advantage of that natural thirst for knowledge by introducing and encouraging simple science concepts through everyday activities and play. Observation You can encourage your children to observe their surroundings without doing anything out of the ordinary. As you run errands, describe what you see, smell, and hear and

encourage your children to do the same. Games like I-Spy are great exercises in observation, especially for young children. Sensory activities are another exercise that is especially effective with preschoolers. Playing with Play-Doh or moon sand allows children to explore texture and smell, while manipulating small tools like cookie cutters and rolling pins helps fine motor skills to develop. Homemade peanut butter dough (made from mixing equal parts powdered sugar and creamy peanut butter) even allows children to use their sense of taste! A sensory bin filled with small beans or dry pasta, water and sea shells, foam letters, or natural elements like sticks and pinecones and a variety of pouring and scooping tools

can keep preschoolers busy for hours. The contents of the bin can be rotated, so that it never loses its appeal. Exploring nature is another easy way to encourage observation. Go for a nature walk with your children and collect interesting rocks, pinecones, leaves, and other natural elements. These objects are especially fascinating to young children when they examine them with a magnifying glass. You can modify this activity by painting the individual compartments of a clean egg carton with colors found in nature and then searching for objects to match each color. Hypothesis and Experimentation Children love to be active participants, so next time

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INSURANCE AND FINANCIAL ADVISORS Founded in 1890 as the National Asociation of Life Underwriters ®

Connections that Count!

you hear “Why?” let them get involved in answering their own question. Guide them in developing a hypothesis and help them carry out a simple experiment. You can also set up simple experiments for them to do with minimal assistance. A large ice block with brightly colored toys in it presents an interesting challenge for preschoolers: How can they quickly melt the ice to get to the toys? Along with any ideas they might have, offer simple tools like a toy hammer, a large rock, and a bowl of rock salt for them to experiment with. A similar experiment that is perfect for winter months is testing to see which room of your house is warmest. Put equal amounts of snow into several containers—make sure

KATE ANDERSON

the containers are all similar in size and material! Ask your child to place the containers in several different locations throughout your house and make a guess as to which container will melt first. Periodically check the containers to see their progress and then discuss why some melted faster than others. By encouraging your children to develop good observation skills and guiding them through simple experiments, you are helping them to develop important problem-solving skills and teaching them how to learn. But your kids won’t think so—they will simply think that they are having fun!

NAIFA comprises more than 700 state and local associations representing the interests of 200,000 members and thier associates nationwide. NAIFA members focus their practices on one or more of the following: life insurance and annuities, health insurance and employee benefits, multiline, and financial advising and investments. The Association’s mission is to advocate for a positive legislative and regulatory environment, enhance business and professional skills, and promote the ethical conduct of its members. The National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors protects and promotes the critical role of insurance in a sound financial plan and the essential role provided by our professional agents and advisors.

Dori Phillips Financial Services LLC

Wes Patterson, MBA Northwestern Mutual Financial Network

Chadd Watson State Farm

Kurt Webb LLC New York Life Insurance

Darrell McKinnon LUTCF, Oxford FinancialGroup Inc.

Ann Fadel Farmers Insurance

Gary Wall American National Insurance Co.

Jim Kauerz LUTCF Farmers Insurance

Jone Olson LUTCF, FSS, State Farm

Ethan Clinger, Farm Bureau

Pamela Taylor American Affordable Insurance

Jeffrey P. VanWagenen Acuity Benefits & Insurance

Cal Gibbs CLU, ChFC, Corporate Benefits Inc.

Peter Jeppson, Money Masters

Scott Johnson American National

Bret P. Weston Weston Insurance Agency

Harold Young Equitable Life & Casualty

Dan Springer LUTCF, New York Life

Brett Peterson Beacon Financial

Wayne Eckman State Farm

Howard McRoberts LUTCF Cambridge Financial

John E. Coles Jr. CFP RFC Eagle Gate Corporation

Nate Shillig State Farm

Joe Johnson Corporate Benefits Inc.

Michael J. Gibbs Corporate Benefits Inc.

Kimball Doxey Oxford Financial Group Inc., LUTCF

Mark G Kano CLU, LUTCF, State Farm

Marvin Reynolds ChFC, Beacon Educational Resources

Timothy Jackson Acuity Benefits & Insurance

Jennifer Bassarear State Farm, CLU, CASL

Timothy Johnson American National Insurance

Wynn R. Hall CLU, ChFU, Cambridge Financial

Paul A. Coles Capital Management & Insurance Services

Toby H. Gonzales State Farm


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Church News

A15

Baha’i writer offers locals publishing advice Autumn Concert to be held at Tabernacle in October

BY KAREN WEBB Special to the Clipper BOUNTIFUL —“The publishing world is a jungle these days,” Author Lisa Bradley said last week at the South Branch Library. “But smart cats can take advantage of it.” Bradley, currently on book tour with her first novel, spoke to a small group of budding writers about the new field of selfpublishing and the realities of self-promoting. “With publishers facing hard times,” Bradley said, “and many of them going out of business, self-publishing has become a realistic option, although it has challenges too.” Bradley’s journey has been an interesting one. A member of the Baha’i Faith, Bradley went first to the nationally-based Baha’i Publishing Trust with her “Abby Wize: Away,” a work of fantasy fiction in which the main character, a horse-loving teen, ends up 700 years in the future when world peace has become a reality. Unfortunately, fantasy fiction turned out not to be on the publisher’s “needed” list. “I had gotten some feedback at that point,” she admitted, “and what I really thought was a final rough draft turned out to need a little more work than I was thinking it did. The big challenge was that, because there was so much content overtly drawn from the ideas and scriptures of the Baha’i Faith, I knew I would need an editor who was also a Baha’i.” She struck pay dirt on a listserver developed specifically for Baha’i writers. A number of her fellow writers had commented on the work extensively, but one, Lucki Wilder, offered to take up the gauntlet and edit the whole thing. “She put her heart and soul into the book,” said Bradley, “because she knew it was a novel she wanted her grandchildren to be able to read.” Once Bradley had been turned down by the obvious publisher for a work of

Kaysville ward to celebrate 160th birthday Saturday KAYSVILLE — The Kaysville 1st Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will hold its 160th Birthday celebration, Saturday, Sept. 17, from 1-7 p.m. at the Kaysville Tabernacle and bowery, patterned after the Centennial celebration of 1951. All former and current members are invited.Anyone with artifacts, histories or pictures they would like to share, should contact Janet Roberts at 801-5443219.

LISA BRADLEY shares publishing tips with aspiring writers at the South Branch Library. Courtesy photo

fiction heavy on Baha’i elements like world peace, another member of the group, suggested Bradley try AuthorHouse, technically a vanity press. “The process of getting the book into shape took over two years.” said Bradley. “They were good to me in terms of sticking with the agreed price for my package and my perbook price.” And two years ago, many of the basically free true self-publishing routes like Amazon’s Kindle and Smashwords were not available. Either way, the selfpublishing route also offers a different way of handling print copies. They work as Print on Demand sources. Rather than printing what can be enormous print runs employed by the traditional, contract publishers, they print exactly what people, authors or the public, demand. For many smaller publishers, this combination of e-publishing and POD has

become a viable business model, allowing the small press to stay in business when big print runs that will never be purchased or books that can be legitimately returned by distributors or stores can sink a small company. Using Abby Wize as an example of the costs involved, Bradley explained that she may pocket $3.50 of the $19.99 cover price ($29.99 for hard cover or a whopping $9.99 from Kindle), depending on how many middlemen take their cut (she offered Wilder a generous 40 percent split of any profit for editing the book). She discouraged attendees from looking at book-writing as a moneymaking venture, while acknowledging that her own book has been surprisingly successful, even among potential readers who are not themselves Baha’is. “I tell potential buyers that the book has a deeply spiritual element and that

it involves a future where world peace has arrived,” she explained. “I also mention that Abby, the protagonist is a 13-year-old horse-loving girl who is discovering the art of horse whispering as an alternative to harsher methods that exist to train horses.” Bradley herself is a certified horse whisperer. “What Lisa said didn’t change my mind about trying to write and eventually publish my book,” commented aspiring writer, Centerville Junior High student Zayne Webb. “But her talk opened my eyes to how challenging getting it polished and published might be.” “What I thought was a sweet little niche book about horses and a young girl’s faith,” concludes Lisa, “turns out to have broad appeal to lovers of animals and world peace everywhere.” For more information visit www.AbbyWizeBooks.com. news@davisclipper.com

SALT LAKE CITY — The Orchestra at Temple Square, under the direction of Igor Gruppman, will present an “An Autumn Concert” on Friday, Oct. 21 and Saturday, Oct. 22, 2011, at 7:30 p.m. in the Tabernacle. The concert will feature music by the Orchestra at Temple Square, led by Gruppman, conductor of the orchestra. Christian Smith, principal bassoonist for the orchestra, will be featured in Vivaldi’s Concerto for Bassoon in E-flat Major (RV 483). Other repertoire on the concert will include Bach’s aria for alto and solo violin, “Erbarme dich, mein Gott, um meiner Zahren Willen!” from the St. Matthew Passion and the 6th movement from Mahler's Symphony #3. The Orchestra at Temple Square was formed in 1999, under the direction of Gordon B. Hinckley, then President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Its charter as an all-volunteer musical organization is to accompany the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and to perform in two con-

certs of its own each year. Gruppman was named conductor of the Orchestra at Temple Square in 2003. His career has been varied, serving as a violin soloist, conductor, concertmaster and chamber musician and he has appeared in the great European capitals and in the major cities of North America, Israel, and New Zealand. He has been a frequent guest with such orchestras as the London Symphony Orchestra and the Royal Philharmonic, and has worked with conductors Sir Georg Solti, Mstislav Rostropovich, Sir Colin Davis, Christoph Eschenbach, and Bernard Haitink. In addition to his duties with the Orchestra at Temple Square, he is currently concertmaster of the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra. Tabernacle doors will open at 6:30 p.m. the evening of the concert. Tickets are required but are free to the public and are limited to those 8 years of age and older. They became available Tuesday, Sept. 13, at www.lds.org/events or by calling 801-570-0080 or toll-free 1-866-537-8457.

Called to serve North America

Sister Ford Sister Sarah Ford,daughter of Charlene Ford and M. Lindsay Ford,has been called to serve in the Michigan Lansing Mission. She will speak Sept.18 at 2:45 p.m.in the Canyon View Ward,210 E.1825 N., Centerville.

Missionary deadline: Friday, noon

MISSIONARY HEADQUARTERS

...$199 . . . . . . . . . . ... t Suits ..............$35 n a P o 8 cks • Tw ble Sla irts ..........$1 a h s a •W Free Sh ..............$35 e l k n i • Wr ts ...... s e ..$119 V . . . r . e . . t . a . . e . s .. • Sw p Coat f Shoes ....$99 o T 1 n oo •3i Waterpr ets ...... $249 t r o p k c S • Ro uggage L e c e i •4P EVERY ACCESSORY YOU NEED ALL AT MISSIONARY DISCOUNT PRICES FREE, FAST ALTERATIONS NEW BOUNTIFUL LOCATION

45494

LAYTON

1706 S. 500 W. 1986 N. HILLFIELD RD.

OGDEN NEWGATE MALL

292-1236 614-1366 627-3152


A16

News CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Parenting

Helping your children figure out ‘Why?’ W hy? If you’re the parent of a preschooler, that’s probably a question you hear quite a bit. There’s no denying that children are infinitely curious about the world around them, constantly wondering about how things work and why things happen the way they do. Early childhood is the perfect time to take advantage of that natural thirst for knowledge by introducing and encouraging simple science concepts through everyday activities and play. Observation You can encourage your children to observe their surroundings without doing anything out of the ordinary. As you run errands, describe what you see, smell, and hear and

encourage your children to do the same. Games like I-Spy are great exercises in observation, especially for young children. Sensory activities are another exercise that is especially effective with preschoolers. Playing with Play-Doh or moon sand allows children to explore texture and smell, while manipulating small tools like cookie cutters and rolling pins helps fine motor skills to develop. Homemade peanut butter dough (made from mixing equal parts powdered sugar and creamy peanut butter) even allows children to use their sense of taste! A sensory bin filled with small beans or dry pasta, water and sea shells, foam letters, or natural elements like sticks and pinecones and a variety of pouring and scooping tools

can keep preschoolers busy for hours. The contents of the bin can be rotated, so that it never loses its appeal. Exploring nature is another easy way to encourage observation. Go for a nature walk with your children and collect interesting rocks, pinecones, leaves, and other natural elements. These objects are especially fascinating to young children when they examine them with a magnifying glass. You can modify this activity by painting the individual compartments of a clean egg carton with colors found in nature and then searching for objects to match each color. Hypothesis and Experimentation Children love to be active participants, so next time

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INSURANCE AND FINANCIAL ADVISORS Founded in 1890 as the National Asociation of Life Underwriters ®

Connections that Count!

you hear “Why?” let them get involved in answering their own question. Guide them in developing a hypothesis and help them carry out a simple experiment. You can also set up simple experiments for them to do with minimal assistance. A large ice block with brightly colored toys in it presents an interesting challenge for preschoolers: How can they quickly melt the ice to get to the toys? Along with any ideas they might have, offer simple tools like a toy hammer, a large rock, and a bowl of rock salt for them to experiment with. A similar experiment that is perfect for winter months is testing to see which room of your house is warmest. Put equal amounts of snow into several containers—make sure

KATE ANDERSON

the containers are all similar in size and material! Ask your child to place the containers in several different locations throughout your house and make a guess as to which container will melt first. Periodically check the containers to see their progress and then discuss why some melted faster than others. By encouraging your children to develop good observation skills and guiding them through simple experiments, you are helping them to develop important problem-solving skills and teaching them how to learn. But your kids won’t think so—they will simply think that they are having fun!

NAIFA comprises more than 700 state and local associations representing the interests of 200,000 members and thier associates nationwide. NAIFA members focus their practices on one or more of the following: life insurance and annuities, health insurance and employee benefits, multiline, and financial advising and investments. The Association’s mission is to advocate for a positive legislative and regulatory environment, enhance business and professional skills, and promote the ethical conduct of its members. The National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors protects and promotes the critical role of insurance in a sound financial plan and the essential role provided by our professional agents and advisors.

Dori Phillips Financial Services LLC

Wes Patterson, MBA Northwestern Mutual Financial Network

Chadd Watson State Farm

Kurt Webb LLC New York Life Insurance

Darrell McKinnon LUTCF, Oxford FinancialGroup Inc.

Ann Fadel Farmers Insurance

Gary Wall American National Insurance Co.

Jim Kauerz LUTCF Farmers Insurance

Jone Olson LUTCF, FSS, State Farm

Ethan Clinger, Farm Bureau

Pamela Taylor American Affordable Insurance

Jeffrey P. VanWagenen Acuity Benefits & Insurance

Cal Gibbs CLU, ChFC, Corporate Benefits Inc.

Peter Jeppson, Money Masters

Scott Johnson American National

Bret P. Weston Weston Insurance Agency

Harold Young Equitable Life & Casualty

Dan Springer LUTCF, New York Life

Brett Peterson Beacon Financial

Wayne Eckman State Farm

Howard McRoberts LUTCF Cambridge Financial

John E. Coles Jr. CFP RFC Eagle Gate Corporation

Nate Shillig State Farm

Joe Johnson Corporate Benefits Inc.

Michael J. Gibbs Corporate Benefits Inc.

Kimball Doxey Oxford Financial Group Inc., LUTCF

Mark G Kano CLU, LUTCF, State Farm

Marvin Reynolds ChFC, Beacon Educational Resources

Timothy Jackson Acuity Benefits & Insurance

Jennifer Bassarear State Farm, CLU, CASL

Timothy Johnson American National Insurance

Wynn R. Hall CLU, ChFU, Cambridge Financial

Paul A. Coles Capital Management & Insurance Services

Toby H. Gonzales State Farm


Sports From the sidelines Shain Gillet

Is Holy War still relevant?

S

aturday is the biggest game of the year for BYU and Utah fans, as the annual Holy War takes place months in advance thanks to two teams moving in different directions following the 2010-2011 season. And as a fan of rivalries and history between two teams in general, I began to ask the question of whether or not this game means as much now as it did in the past. When I brought up the question during a dinner with my in-laws, who both have masters degrees from the University of Utah, they had two unique answers that got my attention. Without giving away who said what, one of them said “it’s still Utah and BYU, which will always be a big deal,” while the other said it’s still an important game, but may not be in the far future given the status of

So is this rivalry still important? The short answer is yes. the two rivals. I couldn’t help but agree on both fronts. The annual game, which will likely be earlier than usual from here on out, is still set in stone for the next five years. After that well, who knows. Both may well decide that it could be more of a hindrance to play each other and call it quits for a couple years. But the fact that the two teams are named BYU and Utah and are playing on the same field for the umpteenth time makes the game important, regardless of when the game is held. “Everybody looks forward to this game,” said one of my in-laws. “It doesn’t matter when they play or what they’re playing for, now that things have changed.” The other side of that coin could also be true. The fact that they play each other now is a big deal because a rivalry is a rivalry and winning Holy War for bragging rights should be enough to sustain the rivalry for the next five years. But what happens after that? Will the two teams continue to play each other? Will the game be as significant n See “FROM” p. B5

Vaccine safety

What you need to know, Page B10

PARC racers

take to the mall, Page B16

SECTION

B

Thursday, Sept. 15, 2011

Game of the Week: Woods Cross at East

’Cats to look for revenge against East BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Sports Editor

less of which region they’re in or what classification they are. The absence of Tanner Curtis hasn’t changed anything the Leopards have done this year either. So far, the rushing attack this year is being led by quarter back Jason Cook, who already has 564 yards rushing with six touchdowns on the ground. Liti Molisi, the team’s second leading rusher, is just five yards short of averaging 100 yards per game in the team’s first four games of the year, already scoring three times this season. True to the form of the option offense, Cook has thrown for just 416 yards without a single touchdown pass, instead opting for his feet to do the scoring for him. The Leopards boast one of the best defenses in all of 4A so far, allowing the fifth fewest points in the classification and the lowest points among Region 6 teams. Led by Neil Robbins and Sione Makoni, the

SALT LAKE CITY – The Woods Cross Wildcats made it back from Pocatello with a tough loss against the Rams of Highland, Idaho, dropping a twopoint contest. The Leopards have gone through their preseason games without a loss, and have pummeled their opponents in the meantime with an average of 30 points per contest scored. Last season, the two teams battled through one of the toughest games of the year for both teams. The Wildcats, led by current Roy head coach Fred Fernandes, battled to a 14 point halftime lead only to see it squandered by the fourth quarter by a pair of rushing touchdowns. This year’s version of the Leopards isn’t any different from last year’s. Running the ball with an option-style offense has been the team’s bread and butter for many years, regard- n See “GAME OF” p. B5

THE WILDCATS’ DEFENSE has kept Woods Cross in its games during the preseason, where they went 2-2 in four games. Photo is from previous game. Photo: Jen Barnett www.photojen-ics.com

Vikings down Braves again, 17-13 BY BEN WHITE

Clipper Correspondent

JOSH STAPLES THREW for 157 yards and two touchdowns as the Vikings beat Bountiful 17-13 Friday night. Photo: Jen Barnett www.photo-jen-ics.com

BOUNTIFUL — Bountiful and Viewmont. The two schools, located less than two miles apart, have been battling each other since the 1960s. And as the case generally is, this contest came down to the final minutes. Viewmont used a strong fourth quarter to come away with a 17-13 win. Though they do not compete in the same region, there is always an intensity that is difficult to describe. Anyone who arrived to the game late was forced to park in the neighborhood around the high school and make a long trek to the stadium. All the best seats in the house were taken long before kickoff. “As you saw on Friday night,” said Bountiful coach Larry Wall, “there were a lot of people in the stands. “This is a big rivalry for us.” “A lot of these kids know each other from junior high,” said Viewmont coach Brad Lloyd. Bountiful looked to take control early in this one, scoring on a four yard run

by Teau Satuala. Satuala, who rushed for 875 yards as a junior last year, has been unable to practice or play to this point. “It’s good for our team to get Teau back,” said Wall. “As he gets more up to speed, he will continue to be a big part of what we do.” In the second quarter, Jakob Hunt was able to punch it in from one yard out after a methodical drive down the field. Viewmont looked to answer with a drive of their own. Quarterback Josh Staples made some throws to keep the Vikings going. As Viewmont moved into Brave territory, the Bountiful defense shut the door on their hopes. Safety Cam Zollinger picked off a Staples’ pass with 8:42 left in the quarter, and the Vikings weren’t able to threaten again in the half. The third quarter was a defensive slugfest. Whenever either team started to get things going, the opponent’s defense was able to rise to the occasion and deny them. The Vikings were able to help themselves when Aaron Dalton made a 30yard field goal. n See “VIKINGS” p. B5


B2

Sports CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Lady Braves edge Bees in volleyball BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Sports Editor

BOUNTIFUL — The Bountiful High Lady Braves volleyball team entered the season with a 5-4 record after competing in a big tournament to start the year. In the team’s second volleyball game since then on Tuesday, they ran into 4A state placer Box Elder, who returned some eight seniors to this year’s squad. While their opponent was tough, they were still able to beat the Bees in five games with scores of 25-19, 12-25, 26-24, and 16-14. “(Box Elder) is a very tough team in 4A,” said Lady Braves coach Lane Herrick. “They’ve got eight seniors on the team and are very well-coached. “They’re one of the best teams in 4A without a doubt.” Bountiful had to come back from four points down in order to take the first game, trailing 5-1 before ripping off 14 of the next 17 points to take a 15-8 lead. After the Bees came back to close the deficit to 19-16, Bountiful was able to put together a run of kills in order to take the first game. A pair of fouls made the score 20-16 before Lauren Winters spiked in a kill for the five point lead. Brindee Herrick finished off the game with a kill for the 1-0 lead.

MADI PACKARD, seen here with a teammate in last year’s action, had 18 kills and two aces as the Braves beat Box Elder Tuesday night. Photo: Jen Barnett www.photo-jen-ics.com The next two games went to Box Elder, winning by 13 in the second game and two points in the third to take a 2-1 lead. “We were putting things together pretty well,” said Herrick. “We didn’t take advantage of some of the things that we should have, they’re starting to come together and gel nicely.” Bountiful was able to bounce back from its third-game loss by winning

the final two games by two points each. Helping the Braves throughout the match were outside hitters Madi Packard and Rachel Cottle, as well as setters Jensen Willard and Tipper Nelson. In all, Packard and Cottle combined for 25 kills, three aces and a number of timely blocks that helped Bountiful squeeze by the Bees. In the fourth game

alone, Packard recorded seven kills for Bountiful, while Cottle got seven more kills and a block assist. Katie Allen got the Braves’ final kill to take the fourth game and tie the match at two games apiece. “Packard is a good leader for us,” said Herrick. “She’s really come through for this team so far and she’s a great presence in the middle of the net.” Willard and Nelson were also key in the win over the Bees, getting 27 combined assists with three aces. Willard and Nelson, a freshman and junior respectively, had never been in the setter position before. However, they are quickly becoming wellrounded table setters for the rest of the Braves this season. “(Brindee Herrick) was our setter going in, but we needed to move her in order to strengthen our line up,” said Herrick. “She’s responded well and the setters have done a great job for us in the middle of the floor. “I like the direction we’re heading in so far. I’m real pleased with all their efforts they’ve put forth. We’re not going to go away this year.” The Braves have one more preseason game before kicking off their region games. The Braves will take on the Viewmont Vikings Tuesday afternoon, then face Clearfield to kick off Region 6 action.

Wildcats drop final preseason game BY SHAIN GILLET

Clipper Sports Editor POCATELLO — The Woods Cross Wildcats football team took the long road to Pocatello, Idaho in order to battle the Rams of Highland High School. And even with the three total touchdown performance by Sean Barton, the Wildcats let a 21-3 lead get away and eventually fell, 30-28. Barton’s first two touchdowns came on the ground, finding the end zone twice in the first quarter to give the Wildcats a 14 point lead after the first quarter. Barton’s scoring runs came from five and 11 yards away respectively, and his night of scoring was almost over as quickly as it started. After an Aaron Thompson field goal from Highland trimmed the lead to 11 points, Barton was quickly on the receiving end of an interception. He returned the pick for a touchdown to give the Wildcats a 21-3 lead. Highland quickly recovered from its deficit, however, and had taken the lead by the time the third quarter ended.

THE WILDCATS DEFENSE, seen here against Bonneville in week two, lost another close game Friday night. Photo: Jen Barnett www.photo-jen-ics.com.

In the third, Highland’s Joel Jewll threw a pair of touchdown passes to help

the Rams obtain the lead. The first was a six yard pass to Cole Ashby, with

the second going to Kase Howell on a 41-yard catch and run. Highland converted a two-point conversion on the second touchdown to take a three point lead entering the fourth quarter, and Jewll threw another touchdown pass to give the Rams enough of a cushion to hold off the Wildcats comeback attempt. Barton finished the game with 30 yards on only five carries with a pair of touchdowns, while Alton Brown had 36 yards on seven carries. Skyler Farnes threw for a season-high 293 yards and one touchdown, but also threw four interceptions against the Rams defense. Barton was the recipient of most of Farnes’ completions, catching five balls for 144 yards. Barton also helped the defense with eight tackles, one sack and one interception. Junior Vailolo had 7.5 tackles in the game. Woods Cross will square off against the East High Leopards Friday night at East High. The Leopards are undefeated at 4-0 on the year, averaging 30 points per contest in their preseason games this year. sgillet@davisclipper.com

VIEWMONT’S CAMILLE GREEN, seen here against Skyline earlier, scored two of the Vikings’ 12 goals Tuesday afternoon. Photo: Jen Barnett www.photo-jen-ics.com

Lady Vikes crush Kearns soccer BY SHAIN GILLET

Clipper Sports Editor BOUNTIFUL — The game between the Viewmont Vikings girls soccer team and the Kearns Cougars was over almost as soon as it began. With only 10 minutes gone in the first half, Viewmont was already up 2-0 before firing off five goals in a seven minute span. The constant goalscoring led to Viewmont racking up a 10-0 halftime lead, eventually winning the match 12-0. The Vikings were easily able to dribble, shoot and score with ease against the Kearns defense Tuesday afternoon. A pair of goals in the 16th and 18th minute by Lizzy Rasmussen and Lindsey Essig gave the Lady Vikes a four-goal lead. Two minutes later the Vikings scored again for a five-goal lead, then Rasmussen put in her second and third goals of the game in the following minutes to increase the lead to 7-0. Meanwhile, the Kearns offensive attack was being

controlled by the defense. They were never able to get a decent shot on goal for the first 40 minutes, and Alex Cook sucked up every opportunity that was even close for the Cougars. Kearns was left with a 10-goal deficit to climb after the first half finally ended, and never recovered in the game. Rasmussen finished with five total goals in the game as six different players found the back of the net for Viewmont. Abbie Flandro, Courtney Wallis and Ella Johnson each scored a single goal. Ali Forsberg and Camille Green each added two goals while Cook stood at the net to collect her fifth shut out of the season. Since taking a 3-0 loss to Bountiful in the second game of the year, the Lady Vikes have won eight straight games. Since entering Region 2 play, Viewmont is 4-0 while outscoring their opponents 31-1. They continue through region play with a game against Hunter at home Thursday.

The Davis Clipper 801-295-2251 1370 So. 500 W. Bountiful Ut 84010


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Sports

B3

HEAD COACH DAVE Newman and his Forza U-12 team are seen here after winning the Mayor’s Cup, which concluded in early September. Pictured here are (in no specific order): Back row: coaches Rich Egan, Kyle Hoffman and Dave Newman. Middle row: Adam Johnson, Koleman Morton, Joshua Beard, Bridger Booth, Mason Hoffman, Brock Robinson and Spencer Brown. Front Row: Briggs Newton, Micah Maynard, Kellen Burke, Alberto “Jr” Ortiz, Tanner Kennard, Kolsen Egan, Jackson Ensign. Photo: Courtesy.

Youth soccer team making waves Winning a soccer championship can be one of the most difficult things to accomplish in any youth sporting event. Recently, the Forza U-12 boys soccer team in Bountiful has been tearing up the competition left and right, winning championships throughout the summer and recently winning the Mayor’s Cup tournament that wrapped up in early September.

Headed by Woods Cross girls soccer coach Dave Newman, the boys team has travelled to tournaments all over the state while winning or finishing second in six of the team’s competitions this season. Starting in June, the team won the Western Light’s Classic, the Impact United Tournament, and the La Roca Pioneer Cup to go along with the Mayor’s Cup.

They also had a second place finish in the Park City Extreme Cup and went to the semifinals of the Sparta Cup in August. Last year the team was able to play in the Utah State Cup, where they also reached the semifinal game of the tournament. The tournament this year will occur in October, where the team is hoping to win a championship.

SURFING THE INDOORS Carter Wood of Farmington Utah recently placed third in the Jr. Men’s Flowboard Competition held in Ogden last weekend. Photo: Courtesy.

sgillet@davisclipper.com

Special golf tourney coming LAYTON — The Special Olympics come around with great anticipation by many, but seemingly the support of very few. In order to support the next special Olympics, Swan Lakes Golf Course in Layton will be hosting the 16th annual Cheryl Gocel Memorial Golf Scramble. The event is a benefit tournament for the Special

Olympics and is considered to be a simple, fun event for everyone who participates. The tournament will take place Saturday, Sept. 24 at the golf course, located at 850 N. 2200 West in Layton. The event will allow times for up to four players and is a scramble event. Cost is $40 per player and includes nine holes on the

course and 18 holes on the putting course, lunch and prizes. Prizes include $10,000 for a hole-in-one, place prizes, long drive and closest to the hole contests. For more information or to sign up for the event, contact Ed Gocel at 801593-8824 or Swan Lakes Golf Course at 801-5461045. sgillet@davisclipper.com

Eckman Ins and Fin Svcs Inc Toby H Gonzales Insur Agcy Inc Mark G Kano Insur Agcy Inc Wayne Eckman LUTCF 98 West 200 North Bountiful, UT 84010 Bus: 801-292-7291

Toby H. Gonzales 465 South 200 West, Suite 2 Bountiful, UT 84010 Bus: 801-292-9424

Jone Olson Insurance Agcy Inc Jone Olson 94 West 200 North Bountiful, UT 84010 Bus: 801-292-8413

Mark Kano LUTCF CLU 21 S. 200 W., P.O. Box 807 Bountiful, UT 84011 Bus: 801-298-2636

Jennifer Bassarear Ins Agy Inc Jennifer Bassarear CASL/CLU 107 N Main St, Ste 104 Bountiful, UT 84010 Bus: 801-292-8291 Fax: 801-292-1344


B4

Sports CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Holy War commences Saturday BY SHAIN GILLET

Clipper Sports Editor PROVO — It’s only the third week of the college football season, and the annual Holy War between BYU and the University of Utah is ready to commence. And despite the early rivalry game, it means just as much to both teams as any other rivalry in the nation. “I think (the rivalry) is the same. At least from our perspective, it’s the same,” BYU coach Bronco Mendenhall said in a press conference. “It doesn’t mean it’s more important or less important. It’s the same.” Mendenhall and Utah coach Kyle Whittingham have been coaching the annual rivalry for the past six seasons, splitting the rivalry game with three wins a piece. Even in the past 15 years, the Cougars and Utes have had 12 games decided by less than a touchdown. Last year’s game ended with Utah blocking the go-ahead field goal in the closing moments of the fourth quarter, sealing a 17-16 win over the Cougars at Rice Eccles Stadium. This year, people are expecting more of the same results as there have been in the past years, dating back to the days of LaVell Edwards and Ron McBride. Bryan Kariya, BYU running back and former Davis High standout, said he doesn’t feel any different about facing the Utes in September instead of November, and preparation for the game is just as important now as it has been in the past. The Cougars opened up the season with what many called a stunning victory over the Ole Miss Rebels, a 14-13 affair that saw BYU score both touchdowns off

playing at less than 100 percent. During the offseason Wynn had shoulder surgery and began throwing before the season started in order to be prepared for the upcoming season. At a press conference Monday, he said his shoulder wasn’t completely healed, but that he was pretty close to being 100 percent. Wynn leads the Utes passing attack this year with 339 yards and three touchdowns without an interception. His two favorite targets so far are DeVonte Christopher and Dres Anderson, who have 224 yards with two combined touchdowns. John White IV leads the rushing attack with 206 yards and two scores on the ground, picking up where he left off last season after leading the team in rushing in the 2010 campaign. The Utes were on the wrong end of • Rivalry began back in what was initially a 1896 with a 12-4 victory 17-14 score against by the Utes. USC last week. Initially, a blocked • Utah leads overall BYU’S MATT REYNOLDS is hoping to lead the Cougars past the Utes in field goal was recovseries 54-34-4 Saturday’s third-week match up against Utah. Reynolds is a senior offensive ered by USC and • Utes won last year’s lineman for the Cougars. Photo: Courtesy of Mark Philbrick/BYU photo scored on the run game on a blocked back. field goal in the closing After initially of Rebel turnovers. The running game still minutes. calling the score off, They followed the win with a tough, hasn’t been completely estab• Schools have split the a review awarded hard-fought one-point loss to the Texas lished while facing two tough last six meetings. the Trojans with the Longhorns, who beat Rice 34-9 the week opponents from the SEC and touchdown for the before. the Big 12 in Ole Miss and final points in the Jake Heaps has performed well so far Texas, as J.J. DiLuigi has only game. this year in just the two games, throwing 95 yards without a touchdown. The end result was a nine point loss for 417 yards with a 60 percent compleKariya has carried the ball just 11 instead of three points. tion rate and two touchdowns. Both of times in those games with 35 yards and The Cougars and Utes will meet at his touchdowns have gone to Ross Apo, no touchdowns. LaVell Edwards Stadium at 7:15 Saturwho leads the teams with 86 yards on For the Utes, it was reported Monday day night. seven catches. that quarterback Jordan Wynn will be

Rivalry’s storied history includes:

Wildcats finally home Saturday BY SHAIN GILLET

Clipper Sports Editor OGDEN — The Weber State University Wildcats football team had a tough start to its regular season. After opening the year with two losses on the road, the Wildcats come home Saturday to host the Sacramento State Hornets to open their Big Sky Conference schedule. Weber State opened up the year with a 35-32 loss to the Wyoming Cowboys of the FBS despite quarterback Mike Hoke’s 314 yard, two-touchdown effort. Tanner Hinds, who graduated from Davis High School not long ago, recorded the first rushing touchdown of his career in that game, a two-yard run that gave Weber State the only lead they had in the game. Against Utah State last week, the Wildcats again saw an early lead vanquished quickly. Hinds was the beneficiary of his second rushing touchdown, a one yard effort that gave Weber State a 7-3 lead after the first quarter. They rarely saw the end zone since, ultimately losing 54-17 thanks to a 24-point third quarter by the Aggies. Hinds, listed as a freshman, is one of roughly six players Weber State has on its roster that are from Davis County.

Others include former 20 tackles and one sack on Bountiful standout Jamie the year, with Okwuonu Rigby (also listed as a racking up 19 tackles while freshman), and former Webb has 13 in two games. Woods Cross receiver DarPete Rolf has the only chon Taggart, who was one interception on the team of the top leading receivso far as the secondary ers in the state last year. looks to aid the Wildcats Hinds so far has been to a win. seen as a short-yardage Sacramento State will be back, rushing for 43 yards looking for Jeff Fleming on 14 carries to have in the Wilda good cats first two day in the games. air as he He leads hopes to the team in improve touchdowns, on his 51 however, percent while Josh comple• 9/3 @ Wyoming L Booker and tion rate • 9/10 @ Utah State L Mike Hoke while • 9/17 Sacramento State are 1-2 in leading rushing the team • 9/24 @ N. Colorado yards on the in pass• 10/1 @ E. Washington team with ing yards • 10/15 Idaho State 139 and 94 (335) and yards gained touch• 10/22 Southern Utah respectively. downs • 10/29 @ Montana Hoke’s (three). • 11/5 Montana State arm has Chase gotten betDead• 11/12 N. Arizona ter in every der leads • 11/19 @ Portland State game since the team

Wildcats 2011 schedule

opening the season, completing 63 percent of his passes for 452 yards and three touchdowns. His favorite target so far is Xavian Johnson, who has 11 catches for 152 yards and two touchdowns. Defensively the Wildcats have Anthony Morales, Willie Okwuonu and Nick Webb leading the charge. The top three tacklers on the team, Morales has

through two games with 105 yards on just nine receptions with two touchdowns. Brandyn Reed is second of the teams with 92 yards with two scores as well. Sacramento is 1-1 on the year, with Weber State posting an 0-2 record. Kick off is scheduled for 5:05 p.m. at Stewart Stadium in Ogden.

sgillet@davisclipper.com

be open from Wednesday August 24, 2011 through Wednesday September 14, 2011.


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

FEARLESS FORECAST Shain Gillet

A

2-1 week isn’t half bad, considering I knew pretty much nothing about the Highland, Idaho team that faced the Wildcats last Friday. The narrow loss the Wildcats took kept me from another perfect week, but I’ll live with having one already early in the season. Four games this week as Davis, Bountiful and Woods Cross kick of region action and Viewmont has another preseason game. Bountiful: 35 Cyprus: 7 Bountiful is entering Region 6 having gone 1-3 in its non region games and looking sluggish on both sides of the ball. But the best thing about Bountiful teams in the past has been this: they always per-

form when the games really start to count. Having to kick off the region schedule with Cyprus is a blessing, as the Pirates were outscored 87-17 the past two games and have given up an average of 34 points in their first four games of the year. Despite the Pirates move from 5A to 4A, there hasn’t been much change in the team’s performance. It may change, but not against the Braves. I expect everybody on the Braves team to have a good day Friday night and improve to 1-0 in Region 6 play. Davis: 21 Syracuse: 17 The battles between the Davis Darts and Syracuse Titans have been close ever since the Titans came into existence. Many of the team’s games have come down to a touchdown or less, and I don’t see much changing here. Last year the Darts battled to a 6-0 victory that was a defensive game for the ages. While most of the offense is gone from that game, Davis’ new look will likely have Syracuse on its heels to begin the

game. The Titans went through the preseason with an unblemished record while giving up just under 12 points per contest on defense. Their schedule was drastically different (playing two 4A and one 3A team) from the Darts’ (who played all 5A teams), leading me to believe they won’t be ready for Davis this week. Woods Cross: 24 East: 31 The Wildcats get the unfortunate opportunity of having to play the Leopards in the first region game of the year. Woods Cross ended the preseason with a 2-2 split with both losses coming by less than a touchdown combined (three points to Viewmont, two to Highland, Idaho). The Leopards, meanwhile, ransacked through their schedule and finished 4-0 while scoring 30 points per game. If the score looks familiar it should. It’s the exact score that Woods Cross was on the short end of last season, and I don’t see a lot of change coming this year despite the team’s improved offensive perfor-

Sports

B5

mance so far. Viewmont: 21 Lehi: 31 The Vikings have done well this season so far, beating Woods Cross and Bountiful in thrilling fashion while fighting to every last second in their loss to Davis. But don’t let Lehi’s record fool anyone. They’re 2-2 this preseason but have scored no fewer than 20 points in any game. They even put up 40 points and still took a loss in the second week of the season. I’m a little worried about Viewmont’s defense in this one, despite their strong preseason performance. Will they be able to sustain an offense that has averaged 37 points per game so far? I’m discounting their 56-point performance specifically because it was against Payson, but I don’t like the Vikings’ odds here. There should be quite a few close games this week, so wherever you’re headed I hope it’s fun. Until next time. Last week: 2-1 For the year: 9-3-1

Darts take down Wolverines 28-12 Game of the Week: BY SHAIN GILLET

Clipper Sports Editor OGDEN — For the second time in four years, the Davis Darts football team played a game at Ogden’s Stewart Stadium. Home to the Weber State Wildcats, the Darts were the designated home team against the Hunter Wolverines, and used an early 28-0 lead to win their third preseason game 2812 Friday night. “We saw some things on film that we needed to fix offensively,” said Davis coach Ryan Bishop. “We needed to find an identity if we could. “More than anything tonight we just wanted to come out and start fast.” The Darts were able to do just that, piling up a 28-0 lead after the first quarter thanks to turnovers caused by the Davis defense and special teams. After Tyson Denney found Karter Chisholm for a 45 yard touchdown pass to give Davis the 7-0 lead, Hunter fumbled the ball on the ensuing kick off. Davis recovered, then found the end zone again with 6:21 left in the first quarter for a 14-point advantage. On the three-play drive, Mark Christiansen scam-

TYSON DENNEY, seen here against Viewmont, threw for two touchdowns as the Darts beat Hunter Friday night. Photo: Jen Barnett www.photo-jen-ics.com

pered into the end zone from six yards away. Davis’ defense forced another fumble after the Wolverines second play from scrimmage, again converting the turnover into a touchdown two plays later. Denney found Corby Fuhriman on the first play of the drive, and Christiansen followed with another six yard touchdown run for the 21-point lead. After Rossiter Potter

intercepted Hunter’s next offensive play, Denney threw a six-yard touchdown pass to Chrisholm for the duo’s second and final touchdown hook up of the night, and the Darts were up 28-0 after the first quarter. “We took advantage of those opportunities when they came to us,” said Bishop. “We got the turnovers and the defense gave us the short field to work with and we were able to

convert those into points. “It was a strong performance for all of us tonight.” Both of Hunter’s scoring opportunities didn’t come until the fourth quarter, after both teams had started to substitute in secondteam players. The Wolverines first score came with 9:52 remaining in the game and made the score 28-6 after the missed extra point. They scored again more than four minutes later on a four yard touchdown run. The Darts held Hunter out of the end zone on the two-point try to cap off the scoring for the game. Denney finished with 119 yards passing with two touchdowns and one interception. Christiansen had 85 yards on 17 carries on the ground with two touchdowns. “Denney is a good player and a good leader,” said Bishop. “And he’s constantly looking to get better. “I think we’re peaking at the right time right now. Hopefully that’ll translate into next week.” The Darts will face Syracuse tomorrow night at Syracuse High School. sgillet@davisclipper.com

Vikings down Braves again, 17-13 Continued from p. B1

The real drama occurred in the fourth quarter. Twice, Staples was able to find 6-4 receiver Haden Heath for touchdowns. The second of the two scores came with only seconds remaining in the game and gave the Vikings the win. “I have to give credit to our defense,” said Lloyd. “They made the plays necessary to win. “Also, the offensive line did a fantastic job. Bountiful did a lot of different things to come after us on

defense and the offensive line gave us time to make the plays and move the ball.” The Vikings were aided on their final drive by a big conversion on fourth down. Staples connected with Holden Grandstaff to move the chains on fourth and five inside Viewmont territory. For the Braves, it just came down to a few simple plays in the loss. “Fact is, we made mistakes,” said Wall. “Mistakes that you cannot make against a good team like

Viewmont and hope to win.” For the Braves, Satuala rushed for 73 yards on 16 carries. Jack Fabrizio and Hunt combined for nearly a hundred yards on the ground to pace the Bountiful attack. Viewmont was led by Staples, who rushed for 60 yards and threw for another 157. Heath grabbed six passes for 80 yards and two touchdowns. Bountiful begins region play by heading down to Cyprus tomorrow for a battle against the Pirates.

Cyprus has struggled so far and the Braves will look to steady their course after a 1-3 start. The Vikings still have one more game before region play kicks off, as they host the Lehi Pioneers tomorrow. Though an unfamiliar opponent, they have the team’s attention. “They are much like the old Davis High teams,” said Lloyd. “They run that double wing offense and throw the ball at opportune times.” Kickoff is set for 7 p.m.

Woods Cross at East Continued from p. B1

duo have combined to racked up 66 tackles so far. Korey Rush and P.J. Nuusa have led the team in sacks, having 2.5 and two sacks respectively. Jewka Petetefa has been the leader in the secondary, despite having just four tackles on the year. The junior defensive back already has three interceptions this year and will be looking for more against the Wildcats, who have grown to be a more passing style team than in years past. Woods Cross changed its offensive style almost as quickly as it’s changed coaches, going from a runfirst balanced style to a shotgun pass-first balanced style of offense. Making the transition easy on first year head coach Nick Longshore is quarterback Skyler Farnes. The southpaw has thrown for more than 900 yards already with seven touchdown passes. His favorite targets this year are Sean Barton and

From the sidelines Continued from p. B1

then as it is now? And what will happen if the teams do decide to not play each other as often? Winning the game may be as meaningful to both teams as beating an FCS team by 40-plus points. However, one need not look further than the high school rivalries that occur to see that a rivalry is important to people no matter when the team’s play each other. Take the case of Viewmont and Bountiful, who just played each other last Friday with a packed house of former and current school members who cheered for their respective teams as the Vikings

Nick Sefakis, who have 23 and 15 catches respectively with a combined 616 yards and four touchdowns. And even though the team is in shotgun a majority of the time, Longshore hasn’t forgotten about the running game. Farnes himself leads the team in rushing with 185 yards and two scores, but Barton leads the team with four scores on the ground to go along with his two receiving touchdowns. Barton also leads the team defensively with 48 tackles and two interceptions, while also getting 1.5 sacks so far. Derek Lord, the junior defensive back, is second on the team with 27.5 tackles and is tied with Barton in interceptions this season. With a revamped offense and a defense that is starting to come together, the Wildcats should be in prime position to get revenge on last year’s 3124 loss. The Wildcats and Leopards will play at East High starting at 7 p.m.

edged out the Braves by four points. On paper this game means nothing more than a preseason match up between two teams that are less than two miles apart from each other. But the game itself is one of the biggest around in the south end of Davis County, along with the Wildcats and Braves. And I have no doubt that even if Woods Cross and Bountiful parted regions, that game will still be just as important as any other football game during the year. So is this rivalry still important? The short answer is yes. But the long-term ramifications of the split might say otherwise in the far future. sgillet@davisclipper.com


B6

Sports CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Pair of changes for hunting day BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Sports Editor

DAVIS COUNTY — Saturday will mark a very special day for youth hunters in Davis County. On that day, youth hunters will be able to take out their rifles and take part in Utah’s Youth Hunting Day. Saturday’s special day will allow youth to hunt Canada, snow, blue and other types of geese in Utah, marking the beginning of what will be a long hunting season for the aerial birds. However, hunters under 15 years old that are taking part in the hunt need to be aware of a pair of changes. On Sept. 17, youth hunters will not be allowed to take light geese. They include snow, blue and Ross’ geese; however, Canada geese may be taken on that day. Also, the light goose hunting season will last no longer than 107 days, even though a 108-day hunt was initially approved by Utah. There will be plenty of opportunities to catch several different types of birds, according to Justin Dolling of Utah’s Division of Wildlife Resources. “With so many other

OFF-HIGHWAY VEHICLE classes can still be taken online by local residents. Photo: Courtesy

Youth OHV courses still available online Utah State Parks has been offering off-highway vehicle courses to everyone who wants to be safer while riding. The state department is also reminding younger riders that the courses are still available online, however, and can be taken at any time. Utah State Parks started offering the course online in an effort to meet the growing demand for OHV youth education courses throughout the state. Each online course

offers different teaching styles in order to address various learning needs (visual aids, etc.). Course fees are $30 and cover ATV’s, off-highway motorcycles and side-byside ATV’s. Students who complete the course successfully will be able to print a temporary certificate, valid for 60 days. For more information or to sign up for an online course, visit stateparks. utah.gov/ohv or call 801538-7433.

It’s Coming! October 6th ... it’s the Clipper

spook tacular Coloring Book

ou y , s d Ki in can w ! prizes Here

's w hat you can

Colo

r an d en te

La Haci 5557 E

$25

win!

r this pag

e at. ...

enda Re stauran t 55

. Rand wick • 5

-0000

EXTRA PAGES will be available at www.davisclipper.com

50% expir

es 10

/31/

off

11

A treat for parents too!

THESE SNOW GEESE will be one of several birds available to hunt during the migratory bird hunting season. Photo: Courtesy of Lynn Chamberlain, Utah DWR. water migratory areas (WMA’s) in Northern Utah to hunt, I’d recommend going to several different spots,” he said. “Water conditions at most of the WMA’s are the best we’ve seen in years. “The Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge also has plenty of water.” DWR personnel planned on removing sediment from the main lake at Salt Creek, allowing the lake to be drained at that area. It will not be ready for the beginning of the bird hunting season, accord-

ing to Dolling. “In the long run, the project will improve duck and goose habitat and hunting at Salt Creek,” he said. “Then, as the season moves along, the conditions in that area will get better.” The general waterfowl hunt begins on Oct. 1. Dolling stated that the Salt Creek project should be done at that time, giving other hunters the opportunity to hunt waterfowl for the season. Other hunts, such as the archery elk hunt, have already started in the state of Utah.

The rifle elk and deer hunt will begin around October. That hunt is the most popular among residents in Davis County and the rest of the state as they attempt to catch their own elk for the season. More information about Youth Hunting Day is available in the 2011-2012 Waterfowl Guidebook, which is available to be downloaded online. For more information or to download the guide book, visit wildlife.utah. gov/guidebooks. sgillet@davisclipper.com


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Everyday Davis

B7

23rd Army Band commemorates 9/11 STAFF SGT. Randy Cox solos on the tuba with the band Sunday.

Music marks anniversary STORY AND PHOTOS BY LOUISE R. SHAW Clipper Staff Writer

N

ORTH SALT LAKE — A stiff wind picked up part-way through the commemorative concert of the Utah National Guard’s 23rd Army Band Sunday, but that didn’t stop the band from playing or the audience from enjoying its WARRANT OFFICER Denny Saunders, silhouetted by a moody sky, led the 23rd Army Band before a crowd gathered on the mix of patriotic tunes and CHIEF Eaglewood Golf Course to commemorate the events of 9/11. Sunday marked the 10-year anniversary of the attack. tributes. It was, perhaps, a reminder to shoulder on even in adversity, with music written to memorialize the events of 9/11 filling the air as the skies darkened. Though the temperature dropped, and though some had to run to catch music and others helped out keeping stands and speakers and the flag erect, the rain held back and the audience gave a warm thanks to band members with each number. Those representing local fire and police agencies, as well as those who have served in the military, also received hearty applause from the group gathered

at Eaglewood Golf Course’s ninth fairway. The concert is part of the second Sunday series organized by North Salt Lake City and financed, in part, with contributions from Big West Oil (Flying J) and Chevron. It was emceed by Matt Jensen, a member of North Salt Lake’s city council, who also plays French Horn in the army band. TOPHER MAXWELL of the South Davis Metro Music written specifically to commemoFire District, keeps the U.S. flag erect on a windy evening, with his daughter, Macie, by rate the events of 9/11 was included in the his side. performance, which was directed by Chief Warrant Officer Denny Saunders. Retired Gen. Robert C. Oaks read a narration largely based on President Barack Obama’s words, to the music of John Williams’ THOUGH THE SKIE “Hymn to the Fallen.” Two other songs written in tribute to those who sacrificed S DA du ring much of the co RKENED, the United States flag wa as a result of the event 10 years ago were also performed, including “American by artists from John ncert, which featured patriotic mel s lighted by the sun odies and music co Soldier,” by Toby Keith and “As All the Heavens were a Bell,” by Jay Bocock. Williams to Toby Ke mposed ith. The city’s next concert will feature a bassoon, oboe and flute trio performing classic French salon music. It is scheduled to take place at 6 p.m. on Oct. 9 in North Salt Lake’s City Hall, at 20 S. Hwy 89.

MAYOR LEN ARAVE (standing above) welcomed the crowd to North Salt Lake’s second Sunday concert prior to the presentation of the colors (at left).


B8

Business CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Carr Printing keeps innovating BY TOM BUSSELBERG

Clipper Editor WEST BOUNTIFUL — Carr Printing is arguably south Davis County’s oldest business. But the 121-year-old company continues to innovate and look for new niches. For example, it still prints phone directories for those who want them, and offers listings, not only for Davis County, but provides an app with business and other listings for most major cities in the country. And it’s faster than other, similar services, because it isn’t Internet-generated. Company president Lloyd Carr says that service, unveiled more than a year ago, continues to grow, even as other sources of business are gaining ground. “Point of Display” banners and signs provide an easy-to-set-up way to publicize an event or service, as a bank might do at each one of its branches, Carr says. It’s generating new business while the company also tailors it to suit existing printing customers, he says. Paintings can be reproduced onto canvas, Carr continues, proudly showing of a portrait of LDS President Thomas S. Monson that was done by local artist Ken Corbett as a gift for the church leader.

CEO LLOYD CARR, right, and Blake Palmer, pre-press specialist, showing off Carr Printing’s new high-quality printing process. Photo by Louise R. Shaw “Then he (Corbett) wanted to do 50 more” reproductions, Carr says, noting, “It was a double honor” to be able to do the job, from a church perspective and also because Monson “was a printer” for many years. “This is a new service. We can produce photos, family histories, sports books, etc.,” Carr says. The advent and virtual total switch to digital photography has been good and potentially bad.

It can be bad if people don’t continually back up their photos, at least once every decade, if not more. “Because it’s all digital, there’s no film to go back to” when needing to reproduce a photo, Carr says. “My sister always backed up discs” and stored them on computers – but both computers were stolen and there was no other backup, he recalls. Millenniata is a way offered by Carr to back up documents, photos, etc.,

for this generation but also for several in the future, Carr says. Files are protected as they are written into a stone-like data layer. A high-powered laser cuts into the data layer to permanently leave pits and grooves (depressions) and lands (surface). Regular CD and DVD discs are photo-sensitive and eventually fade and become unreadable. “With the right (or wrong) kind of disasters, nothing would be left” of those records, Carr says. “The federal government has tested this,” subjecting (stored items) to up to 140 degrees below zero and in boiling water. The data was all readable,” up to 100 years or even longer, he says. Carr Printing also has added light packaging and with recent installation of a third generation Indigo Digital system, is the first company west of the Mississippi to offer this kind of high-quality printing, bindery and more. Its yearbook business now caters to about 500 elementary and junior high schools. Carr provides Cloud computer hosting for schools to send data from various formats, with multiple online access through its browser. “We’re still growing pieces of business,” although staff is down from a high of 65 to nearly 50.

Connections made The room was packed for the recent visitor’s day held by a newlycreated Bountiful chapter of BNI, an international business networking group. The meeting, which was held at Joy Luck restaurant, included Sen. Dan Liljenquist, Rep. Becky Edwards, and North Salt Lake Mayor Len Arave. The group, who create referral connections among participants, is currently looking for new members (www.bni.com). Photo by Jenniffer Wardell

New clinic opens along Highway 89 BY LOUISE R. SHAW

Clipper Staff Writer BOUNTIFUL — It’s not just when you’re sick that you should see a doctor, according to Gavin Van Staden, M.D., it’s also when you want to stay healthy. Van Staden and Bradley A. Urie, M.D., recently opened a medical clinic on Highway 89, near the boundary of North Salt Lake and Bountiful, where they hope to provide “onestop” care. Van Staden works in family practice and pediatrics and Urie in anesthesiology and pain management. The two worked together earlier in Layton, but saw a need in this part of the county for the kind of care they offer. “We spend a lot of time as doctors talking with

DOCTORS Gavin Van Staden (left) and Bradley Urie recently opened Woodmead Medical Clinic on Highway 89, where they hope to assist patients in maintaining good health. Photo by Louise R. Shaw our patients about health concerns, family histories and doing routine screening,” said Van Staden. “We want people to understand why we make recommendations so they’re better able to manage their own health.”

He added that in their new facility, Woodmead Medical Clinic, they offer many procedures but try to make it as “unclinical” as possible to save the “stress and hassle” of hospital visits. Van Staden, originally

from South Africa, specialized in surgery in England and then changed to general practice and family medicine when he came to Utah to work for the University of Utah in 2005. Urie, a native of Davis County, completed a fellowship in Buffalo, N.Y. and a residency in Detroit, Mich., after graduating from Ross University. He said he most often works with those struggling with neck or back pain. Both doctors have four children and live in Davis County. They can be reached at 801-296-0600 or 3263 S. Hwy 89, Suite 300 in Bountiful. Van Staden said they hope to help patients and their families maintain their health, “which in the long term is less costly and less stressful,” he said.

On the Move Conference scholarships open KAYSVILLE — A limited number of scholarships are available for the Oct. 5 Women Entrepreneurs Conference to be held at the Davis Applied Technology College, here. The event will be from 7:30 am. to 4:30 p.m. at the college, 550 E. 300 S. For more information, visit www.datc.edu/ node/7804.

Local doctor tests new tech

BOUNTIFUL — New technology is breaking ground in the medical world, and a local doctor is being recognized for his part in it. Dr. Brian Rodgers of Bountiful Family Healthcare has achieved a major milestone by completing a 90day period in which he demonstrated “Meaningful Use” of an electronic health record (EHR) system. Rodgers used the system for prescribing, submitting clinical quality information and in other ways which can be measured significantly in quality and quantity. Rodgers’ participation is part of the Medicare EHR Incentive Program aimed at making doctors’ jobs easier by incorporating electronic health record systems into their offices and everyday practices. With his demonstration of “Meaningful Use,” Rodgers exhibited the practicality of the EHR system and established himself as a leader in the world of EHR technology.

‘17 miracles’ out on DVD

LAYTON — 17 Miracles, written and directed by Layton-based filmmaker T.C. Christensen (“Praise to the Man,” “The Work and the Glory”). was recently released on DVD from Excel Entertainment Group. As part of the Willie Handcart Company, Levi Savage (Jason Wade) feared that leaving late in the season would lead to despair and death. What he came to find is that for every tragedy, there is a multitude of miracles. Based on actual events, “17 Miracles” will open your eyes to the stories of the Mormon pioneers as you have never before seen them. Something extraordinary is about to happen. The film has a running time of approximately 102 minutes and is rated PG for mild thematic elements. For more information, visit www.17Miracles.com. The DVD ($24.98) and Blu-ray ($29.98) are available at Deseret Book and DeseretBook.com. Excel Entertainment, Utah’s largest independent film distributor is behind such box office and DVD success stories as “God’s Army,” “The Other Side of Heaven,” “Saints and Soldiers,” “The Work and the Glory,” and “Forever Strong.”

maurices coming to Clinton

CLINTON — A new fashion store is scheduled to open its doors this fall. The clothing store maurices (the lowercase spelling is an intentional part of the name) will launch its new location October 2011. According to maurices, they sell clothes to fit almost any situation, whether for school, work, evenings out or evenings in. Their brands include Silver jeans as well as maurices’ own Studio Y and Wear @ Work. “Sure you can spend several hundred dollars for a purse,” said Mark Sutton, maurices’ Senior Vice President of Stores, “or you can shop maurices and find something quite similar and of great quality for a fraction of that price.” The clothing store is also known for its engagement in charitable activities, such as clothing and food drives, support for local citizens, and fund-raising events. Each individual store has the prerogative regarding their charitable activity, ensuring each one will be tailored to the needs of that specific town. Currently, maurices has 780 stores in 44 states. This will be their 15th location in Utah.

Agents complete course

WOODS CROSS — A pair of insurance agents from Woods Cross have completed a career agents course offered by the University of Farmers. Andrea Olsen-Norris and Robert Gaskill completed the five-day course at the Agoura Hills, Calif., “university,” recently. “This course gives an agent the ability to learn how to successfully understand the needs of Farmers customers and help them hone the right insurance to meet their needs,” said Annette Thompson, senior vice president of Farmers.


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Business

B9

Dick’s Sporting Goods set to open at Layton mall BY TOM BUSSELBERG

Clipper Editor LAYTON — Motorists cruising along I-15 have known it was coming for a long time. Now, the day is finally coming for the new Dick’s Sporting Goods to open its doors in part of the old Mervyn’s space at the Layton Hills Mall. The doors will open today, Thursday, Sept. 15, 9 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. for a sneak preview, and an official ribbon cutting will take place Friday, Sept. 16 at 8 a.m. With extended hours for the weekend, the store will be open until 10 p.m. that day, with the same hours on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday. According to PR Newswire, former Brigham Young University basket-

DICK’S SPORTING GOODS will host a grand opening Friday at 8 a.m. at its new store in the old Mervyn’s spot at the Layton Hills Mall. Photo by Tom Busselberg

ball star Jimmer Fredette will be among those on hand as part of the grand opening weekend. On Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., AllAmerican and 2011 John R. Wooden Award winner Fredette will be on hand. Free Adidas T-shirts will also be distributed, while supplies last. On Sunday, a free pair of adult Crocs shoes will be given away to the first 100 adults, 18 and older, visiting the store. Real Salt Lake players Tony Beltran and Nat Borchers will appear from 3 to 4 p.m. In addition, customers can register to win one of two autographed Real Salt Lake Team jerseys or be one of the first 10 customers to purchase a pair of Adidas shoes to receive two tickets to the Real Salt Lake vs. Portland Timbers

match on Oct. 22. In addition, weekend customers can register to win The North Face camping package and autographed Michael Mauro print. Following the belief of founder Dick Stack that “sports play a vital role in teaching our children fundamental values like a strong work ethic, teamwork, and good sportsmanship,” the sporting goods chain will donate thousands of coach’s equipment kits to youth sports organizations, reaching more than a million athletes. The Layton location is the chain’s first in Northern Utah, the second in the state (the first is at Gateway Mall in Salt Lake). There are 457 Dick’s stores in 42 states. tbusselberg@davisclipper.com

Local liquid protein company has national reach BY TOM BUSSELBERG

Clipper Editor KAYSVILLE — There are a proliferating number of protein drinks, out there – all promising to make users stronger or faster. But Provide Gold Liquid Protein is currently used by NFL NBA and NHL teams, as well as by hospitals, senior care facilities, and others. The business is currently housed at the E-Station Incubator facility at the

Simmons Business Center at the Davis Applied Technology College. Brad Andrews co-owns the business with Ed Walker, who provided product development. “We officially formed the company in 2007,’” said Andrews, who has been involved in health-care related sales, marketing, product development and management since 1982. In simple terms, the product fractures amino acids to pre-digest the

proteins, “so you get the full benefit of the proteins, which are all different kinds,” he said. They include meat, milk and vegetable-based, including peanut butter, chicken, fish and pork. “What makes our product a little different is that it is pre-digested. We’ve already fractured those links that bind the amino acids to the protein molecule, which are absorbed much, much quicker by the body,” Andrews said.

Reach thousands of LOCAL readers – and receive this Garage Sale Kit FREE when you

place your Garage Sale ad in the Davis Clipper. The kit includes three attention-grabbing neon posters to post around the neighborhood, balloons, price stickers, and a handy sheet of tips to make your Garage Sale run smoothly.

DEADLINE: 12 noon, Tuesdays CALL 801-295-2251 ext. 100 or 101 or visit www.davisclipper.com Just $12 for 20 words or less – includes online 60¢ per word thereafter

Here are this week’s Garage Sales: Yard Sale Sat. the 17th. 8:00 to ? 507 E 1000 N Bountiful SAT. SEPT 17th, 8-1. 1060 S 650 W, Farmington. Furniture, clothes, scrape booking supplies, frames/art, yard

decor. Cash only. CAMELOT MOBILE HOME PARK’S Semi-Annual Flea Market & Bake Sale. Saturday, Sept 24th 655 N Hwy 89, North Salt Lake from 8am to 1pm. Hot Dogs &

Soda for sale. **Raffle for Gift Baskets** CHARITY YARD Sale. First Baptist Church, 1915 S. Orchard Dr. Bountiful. Sat. Sept 17th, 8-1. Fantastic Items

There are more than 80 medical products/health care distributors that carry the product, including several Davis County retail outlets. “We now have 29 professional sports teams that use our products,” he said, including not only teams in pro football, basketball and hockey, but also major league baseball. “We developed the product to facilitate rebuilding of tissue in people who are sick, for

wound care, burn patients, for a lot of elderly folks who struggle with getting enough protein in their system,” Andrews said. “The body doesn’t digest the same as it did when you’re younger. People lose their lean muscle, it affects their energy,” he said. Provide Gold is very concentrated, with 15 grams of protein in a single ounce, Andrews said. Typically, to get from six grams to 30 grams of

protein generally involves ingesting it in a large shake, something older people can’t or won’t do, he said. Although the firm is based in Utah, its focus has not been here. Instead, their market push has been in states such as Texas, Florida, Ohio and California. For more information, visit providenutrition.com or providegold.com. tbusselberg@davisclipper.com


B10

Health CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

What you need to know about vaccine safety Vaccines are one of the greatest success stories in public health and have put an end to smallpox, nearly rid the world of polio, and greatly reduced cases and outbreaks of many infectious illnesses, such as measles, to alltime low levels. The United States has access to the safest, most effective vaccines in history. By law before a vaccine can be licensed in the U.S. it must undergo very extensive testing. Once in use, vaccines are continually monitored for safety and efficacy. Vaccines are our best defense against infectious diseases, but no vaccine is 100 percent safe or 100 percent effective. Are vaccines tested and monitored for safety? Yes. Vaccines are held to the highest standards for safety. Before a vaccine is licensed in the U.S., the FDA requires testing to ensure safety. After it is licensed, the FDA requires the vaccine’s manufacturer to routinely submit samples from each vaccine lot for testing before its release. Manufactures must also submit their own test

VACCINES have put an end to many diseases, but knowing the facts can keep you safe. Photo Stock results for each vaccine lot’s safety, potency, and purity. Once a vaccine is in use, CDC and FDA monitor its safety through the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). This system collects reports from healthcare providers, vaccine manufacturers, and the general public. An adverse event is any health problem or side effect that happens after

a vaccination. VAERS cannot determine if an adverse event was caused by a vaccine, but can help determine if more investigations are needed. If researchers find a vaccine may be causing a serious side effect, CDC and FDA will investigate further and take appropriate action. This may include distributing safety alerts, inspecting the vaccine manufacturer’s

facilities and records, changing the instructions to providers on the vaccine label and/or in the package insert, restricting who may receive the vaccine by withdrawing recommendations for its use, or discontinuing the vaccine’s license. Who Should Not Be Vaccinated? Some people should not get certain vaccines or should wait to get them. Specific information for each vaccine is found in the vaccine’s package insert. For instance, individuals with a weakened immune system, as occurs with cancer treatment, often need to wait to be vaccinated. Also, if a person has had a severe allergic reaction to a vaccine, a second dose is not recommended. However, a person with a mild, common illness, such as a cold with a low-grade fever, does not have to wait to be vaccinated. What Vaccine Side Effects Occur and Why? • Each person is unique and may react differently to an immunization. • In most persons, vaccines are effective and

often only cause mild reactions such as fever or soreness at the injection site. • Some people may experience a more serious side effect, such as an allergic reaction, but these events are very rare and it may be very difficult to identify these individuals. • Be sure to tell your healthcare provider if you have any health problems or known allergies to medications or food. What Should I Do If Someone Has a Reaction to a Vaccine? • If the reaction is severe call a doctor or take the person to a doctor immediately. • Tell your doctor what happened, when it happened, and when the vaccination was given. • Ask your doctor, nurse, or health department to file a VAERS form, or call VAERS yourself at 1-800-822-7967. For more information on vaccine safety and to receive updates on vaccine safety, visit www.cdc. gov/vaccinesafety or call 1-800-CDC-INFO. For more information on VAERS, visit www. vaers.hhs.gov.

Be aware of food allergies BY ALLAN C. EDSON M.D.

Special to the Clipper WOODS CROSS — In the June 20, 2011 issue of the journal “Pediatrics,” it was reported that in the largest ever study of the prevalence of food allergies, about 8 percent of children under the age of 18 are affected. A previous study published in 2009 had that number at about 4 percent. The highest number are among pre-schoolers, aged 3 through 5, but the most severe reactions are among teens, especially boys. Many reactions are mild, and can be outgrown, but they can often be severe and even deadly. The most common allergen is peanut, affecting about 2 percent of children. Next are milk and shellfish allergies, followed by tree nuts, eggs, fish, strawberry, wheat, and soy. About 40 percent of children with food allergies have severe symptoms, such as wheezing and anaphylaxis (trouble breathing and a sudden drop in blood pressure). If you suspect your child has food allergies, you should see a Board-Certified Allergist.


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

News

B11

Presidential candidate comes to county BY ELIZABETH NIELSEN

Clipper Correspondent FARMINGTON — It isn’t that often that a presidential candidate makes a stop in Davis County. On Monday, presidential candidate John Davis Jr. was on hand at the historic Memorial County Courthouse in Farmington to outline his agenda, answer questions, and meet potential voters one-on-one. He started off by shaking hands and asking if there were any questions, with several coming from a very intimate group surrounding him. Davis was quick to discuss

his reasons for running. “God spoke to my heart. He wants someone who cares about the American people and our country.” If elected, Davis said he will make sure the phrases “in God we trust,” remains on American currency and “One nation under God” remains in the pledge of allegiance. The candidate said that his dedication to God and country is the foundation from which he works. His website quotes a pertinent scripture: “If my people who are called by my name will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from

their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sins and will heal their land.” (Chronicles 7:14). Davis’ core message is that “We have to fix America.” His campaign points, which he calls his “Contract To America,” are: balance the budget; term limits; upholding the Constitution of the United States; common sense leadership; less government; border control, work visas, and citizenship for law-abiding aliens. The concepts are broad, however Davis took time to answer questions and explain the details person

to person. With a “downhome attitude,” Davis appeared approachable and open to discussions with anyone and everyone. Davis plans to continue to move through each county in the United States (of which there are more than 3,000), giving citizens a chance to meet him and have their questions answered. As he hoisted an oversize wrench over his shoulder, the wrench emblazoned in red, white and blue, Davis used it as the symbol he epitomizes of, “Let’s fix America.” news@davisclipper.com

PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE John Davis, Jr. Courtesy photo

Full list of candidates • Stewart Alexander • Michele Bachman • Herman Cain • John Davis Jr. • Roger Gary • Newt Gingrich • Jon Huntsman • Gary Johnson • Fred Karger • Andy Martin • Thad McCotter • Jimmy McMillan • Tom Miller • Barack Obama • Ron Paul • Rick Perry • Carl Person • Buddy Roemer • Mitt Romney • Rick Santorum • Randall Terry • R. Lee Wrights • Vern Wuensche

CALL 801-292-2022

Now available at The Davis Clipper, 1370 S. 500 W. Bountiful


B12

Comics CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011


9000

LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 13-259-0066 Trust No. 1321484-07 Ref: Aaron John Morris TRA: Loan No. xxxxxx2892. IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED July 11, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THIS PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 11, 2011, at 10:30am, James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under a Deed of Trust recorded July 19, 2006, as Instrument No. 2185667, in Book 4079, Page 843-858, of the Official Records in the office at the County Recorder of Davis County, State of Utah, executed by Aaron John Morris and Lisa Morris, Husband And Wife, As Joint Tenants, will sell at public auction to highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. Successful bidders must tender a deposit of $5,000 in certified funds to the trustee at the time of sale, with the balance due by noon the following business day, at the office of the Trustee. At the main entrance of the davis county district court Bountiful Department, 805 South Main Street Bountiful Utah all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Lot 66, byram park estates, according to the official plat thereof as recorded in the office of the Davis county recorder, state of Utah.. The street address and other common designation of the real property described above is purported to be: 7460 South 1475 East South Weber Ut 84405. Estimated Total Debt as of October 11, 2011 is $307,290.12. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is: Aurora Loan Services, Llc. The record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are: Aaron John Morris & Lisa Morris. Dated: September 07, 2011. James H. Woodall 10808 River Front Parkway, Suite 175 South Jordan Ut 84095 (801)2549450 (800)245-1886 (Hotline) Hours: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Signature/by: James H. Woodall R-389487 09/08/11, 09/15/11, 09/22/11 C-7902 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder on October 6, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. at the Main Entrance to the DAVIS County Courthouse, 805 SOUTH MAIN, BOUNTIFUL, UT 84010, in the County of DAVIS by BRYAN W. CANNON, as Successor Trustee, and CitiMortgage, Inc., Beneficiary, under the Deed of Trust dated September 18, 2007, made by RHONDA HILL AND CHARLES HILL, as Trustor recorded September 25, 2007 as Entry No. 2308709 in Book 4374 at page 1018 of official records of DAVIS county, given to secure indebtedness in favor of CitiMortgage, Inc. by reason of certain obligations secured thereby. Interest of Deed of Trust was sold to Vericrest Financial, Inc. Notice of Default was recorded May 25, 2011 as Entry No. 2600269 of said official records. Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder payable in lawful money of the United States, without warranty as to title, possession or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender the purchase price in the amount bid within 24 hours of the sale by cashiers check. The address of the property is purported to be 1716 West 1390 South, Syracuse, UT 84075 more particularly described as follows:

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

LOT 109, BUMBLEBERRY SUBDIVISION PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER, STATE OF UTAH. 12-377-0109, The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The record owner(s) of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default are Rhonda Hill and Charles Hill. This sale is for the purpose of paying obligations secured by said Deed of Trust including fees, charges and expenses of Trustee, advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, interest thereon and the unpaid principal of the note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as in said note and by law provided. Bidders must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale. The deposit must be in the form of a bank or credit union cashier’s check or bank official check payable to Bryan W. Cannon and Associates. The balance must be in the form of a wire transfer, bank or credit union cashier’s check, bank official check or U.S. Postal money order payable to Bryan W. Cannon and Associates. Cash payments are not accepted. A trustee’s deed will be delivered to the successful bidder within three business days after receipt of the amount bid. DATED this 1st day of September 1, 2011. BRYAN W. CANNON 8619 South Sandy Parkway Building A, Suite 111 Sandy, Utah 84070 www.cannonfirm.com Office Hours: M-F 8am – 5pm Phone: (801) 255-7475 Cannon File #90020777 C-7923 9/1-15 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the Justice Complex, Court’s Building, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah 84025, on October 5, 2011, at 3:00 p.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated June 28, 2007, and executed by JORDAN WONG, as Trustor, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOME LOAN CORPORATION as Beneficiary, which Trust Deed was recorded on June 29, 2007, as Entry No. 2284539, in Book 4315, at Page 2063, in the Official Records of Davis County, State of Utah covering real property purportedly located at 188 East 2050 South D2, Bountiful, Utah 84010 in Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: UNIT D-2, BOUNTIFUL TOWNHOUSE PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Tax ID: 05-097-0014 The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is UTAH HOUSING CORPORATION, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is JORDAN WONG. Bidders must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 2:00 p.m. the day following the sale. Both the deposit and the balance must be paid to Lincoln Title Insurance Agency in the form of a wire transfer, cashier’s check or certified funds. Cash payments, personal checks or trust checks are not accepted. DATED: August 26, 2011. LINCOLN TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY by: Paula Maughan its: Vice President Telephone: (801) 476-0303 web site: www.smithknowles.com SK File No. 11-0594 C-7924 9/1-15 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Tuesday, October 4, 2011, at the hour of 4:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Stacey D. Russell and Randall L. Russell, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, covering real property located at approximately 156 East 1150 North, Layton, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: ALL OF LOT 86, FORT LANE SUBDIVISION NO. 2, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE 10025-0086 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Stacey D. Russell and Randall L. Russell. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustee’s sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 25th day of August, 2011 Marlon L. Bates, successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-2364 C-7925 9/1-15 NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, DAVIS COUNTY, FARMINGTON DEPARTMENT, STATE OF UTAH 800 West State St., Farmington, Utah 84025 ESTATE OF BONNIE BELL BERAZ Probate No. 113700221 Scott D. Robison and Sandee M. Robison of 5875 So. 4400 W., Hooper, UT 84315 were duly appointed personal representatives of the above entitled estate. All persons and creditors having claims against the above estate are required to present their claims in writing to Scott D. Robison, Sandee M. Robison or the undersigned or the Clerk of the District Court in Davis County within three (3) months after date of the first publication of this notice or be forever barred under the Utah Uniform Probate Code. Date of first publication: Sept. 1, 2011 DATED the 24th day of August, 201. MELVIN A. COOK Attorney for Personal Representatives 139 East South Temple, Ste. 300 Salt Lake City, UT 84111 C-7926 9/1-15 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Tuesday, October 4, 2011, at the hour of 4:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Gary Burningham and Heidi Burningham, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, covering real property located at approximately 1096 North 300 West, Layton, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as:

9000

CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

LEGAL NOTICES

LOT 14, RILEY SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. 10-039-0014 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Gary Burningham and Heidi Burningham. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustee’s sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 29th day of August, 2011 Marlon L. Bates, successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-1782 C-7931 9/1-15 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Monday, October 17, 2011, at the hour of 4:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Herbert L. Santizo, in favor of Argent Mortgage Company, LLC, covering real property located at approximately 275 East Eagleridge Drive, North Salt Lake, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: LOT 104, EAGLEPOINTE ESTATES PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER, UTAH. 01254-0104 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is Bank of America, National Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank NA as Trustee for Washington Mutual Mortgage Pass-Through Cerificates WMALT Series 2007HY1 Trust, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Herbert L. Santizo. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustee’s sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 8th day of September, 2011 Marlon L. Bates, successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-1858 C-7947 9/15-29

9000

Classifieds

LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Monday, October 17, 2011, at the hour of 4:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Jennifer D. Robinson and John M. Robinson, in favor of Long Beach Mortgage Company, covering real property located at approximately 721 West Moon Circle, Farmington, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: ALL OF LOT 5, MOON PARK SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF 08-086-0005 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2003-1, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Jennifer D. Robinson and John M. Robinson. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustee’s sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 8th day of September, 2011 Marlon L. Bates, successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-2332 C-7946 9/15-29 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the Justice Complex, Court’s Building, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah 84025, on October 19, 2011, at 3:00 p.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated August 26, 2005, and executed by ROBERT A. REYNA AND MICHELLE R. REYNA, as Trustors, in favor of AMERICA FIRST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION as Beneficiary, which Trust Deed was recorded on August 30, 2005, as Entry No.

9000

B13

LEGAL NOTICES

2101022, in Book 3860, at Page 300, and re-recorded on January 30, 2006, as Entry No. 2141076 in Book 3960, at Page 224, in the Official Records of Davis County, State of Utah covering real property purportedly located at 1457 North 2340 West, Clinton, Utah 84015 in Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: LOT 119, LEXINGTON ESTATES PHASE 2, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT AS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER. Tax ID: 14-388-0119 The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is AMERICA FIRST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default are ROBERT A. REYNA AND MICHELLE R. REYNA. Bidders must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 2:00 p.m. the day following the sale. Both the deposit and the balance must be paid to Lincoln Title Insurance Agency in the form of a wire transfer, cashier’s check or certified funds. Cash payments, personal checks or trust checks are not accepted. DATED: September 6, 2011. LINCOLN TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY by: Debra J. Hohosh its: Vice President Telephone: (801) 476-0303 web site: www.smithknowles.com SK File No. 10-0944 C-7944 9/15-29

ANNOUNCEMENT OF APPOINTMENT AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT, DAVIS COUNTY, FARMINGTON DEPARTMENT, STATE OF UTAH IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HELEN McRAE EVANS, Deceased. James Winslow Young, 803 East Center Street, Centerville, Utah 84014, has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-entitled estate. Creditors of the estate are hereby notified to (1) deliver or mail their written claims to said Personal Representative at the address set forth above; (2) deliver or mail their written claims to the Personal Representative’s attorney of record, David S. Cook, 85 West 400 North, Bountiful, Utah 84010; or (3) file their written claims with the Clerk of the Second Judicial District Court in Davis County, State of Utah, or otherwise present their claims as required by Utah law, within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice or be forever barred. Date of first publication: Sept. 1, 2011. DATED this 26th day of August, 2011. DAVID S. COOK Attorney for Personal Representative 85 West 400 North Bountiful, Utah 84010 Telephone (801) 292-7216 C-7933 9/1-15


B14

9000

Classifieds CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011 LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the Justice Complex, Court’s Building, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah 84025, on October 5, 2011, at 3:00 p.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated June 28, 2007, and executed by JASON WONG, as Trustor, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOME LOAN CORPORATION as Beneficiary, which Trust Deed was recorded on June 29, 2007, as Entry No. 2284506, in Book 4315, at Page 1900, in the Official Records of Davis County, State of Utah covering real property purportedly located at 80 North Peregrine Lane #12, Bountiful, Utah 84010 in Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: UNIT NO. 12, CONTAINED WITHIN THE PEREGRINE POINTE CONDOMINIUM PHASE 2, A CONDOMINIUM PROJECT AS THE SAME IS IDENTIFIED IN THE RECORD OF SURVEY MAP RECORDED OF SURVEY MAP RECORDED IN DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, AS ENTRY NO. 1575568, IN BOOK 2616, AT PAGE 381 (AS SAID RECORD OF SURVEY MAP MAY HAVE HERETOFORE BEEN AMENDED OR SUPPLEMENTED) AND IN THE DECLARATION RECORDED ON AUGUST 16, 1999 IN DAVIS COUNTY, AS ENTRY NO. 1539875 IN BOOK 2546 AT PAGE 1014 (AS SAID DECLARATION MAY HAVE HERETOFORE BEEN AMENDED OR SUPPLEMENTED.) TOGETHER WITH THE APPURTENANT UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN SAID PROJECT’S COMMON AREAS AS ESTABLISHED IN SAID DECLARATION AND ALLOWING FOR PERIODIC ALTERATION BOTH IN THE MAGNITUDE OF SAID UNDIVIDED INTEREST AND IN THE COMPOSITION OF THE COMMON AREAS AND FACILITIES TO WHICH SAID INTEREST RELATES. Tax ID: 03-188-0012 The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is UTAH HOUSING CORPORATION, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is JASON WONG. Bidders must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 2:00 p.m. the day following the sale. Both the deposit and the balance must be paid to Lincoln Title Insurance Agency in the form of a wire transfer, cashier’s check or certified funds. Cash payments, personal checks or trust checks are not accepted. DATED: August 29, 2011. LINCOLN TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY by: Paula Maughan its: Vice President Telephone: (801) 476-0303 web site: www.smithknowles.com SK File No. 11-0603 C-7934 9/1-15 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the Justice Complex, Court’s Building, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah 84025, on October 19, 2011, at 3:00 p.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated July 13, 2009, and executed by SEITER PHILLIPPS HOLDING COMPANY, LLC, A UTAH LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Trustor, in favor of BANK OF UTAH as Beneficiary, which Trust Deed was recorded on July 30, 2009, as Entry No. 2471115, in Book 4828, at Page 234, in the Official Records of Davis County, State of Utah covering real property purportedly located at 710 South Redwood Road, North Salt Lake, Utah 84054 in Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: PARCEL NO 1: LOT 4B, OUTDOOR RECREATION OUTLETS-LOT 4 AMENDED SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER, STATE OF UTAH.

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

PARCEL NO 1A: A NON EXCLUSIVE 30 AND 40 FOOT INGRESS AND EGRESS ACCESS EASEMENT APPURTENANT TO PARCEL NO. 1 ESTABLISHED AND SHOWN BY AND ON THAT CERTAIN DEDICATION OF PLAT FOR OUTDOOR RECREATION OUTLETS-LOT 4 AMENDED SUBDIVISION RECORDED AUGUST 30, 2007 AS ENTRY NO. 2302180 IN BOOK 4357 AT PAGE 461 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. Tax ID: 01-402-0002 The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is BANK OF UTAH, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is SEITER PHILLIPPS HOLDING COMPANY, LLC, A UTAH LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Bidders must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 2:00 p.m. the day following the sale. Both the deposit and the balance must be paid to Lincoln Title Insurance Agency in the form of a wire transfer, cashier’s check or certified funds. Cash payments, personal checks or trust checks are not accepted. DATED: September 9, 2011 LINCOLN TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY by: Debra J. Hohosh its: Vice President Telephone: (801) 476-0303 web site: www.smithknowles.com SK File No. 11-0632 C-7950 9/15-29

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 08-337-0316 Trust No. 1232922-07 Ref: Amy Sorensen TRA: Loan No. xxxxxx4902. IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED June 05, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THIS PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 04, 2011, at 10:30am, James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under a Deed of Trust recorded June 22, 2006, as Instrument No. 2178643, in Book 4061, Page 1051, of the Official Records in the office at the County Recorder of Davis County, State of Utah, executed by Amy Sorensen, A Married Woman, will sell at public auction to highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. Successful bidders must tender a deposit of $5,000 in certified funds to the trustee at the time of sale, with the balance due by noon the following business day, at the office of the Trustee. At the main entrance of the davis county district court Bountiful Department, 805 South Main Street Bountiful Utah all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: All of lot 316, pheasant brook north cluster subdivision phase 3a2, kaysville city, Davis county, Utah, according to the official plat thereof.. The street address and other common designation of the real property described above is purported to be: 1941 Cooper Street Kaysville Ut 84037. Estimated Total Debt as of October 04, 2011 is $330,606.08. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is: Aurora Loan Services, Llc. The record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are: Amy Sorensen. Dated: August 31, 2011. James H. Woodall 10808 River Front Parkway, Suite 175 South Jordan Ut 84095 (801)254-9450 (800)245-1886 (Hotline) Hours: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Signature/by: James H. Woodall R-389643 09/01/11, 09/08/11, 09/15/11 C-7908

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder on October 6, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. at the Main Entrance to the DAVIS County Courthouse, 805 SOUTH MAIN, BOUNTIFUL, UT 84010, in the County of DAVIS by BRYAN W. CANNON, as Successor Trustee, and Citicorp Trust Bank, fsb, Beneficiary, under the Deed of Trust dated June 22, 2007, made by LORI KIRKWOOD AKA LORI BURNINGHAM, as Trustor recorded July 2, 2007 as Entry No. 2285210 in Book 4316 at page 2089 of official records of DAVIS county, given to secure indebtedness in favor of Citicorp Trust Bank, fsb by reason of certain obligations secured thereby. Interest to the Deed of Trust was sold to Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC. Notice of Default was recorded April 15, 2011 as Entry No. 2594305 of said official records. Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder payable in lawful money of the United States, without warranty as to title, possession or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender the purchase price in the amount bid within 24 hours of the sale by cashiers check. The address of the property is purported to be 2313 South 1350 West, Woods Cross, UT 84087 more particularly described as follows: LOT 646, FIELD CREST SUBDIVISION PHASE 6, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER. 06-2270646, The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The record owner(s) of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default are Lori Kirkwood. This sale is for the purpose of paying obligations secured by said Deed of Trust including fees, charges and expenses of Trustee, advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, interest thereon and the unpaid principal of the note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as in said note and by law provided. Bidders must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale. The deposit must be in the form of a bank or credit union cashier’s check or bank official check payable to Bryan W. Cannon and Associates. The balance must be in the form of a wire transfer, bank or credit union cashier’s check, bank official check or U.S. Postal money order payable to Bryan W. Cannon and Associates. Cash payments are not accepted. A trustee’s deed will be delivered to the successful bidder within three business days after receipt of the amount bid. DATED this 1st day of September, 2011. BRYAN W. CANNON 8619 South Sandy Parkway Building A, Suite 111 Sandy, Utah 84070 www.cannonfirm.com Office Hours: M-F 8am – 5pm Phone: (801) 255-7475 Cannon File #90020805 C-7927 9/1-15 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the Justice Complex, Court’s Building, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah 84025, on October 19, 2011, at 3:00 p.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated December 6, 2007, and executed by DAVID S. TOLMAN TRUSTEE AND JANET TOLMAN TRUSTEE, OF THE JANET TOLMAN TRUST, DATED NOVEMBER 28, 2006, as Trustors, in favor of AMERICA FIRST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION as Beneficiary, which Trust Deed was recorded on December 10, 2007, as Entry No. 2326444, in Book 4425, at Page 61, in the Official Records of Davis County, State of Utah covering real property purportedly located at 1081 East Birdie Circle, North Salt Lake, Utah 84054 in Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

as: LOT 3-I, EAGLEWOOD ESTATES PLAT I, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Tax ID: 01-190-0003 The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is AMERICA FIRST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, and the record owners of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default are DAVID S. TOLMAN TRUSTEE AND JANET TOLMAN TRUSTEE, OF THE JANET TOLMAN TRUST, DATED NOVEMBER 28, 2006. Bidders must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 2:00 p.m. the day following the sale. Both the deposit and the balance must be paid to Lincoln Title Insurance Agency in the form of a wire transfer, cashier’s check or certified funds. Cash payments, personal checks or trust checks are not accepted. DATED: September 7, 2011. LINCOLN TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY by: Debra J. Hohosh its: Vice President Telephone: (801) 476-0303 web site: www.smithknowles.com SK File No. 10-1287 C-7945 9/15-29 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of the sale, on the front steps of the Davis County Courthouse at 800 West State Street, Farmington, Davis County, Utah, on October 11, 2011 at the hour of 10:00 a.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a Trust Deed originally executed by Jenco Generators, L.C., as Trustor, in favor of Utah Central Credit Union, covering real property located at 252 North Highway 89, North Salt Lake, Utah 84054, and more particularly described as: Beginning at a point on the East line of State Highway 89, said point being South 89°54’24” West 1977.24 feet along the section line and North 0°05’36” West 1412.30 feet and North 21°52’00” East 147.99 feet from the South _ corner of Section 1, Township 1 North, Range 1 West, Salt Lake Meridian, and running thence North 21°52’00” East 82.88 feet along the East line of said State Highway 89; thence South 69°55’00” East 140.00 feet; thence South 21°52’00” West 87.22 feet; thence North 68°08’32” West 139.93 feet to the point of beginning. #01-047-0334. The current beneficiary of the trust deed is Utah Central Credit Union and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Jenco Generators, L.C. This Trust Deed is recorded as Entry Number 2332458 of the records of the Davis County Recorder. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee $5,000.00 at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale. Both payments must be in the form of a cashier’s check or certified funds. The trustee maintains a bona fide office in the state meeting the requirements of Subsection 57-1-21(1)(b). The address of the office of the trustee is P.O. Box 25786, Salt Lake City, UT 84125-0786. The hours during which the trustee can be contacted regarding the notice of default are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, with the exception of legal holidays. The trustee may be contacted by telephone during these hours at (801) 972-0307. THIS IS AN EFFORT TO COLLECT A DEBT. INFORMATION RECEIVED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 7th day of September, 2011. /s/ BRUCE L. RICHARDS Trustee 1805 South Redwood Road P.O. Box 25786 Salt Lake City UT 84125-0786 C-7949 9/15-29 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 05-005-0008 Trust No. 1324518-07 Ref: Kary Austin

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

TRA: Loan No. xxxxxx5214. IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED April 09, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THIS PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 18, 2011, at 10:30am, James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under a Deed of Trust recorded April 10, 2007, as Instrument No. 2260484, in Book 4258, Page 1510-1528, of the Official Records in the office at the County Recorder of Davis County, State of Utah, executed by Kary Austin, A Married Woman, will sell at public auction to highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. Successful bidders must tender a deposit of $5,000 in certified funds to the trustee at the time of sale, with the balance due by noon the following business day, at the office of the Trustee. At the main entrance of the davis county district court Bountiful Department, 805 South Main Street Bountiful Utah all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Beginning in the center of Highway No.2. at the Southeast corner of the property conveyed to William Boulton, by Quit Claim Deed, recorded March 6, 1980, in Book “F”, at Rage 537, of Deeds at a point 14 rods south and 20 rods Southeasterly from the Northwest corner of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 2 North, Range 1 East, Salt Lake meridian and running thence Northwesterly 200 feet along the Southerly line of said property; thence Southwesterly 60 feet along a line parallel to the centerline of said Highway No.2; thence Southeasterly 200 feet to the center of said Highway, 60 feet Southwesterly from the point of beginning; thence Northeasterly 60 feet along the center of said Highway to the point of beginning. The following is shown for information purposes only: Tax ID No. 05-005-0008 The street address and other common designation of the real property described above is purported to be: 2508 South Orchard Drive Bountiful Ut 84010. Estimated Total Debt as of October 18, 2011 is $139,945.57. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is: Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas As Trustee. The record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are: Kary Austin. Dated: September 14, 2011. James H. Woodall 10808 River Front Parkway, Suite 175 South Jordan Ut 84095 (801)2549450 (800)245-1886 (Hotline) Hours: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Signature/by: James H. Woodall R-389935 09/15/11, 09/22/11, 09/29/11 C-7914 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Tuesday, October 11, 2011, at the hour of 4:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Phillip T. Stonehart, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for lender, its successors and/or assigns, covering real property located at approxi-

9000

LEGAL NOTICES

mately 286 East 400 North, Centerville, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: BEGINNING AT A POINT 380 FEET WEST FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 8, BLOCK D, NMC CENTERVILLE TS SURVEY; THENCE WEST 100 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 132 FEET; THENCE EAST 100 FEET; THENCE NORTH 132 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. 02099-0029 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Phillip T. Stonehart. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustee’s sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 31st day of August, 2011 Marlon L. Bates, successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-1711 C-7939 9/8-22 ANNOUNCEMENT OF APPOINTMENT AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the matter of the Estate of Lois Ivie Pingree, the deceased Deceased Probate Number 113700236 Bruce D. Pingree, whose address is 2001 Ross Avenue, Suite 600, Dallas, Texas 75201 has been appointed Personal Representative of the above entitled estate. Creditors of the Estate are hereby notified to: (1) deliver or mail their written claims to the Personal Representative at the address above; or (2) file their written claims to the Clerk to the District Court in Davis County, or otherwise present their claims as required by the Utah law within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice or be forever bared. Date of first publication: Sept. 15, 2011. BRUCE D. PINGREE 2001 Ross Avenue, Suite 600 Dallas, Texas 75201 (214) 953-6878 (p) (214) 661-4878 (f) C-7951 9/15-29 CENTERVILLE CITY PLANNING COMMISSION LEGACY CROSSING AT PARRISH LANE, A MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT, AT THE CORNER OF PARRISH LANE & 1250 WEST Notice is hereby given that the Centerville City Planning Commission will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, September 28, 2011, beginning at 7:00 p.m., or as soon as the matter may be heard, in the City Council Chambers at the Centerville City Hall Building, 250 North Main Street, Centerville, to consider an amendment to the current approved site plan; which consists of changes to the hardscape and landscape planting plan on the east side of theater. The process for this change include conceptual/final site plan approvals by the Planning Commission. More information about this proposed change contact Community Development Department at 801-292-8232. Marilyn Holje, City Recorder C-7952 9/15


9000

LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF APPEAL HEARING—FARMINGTON CITY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN OF a public hearing to be held by the Farmington City Council at the City Offices, 160 South Main Street, Farmington, Utah, at its regularly scheduled meeting on Tuesday October 4, 2011, at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as business permits, to consider an appeal of the Planning Commission’s decision to approve a Hampton Inn located at 332 West Park Lane in a CMU zone (Application #C-1411). The public is invited to attend and give written or oral comments. DATED this 15th day of October, 2011. Holly Gadd, City Recorder. C-7953 9/15 NOTICE TO CREDITORS LENORE W. RANDALL, Deceased Pursuant to Section 75-7-308, Utah Code Annotated, DENNIS T. RANDALL, whose address is 5692 Park Place East, Holladay, Utah 84121, as Trustee of THE LENORE W. RANDALL TRUST, hereby gives notice that LENORE W. RANDALL, the Trustmaker of said Trust, died on August 23, 2011. Creditors of the deceased Trustmaker are hereby notified to deliver or mail their written claims to the Trustee at the address above within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice or be forever barred. William L. Prater, Attorney DATED this 12th day of September, 2011. Dennis T. Randall, Trustee Date of first publication: Sept. 15, 2011 C-7954 9/15-29

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 05-021-0006 Trust No. 1303259-07 Ref: Brian Bradley TRA: Loan No. xxxxxx3517. IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED July 13, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THIS PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 04, 2011, at 10:30am, James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under a Deed of Trust recorded July 17, 2007, as Instrument No. 2289182, in Book 4326, Page 628-647, of the Official Records in the office at the County Recorder of Davis County, State of Utah, executed by Brian Bradley, A Married Man, will sell at public auction to highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. Successful bidders must tender a deposit of $5,000 in certified funds to the trustee at the time of sale, with the balance due by noon the following business day, at the office of the Trustee. At the main entrance of the davis county district court Bountiful Department, 805 South Main Street Bountiful Utah all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Lot 6, oak hills subdivision, plat a, according to the official plat thereof, on file and of record in the office of the Davis county recorder.. The street address and other common designation of the real property described above is purported to be: 2276 South 250 East Bountiful Ut 84010. Estimated Total Debt as of October 04, 2011 is $212,437.72. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is: Aurora Loan Services, Llc. The record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are: Brian Bradley. Dated: August 31, 2011. James H. Woodall 10808 River Front Parkway, Suite 175 South Jordan Ut 84095 (801)2549450 (800)245-1886 (Hotline) Hours: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Signature/by: James H. Woodall R-390010 09/01/11, 09/08/11, 09/15/11 C-7921

Dav is Booki n gs The following is a list of bookings with total fines and/or bail exceeding $1,000.

Monday, Sept. 5 Jeffery Lyle Archibald, 45, Bountiful PD,intoxication,carrying a concealed weapon, firing weapon. Mark Andrew Tyler, 39, Syracuse PD, violation protective order. Dusty Leon Johnson, 24, UHP, failure to register vehicle, contempt of court. Melissa Rosella Heaton, 43, North Salt Lake PD, theft. Steven Thomas Reese, 44, Clearfield PD, amphetamine possession. Dane Austin Massie, 23, DCSO, no insurance, domestic violence, driving on denied license, narcotic equipment. Tina Marie Ellsworth, 41, Clearfield PD, no insurance, narcotic equipment-possession, synthetic narcotic-possession. Joshua Elden Atkin, 24, Layton PD, driving on suspension, narcotic equipment-possession. Robert Santos Soto, 24, AP&P Farmington, unauthorized use of vehicle. Connie Marie Rios,19,Layton PD, assault, disorderly conduct. Krystal Fern Casuse, 31, North Salt Lake PD, simple assault, domestic violence, assault. Eduardo Arevalo, 23, UHP, traffic offense, DUI drugs, marijuana possession, narcotic equipment-possession.

Tuesday, Sept. 6 Kyle James Campbell, 19, Clearfield PD, resisting/interfering with police, liquor possession. Matthew Alderman, 25, North Salt Lake PD, aggravated assault/weapon. Porfie Gilbert Martinez, 40, DCSO, intoxication. Terry Charles Julius Goodman, 22, Farmington District Court, shoplifting, false police report. Shawnne Jane Ross, 53, Davis County Justice Court, fraudulent activities. Craig J. Perkins, 37, Layton PD, DUI alcohol. Edson Yadir Vargas, 21, Morgan County Sheriff, criminal trespass. Steven James Elliott, 38, Sunset PD, simple assault, disorderly conduct, narcotic equipment-possession. Carol Lee Jones, 53, Bountiful PD, DUI drugs. Cheryl Lynn Thaxton, 42, DCSO, amphetamine. Lawrence Kim Archuleta, 30, DCSO, service FTA warrant, no proof of insurance. Tiffani Readann Fergeson, 23, AP&P Farmington, counterfeiting. Lindsay Bradford, 28, Davis Metro narcotics, marijuana possession. Andres Gonzales, 18, Clearfield PD, disorderly conduct, threat. Mitch Clegg, 22, Clearfield PD, threat, disorderly conduct. Robert Lynn Ellsworth, 48, Bountiful PD, property damage, disorderly conduct, intoxication.

Dominick Jordan Amarel, 19, DCSO, contempt of court. Boyd M.Eder,49,Bountiful PD, simple assault, intoxication.

Wednesday, Sept. 7 Mark Anthony Davis, 41, Centerville PD, DUI alcohol, driving on suspension. David Carlin Woodmansee, 31, DCSO, DUI alcohol. Victor Ray Dobson, 27, DCSO, shoplifting, resisting/ interfering with police. Duy Minh Trang, 40, DCSO, marijuana possession. Sandra Franco, 29, UHP, failure to register vehicle, driving on suspension, traffic offense. Ernest Irving Larum, 41, Clearfield PD, doing business without a license. Gerson Valle, 25, Morgan County Sheriff, no insurance. Kevin Lee Carter, 27, DCSO, DUI alcohol.

Thursday, Sept. 8 Jessica Gorder, 29, Sunset PD, theft. Joshua Cameron Watts, 19, West Bountiful PD, liquor free text, theft, larceny from a vehicle. Travis James Fausett, 28, Clearfield PD, simple assault. Abraham Ocejo, 19, DCSO, marijuana possession, driving on suspension, larceny from a vehicle. Victor Zuniga Lafuente, 40, DCSO, criminal arrest warrant. Jeremy Verlon Nelson, 24, Kaysville PD, reckless endangerment, firing weapon. Kerri Leigh Cordrey, 40, Clearfield PD, narcotic equipment-possession. Brent James Thomson, 31, North Salt Lake PD, simple assault. Candido Gonzalez, 29, Morgan County Sheriff, DUI alcohol. Kenneth Roger Mascarenas, 48, Syracuse PD, intoxication, simple assault. Christopher Steven Zeigler, 29, DCSO, marijuana possession. Tyler Daniel Braun, 28, DCSO, no proof of insurance, driving on suspension. Brijette Moon, 28, UHP, DUI drugs, marijuana possession, narcotic equipment-possession, faulty equipment. Rory J. Sevy, 23, DCSO, contempt of court, narcotic equipment-possession. Christopher William Norcross, 22, Layton PD, DUI drugs, licensing free text, marijuana possession, narcotic equipment possession, improper turn. Zack James Littlefield, 18, Syracuse PD, damage property private. Jeremiah Lee Hernandez, 31, Clinton PD, heroin possession.

Friday, Sept. 9 Jeffery Martin Candia, 28, DCSO, DUI alcohol, stopping violation, traffic offense, driving on suspension. Jeremy Burton Williams,

CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011 35, North Salt Lake PD, stolen property. Andrei Ardelean Holt, 21, DCSO, service FTA warrant. David Frederick Fox, 48, UHP, DUI drugs, traffic offense. Justin Truman, 22, DCSO, theft, stolen property, service FTA warrant, false police report, marijuana possession. Chance Lindsay Robinson,30, Centerville PD, forgery of misc. documents, driving on denied license. Jason Nathanial Weille, 32, Woods Cross PD, using plates reg. to other vehicle, amphetamine possession, traffic offense, no insurance. Gerald Lee Stanley Jr., 50, UHP, theft. Charles Tyler Hughes, 33, North Salt Lake PD, forgery of misc. documents, fraud-insufficient funds check. Michele Hughes, 50, North Salt Lake PD, fraud-insufficient funds check. Colton Alexander Pratt, 18, Layton PD, burglary forced entry residential. Shane Daniel Daley, 36, UHP, no insurance.

Saturday, Sept. 10 Charla Maree Diaz, 40, UHP, amphetamine sell. Thomas Romero, 47, UHP, traffic offense, DUI drugs, failure to display license plate. Lara Jan Lucas, 34, Layton PD, traffic offense, DUI alcohol. Harley Greg Welsh, 32, North Salt Lake PD, criminal trespass, false police report, driving on denied license, traffic offense, false police report. Elizabeth Chantel Levensailor, 19, North Salt Lake PD, liquor possession, contempt of court, assault. Reanne Marie Chase, 20, North Salt Lake PD, aggravated assault weapon. Clayton Arthur Howell, 24, UHP, DUI alcohol, traffic offense. Samuel Juan Antonio Gonzales, 27, UHP, DUI alcohol, speeding, traffic offense. Gregory Conrad Wahlstrom, 27, Centerville PD, marijuana possession, driving on suspension. Melissa Rose Gallegos, 32, Clearfield PD, no proof of insurance. Marissa Rose Apodaca, 20, Layton PD, shoplifting. Christopher Lee Harmon, 38, Sunset PD, intonation, marijuana possession, service FTA warrant. Tawny Shae Rollins, 22, Bountiful PD, narcotic equipment-possession, damage property public. Carey John Phelps, 48, UHP, DUI alcohol, no insurance, traffic offense. Rachel Ann Speth, 32, Centerville PD, narcotic equipment-possession, contempt of court, driving on suspension. Dominic Francis Olveda, 20, UHP, DUI drugs, no insurance, narcotic equipment-possession. Dennon Jay Brown, 19, West Bountiful PD, theft, narcotic equipment-possession. Mark Anthony Eastman, 20, Clearfield PD, criminal trespass, theft. Jordan Harold Hascher, 20, Clearfield PD, criminal trespass, theft.

Classifieds

JoAnn Ruth Clegg, 19, Layton PD, simple assault. Jordan Berghout, 19, Layton PD, controlled substances, liquor possession, contempt of court, liquor possession. Moises Cervantes, 33, UHP, amphetamine possession.

Sunday, Sept. 11 Martin Saenz-Rodriguez, 20, North Salt Lake PD, liquor, service FTA warrant. Jason Allan Small, 27, Layton PD, DUI alcohol, driving left of center. Randall David Watts, 41, UHP, DUI alcohol, other right of way violation. Nelly Espinoza, 33, UHP, traffic offense, DUI alcohol, liquor free text, child restraint violation. Shanae Walters, 22, Layton PD, DUI alcohol, failure to display license plate, no motorcycle license. Christina Ann Martinez, 42, Centerville PD, DUI drugs, traffic offense. Michael Patrick Doyle, 42, DCSO, DUI alcohol, throwing material from moving vehicle.

B15

Cindy Stevenson, 42, Layton PD, simple assault, domestic violence, cruelty toward child. David Dean Madill, 26, DCSO, traffic offense, no proof of insurance, driving on suspension. Breann Rosalyn Pacheco, 28, Layton PD, driving on suspension. James Travis Betts, 26, UHP, traffic offense, driving on suspension, narcotic equipment-possession, marijuana possession, DUI drugs. Hardeep Singh, 42, Woods Cross PD, embezzle business property, damage property public, issuing a false certificate, gambling device-transport, no motorcycle license. Christopher Lamar Sands, 37, Clearfield PD, domestic violence. Adrianna Ramirez, 19, UHP, traffic offense, driving on suspension, narcotic equipment-possession, marijuana possession, DUI drugs. Kevin Richard Hadley, 40, UHP, DUI alcohol, speeding.


B16

News CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

RYAN KNIGHT enjoys the ride in a pallet car created by Smith Optics in last year’s race. This year the event will move to Layton Hills Mall. Courtesy photo

PARC racers take to the mall Wed. LAYTON — “Working on dreams,” is the theme of the third-annual Pioneer Adult Rehabilitation Center (PARC) Pallet Race set for next week. Because of it’s success in previous years, this year’s race will move to the Layton Hills Mall south parking lot, where PARC students and business supporters will compete for design and speed prizes on Wednesday, Sept. 21, beginning with a parade at 10 a.m., followed by the races at 10:30 and an awards ceremony and lunch at 11:30. PARC is a non-profit organization administered by Davis School District that focuses on fostering independence for people with disabilities by helping them with employment and training. It serves more than 600 people with disabilities along the Wasatch Front. Businesses are involved in sponsoring and creating the cars, which will carry a member of PARC and be pushed by sponsors. Those participating in

this year’s event include Barlow Companies, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Layton Hills Mall, Mountain America Credit Union, Northrop Grumman, Boeing, Bell Photography, Lifetime Products, Group Benefit Services, Brady Industries, Grainger, Smith’s Food & Drug Stores, Waxie, and Interstate Barricades. A free lunch of finger foods will be provided following the race by the Olive Garden Restaurant, D & B Catering, Layton Golden Corral Restaurant, Layton Kentucky Fried Chicken, Utah Foods Services and Pepsi Bottling of Ogden. At the awards presentation, PARC will also honor individuals with disabilities that have made great progress toward independence through their employment. More information on PARC and next week’s pallet race is available through Merri Ann Perkins, at 801-402-0950 or at www.parc-ut.org. lshaw@davisclipper.com

Made in America Riccar Vibrance

Most Vacuums

Made in USA

Made Somewhere Else

Quality Construction

Disposable Construction

3 Year Warranty

1 Year Warranty

ONLY 00

$219. $300 - $500 On Sale Now

$10.00 OFF

Come in and try the Riccar Vibrance Satisfaction Guaranteed

All

Stain Removers

Any Vacuum Service Exp. Sept. 30, 2011

20%OFF Exp. Sept. 30, 2011

305 N. 200 W., Bountiful UT. 84010

801-298-3656 Mon-Fri 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Sat 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

The great outdoors The Centerville City Trails Committee is sponsoring a fall hike on the Parrish Canyon Trail, Sept. 17 at 7 a.m. People are asked to meet at the top of Parrish Lane (700 East 400 North) in Centerville. This will be about a half-day hike for the more experienced hiker. Participants will receive a “Take a Hike” lapel pin. For questions call 801-298-3021. Courtesy photo


Davis

Life

Bulletproof Washington Calendar of Events listings, Page C2

What’s on TV

TV listings for the week, Page C6-7

SECTION

C

Thursday, Sept. 15, 2011

Beauty of a decade Lamplight Gallery celebrates 10 years BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer BOUNTIFUL – For their 10th anniversary, Lamplight Gallery has invited some old friends to come home. To mark the occasion, the gallery has created an exhibit featuring work from Lamplight artists both past and present, an eclectic, lovely collection of work that spills across both levels of the

COUNTERCLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: Work by Anne Chesley, Theresa Otteson, and Carma Hart Fuller. Photos by Jenniffer Wardell

Family trio headlines two concerts BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer

NORTH SALT LAKE — For these performers, music is a family affair. Award-winning musician and North Salt Lake resident Lenora Ford Brown will be performing a set of concerts with her son and daughter, who are also musicians. The trio will first perform at the Libby Gardner Concert Hall on the University of Utah campus on Sept. 18 at 7 p.m., followed by a concert on Sept. 23 at 7:30 p.m. in the Assembly Hall at Temple Square. “Several months ago, my kids

and I decided that doing a concert together would be a great family memory,” said Brown. “We started small, but it kind of mushroomed from there.” The mushrooming meant that one concert grew into three, the first of which was already held at Cabrillo College in Santa Cruz, Calif. Heather Thompson, Brown’s daughter, performs and teaches piano nearby. Evan Neal, Brown’s son, recently became a cellist in the Salt Lake Symphony, while Brown is an adjunct Professor of Music at the University of Utah. “Santa Cruz was my daughter’s area, the U is my area, and

Temple Square is everyone’s area,” said Brown. During the concert, the three will perform work by Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert and Brahms. Though many of the pieces will be played individually, Brown will have a duet with each of her children. “It’s just an absolutely great experience,” said Brown, of the chance to perform with her kids. “There are families who get to play together, but not a lot. It’s been wonderful.” LEFT TO RIGHT: Heather Thompson, Evan Neal, and Lenora Ford Brown. Courtesy photo

gallery and feels like an artistic family reunion where the visitors are just as welcome as the artists themselves. For those familiar with the gallery, the exhibit offers the chance for them to go hunt for old friends of their own. I was thrilled to reacquaint myself with Deborah Goodman’s bright birds and frogs, as whimsical as pages from a children’s book and finely wrought enough to satisfy any nature lover. Carma Hard Fuller’s carved, painted gourds echoed the nature theme while offering a bit of three-dimensional fun. Some of those old friends might even surprise you. I was struck by Beverly Mangum’s meltingly beautiful watercolors, perfect enough for postcards and imbued with just a touch of wonder. There are also several Lamplight stalwarts on display, including the four artists who have been involved since the gallery was founded – Colleen Parker, Barbara Dowdle, Charlene Hill, and Rebecca

Lee. Parker’s work is bright and freeform, the result of experimentation and play that seems to encourage viewers to go out and do the same thing. Lee focuses on exquisitely detailed still lifes of fruit and flowers, while Hill balances nature with a touch of the domestic. Dowdle’s latest collection of shells into dreamy, warmwashed fantasies. There’s also the chance to get acquainted with new artistic friends whose work you might not have had the chance to see before. Stan Elmer turned a simple flower into an explosion of color that looked like a firework in miniature, while Kay Affleck’s animals had fur so richly detailed that I felt like I could reach through the canvas and pet them. A few new spots recently opened up at the gallery, so if you’re familiar with a brush or camera there’s a chance you might be able to permanently join the party (call 298-0290 for more information). As for the rest of us, there’s more than enough to inspire at least one more return visit. jwardell@davisclipper.com


EVENTS C2

Calendar CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011 ents Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Oklahoma!” Oct. 3, 4, 5, 6, 10 and 11 at 7 p.m., Oct. 8 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets available at the BHS Business Office, Top Hat DVD & Video, and Paisley Skye. Set in a Western Indian territory just after the turn of the century, Curly, a handsome cowboy, and Laurey, a winsome farm girl, play out their love story. Although the road to true love never runs smooth. That they will succeed in making a new life together, we have no doubt, and that this new life will begin in a brand-new state provides the ultimate climax to the triumphant OKLAHOMA! This is a family-

Sept. 8-16 • In partnership with the Utah Food Bank, First National Bank is sponsoring a food drive from now until Sept.16. This is a unique opportunity to support your favorite Utah team in sport’s most exciting rivalry. Bins will be decorated in Utah Red and BYU Blue. Food contributions can be placed to show support for your team. Let’s see who has the best, most devoted fans! Donations are accepted at any branch of First National Bank.

‘Anything Goes’ at CenterPoint Legacy Theatre now through Sept. 30. See ‘Stage’ for complete information.

Sept. 15 • Best-selling author Brandon Sanderson, award-winning illustrator Mark Buehner, and Deseret Book Editor Lisa Mangum will be speaking and answering questions about their books and yours in “Talking Books,” an exciting evening program presented at the Davis County South Branch Library at 7 p.m. The library is located at 725 South Main in Bountiful, Utah. Tickets are required. Free tickets will be available at all branches of the Davis County Library starting at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 10. Limit two tickets per person. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. After the program speakers will be available to sign books and visit. To make accommodations for patrons with special needs, contact Chris Sanford or Rosalie Taylor at 801-451-2322. • Fifth annual “Dixie Clicks” Photo Club exhibit, 4-7 p.m. Bountiful Farmers Market, East of Main Street on 100 S., Bountiful. • BNI, an international networking organization specializing in business referrals among members, is holding a visitor’s day for its Golden Goose Chapter, 7-9 a.m. at the Russon Brothers Mortuary, 1941 N. Main, Farmington. Anyone interested in attending is welcome. Contact Diana Holbrook McKee for reservations at 801-390-3982 or DiSellsHomes @gmail.com. For more info about BNI, visit www.UtahBNI.com.

Sept. 15-16 • The 3rd annual Freedom’s Light Constitution Celebration will take place on Sept. 15-16 at the Bountiful City Park on 400 N. and 200 W. This is a free event for the whole family and runs from 9 a.m. till 9 p.m. You will have a chance to see the Mayflower, visit Jamestown and meet Christopher Columbus. Schools throughout Davis County will be competing in a Constitution Bowl, which has been expanded to include elementary schools as well. There will be stage performances, food booths as well as live entertainment. For more information or to volunteer contact: 801-2985309, england1776@gmail.com or 80 1-296-6053.

Sept. 17 • Constitution Day Committee of Utah presents David Barton, America’s historian, author of “The Bulletproof George Washington,” 6:30 p.m., Davis Conference Center, 1651 N. 700 W., Layton. Tickets available at www.cdutah.org or by calling 801-540-0373. • You are invited to attend TriCounty Independent Living Centers Celebration Of Independence 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at Fort Buenaventura Park located at 2450 A Avenue in Ogden. Learn about resources for people with disabilities and participate in free family activities and lunch. Darice Aslett at 801.612.3215 or visit tricountyilc.org. • It’s a party at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts (UMFA) and the whole family is invited, 1-

4 p.m., the UMFA and the Confucius Institute at the University of Utah will present Artful Afternoon in the Marcia and John Price Museum Building. Artful Afternoons are semiannual family programs devoted to art, creativity, culture, and fun. Free and open to the public, the UMFA’s upcoming Artful Afternoon will be inspired by the Moon Festival. For more information call (801) 581-7332 or visit www.umfa.utah.edu .

Sept. 20 • AARP will meet at the Golden years Senior Activity Center, 726 S. 100 E., Bountiful, 12:30 p.m. Russell Mahan, Bountiful City Attorney, will be the speaker. • WSU’s Department of Performing Arts will host a WSU Marching Band Review featuring high school bands from Utah as they perform and receive a critique from judges to help improve their performance, 4 p.m., Stewart Stadium, $6/$30 for family up to six, 1-800-WSUTIKS.

Sept. 21 • The Great Salt Lake Chili Affair – a fund-raiser to benefit The Road Home, Utah’s largest homeless shelter, 5:30-9 p.m., The Salt Palace, hall 4, individual tickets $42, table of 8, $300. $5 donation appreciated for the Kid Zone. Online at www.theroadhome.org or at the door the night of the event.

Sept. 22 • Where can you find a whole bunch of costumed characters, games and safety information, all at the same time? In Roy, at Lakeview Elementary 2025 W. 5000 S., from 5:30 -8:30 p.m., the Lakeview PTA will host a community Health and Safety carnival. Tickets and wristbands available at the carnival.

Sept. 24

and join NSL for its Halloweenthemed 5K along the beautiful Bonneville Shoreline Trail. (Prizes will be given for the fastest runners and for the best costumes.) In addition to the 5K there will be a free kids 1K. The finish area for the race will be Trailhead Park, 9 a.m. 5K Cost: $12 with Tshirt, $6 without a T-shirt. Register online at: http://www.active. com/running/north-salt-lakeut/run-for-your-lives-halloween5k-2011

CONCERT Sept. 16 • WSU Cultural Affairs concert series presents pianist Christopher O’Riley and cellist Matt Haimovitz performing music ranging from Bach to Radiohead, 7:30 p.m., Val A. Browning Center Austad Auditorium, $15/$12, 801-626-6570.

Sept. 19-20 • In a first-ever partnership, Utah Chamber Artists (UCA) and the Salty Cricket Composers Collective will partner on a commission competition exclusive to Utah-based composers. The winning two pieces will be premiered at the Utah Chamber Artists’ annual Cathedral Collage concerts called, “Voicing Wonder... Chant & Contemplation.” The concerts will begin at 7:30 p.m. and will be held at the Cathedral of the Madeleine. Admission is free. More information about this concert can be found at utahchamberartists.org.

Sept. 22 • The Ogden Symphony Ballet Association presents Beethoven’s “Emperor” Concerto, 7:30 p.m., Val A. Browning Center Austad Auditorium, $36/$31/$26/$21/$16, 801399-9214.

• Harvest Moon Celebration, historic 25th Street, Ogden, noon-10 p.m. Free kids activities noon-5 p.m. www.historic25.com • Semi-Annual Flea Market will be held from 8-1. 655 North Hwy 89 Camelot Mobile Home Park in the club house and around the park.

Sept. 23

Oct. 8

• UMEA All-State Grand Festival Concert, Tabernacle on Temple Square, 7:30 p.m. The

• Find your favorite costume

• Temple Square Concert Series, 7:30 p.m. Assembly Hall. “Families Making Music” concert. Lenora Ford Brown, piano; Heather Thompson, piano; Evan Neal, cello.

Oct. 8

Tell Davis County what you’re doing! Send in your events, concerts, plays, and communi ty events to rjamieson@davisclipper.com to get it included in the calendar.

Utah Music Educator Association’s AllState Grand Festival Concert is a celebration of the top music students from across the state of Utah. This concert features high school choral students who have been selected as the best in the state. Guest conductor for this year’s event will be famed Mormon Tabernacle Choir director Mack Wilberg. Tickets are required for this event. Tickets may be obtained at the Conference Center Ticket Office, located at door 4, over the Internet, or by calling 801-570-0080. Best dress is requested.

Oct. 21-22 • The Orchestra at Temple Square, under the direction of Igor Gruppman, will present “An Autumn Concert” at 7:30 p.m. in the Tabernacle. Tickets area required for this event and may be obtained at the Conference Center Ticket Office, located at door 4, over the internet, lds.org or by calling 801-570-0080.

STAGE

Oct. 7-8 • Odyssey Dance theatre will present its smash Halloween hit “Thriller,” Weber State University, Val Browning Center, Ogden, 801-626-8500 www.weber-statetickets.com

Oct. 12-29 • Odyssey Dance theatre will present its smash Halloween hit “Thriller,” Kingsbury Hall, Salt Lake City, 801-581-7100 www.kingtix.com

CLASSES Ongoing

• CenterPoint Legacy Theatre presents the musical “Anything Goes” at the Davis Performing Arts Center, 525 N. 400 W., Centerville. For tickets and more information, call 801-298-1302.

Oct. 3-6, 8, 10-11

Sept. 20, 27, Oct. 4

• Bountiful High School pres-

Sept. 20-Nov. 1 • Stepfamily education classes. Free educational program focusing on issues unique to stepfamily relationships. Family Enrichment Center, 320 S. 500 E., Kaysville, Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m. Six week class. Register 801-402-0664. Free childcare ages 0-5, dinner provided. Topics include: communication, conflict management, exspouses, financial issues, parenting non-biological children plus much more.

Sept. 20, 23 friendly production for all ages.

• The NAMI Davis County affiliate present the BRIDGES Class, building recovery of individual dreams and goals through education and support, DATC Kaysville campus, room 1115, 10week course, beginning Sept. 6, 79 p.m. cbhotshot47@gmail.com, 801-638-3008 or brocma1956@hotmail.com. • Family to Family class presented by NAMI Davis County affiliate, free 12-week course, Kaysville DATC campus room 1099, 7-9 p.m. For more information, call 801-444-0144.

Sept. 3-30

Rainbow Squares are having beginning square dance classes on Tuesday nights starting Sept 20, 7-8:30 pm. The first three classes Sept. 20, 27 and Oct. 4 will be free for new dancers. After that they will be $5 per person to cover rental of the hall. Couples and singles are welcome. Rainbow Squares dance on Tuesday nights at the Bountiful Community Church, 400 E 150 N. Regular members dance from 8:30 – 10 p.m. Square dancing is a fun way to increase your cardiovascular fitness, strengthen bones, burn calories and meet new people. There are “angels” (experienced dancers) to help out and also dance with the beginners who need partners. Call Ron and Audrey Poulson 801-451-8837 or Don and Lynne Rasmussen 801-292-0113 for more info.

• Square dance classes.

• Davis County Health Department’s Family Caregiver Support Program is offering an eight-week series of classes for individuals caring for family members who are older or frail. These classes are free to the public. Individuals may attend at anytime during the series. A complimentary lunch is provided but an RSVP by each Monday at noon is required to receive a meal. Contact Megan at 801-525-5088. No reservation is required to attend the class only. Topic: How to Pay for LongTerm Care, presented by Jared Nye, Legacy Village Assisted Living Center. • Sept. 20, noon, Legacy Village, 1201 N. Fairfield Road, Layton • Sept. 23, 11:30 a.m., Golden Years Senior Activity Center, Bountiful.

Oct. 25-Dec. 6 • ACT prep class sponsored by the University of Utah’s Youth Education Office, 4:30-7 p.m., $189, Bountiful U of U campus, 75 E 200 S. To register, go to www.youth.utah.edu or phone (801) 581-6984.

Oct. 7-8 • The Art of Craft: A Writers Conference for ALL Genres hosted by the Utah Chapter of Romance Writers of America. Agents and Editors will be taking pitches. In Park City. For more info, go to www.utahrwa.com/ HOWConference.html


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

Classifieds

C3

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

100 HELP WANTED

TEACJER (Private School) Learn to teach children to think for themselves in a fast-paced academic environment. Challenger School is seeking exceptional individuals for teaching positions in the Salt Lake City area. To apply, submit a cover letter, resume, and brief essay discussing your view of America to HR@challengerschool.com.

ACTIVITIES POSITION, P/T weekdays, some Saturdays, and evenings. music skills required. Apply at www.rlg.net under Life Enhancement Coordinator.

MODELS, ACTORS, Extras needed! Earn $15-$165 hr. All experience levels. 801-4380067

BUBBLY, ENERGETIC Person Needed immediately! P/T account rep to call existing accounts and some new clients. Must be outgoing, and have own transportation, hourly wage. 801-295-3127

TOW TRUCK F/T driver needed. Must live in the S. Davis area. CDL a plus but not required. Must have good driving record.

MEDICAL ASSISTANT/ Receptionist. We are looking for a confident medical receptionist with good people skills and excellent work ethic for a busy family medicine practice. Please fax resume to 801-5432249. Certified Medical Assistant preferred but not required.

BRATS! NOW HIRING! 16 to 20 hours per week. Minimum Wage. 801-397-2728 OPENING FOR Hair Stylist, permanent makeup artist or Esthetician. 1/2 off booth rent for Sept. 801-292-8177 or 801699-8303 SNOW-PLOW DRIVERS Wanted. Keep your day job and be on call to plow snow. Need Valid Drivers License, Good driving record, & transportation to and from starting point. Available during every snow fall. Hours and shift length vary. $15$18/hour. Loveland Lanescape & Gardens 801-294-4300 DRIVERS: CENTRAL refrigerated is growing! Hiring experienced & non-experienced drivers. CDL training available! Emply today! Avg $40,000 $70,000 1-800-525-9277 CENTERVILLE CITY is accepting applications for court clerk. (immediate/future openings). Minimum qualifications: high school graduate/ equivalent, 1yr related experience. Must have computer/office skills; very good interpersonal skills, ability to manage unpleasant situations. Strong preference for candidates with extensive court experience/ knowledge of CORIS system. Positions open until filled. Send application to Court Supervisor 250 North Main, Centerville, UT 84014. An Equal Opportunity Employer and a drug free workplace. For job description see City’s website: www.centervilleut.net or call 801295-8344.

CUSTOMER Service Position Reading Horizons is looking to fill a customer service position. Enjoy job satisfaction by working for a reliable company providing reading programs to schools. FLEXIBLE HOURS. Part or Full time. Base + Commission. Email resume to tyson@readinghorizons.com. LEASING COUNSELOR for Assisted Living Community in Bountiful, F/T some evenings, Saturdays, and holidays. Computer and phone skills necessary. Apply on line @ www.rlg.net BE YOUR own boss! Come experience a highly profitable and dynamic world of Miche Bag Hand Bags. Teri 801-597-7197 www.my.michebag.com/tlc/ DENTAL OFFICE in Centerville looking for hygienist to work (2) half days a week. Working days flexible. Workload may increase over time. Call Lorraine for interview (801)292-5172

CHIEF OF POLICE for West Bountiful City. Position closes Sept 23, 2011. Information may be found at www.westbountiful.utah.gov PUBLIC SERVICES DIRECTOR for West Bountiful City. Position closes Sept 23, 2011. Information may be found at www.westbountiful.utah.gov GREEN SPACE SUPERINTENDENT for West Bountiful City/Lakeside Golf Course. Position closes Sept 23, 2011. Information may be found at www.westbountiful.utah.gov

DEPUTY SHERIFF I Davis County Sheriff’s Office; $17.35/hour. Performs entry level law enforcement duties. Official application required and available; visit our website at www.daviscountyutah.gov for details or call 801-451-3415. Closes September 23, 2011. Equal Opportunity Employer

BOUNTIFUL GLASS now has positions available. Some background in construction is required plus a valid driver license and good driving record. Great career opportunity to learn a trade. Apply in person at 1284 W 75 N, Centerville. CONCRETE FINISHER WANTED! Experience, tools, and own transportation. Please call Gary 801-721-3092

******************************* CLIPPER ROUTES AVAILABLE! CARRIERS NEEDED!!! IDEAL FOR AGES 10-16 ******************************* * BOUNTIFUL AREA* 400 E 1200 N Route A04

CNA CLASSES

***************************** *CENTERVILLE AREA*

Become a Certified Nurse Assistant! Two courses now being offered! Choose either a six week night/weekend class, or a two week day class! Phlebotomy classes offered. Call Janice (801)589-2597 or visit www.cnacareers.com

HELP WANTED Bountiful Day Care is looking for a Van Driver/ School Age Teacher

Call Denise at 801-397-0937

Pages Lane & 850 S Route CV26 **** 1000 N 425 W Route CV10 ****************************** *FARMINGTON AREA* Clark Lane 1525 W Route F27 ********* Clark Lane & Ranch Road Route F26 ********* 950 N 1875 W Route F25 ******************************** MONTHLY PAY Plus Tips and Raises ****************************** CALL JULIE @ 801-294-0053 *************

PART TIME Lead Cosmetology Adjunct Instructor Seeking talented candidates for Cosmetology Lead Adjunct Instructor. Must be licensed. Minimum of 3 years experience required. Prior teaching experience desired. 35 hrs/wk. View complete position announcement and submit application, resume, and cover letter to DATC HR by 9/25. Online at www.datc.edu/hr or at 550 E. 300 S. Kaysville UT 84037.

SERVER/DISHWASHER positions available, mature 21 or older preferred, fluent in English. Must be able to work days, evenings, weekends, and holidays. Davis County Food Handlers Permit is required. Apply at www.rlg.net

CUSTOMER Service For Express Shuttle, FT/PT, $8$10/hr, plus benefits. Call 801596-3708 or fill out an application at 427 W 800 N, SLC.


C4

Classifieds CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

100 HELP WANTED

115 YARD WORK

120 SERVICES

WOODS CROSS City is accepting applications for the position of seasonal F/T worker. Applicant must be 18yrs, possess a valid Utah driver’s license. Applications will be accepted at: Woods Cross City Hall, , 1555 S 800 W, Woods Cross, Utah.

LANDSCAPING SERVICE: TREES, SHRUBS, YARD CLEAN UP. trimming/removal, flower beds, hauling, mowing, concrete. Affordable rates - references. Senior Discount. Dan 801-518-7365 YARD WORK 4 hard workers $80/hr. Anything for you and your yard. We will work hard for you. Call Jared 801-652-3028

$100- $150 home cleaning ELIANA’S CLEANING Experienced and reliable home cleaning services. Referrals upon request. One time, weekly, or bi-weekly. Same day service available. Move-ins & moveouts. First clients receive home cleaning for $100/small home and $150/big Call now and schedule your cleaning (801) 719-4245

ALL PURPOSE Landscaping. Hauling, sprinkler repair, tree service, concrete, handyman minor repairs. Ask for Bill 801759-9670. Free estimates. Efficient/reliable.

HOUSE CLEANING SERVICE Are you looking for someone to clean your home? Lets us do it for you! We do excellent work. Sr. Citizen discount. 801-2958095 or 801-755-7706

**GENERAL CLEAN-UP** * Weeding of Flower-Beds * Removing of Bushes & Trees * Hauling Away * Complete Landscaping Free Est. 801-328-3796

HOUSE CLEANING - Bntfl Area. Experienced, Efficient, and Dependable. References available. Call Kyra 801- 577-0008

GOOD P/T Positions Immediate Openings in Davis County For Routes Delivering Deseret News and Tribune Papers. Positions Fill Quickly. Earn Up to $800 Monthly Call 801-204-6114. ******************************* CLIPPER ROUTES AVAILABLE! CARRIERS NEEDED!!! (Ideal for AGES 10-16) ******************************* BOUNTIFUL AREA Penman Lane & 2200 S Route B16 ******** Bonneview Dr. & 2050 S. Route CB08 ********* Bountiful Blvd & Lakeview Dr. Route CB04 / CB28 ******************************** Monthly Pay Plus Tips and Raises CALL MORGAN @ 801-916-5122

115 YARD WORK DUMORE CONCRETE We do all types landscaping, lawn sprinkler, and tree service. Reliable. Best quality. Free estimate. Call Mike 801-8317620 ***WEEKLY LAWN CARE*** Mowing, trimming, edging, fertilizing, sprinklers, yard work. Davis County. 23yrs in business. 801-499-2359 YARD cleanups Kelly and her team Specialize in Yard Cleanups! Weed,Prune,Trim,Plant...Lic- ensed & Insured FREE ESTIMATES! Call Kelly 801-433-8692 KARL’S TREE & YARD SERVICE Removal, Shaping, Pruning of Trees/Bushes. Most Yard Jobs. Free Estimates. Karl 801-298-0610 LAWN AND YARD WORK Weekly Mowing/Trimming, Fertilizing. Raking, Shrub/Tree Weeding, Trimming, Mulch, Sod, Trees, Plants, Landscaping, Hauling, Sprinkler Repairs. We Do It All! Since 1987. Lic/Ins. 801-292-0450 TREES! TREES! TREES! Shrubs, hedges, removal trimming, flower-beds Affordable prices. Senior Discount. Call Dan 801-518-7365 PREMIUM DARK weed free organic composted top soil. Composted ground cover mulches, play ground mulch, public welcome. Call for pricing. Small and large load delivery. Contractor prices available. 801-2958907 or 801-544-0201 GOLD’S LANDSCAPING New landscape design and installation or landscape remodels. We excel at the design and installation of retaining walls, flag stone patios, fire pits. No project too big or too small. 801-8241453 or 801-824-1454

HANDY ANDY’S LANDSCAPE & HAULING LOCAL PROMPT SERVICE Go w/this familiar & dependable name in Davis County. Over 30 years experience & commitment to customer satisfaction. Where quality is not just a word, it’s our only way of doing business.

120 SERVICES *PROFESSIONAL PAINTER* 35 yrs. exp. excellent references Int/Ext. Please call Scott for Free Estimates. No Job Too Small 801-699-1942 CALL JOE 801-347-5174 Bill Professional Landscaping, concrete work driveways Retaining wall. Wall any wall stamped concrete. Hauling tree, trimming, sod. General clean up. Free estimates. 435-496-3338 PAINTING, CEILINGS, SHEETROCK. Spray, texture, removal, troweled textures, custom painting, water damage & home repairs. 30-years experience. Call Bart 801-664-8986 GENERAL CONTRACTOR Islander Construction Lic/Ins welcome small jobs. Professional employee. 30yrs exp. in flat work, stamping, patio, walk ways/driveways, color stem. Complete remodeled/additions. Free estimates, One call does it all. Pili 801-921-1269 801-499-3953 SPECIALIST CONCRETE Finishing, Driveway, Sidewalk, Patio, Retain wall, Fence, Garage Finishing, Building, Concrete Finishing, Stucco. Installing windows/framing. Licensed/Insured. John or Johnson 801-410-6129. Free estimates HANDYMAN HARRIS I can fix, mend, repair, restore, patch, build or rebuild most anything. References Avail. Reasonable Rates. Call 801573-0784 RUSSON’S HANDYMAN service, repair cabinets, wood furniture, new moldings, repair sheetrock, general house maintenance. Call Kent 801-510-4862 or 801-292-2264 *TREE SERVICE* Free estimates. Trimming, Pruning, Topping, Stump removal, View trimming, Brush chipping. We go out on a limb for you. Dangerous trees removed safely. Experience, licensed & Insured. John 801-410-6129. FREESTONE Plumbing Plumbing services. Free estimates. Most credit cards accepted! Allen @ 801-808-0812. or go to www.freestoneplumbing.com. THE WINDOW SCREENER Window Screens Repaired or Replaced Mobile Unit. Work done on site. 9 yrs Experience, 35 yrs in the area. 801 664-0852 PAINTING 20 years exp. Int/Ext. residential/commercial, prof/finish. free est. Call 801-298-4472 or 801706-2951 CLEANING LADY Consistently thorough, Dependable. Licensed. Bonded. Insured. Call Style Cleaning Services. 801295-7895

BANKRUPTCY ATTORNEY

Fall Cleanup is Our Specialty!

HANDY MAN Services, New, remodel, framing, dry wall, electrical, plumbing, concrete, tile, paint, etc. 801-447-3437, or 801347-6518 GARAGE DOORS & Openers Repairs on all makes & models, Broken springs, free est on new doors. Mountain West Doors 801-451-0534,801- 294-4636

130 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES BE YOUR own boss! Come experience a highly profitable and dynamic world of Miche Bag Hand Bags. Teri 801-597-7197 www.my.michebag.com/tlc/

240 FOR SALE STOVE SALE Pellet, wood, and gas stoves. Unbelievable prices and many brands. Reduced to $900. Senior discount. 10% Tax rebates. Call for prices. We install. 801-295-7398 or 801598-3473 CREAM COLOR Queen hide a bed couch in good condition, $75 OBO. Very comfortable mattress. Great for when you have guests and no extra beds. Entertainment Center (Saunders) for up to a 44” TV, CD’s storage, in good condition, $35 OBO. 2 tall mirrors, $5 each.. Call 801864-3743.

250 GARAGE SALES yard sale Sat. the 17th. 8:00 to ? 507 E 1000 N Bountiful SAT. SEPT 17th, 8-1. 1060 S 650 W, Farmington. Furniture, clothes, scrape booking supplies, frames/art, yard decor. Cash only. CHARITY YARD Sale. First Baptist Church, 1915 S. Orchard Dr. Bountiful. Sat. Sept 17th, 8-1. Fantastic Items CAMELOT MOBILE HOME PARK’S Semi-Annual Flea Market & Bake Sale. Saturday, Sept 24th 655 N Hwy 89, North Salt Lake from 8am to 1pm. Hot Dogs & Soda for sale. **Raffle for Gift Baskets**

260 TRADE EXERCISE Bike Looking to trade a Freemotion XTc Exercise Bike, (very good condition,purchase price $350) For a Treadmill of equal value. 801712-0691

270 WANT TO BUY BOOKS WANTED! I pay cash for old LDS & other books. Also old photos & historical memorabilia Call 800-823-9124

310 SOUTH MAIN STREET BOUNTIFUL, UTAH 84010

801-298-5820

Specializing in Chapter 7 & 13’s

• Complete tree services • Clean & Haul

WE DO IT ALL Licensed - Insured Free Estimate

296-1396 30234

• FREE Bankruptcy Advice • FREE Consultation • Bankruptcy STOPS Collection Calls, Foreclosures & Garnishments 45603

Cathcart & Peterson, LLC

NO CREDIT REQUIRED! $299 Deposit

801-298-7200

WWW.KANDJAUTO.COM

330 AUTOS FOR SALE

570 APARTMENT FOR RENT

750 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT/SALE

520 INSTRUCTION/TUTORING

BOUNTIFUL DUPLEX 3926 S 850 W. Large 2bd, 1bth, hook ups, covered deck, fireplace,, carport, big yard. $775/mo, $500 deposit, central air. No pets/smokers. Avail. Sept 15. Bonded Realty 801-359-7979

BNTFL 500 S OFFICES Single room up to 2,200 sqft/Starting at $300, Beautifully restored Historical Properties 801-2922882 or 801-244-2400

DRAWING LESSONS Mr. Feller is now offering Art Classes. For more information go to www.mrfeller.com VOCAL PERFORMANCE Youth singing performing group, ages 5-13. Classes begin Sept. 12th (every mon.) and run thru December for our 2011 Christmas performing season. Marcia Anderson Centerville Academy “Ginger Bread Kids” $30mo, lower family rates avail. 801-298-KIDS(5437). www. centervilleacademy. org PIANO LESSONS Experienced teacher with university and conservatory training. In Woods Cross. Weekly or monthly rates. Alan Seegmiller 801-292-0674

530 CHILD CARE

FARMINGTON 2BD, fireplace, W/D hook ups, carport, A/C, patio or balcony. No smokers/pets, 801-451-5223, 801-451-7187 CLEAN 1BD in Bountiful 253 E 200 S. W/D hook ups, water/sewer/garbag paid. No Smokers/pets. Ideal for couples. Call 801-451-0282 BOUNTIFUL TOWNHOUSE Large 1200sqft. 945 S. Main. 2bd, 1.5bth. Quiet, cv’d pkg, patio, central air. New paint, carpet, appliances, fixtures, D/W, W/D hook ups, satellite/cable hookups. No smokers/pets, $895/mo Deposit $450. 801292-1774.

Kreative Kidz West Bountiful I have two openings in my daycare. I will provide the best in early childhood care and education. My “Playschool” will offer the best setting for young children: the comforts of home and the enrichment of school. I transport to a few local schools. Contact me, Alisha, at 801-3972663. Why me? University of Utah college graduate. CPR and first aid certified. State licensed in-home family daycare.

BOUNTIFUL 4BD, 2Bth managers Apt. (no management responsibilities) Walk-out basement and fenced yard. $1200/mo. 32 W. 1000 N. Call Days 801-403-8899 OR Evenings & Weekends 801-5406984

LOOKING FOR a day care provider in Centerville? I have 20yrs experience. Call Brenda 801-597-6117

A GREAT QUIET PLACE Bountiful 2bd, 1bth, firpl., A/C, pool. New carpet/tile. $695/mo, $300/dep. Ask about move in specials. 639 S. Main. 801-298-0687

540 TRAVEL/TIME SHARE FABULOUS SAN DEIGO BEACH CONDO on the sand. 2bd, 2bth, 2 balconies over looking the beach 3 TV’s, DVD’s VCR’s, full kitchen. Sea World and Zoo 15 mins. Sept-May $699 excluding holidays. 801859-8473 or 888-203-9484. sdoceans.com

550 CONDO FOR RENT MAPLE HILLS 2900sqft, 5bd, 3bth, freshly painted, new appliances, 2 kitchens, jetted tub, 2 fireplaces, storage, 2 car garage 801-292-2741 CENTERVILLE Large 3bd, 2bth, double garage, full kitchen, W/D hkups, A/C. No pets. $1025/mo 801-635-7709, 801628-6113

560 ROOM FOR RENT WX, CABLE and Utilities included. Call Chris 801-390-8626 or Nick 801-560-7305

570 APARTMENT FOR RENT PRIVATE APARTMENT Living Lrg. 1bd. new construction. Secure building, covered parking/storage. Lovely grounds, amenities. Open, sunny rooms, jetted tub, bonus room/office. Private rooftop deck. Short term executive lease/standard. Furnished/unfurnished. 1200sqft. Move in special. CALL TODAY! 801-989-1602 NON SMOKERS wanted for NICE 2bd. Must see to believe, spacious, quiet, W/D hook ups, covered parking, storage, patio, clean. No Pets. 842 W 1500 S Woods Cross 801-577-8754 2BD TOWNHOUSE style unit in 4-plex NSL. Central air, energy efficient. $650/mo. No smokers/pets. $400 refundable deposit. Avail 10/1. 801-9497377. NSL LARGE Studio Apt. In a Historic bldg. $445/mo. Includes all utilities except electric. No smokers/pets. Call 801-9365521 or 801-604-0647 BOUNTIFUL 2BD, W/D hook ups, car port & patio, gas paid, $650/mo + $400 deposit. Absolutely No smokers/pets!. 88 E 1100 N. 801-815-2364 BOUNTIFUL 4-PLEX 908 W 4100 S, 3bd, 1bth, central air, large yard, No pets/smokers. $695/mo, $400 deposit. Bonded Realty 801-359-7979. Avail Sept 15th

BOUNTIFUL 2 BD, 1 BTH. W/D hook ups, Central/Air. No smokers/pets. Off-street parking $620/mo + $400dep. Ground level, Good location. 68 S. 200 W. 801-298-2524

THE PARK Quite Professional Living. 1bd. w/den, A/C, Fireplace, Storage, Full W/D Hkup., $815/mo. No smokers/pets, 801-647-1830 or 801-292-2882, 801-989-1602 UPSCALE SENIOR Living Secure Building. Covered parking/Storage. Lovely grounds. Planned activities. Near retail, church, health services. Nice floor plans/private patio/balconies. 1st/month discount. Call today! 8012-989-1602.

575 DUPLEX FOR RENT HUGE BNTFL 2200sqft 4bd, 2bth. Walkout bsmt. Lg rec room. Hookups, covered prkng, storage. Great Schools. No smoking/pets. $1200/mo 801641-8878, 801-991-0569 NSL SidebySide 4-plex. 172 S Orchard Drive. 2bd, 1bth, 1car garage, W/D hooks ups, new carpet/paint. $750/mo, $450 deposit. No smokers/pets. Bonded Realty 801-359-7979 BOUNTIFUL LARGE 2-3bd, 1bth, 1300sqft, great central location, no smokers. Pets nego, avail now. $850/mo, $650 dep. 26 S 425 W #2. 801-231-3320

580 HOME FOR RENT

OFFICE SPACE for rent on Main street, Bountiful. $200 to $275 monthly. Includes utilities, month to month. Call Brad 8901-7928894

820 HOME FOR SALE BOUNTIFUL BENCH 5800sqft. 7bd, 6bth, premium cul-de-sac w/views. Granite kitchen. 3car garage, RV parking, tons of storage. Call/text 801-597-7197. SUMMER HOME EXCEPTIONAL CABIN on 5 acres, Fruitland, UT, $168,000 Built in 2005, 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, family-sized loft. 1 1/2 hrs. from SLC, 30 min. from Strawberry Reservoir and Starvation Reservoir. Year-round access with ATV riding and winter snowmobiling. Mature trees, beautiful panoramic views. Large storage shed, forced propane heat, power, water, septic tank. Wrap-around covered deck and stained wood exterior. Is well maintained, partially furnished. Must see!! Call Rick at 801-4979966. EXCEPTIONAL CABIN 5 acres in Fruitland, UT. $168,000. Built in 2005, 2Bdrm, 1Bth, family-sized loft. 1 1/2 hrs.from SLC, 30 min. from Strawberry and Starvation Reservoirs. Year-round access with ATV riding and winter snowmobiling. Mature trees, beautiful panoramic views. Large storage shed, forced propane heat, power, water, septic tank. Wraparound covered deck and stained wood exterior. Is well maintained, partially furnished. Must see! Call Rick at 801-4979966

830 BUILDING SUPPLIES STEEL BUILDINGS Reduced Factory Inventory 30x36 — Reg $12,300 Now $9,970, 36x58 — Reg $20,300 Now $16,930, 48x96 — Reg $42,400 Now 36,200, 81x130 — Reg $104,800 Now $89,940, Source # 1A0. 866-609-4321 STEEL BUILDINGS Reduced Factory Inventory 30x36 ? Reg $12,300 Now $9,970, 36x58 ? Reg $20,300 Now $16,930, 48x96 ? Reg $42,400 Now $36,200 81x130 ? Reg $104,800 Now $89,940, Source #197, 801303-0561

We LOVE our carriers! Thank The entire you! Clipper staff would like to thank our army of hardworking, dedicated newspaper carriers. We appreciate all that you do!

r Clippe

BOUNTIFUL 5BD, 2bth, D/W, W/D hk-ups, 2car/garage, new carpet/paint/appliances, No smokers/pets. $1250/mo $900/deposit, 1yr lease. Call 801-597-4965, 325 E 650 N. NICE BOUNTIFUL 5 Bdrm, 2.5 Bth, large garage, storage, schools close, great area. $1250/mo. No animals or smoking. Call 801-295-5683 FARMINGTON SOUTH 3 BD, 2 BTH, 2 -car garage No Smokers/ Pets $1100/mo 801-721-8229 ATTACHED 4BD, 2Bth managers Apt. (no management responsibilites) Walk-out basement and fenced yard. $1200/mo. 32 W. 1000 N. Bntfl. Call Days 801-403-8899 OR Evenings & Weekends 801-5406984 BOUNTIFUL 5BD, 3bth, new decor, $1250/mo. Fenced yard, fruit trees, 2 car garage, work shops, auto sprinklers. No smokers/pets. 480-707-8282. CENTERVILLE 65 E Chase Lane. Small 2bd, 1bth, avail July 15th. $650/mo, deposit $400. Call Bonded Realty 801-3597979

If you’re interested in becoming a carrier, please call 801-295-2251 ext. 120 or email jhancock@davisclipper.com


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT. 15, 2011

PLUMBING SERVICE DRY CLEANERS

FLOORING MIKE & STERLING’S HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING Manufacture & utility rebates available

HEATING • VENTILATION • AIR CONDITIONING

H CARPET H VINYL H WOOD H AREA RUGS H CERAMIC TILE H LAMINATED FLOOR

Fall is just around the corner let HVAC tune up your furnace today

801-292-9069

FURNACE & AIR CONDITIONER Service & Replacement

540 North 500 West, Bountiful

HVAC CONSTRUCTION, INC.

6 MONTHS SAME AS CASH

801-298-4822

BOUTIQUE

HVAC@READYTEK.NET AUTOMOTIVE

Come Visit Us!

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

HOURS: MON-FRI 9:00-6:00 SATURDAY 9:00-4:00

The Country Cottage has antiques, home decor and just what you are looking for in a perfect gift for that special someone. It would be worth a trip to Farmington to see what we have.

Get the word out!

EE R F , T N E V E R U O Y LIST

Deadline: Fridays, 4pm

If your group or organization has an event coming up, let people know with the Clipper Calendar. E-mail the details, such as date, time, place, cost, etc. to rjamieson@davisclipper.com, or bring the info to the Clipper office, 1370 S. 500 W., Bountiful. Calendar listings will be published at our discretion on a space-available basis.

Publishing every Thursday in the Davis Clipper

Get the Clipper FREE! ONTHS THREE M RINGS .... NO ST ED! ATTACH

Try it for three months, free! Get the Davis Clipper delivered to your door every Thursday and don’t miss a bit of LOCAL news and happenings. • In-depth news & features • Sports & recreation • Money-saving ads & offers • Weddings, anniversaries, and much more • Church news & missionaries

• Obituaries • Television listings • Youth & education • Arts & events

• News that affects you, your family & your neighbors.

Call 801-295-2251 ext. 119 today! Free subscription is for 3 months. Limited time offer. Open to new subscribers only. THE

Davis Clipper

Celebrating 120 years of being Davis County’s local news source

Classifieds

C5


C6

TV Listings CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT 15, 2011 Andromeda Strain,” “Who Is Clark Rockefeller?” and “Lonesome Dove,” to name just a few. Also, if you happen to subscribe to Netflix or HuluPlus, you must check out his 2004 three-episode guest-starring appearance on “Dead Like Me” (which you can rent or stream) to see a side of Eric you’ve probably never seen before.

Q: One of my all-time favorite comedies is “Will & Grace,” and I especially love Eric McCormack on that show. Can you tell me what he’s got coming up? I’d love to see him in something, whether on the big screen or small. -David D., via e-mail

*** Eric McCormack

who helps solve complex criminal cases. The show also stars Rachael Leigh Cook and Kelly Rowan (“The O.C.”). The series will be 10 episodes long and will join the network’s lineup in summer 2012. This isn’t Eric’s first foray into drama, by far, as he also starred in “The

A: TNT recently announced that Eric would be starring in its new original series “Perception,” about an eccentric neuroscientist (Dr. Daniel Pierce, played by Eric)

Q: Can you tell when/ if “Californication” will return for another season? -- John D., Columbus, Ohio A: The David Duchovnystarring dark comedy will be back for its fifth season on Showtime beginning Jan. 8, 2012. This season will see author Hank

WEEKDAY MORNINGS 6:00 ^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

6:30

2News This Morning Good Morning Utah KSL 5 News Today Sesame Street Varied Programs LDS Super News Paid Paid Paid Paid A Que-Puedes The Daily Buzz

7:00

8:00

8:30

9:00

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

The Price Is Right The Doctors Today Varied Programs Varied Programs Super Dinosaur Live Regis & Kelly Justice Paid Paid Paid The Daily Dish

Paid Varied Paid Varied Dog Dog Dog Dog Varied Paid Stooges Varied Programs Paid Paid Paid Varied Paid Robison J. Meyer Sexy Phineas Phineas Varied Little Little Chug Mickey Pirates SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Minis Life J. Meyer Varied Boy Boy What What Varied Paid Paid Paid Movie Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs Reba Reba Will Will Will Will Chris Chris Parents Sponge. Dora... Dora... Bubble Bubble Umi Umi Movie Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs Paid Paid The Dan Patrick Show Movie Varied Programs Varied Paid CSI: NY Varied CSI Varied CSI: Crime Scene Movie Varied Movie Varied Programs Charmed Charmed Supernatural Supernatural Law CI Varied Law Order: CI Law Order: CI Law & Order: SVU Saved/ Saved/ Yes Dear Yes Dear Prince Prince Prince Payne

1:30

2 News at Noon Fresh Bold All My Children One Life to Live KSL 5 News Today Super Sid Dinosaur Cat in Raggs Varied Programs News Barney Sesame Street News TMZ Judge Judge True Hollywood Matlock Paid Paid TriVita Paid Cine de la Tarde Jerry Springer Maury

Young & Restless Good Things Utah Rachael Ray Martha WordWrl WordWrl Sid The Dr. Oz Show Better Utah Paid Paid Don Cheto Maury CSI: Miami Movie Varied Programs Mickey Mickey SportsCenter Grounde 700 Club

Let’s Make a Deal The View Studio 5 Sesame Street Powr Nmbr Devo Varied FOX 13 News at 11 Mathis Varied Paid Paid Chuper Chuper J. Kyle Varied The Sopranos

Little Varied SportsCenter The 700 Club

Mother Mother Desp.-Wives Max, Rby Max, Rby Diego Varied Paid Paid Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs CSI: Crime Scene CSI: NY (10:25) Movie Varied Las Vegas Las Vegas Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Payne Browns Amer. Earl

2:30

3:00

3:30

^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

News Ent News Two Men News News PBS NewsHour (N) TV 411 Work Little House Simpson Seinfeld Wheel Jeopardy Without a Trace ’ Estudio 2 Two Men Mother

7:00

4:00

4:30

The Talk General Hospital Days of our Lives Martha Cyber

Inside Family News News Ellen DeGeneres News Access Nate Berkus Dr. Phil WordGirl Wild Electric Fetch! Saddle Varied Programs Clifford Martha Arthur WordGirl Wild Electric Judge B. Judge B. Jdg Judy Jdg Judy The Dr. Oz Show The People’s Court Law Order: CI Law CI Varied Ghost Whisperer Ghost Whisperer Ghost Whisperer Lagrimita y Costel Estrellas Hoy En Vivo Noticiero The Doctors Life Life Anderson Dog Dog CSI: Miami Movie Varied Programs American Chopper American Chopper Phineas Phineas Fish Deck Around Pardon SportsCenter My Wife My Wife 70s ’70s

Cold Case Files Mystery Sponge. Sponge. iCarly

Law & Order Law & Order: SVU Friends Friends

THURSDAY EVENING 6:30

5:00

^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

News News News Arthur

5:30 News ABC News Business

Curious Brady News News Insider Jeopardy Without a Trace A Que-Puedes Raymond Mother The Sopranos American Chopper Wizards Wizards Varied Programs 70s 70s Movie Varied

Varied Unsolved Mysteries Victo Big Time Sponge. (4:20) Movie Rockies

Law & Order Law & Order: SVU King King

Law & Order NCIS Seinfeld Seinfeld

SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 7:30

6:00

6:30

News Ent News Two Men News Gme PBS NewsHour (N) TV 411 GED Little House Simpson Seinfeld Wheel Jeopardy Without a Trace ’ Estudio 2 Two Men Mother

8:00

8:30

9:00

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

Big Bang Big Bang The Mentalist The Mentalist Wipeout (Season Finale) (N) ’ Grey’s Anatomy ’ Commun All Night Office Free Ag. Law & Order: SVU Globe Trekker ’ Antiques Rdsho Midsomer Murders Journal Moneytrk Ideas E Street Miller Ctr. Forums PBS NewsHour (N) NOVA (DVS) Around the World... Bones ’ (PA) News High School Football Riverton at Kearns. (N) (Live) Friends Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ A Que no Puedes Historias Delirantes Alarma Noticiero Vampire Diaries The Secret Circle News King

News Letterman Late News Nightline Access Extra (N) News Jay Leno Late Keep Up Wait... “Thelma & Louise” Scully Work Euromx Statistic Steves Perry Mason My 3 Seinfeld Simpson Fam Guy Fam Guy Office Office Scrubs Scrubs Criminal Minds ’ Monk ’ Secretos Chuper Pagado Pagado Mother Raymond 70s Jim

Criminal Minds ’ The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 Beyond Scared ››› “Top Gun” (1986) Tom Cruise. ››› “Top Gun” (1986) Tom Cruise. “Real Genius” Sons of Guns Sons of Guns Cops & Coyotes Cops & Coyotes Extreme Drug Texas Drug Wars Phineas Fish Shake It Good Shake It Wizards Shake It ››› “Spy Kids” (2001) ‘PG’ ANT Shake It College Football LSU at Mississippi State. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight SportsCenter (N) Secret-Teen ››› “Remember the Titans” (2000) Will Patton ›› “Gone in 60 Seconds” (1974) H.B. Halicki. “What Happens” Mother Mother Mother Mother Two Men Two Men Two Men Two Men Sunny Archer (5:45) ››› “Unstoppable” Curb Entou Entou Taxicab Conf. 24/7 ››‡ “Conviction” (2010) Project Runway Project Runway (N) (8:32) Dance Moms Russian Project Runway Project Runway My Wife My Wife Lopez Lopez Friends Friends 70s 70s Lopez Lopez Friends Friends “Hercules in the Underworld” (7:35) › “Bio-Dome” (1996) (9:15) ››‡ “Godzilla vs. Mothra” “Stone of Destiny” Pregame MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at Colorado Rockies. Post Dan Patrick Rockies Baseball The Love We Make Web The Big Weeds The Big Gigolos “Fubar: Balls to the Wall” ‘R’ “Groupie” (2010) UFC Unleashed ’ iMPACT Wrestling (N) ’ MAN MAN Inside Access GTTV Blue (5:35) ››› “The Missing” (2003) ’ ››‡ “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice” ›› “Eat Pray Love” (2010) ’ Castle “Nikki Heat” Castle ’ Castle “Knockout” CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ NCIS ’ NCIS “Bikini Wax” NCIS ’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU ›› “Step Up” (2006) Channing Tatum. Fam Guy Fam Guy Conan (N) Office Office Conan

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

(c) 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

48 Hours: Bullying CSI: NY ’ Blue Bloods News Letterman Late Shark Tank Karaoke Battle 20/20 ’ News Nightline Access Extra (N) ALMA Awards Dateline NBC ’ News Jay Leno Late Wash. Need American Masters ’ Ebert Keep Up Wait... Viewers’ Choice Journal Mack Smart Salud “Man Could Work Miracles” GED Between Best PBS NewsHour (N) This Old House ’ Globe Trekker ’ Steves Perry Mason My 3 Kitchen Nightmares Fringe News Seinfeld Simpson Fam Guy Fam Guy Million. Million. Funny Videos Friends Friends Office Office Scrubs Scrubs Without a Trace ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Monk ’ Intocable en Concierto Alarma Noticiero Secretos Chuper Pagado Pagado Ringer “Pilot” The Secret Circle News King Mother Raymond 70s Jim

6:30

The Early Show (N) Good Morning Today (N) ’ Angelina Builder Quilt Art Quilting Angelina Thomas Lose Paid Paid Paid Paid Vaca Pagado Pagado Paid Memory

7:00

SEPTEMBER 17, 2011 7:30

8:00

8:30

Advan Paid Doodle. Doodle J. Hanna Ocean Explore Culture Turbo Shelldon Magic Babar Thomas Place Old Home Knit Knitting Pas Pas Curious Cat in Super Dinosaur Good Day Utah Weekend Edition Big Icons Winning Sports Paid Paid Paid Paid Nature Pagado Pagado Pagado Magi Magi Sonic X Sonic X

9:00 Busy Health Willa’s Woods Pas Kitchen Paid Kds Paid Pagado Yu-Gi-Oh

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 Busy Food Pearlie W’wright Pas Barbe Celeb Holly Paid Pagado Sonic X

Danger Horse Removal Off Road College Football Auburn at Clemson. (N) PGA Tour Golf Victory P Allen Simply Lidia Pas Pas Pas Pas Zonya’s Rachel Katie P Allen Fat Loss Paid Adven. Animals Paid Money Old Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Pagado Pagado Fabrica Fabrica Dragon Dragon Tai Chi Yu-Gi-Oh

Twist Kettle TriVita Meaning Biography House House House Kitchen House House Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman Rifleman ››› “Broken Arrow” (1950) ››‡ “Red Sun” (1972) Paid Oreck Paid Meaning Paid Sexy Life Changing American Chopper American Chopper Phineas Phineas Chug “Beauty and the Beast” ‘G’ Mickey Mouse Phineas Phineas ANT ANT SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) College GameDay (N) (Live) College Football Penn State at Temple. Urban Twist Paid Paid Boy Boy Boy ››‡ “Can’t Buy Me Love” (1987) Jersey Twist Paid Paid Thin Smarter Smarter ›››‡ “Black Hawk Down” (2001, War) Josh Hartnett. 24/7 24/7 24/7 24/7 24/7 Mel Brooks (9:45) ››› “Megamind” (2010) ‘PG’ Flight Sexy Sexy Paid Paid No Diets! WEN Will Project Runway To Be Announced Fanboy Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. T.U.F.F. T.U.F.F. Penguins Power Ninjas Sponge. Sponge. (5:30) “The Chase” ››‡ “Jaws 2” (1978) Roy Scheider. ››‡ “Simone” (2002) Al Pacino. “Last Starfighter” Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Football PAC Pregame Football Inside the NFL NASCAR “My Best Friend’s Wedding” (9:15) The Love We Make (iTV) Weeds The Big Paid Wealth Walker, Texas Ranger Horse. Xtreme Horse. Trucks! Muscle UFC Unleashed ’ (5:35) ›‡ “Grown Ups” ’ (7:25) “The Scorpion King” (9:05) ›› “Maid in Manhattan” (2002) ›› “John Q” ’ Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ Rizzoli & Isles The Closer Law & Order ’ “Fire Down Below” Shark Paid Monk FREE Paid Paid Mak NCIS ’ NCIS ’ Yes Dear Yes Dear “Romy and Michele’s” “Private Valentine: Blonde” “Bridget Jones”

12:00 12:30 1:00

^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

Write to Cindy at King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475; or e-mail her at letters@cindyelavsky. com.

SEPTEMBER 16, 2011 7:00

SATURDAY AFTERNOON

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

A: Don’t worry, Janet! “30 Rock” will be back for its sixth season at the beginning of 2012. NBC decided to postpone its premiere, mainly because of Tina Fey’s pregnancy and also to give a jump-start to some of its freshman comedies.

Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ ›››› “The Silence of the Lambs” (8:15) ›››› “The Silence of the Lambs” (1991) (10:45) ›‡ “Virus” (1999) Sons of Guns Sons of Guns Dual Survival Man, Woman, Wild Man, Woman, Wild One Man Army (N) Phineas ››› “Spy Kids” (2001) ‘PG’ Shake It Wizards Wizards ANT Phineas Random Shake It Good College Football Boise State at Toledo. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight SportsCenter (N) Happy Happy Happy Happy Happy Happy Happy Happy Happy Happy Happy Happy Two Men Two Men Two Men Two Men Mother Mother Mother Mother ››‡ “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” 24/7 24/7 24/7 24/7 Real/Bill Maher Real/Bill Maher (10:15) ››‡ “Edge of Darkness” ‘R’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Rose Rose Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Sponge. Bucket Lopez Lopez Friends Friends 70s 70s Lopez Lopez Friends Friends ›› “Greedy” (1994) Michael J. Fox. ››‡ “The Pick-Up Artist” ››‡ “If Looks Could Kill” “Night-Dead” MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at Colorado Rockies. Post Boxing TBA Bensin MLB Baseball Living for 32 Patton Oswalt “Sweet Karma” ( 2009) ‘R’ ›‡ “Push” (2009) Chris Evans. In NFL (5:55) Gangland ’ (7:10) UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ (9:39) UFC Unleashed ’ “Days of Thunder” (5:45) “The Last Station” ’ (7:40) ›› “The Scorpion King” (2002) (9:16) ›‡ “Grown Ups” ’ Camelot ’ Law & Order ’ ››› “The Rock” (1996) Sean Connery. ››› “Assault on Precinct 13” (2005) Fire NCIS ’ NCIS ’ NCIS “SWAK” ’ ›› “Fast & Furious” (2009) Vin Diesel. “Fast & Furious” Fam Guy Fam Guy ››‡ “The Longest Yard” (2005) Adam Sandler. ››‡ “The Longest Yard” (2005) Adam Sandler.

6:00 ^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

Q: Why isn’t “30 Rock” on NBC’s fall schedule? I didn’t hear anything about it being canceled! -- Janet F. in Florida

***

SATURDAY MORNING 2:00

Criminal Minds The First 48 Varied Programs Movie Movie Varied Programs Varied Programs Biker Build-Off American Chopper Mickey Varied Mickey Varied Programs Pirates SportsCenter Report Football NFL Live Full Hse. Full H’se Still Stnd Still Stnd 8 Rules 8 Rules Movie Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs Grey’s Anatomy Medical Medical Cold Case Files Sponge. Fanboy Penguins Sponge. iCarly iCarly Movie Varied Programs Baseball Varied Programs Movie Varied Movie Varied Programs CSI: Crime Scene Varied Programs Movie (12:20) Movie Varied Programs Cold Case The Closer Law & Order Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Raymond Raymond Jim Raymond Friends Friends

6:00

Q: I love Joseph Fiennes and think he is absolutely superb as Merlin in “Camelot.” Will he and the show be back for a second season? -- Sally T., via e-mail

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

WEEKDAY AFTERNOONS ^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

***

FRIDAY EVENING 7:30

The Early Show Good Morning America Today Curious Cat in Super Dinosaur C. Be Fit Fetch! WordGirl Curious Cat in News News Paid Paid Paid Justice Varied Programs Bible Varied Nature Noticiero Gran Cine ABC News at 7 ABC News at 8

12:00 12:30 1:00

A: I am sorry to report that Starz has decided not to continue with the “Camelot” series, citing production difficulties. Starz released this statement to somewhat explain its position: “Due to significant production challenges, Starz has decided not to exercise the option for subsequent seasons of ‘Camelot’ with our production partners GKtv, Octagon Films and Take 5 Productions.” This certainly comes as a surprise to many viewers, considering the premiere of “Camelot” garnered the highest ratings ever for an original series on Starz, and continued to pull in high numbers for an original cable series.

Moody (David) even more popular (and richer) than ever after his biopic is released. Rob Lowe reprises his role as Eddie Nero, as does Madeleine Martin as Becca and Natascha McElhone as Karen. Also, Marcy and Stu continue their relationship, even though she is pregnant with ex-husband Charlie’s baby. And don’t think Ben (and his daughter Pearl) are out of the picture: The season opens with Karen, Ben, Becca and Pearl on a cross-country RV road trip.

1:30

SEPTEMBER 17, 2011 2:00

2:30

3:00

3:30

4:00

4:30

5:00

5:30

Off Road Football Football College Football Tennessee at Florida. (N) (Live) 2 News at 5:00pm College Football College Football Regional Coverage. (N) (Live) News News PGA Tour Golf College Football Michigan State at Notre Dame. (N) ’ (Live) Light Health Cooking Savor Primal Kitchen Kitchen Cook’s Rachel Woods Home This Old House Hr Ebert Pas Pas Pas Pas Pas Pas Pas Pas Parents Teens Railroad All Victory Old Home Work Steves Burt Wolf Antique Roadshow Nature ’ NOVA (DVS) Eco Co. Career Into Wild Base MLB Baseball Tampa Bay Rays at Boston Red Sox. ’ News Paid FREE ›› “U.S. Seals” (1999) Jim Fitzpatrick. Money Paid Friends Paid Paid Friends ›››‡ “Dirty Harry” (1971) ’ ››› “In the Line of Fire” (1993) Clint Eastwood. ’ Monk ’ “Patrón de Patrones” (2000, Acción) Lagrimita y Costel Historias Delirantes Alarma Estrellas Humor-Héctor Red Pictures ››‡ “Another 48 HRS.” (1990) Paid Paid Chris Chris ’70s Raymond Flip This House Disaster Guy (N) The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 Red Sun ››› “Seraphim Falls” (2006) Liam Neeson. ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990) Robert De Niro. American Chopper Hard Time Alaska County Jail Behind Bars I Faked Death I Faked Death Shake It Shake It Wizards Wizards Good Good Shake It Shake It ANT ANT ANT ANT College Football Score College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) Score Score Football (11:30) ››‡ “Jersey Girl” ›› “Along Came Polly” (2004) ››‡ “Bruce Almighty” (2003) Evan ›‡ “The Marine” (2006) John Cena. › “12 Rounds” (2009) John Cena, Aidan Gillen. Two Men Two Men Two Men ›‡ “The Fourth Kind” (1:45) “Vampires Suck” (3:15) ›››‡ “Avatar” (2009) Sam Worthington. ‘PG-13’ To Be Announced To Be Announced “Stranger in My Bed” (2005) ›› “Enough” (2002) Sponge. Sponge. Big Time Big Time Victo Victo Victo Victo iCarly ’ iCarly ’ iCarly ’ iCarly ’ Last Star (12:45) ›‡ “Dream a Little Dream 2” “Man Who Knew-Little” ››‡ “Simone” (2002) Al Pacino. ’ (11:30) College Football Colorado vs. Colorado State. (N) Post PAC PAC Rockies Rockies Pregame Web Tom Arnold: Story (1:35) “The Tillman Story” ‘R’ (3:15) “My Best Friend’s Wedding” “Letters to Juliet” UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ (11:00) “John Q” (1:05) ››› “Easy A” (2010) (2:45) ›› “The Stepfather” (2009) ’ “Prince of Persia: Sands” “Fire Down Below” ››› “Assault on Precinct 13” (2005) (3:15) ››› “The Rock” (1996, Action) Sean Connery. NCIS ’ NCIS “Bloodbath” NCIS “Jet Lag” ’ NCIS ’ NCIS ’ NCIS ’ “Bridget Jones: Edge” Friends Friends Friends Friends Jim Seinfeld Seinfeld King King


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, SEPT 15, 2011

SATURDAY EVENING 6:00

6:30

7:00

SEPTEMBER 17, 2011 7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

MONDAY EVENING

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

6:00

^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

Entertainment Ton. Rules Rules Criminal Minds ’ 48 Hours Mystery News Spo Hooked Criminal College Football Oklahoma at Florida State. (N) (Live) ABC Fall News Sport Leisure Extra (N) News Gme Who Do You All Night Free Ag. Law & Order: SVU News Sports Outdoors Storms Antique Roadshow Lark Rise Doc Martin New Tricks Red... Dwarf Doctor Who Wonders Wild Report Gener American Road Paraiso for Sale ’ Theater Big Woodsongs Bonanza ’ Lawrence Welk Heroes Lucy (9:15) Perry Mason Will Rogers-Politics Jack Benny Simpson Seinfeld Cops (N) Cops Amer. Cleve News Seinfeld (10:35) Fringe Crockett Office Office ››› “Thirteen Days” (2000) Kevin Costner, Steven Culp. Brothers & Sisters Brothers & Sisters Monk ’ Monk ’ Monk ’ Psych ’ Psych “Truer Lies” Psych ’ Estrellitas del Sábado A Que no Puedes “Nosotros los Chemos” (2001, Drama) Pagado Pagado Two Men Mother Ugly Betty ’ Bones ’ House ’ Two Men Saturday Night Live ’

^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

Beyond Scared Beyond Scared Beyond Scared Beyond Scared Beyond Scared Beyond Scared ››‡ “Defiance” (2008) Daniel Craig, Jamie Bell. Premiere. ››› “Top Gun” (1986) Tom Cruise. Death Almost, Away Almost, Away Almost, Away Commandment Track Me-Can I Faked Death ANT ANT Random Shake It Shake It “Wizards of Waverly Place” Good ANT ANT Shake It (5:30) College Football Ohio State at Miami. (N) (8:45) College Football Stanford at Arizona. (N) (Live) Sport (5:30) ›› “Evan Almighty” ››› “Ever After: A Cinderella Story” (1998) ›› “50 First Dates” (2004) Premiere. College Football Syracuse at USC. (N) (Live) Two Men ››‡ “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” ››‡ “Hereafter” (2010) Matt Damon. (8:15) True Blood (9:15) ››‡ “Machete” (2010) ’ ‘R’ (11:05) “Hereafter” (4:30) “Enough” “The Perfect Roommate” (2011) ›› “Enough” (2002) Jennifer Lopez. Reba ’ iCarly (N) Victo Ninjas iCarly ’ Friends Friends Friends Friends 70s 70s My Wife My Wife ›› “The Chase” (1994) ’ ››› “The Last Starfighter” (9:15) “The Man Who Knew Too Little” (10:50) “Jaws 2” MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at Colorado Rockies. Post Rockies College Football “Letters to Juliet” ›› “The Other Woman” (2009) ‘R’ “The Penthouse” (2009) ‘R’ Weeds The Big Peters UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Fight Night Live (N) ’ (Live) Blue Deadliest Warrior Repo Repo MAN Prince ›› “Maid in Manhattan” (2002) ’ (8:20) ››› “Easy A” (2010) ›› “The Green Hornet” (2011) ›››‡ “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994, Drama) ››› “True Lies” (1994) Arnold Schwarzenegger. NCIS ’ NCIS “Shalom” ’ NCIS “Reunion” ’ NCIS “Aliyah” NCIS ’ NCIS ’ ››› “Wedding Crashers” (2005) Owen Wilson. ››› “I Love You, Man” (2009) ›› “American Wedding”

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

SUNDAY MORNING 6:00 ^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

6:30

Latino Made Good Morning Animal Mat Contrary Religion Enviro Rabbit Devotional Adults Paid Tummy Paid Paid Turning Discov. Pagado Pagado Paid Paid

7:00

SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

Oreck MathPaid Cash Ghost Stories Ghost Stories The Sopranos ’ The Sopranos ’ Mad Men ››‡ “Secret Window” (2004) ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990) Robert De Niro. Paid Removal Paid Tomor Paid Jentezen Osteen In Touch Curiosity ’ Auction Auction Phineas Phineas Chug Little Mickey Mouse Mickey Pirates Phineas Phineas Good Shake It SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Sunday NFL Countdown (N) (Live) Countdown Paid Thin eBay Mass Boy Boy Boy ››› “Ever After: A Cinderella Story” (1998) Paid Flawless Paid Paid Smarter Smarter Smarter ›‡ “The Marine” (2006) John Cena. Super Ex Ice Age “Real Women Have Curves” 24/7 “Cats & Dogs: Kitty Galore” Real/Bill Maher ›› “Devil” (2010) Hour of Power Osteen Paid Reba ’ Will “The Perfect Neighbor” (2005) “Perfect Teacher” Fanboy Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Odd Parents Winx Club (N) iCarly ’ iCarly ’ “Kermit’s Swamp Years” ’ (7:40) ››‡ “Trapped in Paradise” (9:35) ›› “Airheads” (1994) “Seventeen Again” Paid Prostate Paid Paid Stock Outdoor Whitetail Bowhun Paid Paid Paid Paid Inside the NFL NASCAR “Thirst” (2008) iTV. ‘R’ ››‡ “The Switch” (2010) (10:45) ›‡ “Triggermen” Sexy Fat Loss Auction Auction Auction Xtreme Horse. Trucks! Muscle Deadliest Warrior Rescue (6:05) ››› “Easy A” (2010) (7:40) ››› “Tangled” (2010) ’ “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time” Green Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ ›››‡ “Cinderella Man” (2005) Paid Smoking Monk Paid Paid Paid Osteen Necess. Rough Law & Order: SVU Band ››‡ “American Pie 2” (2001) ›› “American Wedding” (2003) Friends MLB TBS Baseball

SUNDAY AFTERNOON 12:00 12:30 1:00

^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 1:30

2:00

2:30

3:00

3:30

4:30

5:00

2 News at 5:00pm News ABC Football Night News Utah Garden Garden (5:08) Bonanza ’ Countdown Payne Wheel Monk ’ Jose Luis en Cold Case ’

6:30

7:00

SEPTEMBER 18, 2011 7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

60 Minutes (N) ’ The Good Wife ’ The Good Wife ’ CSI: Miami Funny Videos Extreme Makeover 20/20 “Wrong Turn: The Kati Kim Story” (6:15) NFL Football Philadelphia Eagles at Atlanta Falcons. (N) Sports Globe Trekker ’ Nature (DVS) Masterpiece Mystery! (N) ’ Ebert Walk Spain Big Quilts Hecho Squeeze Song of Mountains Antique Roadshow Best Two Years ’ Antique Roadshow 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards (N) ’ (Live) News ›‡ “An American Affair” (2009) History J. Smith Without a Trace ’ Monk ’ Monk ’ Monk ’ Psych “He Dead” “Olor a Muerte” (1991) Valentín Trujillo. “Baño de Sangre” (2001) Edna Bolkan Bones ’ ›› “The Other End of the Line” (2008) Jim ’70s

News Talkin’ Sports Criminal News Red Paid Light News Sports BYU History Lark Rise MI-5 “Persephone” Inner... Closer Over Cultural Gr’t Performances WWII Griffith Sports Simpson Fam Guy Amer. The Fan McCarv Insider Scrubs Psych ’ Psych ’ Secretos Secretos Pagado Pagado Mother ›› “Becoming Jane” (2007)

Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage (5:30) ››‡ “U-571” (2000) Premiere. Breaking Bad (N) (9:04) Breaking Bad (10:06) The Killing Breaking Bad American Chopper Area 51 ’ Curiosity ’ Curiosity (N) Fish Attack 3 Fish Attack 2 ANT Good Good Wizards ANT Random Shake It Up! (N) Good ANT Shake It Up! MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at Philadelphia Phillies. SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” ›› “50 First Dates” (2004) ›› “Paul Blart: Mall Cop” (2009) “Spider-Man 3” ››› “Kung Fu Panda” (2008) ››‡ “Monsters vs. Aliens” (2009) “Monsters vs.” Boardwalk Empire Boardwalk Empire Boardwalk Empire ›››‡ “127 Hours” (2010) Real/Bill Maher Twelve “Perfect Room.” Drop Dead Diva (N) Against the Wall Against the Wall Drop Dead Diva Chris Chris My Wife My Wife Nick George Friends Friends Friends Friends 70s 70s My Wife My Wife ›› “Airheads” (1994) ’ (7:35) ››‡ “Trapped in Paradise” ›‡ “Seventeen Again” ’ “TekWar:” College Football Colorado vs. Colorado State. From Denver. Rockies Rockies Boys in Football World Poker Tour: Dexter (iTV) Weeds The Big ››‡ “The Switch” (2010) ‘PG-13’ Weeds The Big Patton Oswalt Auction Auction Auction Auction Bar Rescue (N) ’ (9:01) Bar Rescue (10:02) ›› “U.S. Marshals” (1998) ’ Tangled (6:35) ›› “The Green Hornet” (2011) (8:41) ››› “Apocalypto” (2006) (Subtitled) ’ Camelot ’ “Shawshank R.” ››‡ “The Da Vinci Code” (2006) Tom Hanks. ››‡ “The Da Vinci Code” (2006) Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU ››‡ “Meet the Fockers” (2004) (8:13) ››‡ “Meet the Fockers” (2004) (10:45) “American Pie 2”

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

Mother Mother Two Men Broke Dancing With the Stars ’ The Sing-Off “Season Premiere: Pt. I” Antiques Rdsho Antique Roadshow Journal Business Cheese Under PBS NewsHour (N) History Detectives Hell’s Kitchen (Season Finale) (N) Million. Million. Funny Videos Without a Trace ’ Criminal Minds ’ A Que-Puedes El Shaka H8R ’ Ringer “Pilot”

9:00

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

Hawaii Five-0 News Letterman Late (9:01) Castle News Nightline Access Extra (N) We Are Utah News Jay Leno Late The Storm That Swept Mexico ’ History Detectives Panda Nursery ’ Inner GED Asia 7 Drexel House-Windsor Steves Perry Mason My 3 News Seinfeld Simpson 30 Rock Seinfeld Friends Friends Office Office Scrubs Scrubs Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Monk ’ Alarma Noticiero Secretos Chuper Pagado Pagado News Raymond Big Bang Mother 70s Jim

Criminal Minds ’ The First 48 The First 48 Hoarders Hoarders Intervention ›››‡ “No Country for Old Men” (2007) ›››‡ “No Country for Old Men” (2007) “Cowboy Way” Desert Car Kings Cash Cash American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper Underworld Phineas ANT Shake It Good Shake It Up! Random “Lemonade Mouth” (2011) ‘NR’ Shake It C’ntdown NFL Football St. Louis Rams at New York Giants. (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) NFL PrimeTime (N) Secret-Teen The Lying Game The Lying Game The Lying Game ››‡ “Bring It On” (2000, Comedy) “Kung Fu Panda” Mother Mother Two Men Two Men ›‡ “Wild Hogs” (2007, Comedy) Tim Allen. Wild Real/Bill Maher ››› “Public Enemies” (2009) Johnny Depp. ‘R’ 24/7 Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell Sex City “Fried-Tomatoes” ›› “The Bucket List” (2007) Premiere. The Protector ›› “The Bucket List” (2007) Family My Wife George George Friends Friends ’70s ’70s George George Friends Friends › “Stroker Ace” (1983) (7:35) ››‡ “Godzilla vs. Mothra” (9:20) “Sibling Rivalry” (1990) “Rebirth-Moth 3” Pregame MLB Baseball San Diego Padres at Colorado Rockies. (Live) Post Dan Patrick Rockies Baseball Youth ››‡ “Piranha” (2010) ‘R’ Weeds The Big Weeds The Big “Love’s Kitchen” (2011) iTV. Single Ways 1,000 Ways to Die Ways Ways Ways Ways War Ways Ways Ways Ways (5:50) ›› “John Q” (2002) ’ (8:05) “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice” ’ ››‡ “Country Strong” (2010) ’ The Closer Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ Law & Order: SVU NCIS “Twilight” ’ NCIS “Kill Ari” NCIS “Kill Ari” WWE Monday Night RAW ’ Fam Guy Fam Guy Fam Guy Fam Guy Fam Guy Fam Guy Conan (N) Office Office Conan

6:00 ^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

6:30

News Ent News Two Men News News PBS NewsHour (N) TV411 Work Little House Simpson 30 Rock Wheel Jeopardy Without a Trace ’ Estudio 2 Two Men Big Bang

7:00

SEPTEMBER 20, 2011 7:30

8:00

8:30

NCIS (DVS) NCIS: Los Angeles Dancing With Stars Dancing With Stars The Biggest Loser ’ History Detectives Horses of the West Journal Asia Biz Leading Living PBS NewsHour (N) Nature (DVS) Glee ’ New Girl Raising Million. Million. Funny Videos Without a Trace ’ Criminal Minds ’ A Que-Puedes Historias Delirantes 90210 “Rush Hour” Ringer (N) ’

9:00

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

Unforgettable Body of Proof Parenthood (N) ’ Frontline Gener Growing Wild! (DVS) News Friends Friends Criminal Minds Alarma Noticiero News Raymond

6:00 ^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

News Letterman Late News Nightline Access Extra (N) News Jay Leno Late Keep Up Wait... POV (N) ’ On One Work Journal Cheese Steves Perry Mason My 3 Seinfeld Simpson 30 Rock Seinfeld Office Office Scrubs Scrubs Criminal Minds ’ Monk ’ Secretos Chuper Pagado Pagado Big Bang Mother ’70s Jim

Criminal Minds ’ The First 48 Billy Billy Billy Billy Billy Billy Billy Billy ›››‡ “We Were Soldiers” (2002, War) Mel Gibson. ›››‡ “We Were Soldiers” (2002, War) Mel Gibson. Desert Car Kings Cash Cash Dirty Jobs ’ Auction Auction Auction Auction Carfellas Carfellas Phineas ANT Shake It Good Wizards ANT Phineas “Phineas and Ferb” Wizards ANT World, Poker World, Poker Baseball Tonight SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight SportsCenter (N) Secret-Teen 70s ››‡ “Bring It On” (2000, Comedy) ››‡ “The Princess Diaries” (2001, Comedy) Mother Mother Mother Mother Two Men Two Men ››› “Taken” (2008) Liam Neeson. Sons of Anarchy Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell 24/7 REAL Sports (9:15) ››› “Unstoppable” (2010) Katie People American Pickers American Pickers Picker Picker Picker Sisters American Pickers American Pickers Family My Wife George George Friends Friends ’70s ’70s George George Friends Friends ›› “Carpool” (1996) ’ (7:35) ››‡ “Young Guns II” (1990) (9:20) ››‡ “18 Again!” “Close-3rd Kind” Pregame MLB Baseball San Diego Padres at Colorado Rockies. (Live) Post Dan Patrick Jay Baseball Living for 32 (iTV) Weeds The Big Weeds The Big Web Web “I Hate Valentine’s Day” Women Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction UFC Count Auction Auction Auction Auction (6:15) ›› “Burlesque” (2010) Cher. ’ (8:15) ›› “Blue Crush” (2002) ’ ›› “The Green Hornet” (2011) ’ Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) Office Office Conan

WEDNESDAY EVENING

5:30

The Sopranos ’ ›› “Enough” (2002) Jennifer Lopez. Premiere. Billy Billy Billy Billy Billy ››‡ “Defiance” (2008) Daniel Craig, Liev Schreiber. ››› “Top Gun” (1986) Tom Cruise. U-571 Sons of Guns American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper ANT ANT ››‡ “16 Wishes” (2010) Good Shake It Shake It ANT Phineas ANT ANT NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Geico 400. (N) (Live) Sport SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) ›› “Along Came Polly” (2004) ››‡ “Bruce Almighty” (2003) ›› “Evan Almighty” (2007, Comedy) “My Super Ex-Girlfriend” ›› “Fantastic Four” (2005, Action) Ioan Gruffudd. ››‡ “Spider-Man 3” (2007, Action) Devil ’ ››‡ “Just Wright” (2010) (2:15) ›› “Torque” (2004) (3:45) ››‡ “Hereafter” (2010) Matt Damon. ’ “Perfect Teacher” ›› “The Perfect Nanny” (2000) “The Perfect Assistant” (2008) “Perfect Room.” iCarly ’ iCarly ’ Victo Victo Big Time Big Time Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. iCarly ’ Victo Bucket “Seventeen Again” (12:50) ›› “Cowboy Up” ’ (2:40) ›‡ “Jaws III” (1983) ’ (4:20) “Max Dugan Returns” Rockies Pregame MLB Baseball San Francisco Giants at Colorado Rockies. (N) Post Rockies Boys in Football Triggr “World’s Greatest Dad” ‘R’ (2:10) ›››‡ “The Hurt Locker” (2008) ‘R’ “Thirst” (2008) iTV. ‘R’ Rescue (12:43) Bar Rescue ’ Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction (11:25) “The Green Hornet” ›› “Armored” (2009) ’ ››‡ “Alice in Wonderland” (2010) (4:50) “Tangled” “Cinderella Man” ›››‡ “A Beautiful Mind” (2001) Russell Crowe. “The Shawshank Redemption” (1994) Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU MLB Baseball: Rays at Red Sox Friends Friends ››› “Wedding Crashers” (2005) Owen Wilson.

6:00

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

4:00

NFL Football: Raiders at Bills NFL Football Cincinnati Bengals at Denver Broncos. (N) Paid Fat Loss FREE Paid Wipeout ’ Wipeout ’ Pictures Memory PGA Tour Golf BMW Championship, Final Round. (N) ’ (Live) News News Dream Machines Antique Roadshow NOVA (DVS) Nova scienceNOW History Detectives French Destinos Connect Dragon’s Sewing Sew It Paint Art Work Wood Woods Squad Biz Kid$ Lawrence Welk Inside Group BYU Healthy Little House/Prairie (11:00) NFL Football Regional Coverage. The OT English Premier League Soccer News Cheers Cheers Paid Memory Paid Paid Money Cheers Paid Paid ››› “Colors” (1988) Sean Penn. ’ ››› “Rudy” (1993) Sean Astin, Ned Beatty. ’ “El Tesoro de la Ladera Ranch” “El Hijo del Tahúr” (2003) Hugo Stiglitz Lo Mejor de TTMT Paid FREE › “Sorority Boys” (2002) Barry Watson. Chronicles Ugly Betty ’

SUNDAY EVENING ^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

The NFL Today (N) NFL Football This Week WEN Paid Mormon History Fast Big Martha Wash. Aviators MotorWk Fitness Healthy Healthy Simple WordGirl Wild Electric Cyber FOX NFL Sunday NFL Football Utah Money Paid Paid Inspiration Ministry Campmeeting ’ Pagado Pagado Fabrica Fabrica WEN Paid Paid Paid

6:30

News Ent News Two Men News News PBS NewsHour (N) TV 411 GED Little House Simpson 30 Rock Wheel Jeopardy Without a Trace ’ Estudio 2 Two Men Big Bang

C7

SEPTEMBER 19, 2011

TUESDAY EVENING

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

Lose Lbs Health CBS News Sunday Morning Nation FREE Record County Removal Leisure Bride. Today (N) ’ Meet the Press (N) Sunday Music Curious Cat in Super Dinosaur Arthur WordGirl Miffy Anne Peep Patrol Biz Kid$ Quest Not in God’s Name I Believe Music Curious Arthur Good Day Utah Weekend Edition (N) Fox News Sunday Paid V’Impe Paid Canyon Paid Utah In Touch Int Mass Paid Paid Pagado Pagado Pagado Pagado Pagado Pagado Paid Pets.TV Mad Missing Rescue Pets.TV

TV Listings

6:30

News Ent News Two Men News News PBS NewsHour (N) TV 411 GED Little House/Prairie Simpson 30 Rock Wheel Jeopardy Without a Trace Mi Sueño es Bailar Two Men Big Bang

7:00

SEPTEMBER 21, 2011 7:30

8:00

8:30

Survivor-Pacific Criminal Minds ’ The Middle Modern Family ’ All Night Free Ag. Harry’s Law Live From Lincoln Center ’ Journal Truth History Bugeye PBS NewsHour (N) Return of Sherlock The X Factor “Auditions No. 1” Million. Million. Funny Videos Without a Trace Without a Trace ’ Historias Delirantes H8R (N) ’ Top Model

9:00

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

CSI: Crime Scene Revenge “Pilot” ’ Law & Order: SVU Not-Our Town I Remember Poirot ’ News Friends Friends Criminal Minds Alarma Noticiero News Raymond

News Letterman Late News Nightline Access Extra (N) News Jay Leno Late Keep Up Wait... “Madness-Grge” America GED Global Under Steves Perry Mason My 3 Seinfeld Simpson 30 Rock Seinfeld Office Office Scrubs Scrubs Criminal Minds ’ Monk ’ Secretos Chuper Pagado Pagado Big Bang Mother ’70s Jim

Criminal Minds ’ The First 48 Storage Wars Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage ››› “The Italian Job” (2003) Mark Wahlberg. ››› “The Italian Job” (2003) Mark Wahlberg. Breaking Bad Desert Car Kings Cash Cash Sons of Guns Sons of Guns Sons of Guns Sons of Guns Phineas ANT Shake it Good Good Random Wizards ››‡ “Little Manhattan” Good Random (5:00) MLB Baseball Teams TBA. MLB Baseball Teams TBA. (N Subject to Blackout) SportsCenter (N) Secret-Teen ››‡ “The Princess Diaries” (2001, Comedy) ›› “The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement” (5:00) “Taken” Two Men Two Men Two Men Two Men ››› “Forgetting Sarah Marshall” (2008) Sarah M REAL Sports ››‡ “Edge of Darkness” (2010) ‘R’ Real/Bill Maher 24/7 Mel Brooks Secre Dance Moms Dance Moms Dance Moms Dance Moms Dance Moms Dance Moms Family My Wife George George Friends Friends ’70s ’70s George George Friends Friends ››‡ “Possession” (2002) (7:45) “Falling Up” (2009) Joseph Cross. “Look Who’s Talking” (1989) “Accidental T.” College Football Colorado vs. Colorado State. From Denver. Dan Patrick MLB Baseball: Padres at Rockies “Talihina Sky” Inside the NFL (N) NASCAR Weeds Inside the NFL NASCAR “Thirst” (2008) iTV. ‘R’ UFC Unleashed (N) The Ultimate Fighter (N) Blue Blue The Ultimate Fighter (N) “Marvin’s Room” (6:50) ››› “Tangled” ’ (8:35) “Friday After Next” ’ ›› “Brooklyn’s Finest” (2009) ’ The Mentalist The Mentalist ››› “300” (2007) Gerard Butler. CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ NCIS ’ NCIS ’ NCIS “Frame-Up” NCIS ’ NCIS “In the Zone” NCIS “Recoil” ’ Browns Browns Payne Payne Payne Payne Conan (N) Office Office Conan


C8

Recipe CLIPPER • THURSDAY, Sept. 15, 2011


Davis Clipper Sept 15, 2011