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Vol. 120 No. 54

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Thursday, NOV. 3, 2011

Hill AFB workload may shrink, other risks BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper Editor HILL AFB — Employee numbers and workload at the Ogden Air Logistics Center, here, could change, shrink or both, as the Air Force works to reduce expenses, including manpower. And the mammoth Falcon Hill project could be in some jeopardy. That has Rep. Rob Bishop, RUtah, the entire Utah Congressional delegation, and Gov. Herbert upset at the lack of transparency by the Air Force in the process. And Stuart Adams, Military Infrastructure Defense Authority chair, also expressed strong frustration at the Air Force’s actions, Wednesday afternoon. “The base commander ought to have final say on missions performed at the base. That’s the thing that frustrates me the most,” the Layton resident said, adding, “Some of that control is going to be moved to Dayton, Ohio,” home of one of three ALCs. “It’s something I obviously don’t support. I’ll do everything I can to reverse it,” the state senator said, also lambasting the “behind closed doors” decision-making the Air Force has used. Meanwhile, the entire Congressional delegation and governor voiced “dismay” in a letter released late Wednesday. It referred to a Nov. 1 closed door meeting “with selected Congressional leaders regarding your anticipated announcement which will outline a major reorganization of the Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC), significant downgrading of the ALC’s (including at Hill AFB), and the establishment of new centralized bureaucracies in Ohio and Oklahoma. “As things stand, we cannot support your proposal due to the lack of analysis which prohibits us from judging the efficacy of proposed changes and impacts on sustainment,” the letter said. “Sadly, the Air Force either can’t, or won’t, provide us with the needed answers as the analytical process n See

“HILL AFB” p. A4

Vo See te 20 r’s 11 C1 Gu -9 ide

Shooting victim expected to survive BY MELINDA WILLIAMS Clipper Staff Writer CENTERVILLE — Police say that Tony Pierce, the man shot in his yard Sunday afternoon in a mobile home park here, is expected to survive. On Wednesday, Centerville Police Lt. Paul Child said he is receiving updates from Pierce’s

family daily on the victim’s condition, and that his condition is improving, having been upgraded from critical to stable. As of Tuesday, Pierce, 41, reportedly has been able to communicate with others. Meanwhile, his neighbor, Michael J. Selleneit, 53, the alleged shooter, is in the Davis County Jail on attempted homicide

charges. He will be arraigned in 2nd District Court in Farmington on Nov. 10. Selleneit also faces charges of being a restricted person in possession of a firearm. His restriction is based on a 1990 conviction of forcible sexual abuse of a child. Pierce was working in his yard just before 5 p.m. on Sunday

at his mobile home in the park at 555 N. 400 West, when Selleneit allegedly shot Pierce two times. One bullet hit Pierce’s leg, another hit his back, causing lifethreatening injuries. Child said the bullet that hit Pierce’s back passed through his body and hit several vital organs. The bullet n See “SHOOTING” p. A4

Bringing in the bison

AROUND 400 RIDERS participated in this year’s Antelope Island Bison Roundup, driving bison into corrals for inoculations and testing. This year’s ride started with temperatures hovering around freezing. Riders say it’s good to have a horse with a quiet temperament that is confident on hills when taking part in the roundup. Photo by Louise R. Shaw

More riders than ever at roundup BY LOUISE R. SHAW

Clipper Staff Writer ANTELOPE ISLAND — Things have changed a bit since Eldean Holliday rode in his first Antelope Island Bison Roundup in 1987. That year was the first for Antelope Island roundups. In those early years, only 40 or 50

Index

came out to ride, as he remembers it. This year 400 riders came to the island, according to Wendy Wilson, state park naturalist, 150 riding to roundup the bison into corrals on the northwest side of the island, and another 250 spectators following on horseback, enjoying the island and the event.

Business.............................A12 Calendar.............................. B5 Church life........................A15

Even with the increased numbers, Holliday said he finds the event exciting, though maybe a bit less scary thanks to the training that precedes the ride. Neal Christensen, trail boss, warned riders not to get in front of the herd and not to round up any bulls. He warned them to stay in groups and

Davis Life...........................A11 Election guide..................... C1 Horizons..............................A9

keep a safe distance from the animals. “You’ll figure it out,” he said to laughter, when asked exactly what a safe distance would be. “They’re faster than your horse,” he said at one point, and if someone yells for a rider to “go,” he said, “keep going as n See “MORE” p. A4

Obituaries.........................A14 Sports.................................. B1 Youth................................A16

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Briefs CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Two men arrested in robbery

training for teachers, youth sports programs, science fair programs and Leonardo on Wheels exhibit.

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CENTERVILLE —

Two Salt Lake City men have been arrested in connection with the robbery of the America First Credit Union here on Oct. 22. Elnathan Posey Jr., 33, was arrested Thursday and Joseph Scott Manning, 30, was arrested Friday for the robbery at the credit union, at 451 W. Parrish Lane. Centerville Police Lt. Paul Child said Posey, believed to be the driver of the getaway vehicle was arrested near the homeless shelter in Salt Lake City by Centerville police and agents of the FBI. He was booked into the Davis County Jail, charged with robbery. Manning was arrested Friday in Salt Lake City by U.S. Marshals on a probation violation and booked into the Weber County Jail. He was on probation for car-jacking, and is now facing charges related to the credit union robbery. Child said police believe he is the person who entered the bank and committed the robbery. Child said officers tried to locate him Thursday and obtained a search warrant for a Salt Lake City apartment. He was not there, but two other arrests were made on drug charges and a stolen car recovered. The credit union was robbed on Saturday, Oct. 22, at 11:29 a.m. by a masked man. Several people witnessed the suspect entering the credit union and then

Colors of fall Though red, orange, and yellow leaves across the county have had a few days of sunshine to show off their colors, they might not have much longer. Snow is predicted for this weekend, though the sun is expected to return next week. Photos by Louise R. Shaw leave in a green Honda Civic. A Centerville police officer also observed the vehicle heading south on I-15, but was unable to catch up to it.

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Holly gives funds to school

WEST BOUNTIFUL — HollyFrontier’s Woods

Cross Refinery is giving $32,000 to West Bountiful Elementary School to support the school’s technological improvements. The money, presented at Tuesday’s board of education meeting, will be used to

purchase additional document cameras, projectors and sound systems, create a mobile computer lab that will include 32 computers for use by the upper grades and upgrades to the wireless system. The money will also be used for field trips for third-graders to the Living Planet Aquarium and for fourth through sixth graders to visit The Leonardo, a contemporary science, technology and art museum. The refinery will also offer information on how the refining process works to children with an interest in math and science. West Bountiful Elementary School Principal Millie Fletcher thanked the refinery for their donation, saying, “The refinery has been a huge supporter to

our school and our technology efforts over the past 10 years to update our classrooms and computer labs.” “We believe in the power of learning and the power of giving,” said Woods Cross refinery manager Lynn Keddington. “As a West Bountiful company, we have a rich legacy here. We have made supporting education one of our primary focuses because we know it is key to continued innovation, and providing skills and growing leaders for our next generation.” In the past, the refinery has given hundreds of thousands of dollars to south Davis County for such things as an emergency mobile command unit, Fourth of July fireworks, a University of Utah scholarship program,

Armed forces honored

KAYSVILLE — Special recognition will be given Saturday, Nov. 5, to those who’ve served or who are currently serving in the armed forces, at the Kaysville/Fruit Heights Armed Forces Day Celebration. Current and former members of the armed services and their spouses are invited to the event, which will be held in the Davis High commons area, 325 S. Main, beginning at 11 a.m. Mike Ramsdell, a bestselling author and a veteran, will be the featured speaker at the event, which will also include musical numbers and a luncheon. “We want to honor those who have served our country and show them our appreciation,” said Amalia Burrola, who has helped coordinate the event for the past three years. Those interested in attending can RSVP through Kaysville City, at 801-5461235.

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Interfaith hymn fest set in NSL

NORTH SALT LAKE — It’s a community of

voices. North Salt Lake will host a Thanksgiving Interfaith Hymn Festival on Nov. 13 at 6 p.m. at the LDS Chapel at 261 E. Center, North Salt Lake. This free event provides an opportunity for members of all faiths to sing together. Community members and church choirs are all invited to participate, and organists from various local churches will provide accompaniment. “Audience members will become the choir as they sing lyrics that praise God and express gratitude for his bounty,” said Rep. Becky Edwards, who helped organize the event. Local churches that will be participating in the festival include the Abundant Life Church, Bountiful Community Church, Bountiful Heights, Church of the Resurrection, Grace Lutheran Church, St. Olaf’s Catholic Church, and the LDS church.

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Hotel remodel to open

NORTH SALT LAKE — It may be a down economy, but the Best Western CottonTree Inn, here, has moved ahead with a major remodeling effort. That will be showcased Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., at the hotel, 1030 N. 400 E., North Salt Lake. Sales director Nicole E. Walker said the public spaces have been renovated, including the lobby and swimming pool.


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

News

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Liljenquist receives national award BY BECKY GINOS

Clipper Staff Writer SALT LAKE CITY — Utah State Sen. Dan Liljenquist’s “rising star” just got a little brighter. He has been named Public Official of the Year by Governing magazine and will be featured in the November issue. “I’m just delighted to be honored for the work of our Legislature,” said Liljenquist, a Bountiful resident. “We’re trying to look down the road as a state and tackle challenges before they become disasters.” Liljenquist received the national honor for his hard stance on Utah’s pension reform, braving political fallout to model a definedcontribution plan. “His actions effectively removed the possibility of the retirement fund ever bankrupting the state and won accolades from The

Wall Street Journal, which called his plan a model other states should replicate,” a statement from the Governing magazine said of his selection. Individuals were chosen from nominations submitted by readers, experts in the public and private sectors, and the Governing editorial team. Qualities such as leadership, courage, innovation, creativity and good management served as the criteria for choosing those awarded. “This recognition says a lot about Dan, but it also says a great deal about the state of Utah,” said Senate President Michael Waddoups in a statement. “In other places, innovators like Dan are relegated to the back bench. Here, smart ideas carry the day. Dan passed his bills with bipartisan support, and concluded the controversial process

with more friends than enemies.” Liljenquist has personally mentored officials in some 40 states over the past two years, on how to implement fiscally sustainable solutions like Utah’s. “I give credit to the Legislature and Gov. Herbert who took the hard vote to tackle issues that will matter 20 years from now,” said Liljenquist. “This is a victory for the state of Utah. These pieces of legislation help put us on solid footing for decades to come.” Liljenquist will be speaking on “Fiscal Reality” at a local Town Hall meeting, Nov. 9 from 7 - 8:30 p.m. at Bountiful City Hall. He and the other honorees will be presented at an awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 17. View the magazine at www. governing.com/POY. bginos@davisclipper.com

Funds to help thwart child abductions BY LOUISE R. SHAW

Clipper Staff Writer LAYTON — Even the happy endings are sad. Even the children saved from a violent father or the girl rescued from a warped abuser will have much to deal with over their lives. But most of the stories end even more tragically. And for that reason, concerned residents gathered at the Davis Conference Center to raise funds for the AMBER Alert program in an event sponsored by the Davis Chamber of Commerce Women in Business. “I’d like to thank each of you who prayed for me, searched for me and used all the resources to find me,” said Elizabeth Smart, who survived nine months in the hands of a kidnapper. “No child should ever have to experience what I experienced. Every child is special and we should all be doing everything we can to protect them.” Smart’s story was one that ended with her returning to her family and to safety thanks to the involvement of the public. “It was a miracle day that we will never forget,”

said her father, Ed Smart, as he related the story of two people who found her almost at the same time. “Awareness is what AMBER Alert is all about,” he said, “keeping your eyes open. Nothing can help a child like the overall public keeping their eyes out for the child.” Awareness is something Elaine Runyan-Simmons has been working to increase since 1982 when her three-year-old daughter, Rachel, was kidnapped. Rachel had been playing with her brothers at the playground at Doxey Elementary in Sunset when the boys ran over to their mother and told her a man had offered Rachel candy and took her away. At that time, there was no way to alert the public, the media and the authorities to the disappearance. “There was no system in place for such a crime,” she said, and the family spent $10,000 in the first three weeks setting up hot lines, going to New York to bring attention to her disappearance, doing everything they could to get help. “We were stuck in a nightmare that wouldn’t end,” she said, adding that they couldn’t eat or sleep.

“It as grueling.” Twenty-four days later the child was found by a family out for a Sunday drive in Morgan County. Her body was hidden in shrubbery near a small stream. Her killer has never been found. “So in time you want to do something so this wouldn’t happen to any other child,” she said. She worked to establish the Rachel Runyan Alert system, the Utah precursor to the nation-wide AMBER Alert, and it was one of those alerts that went on out June 5, 2002, the day Elizabeth Smart disappeared. People are encouraged to get involved by using wirelessamberalerts.com or watching for alerts on Facebook. The funds raised by Davis County’s Women in Business make up the entire budget for Utah’s AMBER Alert program, which does not rely on tax dollars. ���Awareness is what brought me home,” said Elizabeth Smart. “We should be using every available resource and every spare set of hands... it is so vital to every missing child.”

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Treats start early at the Square Princesses, cowboys and wild animals, lady bugs, pirates and an iPhone turned out at the Square Monday, to enjoy the tricks and treats offered by businesses. With parents in tow and cameras flashing, families started the holiday tradition early, enjoying candy and frozen yogurt offered by the businesses at 2600 South and 500 West in Bountiful. Photo by Louise R. Shaw


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News CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Eaglewood Village More riders than ever at roundup start: early 2012 Continued from p. A1

BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer NORTH SALT LAKE — Eaglewood Village is looking at another quiet winter. The development, which had its groundbreaking in late 2007 and has had only occasional work done on it since then, is now on track to start vertical construction on multi-family housing units sometime in early 2012. “We’re making progress,” said North Salt Lake Mayor Len Arave. “It’s just slower progress than anyone would like.” Though earlier reports from the city suggested a possibility that construction on the apartment or condo units might start this fall, the focus is still on all the paperwork needed to get construction started. Currently, the project is undergoing a review with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). “Proceeding with any kind of real estate development is difficult in this market,” said Compass Development representative Ben Lowe. “It has taken a lot of persistence, but we feel fortunate to be moving forward.” That persistence has had to carry the development through more than five years of delays and setbacks,

including the recession, a weak housing market, access issues that needed to be settled, and extra geotechnical work required by the property itself (it’s a former gravel pit). Though no vertical construction has occurred, there has been some work done on the site, including roads, curbs, and gutters. The last construction done on the project was this past summer, when crews added extra turn lanes onto the stretch of Highway 89 that runs near the development. That work was part of the developer’s original agreement with the city, but was done now at the request of the city council. The council also agreed to waive an earlier requirement that said a certain amount of commercial/office space needed to be sold before any housing units went up. “We would like to have commercial and office there, but that takes time,” said Arave. “It’s good to get started.” The new multi-family units will likely hold apartments as well as condominiums, though all units will be built to condominium standards. Leasing will begin after construction starts on the units. “It’s the gateway to our city,” said Arave. “I think we’d like to get it looking a little better.”

Shooting victim expected to survive Continued from p. A1 also hit the sack around his heart. Neighbors rushed to Pierce’s aid and called 911. Pierce’s 8-year-old daughter was inside his mobile home at the time of the shooting, but was unharmed. He was taken by medical helicopter to the Intermountain Health Care Trauma Center in Murray, where he underwent emergency surgery Sunday evening. Child said Pierce and Selleneit have lived next door to each other for several years. During that time, Selleneit made repeated accusations towards Pierce,

but none of the accusations were ever substantiated. A Probable Cause Statement given to the Davis County Attorney’s Office said that for years Selleneit has claimed Pierce has sent “telepathic” waves and messages to Selleneit’s wife, and that she had been telepathically raped and given drugs by Pierce and others. Police recovered a .380 semi-automatic handgun, which is believed to be the firearm used in the assault. Child said they believe that the gun used in the assault was obtained about a year ago from a pawn shop by Selleneit’s wife. mwilliams@davisclipper.com

long as you hear ‘go, go, go.’” Chad Kramer, buffalo herd manager at Custer State Park in South Dakota was also on hand to help with the roundup. “A head shake is usually a sign of aggression,” he said. When asked how you know if they’re bluffing, he answered: “They’re usually not bluffing.” Christensen warned riders to watch for a tail turned up, or a bison coming out of the center of the herd toward them, and made the priorities for the day first safety and then fun, with getting the bison in their corrals a bonus. Holliday remembers early roundups and horses getting “torn up.” He tells of lassoing a bison who’d run into the lake, only to have it keel over once back on land. He had to perform CPR by jumping on it, he said, but it revived. For some years, helicop-

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ters and Ford Broncos were used to bring the animals to the corral, but Wilson said the animals became stressed and had problems when in the corrals as a result. The system in place now, she said, is not only a more natural process, but goes faster. Indeed, many of the bison were already heading north as the ride began. Some riders joked that the bison smelled the horses and knew where they

needed to go this year. Still, there were some tense moments as they were driven over the hill and down into the corrals: one when a couple of bison took off after some riders and another when a young bison escaped through a fence. Female bison can weigh 800 to 1,000 lbs., and bulls from 1,200 to 2,000. Even a five-month old can weigh in at 350. Wilson said about 450 were successfully rounded

Hill AFB workload may shrink, other risks Continued from p. A1 seems to have been circumvented.” “Our requests for open dialogue, transparency, and partnership with the highest levels of the Air Force and (AFMC) have continually been rebuffed,” Bishop said in an Oct. 26 letter to the Secretary of the Air Force Michael B. Donley. “Some general numbers” of any job cuts/transfers were discussed in the closed door meeting with Donley and much of Utah’s congressional delegation Tuesday, said Steve Petersen,

senior policy adviser and counsel in Bishop’s office. “They were in the 100-200 (job) range from each ALC that would vanish,” he said. “They’re (Air Force) quick to say there’s not going to be a RIF (Reduction in Force). That’s this year. We’re looking at the long term. Their plan sets it up so over time, there could really be losses of a lot of jobs.” Petersen stressed it’s not only the job losses, which are serious, “but the (closed) way they are doing this. In my 23 years in

Washington, this is the most closed process I have ever seen,” Petersen said. “It’s a reconfiguration for 3-star bureaucracies. This secretive base selection process flies in the face of the open, transparent process previously used by the Air Force. It now appears locations are pre-determined by the AFMC or other top Air Force decision makers.” “One of our most significant concerns is the plan could severely undercut the long-term viability of Falcon Hill. That investment (Falcon Hill) now

Special Election Held November 8, 2011 Clerk

INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS: To vote for a measure or candidate of your choice, fill in theClerk oval next to your choice. • , and write in the candidate's name on the To vote for a candidate whose name is not printed on the ballot, fill in the oval • blank line(s) provided for a write-in candidate. •INSTRUCTIONS Use ballpoint pen with dark ink (not red). Do not use pencil. TO VOTERS: •• IfTo you tear, or wrongly mark this ballot,choice, contactfillthe County office or Poll Worker. vote fordeface a measure or candidate of your in the ovalClerks next to your choice.

, and write in the candidate's name on the To vote for a candidate whose name is not printed on the ballot, fill in the oval CORRECT candidate. Use ballpoint pen withWater dark ink (notTrustee red). Do not use pencil. Benchland District for THREE) If you tear, deface(Vote or wrongly mark this ballot, contact the County Clerks office or Poll Worker.

WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG blank line(s)WRONG provided for a write-in

• •

Greg Jones Leonard WRONGPhil WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG CORRECT Reid Neumann Water District Trustee James H.Benchland Taylor

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stands at risk through what appears to be an impetuous Air Force reorganization scheme that could reduce demand for Falcon Hill, thereby jeopardizing the future modernization of Hill AFB facilities and infrastructure,” the letter continued. Adams shared those concerns. The AFMC and Air Force said late Wednesday “restructuring” will take place, including management consolidations. More information will appear in next week’s paper.

Official Ballot for Benchland Water District Official forHeld Benchland Water District Special Ballot Election November 8, 2011

Paul E. White Write-in Greg Jones Write-in Phil Leonard Write-in

Serving the “Hart” of your home and business

KAYSVILLE RESIDENTS Eldean Holliday (left) and Elwood Clark have participated in many Antelope Island Bison Roundups over the years. Photo by Louise R. Shaw

up into a corral on the first day. She said there are about 720 on the island now but bulls are left free to roam. The other stragglers would be brought in Saturday, and over the next week, be weighed, immunized and tested for health and pregnancy. About 200 of the disease-free herd will be sold to other herds or businesses. Holliday was joined on the ride by his friend, Elwood Clark, who was participating in his ninth roundup. The Kaysville residents say they enjoy the fresh air and the camaraderie of the ride, and just being on the island. Photographers, families and even a few bus loads of students were there as well, observing the roundup from the road. “This is such a beautiful island,” said Holliday, for the emerald water, its geology and terrain that is “different everywhere you look,” he said. “It is the crown jewel of Utah.”

End of Ballot FRONT Card 20 SEQ# 1 FOR PROOF ONLY 09/23/11 08:58:22


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

News

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Suspect steals front-end loader BY MELINDA WILLIAMS

Clipper Staff Writer CLEARFIELD — Clearfield Police had their own version of O.J. Simpson’s slow-speed chase Monday, when a man allegedly stole a front-end loader and led them on a chase averaging 10-15 mph for about 15 minutes. Caseton Burruss, 38, of Providence, was taken into custody at the Freeport Center after police say the frontloader became stuck and the suspect tried to flee on foot. Clearfield Assistant Police Chief Mike Stenquist said the vehicle was taken from a construction site at 500 West and 200 South, when the operator got out of the front-end loader to move some items from the roadway. While the operator was out

of the vehicle, Burruss allegedly got into the still-running vehicle and drove away. Stenquist said the suspect entered the Freeport Center by driving through fences and locked gates. He said the suspect refused to stop for officers and drove through wooded fields and along a walking trail between 200 and 700 South at the slow speed. Stenquist said police pursued the front-end loader for about 15 minutes before it was driven off a 6-foot embankment and became lodged on a fence at the Freeport Center. He said the suspect fled on foot but was quickly apprehended. Stenquist said officers feel very fortunate no one was injured. The case is still under investigation, and the sus-

pect’s intentions are unclear, because he isn’t talking to police. In addition to the theft of the front-end loader, Burruss is suspected of stealing a car from a Layton car dealership earlier in the day, and when it ran out of gas, stealing another car from a Clearfield residence. Stenquist said that second car was also crashed into a dirt embankment at the Freeport Center. Burruss has been charged with three counts of felony auto theft, felony evading, two counts of leaving the scene of an accident, three counts of criminal mischief and trespassing. He has been booked into the Davis County Jail. mwilliams@davisclipper.com

THE STOLEN front end loader, shown above while still caught in the fence at the Freeport Center. Courtesy photo

After long effort, NSL to get pedestrian light across Highway 89 BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer NORTH SALT LAKE — Soon it will be a little safer to cross Highway 89. After months of discussions and proof of support from nearby residents, UDOT will be putting up a flashing yellow light across Highway 89 near the entrance to Camelot Mobile Home Park. Though it’s not the full traffic light that the city pushed for, the light (which will have a pedestrian walk button) will help make it safer for those who

are crossing the street. “It’s not what they (residents) wanted, but it’s the best we could get,” said North Salt Lake Mayor Len Arave, who helped spearhead the push. A major supporter of the push are the residents of Camelot, who lost one of their neighbors when she was killed crossing Highway 89 two years ago. According to Judy Olschewski, president of the Camelot Homeowners Association, two other Camelot residents have been hit and killed while crossing at the cross-

walk over the past 10 years. “They (drivers) know that the next light isn’t until the post office,” she said. “They have a clear shot to speed up.” Due to blockages by items such as a bus shelter and a large power pole, it’s also hard for people exiting Camelot to safely enter traffic. “You almost have to nose into the street to see,” said Olschewski. Earlier this year, Mayor Arave came to speak to Camelot residents about needs they might have, and

the safety of the crosswalk near the park entrance was immediately brought up. Arave suggested a letter-writing campaign, and Olschewski set about gathering 50-70 letters from concerned residents and nearby business owners. “There’s a new medical clinic near the crosswalk, and I found out they keep an emergency kit under their front desk in case someone gets hit,” she said. Arave brought the letters to UDOT, who acknowledged residents’ feelings but weren’t swayed toward

putting in a light. They had already done a warrant study for the area and came to the conclusion that traffic didn’t warrant a light in that location, a feeling that was supported by the intersection’s odd shape. “Traffic comes in at different angles,” said Arave. “They didn’t want lights in because they felt it would cause more hazard.” That led to months of further discussion, as well as a community meeting late last week that also included Rep. Becky Edwards, RNorth Salt Lake, representa-

tives from the North Salt Lake Police Department, and members of the North Salt Lake Council. Though UDOT continued to insist that a traffic light wouldn’t be an option, they did agree to put up a pedestrian light similar to the one on 500 West in Bountiful. Olschewski said that she was told it would take approximately six to eight weeks to install. “We’ll see how it goes,” said Arave. “If it doesn’t work, we’ll go back to UDOT.” jwardell@davisclipper.com

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Viewpoint/News CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

WEST BOUNTIFUL POLICE CHIEF Todd Hixson is sworn in by Mayor Kenneth Romney. Courtesy photo

Hixson takes reins of W. Bountiful police BY MELINDA WILLIAMS

Clipper Staff Writer WEST BOUNTIFUL — West Bountiful may have a small police force, but the city’s new police chief recognizes his officers have the same responsibilities as those in larger departments. West Bountiful Police Chief Todd Hixson was sworn into office and took over the reins of the police department last month. Hixson knows the area well. He has 15 and a half years of experience with the Bountiful Police Department, where he served as a sergeant, working in areas as diverse as school resource officer, narcotics and community policing to the SWAT team. He graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts in criminal justice administration. As he is still familiarizing himself with West Bountiful and its residents, the city has also hired two new police officers, meaning there will be a learning curve for all three. Hixson said the biggest problem the city faces crime-wise, is in property thefts. “Cutting the number of those is a question of educating the public on how to protect themselves, their vehicles and property,” he said. “It truly is a community effort,” and goes back to the common sense ideas of locking cars and houses, keeping garage doors locked and not leaving items within view in cars and homes. “People feel safe in the

community and that’s a good thing,” he said, until something happens to them. “We want to provide a sense of comfort and safety to residents, but people need to help us out as much as possible. It’s a partnership between the community and police.” Hixson said many crimes are crimes of opportunity. Thieves cruise neighborhoods looking for those opportunities. He urges residents to become familiar with their neighbors and neighborhoods and report activity which doesn’t seem normal. And, he said, report that activity in a timely manner. “We sometimes get calls saying that something happened two or three days before. If we’d received the call at the time (of the incident) we could possibly have stopped a burglary in progress.” He said his officers do a lot of patrolling, “which really helps with crime deterrence.” Hixson credits many leaders and mentors he’s had throughout his career and sees his new position as an opportunity to “pay it forward.” Hixson said the city has some of the most dedicated officers he’s worked with, adding he’s excited to be a part of the team. “As I get settled in, I look forward to meeting community members, working with them to build a strong relationship between the police department and those we serve.” mwilliams@davisclipper.com

Nov. means start of No Parking hours DAVIS COUNTY — The arrival of November on the calendar, Tuesday, seemed to be coordinated with snowflakes. Snow’s imminent arrival means parking restrictions also are in place now, or will be within a couple of weeks. Here’s the breakdown for Davis County cities, North Salt Lake to Kaysville/Fruit Heights. Bountiful winter parking hours started Nov. 1. No street side parking is allowed from 2 a.m. to 6 a.m. Centerville starts their parking restrictions Nov. 15. Parking will be prohibited 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. Farmington restricts parking, starting Nov. 15. No vehicles are allowed to be parked on streets 11 a.m. to 7 a.m.

Fruit Heights residents should not park on streets midnight to 8 a.m. That rule started Nov. 1. Kaysville residents are asked, from Nov. 1, not to park on streets midnight to 6 a.m. North Salt Lake parking restrictions started Nov. 1. No parking is allowed 10 p.m. to 6 p.m. West Bountiful will prohibit parking starting Nov. 15, except two days before or after a holiday. Hours are midnight to 7 a.m. Woods Cross implemented winter parking hours effective Nov. 1. No parking is allowed street side 1 a.m. to 6 a.m. Cities also are asking people to keep sidewalks clear of snow and other debris.

Cyclops

Get Utah out of liquor business The views expressed in this column are the opinion of the writer and not necessarily those of the ownership or management of this newspaper.

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EWS ITEM: “Gov. Gary Herbert said last week that Utah’s liquor agency should be folded into the state Commerce Department or placed under direct supervision of the governor after an audit revealed years of bid-rigging and mismanagement.” I have a better suggestion…The state of Utah should get out of the liquor business lock, stock, and barrel (and fifth). My suggestion should be catnip to conservative Republicans who control the Legislature. They are always spouting off that government is inefficient and the free market better manages goods and services. In the case of liquor, they are probably correct. Utah government (including lawmakers themselves) has turned alcohol management into a low-brow carnival. Despite one of only two agencies that bring in money (rather than spending it) and despite starkly rising sales, the state of Utah cut funding. Money-making

stores were closed even though the state is stuck with paying existing leases on empty buildings. Licenses were unavailable, causing numerous chain restaurants to stop expansion plans in Utah. A law was passed forcing new restaurants to wall off bar areas so patrons could not see a server pour or mix a drink. Commercial developers cited that the law cost the state an estimated 3,000 new jobs and left large vacancies in business centers and strip malls. The liquor agency director overlooked legal bidding procedures, allowing his son’s private business to procure the profitable packaging business. An out-of-state customer was allowed to purchase a sizeable liquor order using a credit card, even though local restaurant owners and clubs are forbidden to place orders with cards – and then the card was never processed. No, the state liquor folks and the lawmakers who pass the laws will never be honored with a CPA organization’s Good Practices Award. This is what happens when people try to manage something they know little or nothing about. Having teetotalers run a liquor operation is like having a bunch of English majors operate NASA – or

BRYAN GRAY letting non-readers choose the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Literature. Granted, alcohol abuse has societal cost. A study last week estimated that excessive drinking in the U.S. had a $224 million price tag. But what has the Legislature done to minimize alcohol abuse? Lawmakers stupidly passed a law favoring clubs, where drinkers can get “hammered” on cocktails without having to order food. It is unseemly that voters who abhor alcohol have no problem profiting from it. Several legislators – all Republicans – have suggested that the state evaluate letting private enterprise distribute and sell liquor. Utah can continue to tax it and even establish hours of sales, but let Smith’s and Harmon’s sell the cabernet sauvignon for dinner. My local grocer is more knowledgeable (and accountable) than a state senator who thinks “single malt” is a product on the Arctic Circle menu.

Letters Why are campaign signs missing? Editor: It would appear that the Halloween Goblins were out early the other night. I had my three incumbent campaign signs ripped off sometime before 11 p.m.  I realize this happens each year there is an election, but it still disgusts me. Parents, do you know where your kids are and what they are doing at night? It has to be youths just out for what they consider fun, but it ends up being a very costly prank that someone

needs to pay for. Candidates spend a great deal of money, time, and effort in putting up these signs, only to have some juvenile delinquents steal them and destroy all their hard work. Something needs to be done to educate these kids that this type of foul-play is not to be tolerated. Perhaps the City Youth Council needs to take on an educational campaign within their respective schools to let the youth know the seriousness of their

Btf. a great place

escapades! However I noticed that one of the opponent’s signs are still up just across the street… makes one speculate… just saying. Hopefully there isn’t anything like that going on. But it does make one wonder why some signs are missing while others are not, yet all signs are near each other? A very concerned citizen.

Editor: I think Bountiful is a great place because of how clean it is and all of the great people who live here. I also think Bountiful is great because it’s a safe place to live. For example, on Friday before the July 24th parade my mom set up chairs and blankets and left them. When we returned not one thing was stolen or even out of place. This proves that Bountiful is a great place to live.

Tom Tolman Bountiful

Jacob Liljenquist, 11 Bountiful


Supplement to the Davis Clipper

Beat ongoing health condition with online self-management Want to decrease your pain, decrease your doctors’ visits, and enjoy life more? Davis County Health Department’s Senior Services is promoting the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program called Living Well with Chronic Conditions and is excited to announce that this workshop is now available online. The online workshop is called Better Choices, Better Health. It is a fun, engaging six week workshop to help you: • Manage pain and fatigue • Lessen depression and frustration • Increase fitness and self-confidence Other subjects covered include: • Techniques for frustration and isolation • Appropriate exercise to maintain and improve strength • Appropriate use of medications and proper nutrition • Communicating effectively with family, friends, and health professionals • How to evaluate new treatments Who Can Benefit? Anyone with an ongoing condition such as asthma, arthritis, chronic joint pain, fibromyalgia, cancer, diabetes, kidney disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, COPD or emphysema, depression, chronic pain, or others. A new online workshop begins every two-tothree weeks. If you are interested in signing up to take an online workshop, call Jessica Hardcastle at 801-525-5087. Discover you can control your health and your life!

November 2011

November is National Caregiver Month By Shawna Mahan, DCHD In-Home Services Bureau Mgr.

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uring this season of thanksgiving, we pause to reflect on the many blessings that have been bestowed on us as individuals and as a community. We are especially grateful for the love of our friends and families. One of the most profound ways in which that love is expressed is through the generous support provided by family caregivers to loved ones who are chronically ill, elderly or disabled. Caregivers reflect family and community life at its best. Family caregivers deserve our lasting gratitude and respect. This month, as we honor the many contributions that family caregivers make to the quality of our lives, let us resolve to work through our community, religious, social, business, and other organizations to offer programs and services that will provide caregivers the support and encourage-

ment they need to carry out their vital responsibilities. During November, Davis County Senior Services offers a special caregiver rejuvenation event after the caregiver classes on Nov. 15 and 18. Participants are welcome to attend both the class and the rejuvenation session or whatever time allows that day. The one hour classes are offered at two different locations. On Tuesdays, the classes are held at the Legacy Village Assisted Living Center (1201 N. Fairfield Rd, Layton) at noon. On Fridays, the classes are at the Golden Years Senior Activity Center (726 S. 100 E., Bountiful) at 11:30 a.m. A complimentary lunch is provided at each class but an RSVP by each Monday at noon is required to receive a meal. No reservation is required to attend the class only. Continued on Page S2

Our hearts are full of thanks Many Davis County seniors participate in Veterans Day observances and luncheons to honor the brave men and women who served our country. This year each senior activity center is doing something different on Thursday, Nov. 10. In Clearfield at North Davis, the Davis County Sheriff’s Office will do a presentation to honor our veterans at 11:15 a.m. In Bountiful at Golden Years, the “Bill Curtis Band” will provide musical entertainment at 10:30 a.m. In Kaysville at Autumn Glow, the Northridge High School’s Air Force Junior ROTC cadets will do a presentation to honor our veterans at 11:30 a.m. Join a senior activity center near you to participate in one of these special events.

Photo by Jessica Hardcastle, DCHD

Holiday gift donations sought for senior citizens Davis County Health Department’s Senior Services is holding a gift drive to help make the holidays a little brighter for senior citizens who may be isolated or not have the financial resources to celebrate this year. The deadline to turn in gifts is Friday, Dec. 16, by 5 p.m., to the Davis County Health Department or at one of the county’s three senior activity centers: Autumn Glow Senior Activity Center, 81 E. Center Street, Kaysville Golden Years Senior Activity Center, 726 S. 100 E., Bountiful North Davis Senior Activity Center, 42 S. State Street, Clearfield For more details or to receive your gift request, contact Jessica Hardcastle at 801-525-5087 or e-mail her at jhardcastle@daviscountyutah.gov. Gift request will not exceed $50.

Pu Se ll ou cti t on

Raise your hand to Stop Diabetes American Diabetes Association, www.diabetes.org

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ith nearly 26 million children and adults in America living with diabetes, and another 79 million at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, the disease is taking a devastating physical, emotional and financial toll on our country. Yet, most Americans don’t consider diabetes a serious matter. They feel it is someone else’s responsibility; someone else’s problem. Recent numbers by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention paint a desperate situation of where we are at, and

where we are heading: • Every 17 seconds, someone is diagnosed with diabetes. • Diabetes kills more people each year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. • Recent estimates project that as many as 1 in 3 American adults will have diabetes in 2050 unless we take steps to Stop Diabetes. Now is the time to act. During November’s American Diabetes Month observance, the American Diabetes Association encourages people to take action and raise their hand to Stop Diabetes. There are many ways to become involved by visiting facebook.com/AmericanDiabe-

tesAssociation, stopdiabetes.com, calling 1-800-DIABETES, or texting JOIN to 69866 (standard data and message rates apply). Diabetes is a serious disease. If it isn’t managed, it can damage many parts of the body, leading to heart attacks, strokes, amputation, blindness, kidney failure, and nerve damage. But there is good news: diabetes complications can be prevented or delayed by properly managing blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Eating healthy, being physically active, and quitting smoking also can help lower the risk of diabetes complications. Continued on Page S2


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Senior Scoop A SUPPLEMENT TO THE DAVIS CLIPPER • NOVEMBER 2011

Cats, Witches, and Scooby-Doo!

Photo by Jessica Hardcastle, DCHD

Linda Thomson and her family all came out to enjoy the festivities at Autumn Glow Senior Activity Center on Halloween Day.

Stop Diabetes Continued from Page S1

Self management is a way to help manage this disease. A self management workshop called Living Well with Chronic Conditions is offered in Davis County to help those with ongoing health conditions, including diabetes. Topics discussed include techniques for

Prescription Assistance program is available National By Joann Berzett application Caregiver DCHD Prescription As• Locating and providing sistance Coordinator those applications Month • Tracking renewal and In 2009, Davis County Senior Services started the Prescription Assistance program. This program provides assistance to community members to help them find no cost or low cost medication to counter the high costs of prescriptions, co-pays and premiums, or disease related expenses.   Finding the right programs for this type of assistance is a daunting task.  Most people who come to us for an appointment need help immediately and for the long term.  They may not have access to a computer, or haven’t learned how to search the databases, or they are just strained by all the rules in applying for assistance. Our program has done all the research already and continues to find more ways as they are introduced.  This program answers those needs by assisting in the following ways: • Gathering information that is required for each

reapplication information • Completing individual program applications • Appealing negative decisions from the pharmaceutical companies • Researching coupons for reduced costs of medications. During their appointments, clients are reminded that it’s dangerous to cut back on their medications to save money. Also, they are cautioned to be especially careful about too-good-to-be-true scams for prescription medication that are circulating through telephone calls and certain Internet or e-mail offers. If you need to apply for prescription assistance because you can’t afford the high cost, please call 801-525-5082 for an appointment.

Continued from Page S1

For more information or to RSVP for lunch, please contact Megan Forbush at (801) 5255088. November class schedule is: • Nov. 4: “A Window into the World of Alzheimer’s and Dementia” – Art Smith, Right At Home • Nov. 8 and 11: Week of Veterans Day – No classes • Nov. 15 and 18: “Caregiver Rejuvenation” – Avalon Cosmetology School, Community Nursing Services, HCNU Hospice, & Hospice for Utah

frustration and isolation, appropriate exercise to maintain and improve strength, appropriate use of medications and proper nutrition, communicating effectively with family, friends and health professionals, and how to evaluate new treatments. For more information about this workshop, call Jessica Hardcastle at 801-5255087.


Annive rsar y 70th: Craig

The family of Glen and Elline Craig will be celebrating their 70th wedding anniversary at a party on Saturday Nov. 5, 2011, 4 p.m. at the Craig residence, 787 East 900 North, Bountiful. Friends are invited to attend. No gifts please. Glen and Elline were married on Nov. 5, 1941 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple. Glen and Elline built a home in Bountiful and have lived there for 66 years, where they raised their four children: Caroline Craig, Olympia,Wash.;Allan and (Terry) Craig, Layton; Marianne and (Roger) Michaels, Mapleton; Rushby and (Cay) Craig, Centerville. They have

Glen and Elline Craig 14 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. We love you Grandma (Nene) and Grandpa, congratulations!

Club donates to museum

ALTIORA WOMENS LITERARY Club members include: top row, Donna Craven, Dorothy Bronson, Cozetta Hirschi, Betty Spencer, president; Julie Woodward and Marva Christensen; second row, Jane Soderberg, Kathy Van Orman, and Norma Gephardt; first row, Charlene Lancaster, Dixie Allen, Marge Jenkins, Verlene Beck, Chloe Rasmussen and Barbara J. Manfull. During the year 2010-11, the members of the Altiora Club collected and donated $300 to the Bountiful Historical Museum.This money goes to the building project and pays for a paver which will be a part of the entry way.The members of Altiora would like to see other organizations donate to the building project. The present museum is housed in three rooms in the

lower level of the Smith/Hyatt Building at 845 S. Main, across the street south from the Willey Cabin.Workers there have added several filing cabinets. Each of those cabinets hold histories and pictures of the early settlers of Bountiful.Visitors from all over come to find the histories of their ancesters who settled Bountiful and environs round about.

City honors youth leaders

Christopher Haslam, BCYC Manager; Krystal Hoffman, BCYC Mayor and John (Marc) Knight, Bountiful City Councilman Bountiful City recognizes the Bountiful City Youth Council leadership for 20102011.The Bountiful City Youth Mayor was Krystal Hoffman and the Bountiful City Youth Manager was Christopher Haslam.These outstanding youth were involved in the Bountiful City Youth Council for several years previous to their appointment to their leadership positions.These leaders, in addition to their advisors, John (Marc) Knight, of the Bountiful City Council, and

Cori Hall, led the Bountiful City Youth Council into being awarded the honor of the No. 1 youth council in Utah by the League of Cities and Towns.This outstanding recognition is very difficult to achieve and is the first time Bountiful has received this honor.The youth council spent thousands of hours of service and volunteering that benefited Bountiful residents. The dedication and commitment of these leaders and advisors has been greatly appreciated.

50th: Simpson Charles and JoLynn Simpson, known by friends and family as Chuck and Jo, are celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary. They were married Dec. 22,1961 in the Salt Lake LDS Temple.An open house will be held in their honor Saturday, Nov. 5, from 5:30-8 p.m. at the LDS 12th Ward, 1476 N. 300 West, Bountiful. Hosting the event are their children, Charlynn (Charly), Jeanna,Anna, Tony, Clifford (Cliff), Jonathan (Jon), Joseph (Joe), their Indian sister, Patty Oliver and their spouses. Chuck and Jo have 30 grandchildren and 16 greatgrandchildren. One grandson, is serving a mission to Inde-

Va lu e S pe ak CLIPPER • THURSDAY, Nov. 3, 2011

Horizons

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Moves like Jagger — or not ’m a news and information something good When the song ended and kind of a guy – an AM the way-too-familiar strains of radio junkie. So that’s usually what you’ll find me listen- “B-B-B-Benny and the Jets” ing to during my daily comstarted, I hopped quickly to mute to and from work. the next station on the radio. News. Sports. Information. Evidently my daughter Beth But sometimes, when the had added one of her stations mood is right — or when to the menu, because I heard there’s nothing really interest- the words to a different kind ing being talked about on my of song about a different kind usual all-talk stations of young love: — I’ll flip over to Take me by the tongue the music chanand I’ll know you nels and see if Kiss me 'til you’re there’s a song drunk and I’ll show that I’d like to lisyou ten to or sing All the moves like along with. Since Jagger my musical tastes I’ve got the moves are pretty eclectic, I like Jagger hop from station Jagger? Mick to station, stopJagger? He’s from ping to listen if my generation. there’s a song And he has really that I know and big lips. But I By Joseph Walker don’t know about like.And then moving on the whole drunkquickly as soon as a commertongue thing.That was Gene cial or a song by Elton John Simmons of KISS who had comes on — whichever comes the ginormous tongue, wasn’t first. it? And didn’t KISS reportedAnd yes, I know this is ly stand for “Knights in why God gave us CD players Satan’s Service?”Which in our cars. My car CD player might explain the lyrics of this doesn’t work. God giveth, and song: Panasonic taketh away. I don’t need to try to control The first music station I you always check is the Oldies sta- Look into my eyes and I’ll tion because I am, after all, a own you certified (or should that be With the moves like Jagger certifiable?) Oldie.When I I’ve got the moves like Jagger pushed on that station’s butSo, OK — we’re not in the ton on my radio, I was pleased 1960s anymore.Times change, to hear a catchy Herman’s and I was never all that fond Hermits tune being played: of Herman or his hand-holdWoke up this morning feeling ing Hermits.There are still fine sweet, innocent kids out there There’s something special on — it’s just getting harder and harder to keep them that way, my mind given the bawdy, tawdry mesLast night I met a new girl in sages coming at them from the neighborhood Something tells I’m into some- pretty much everywhere. That’s why parents, grandparthing good. ents, aunts and uncles, neighI couldn’t help but smile at bors, friends, coaches, teachers the sweet innocence of the and religious leaders have to lyrics. It was a different world work together to make sure back then, when words like those controlling, owning, these evoked the exhilarating drunk-tongue messages are joy of young love: balanced by . . . well, you I walked her home and I held know . . . something good. her hand With – or without – the I knew it couldn’t be just a one moves like Jagger. night stand So I asked to see her next week (Read more from Joseph B. Walker at www.josephbwalkand she told me I could Something tells me I’m into er.com)

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Charles and JoLynn Simpson pendence, Missouri and a granddaughter is serving in the Air National Guard, serving her country in Iraq.We love you Dad and Mom.

B ir t hd a y 90th: Park Marie grew up with four brothers in beautiful Greys Lake, Idaho at a time before electricity had reached their valley. She rode a horse to a two-room first grade through eighth grade school. Continuing on to high school meant leaving the valley and boarding with another family in Soda Springs. She very quickly made many new friends and was elected vice president of the high school. She graduated as salutatorian. Her first home as Ralph Child’s bride was in a sheep Marie Child Park camp. Later they lived in Freedom,Wyo. They loved to their home. She served as a dance and rarely missed going temple worker in the Ogden and Bountiful temples for out on Saturday nights. Marie more than 25 years. This is belonged to a ladies singing where she met her good husgroup and played on a baseband, Richard Park. They ball teams for years. Ralph currently reside in Bountiful. and Marie raised their four She and Richard have had children, Don, Luella, Dena many opportunities of service Lee and Dee in Star Valley and travel. They stay very Wyoming. An excellent busy attending “empty seamstress and cook, she nesters,” going to family often won blue ribbons at the events and attending the temcounty fair for her divinity, ple multiple times every filled cookies, lemon week. Losing her sight has meringue pie, and spud nuts. Before losing her eyesight she only slowed her down a little. She still ties many quilts each loved to crochet. A wonderyear to donate to Humanitariful hostess, her home was an Services. She remains always a warm, welcoming witty, fun and always has a place for friends and family. beautiful smile. We know it Marie has always been active would mean a lot to her to in The Church of Jesus Christ hear from you on her 90th of Latter-day Saints, always birthday! Her children are magnifying whatever calling making a CD of birthday she was given. She especially wishes or memories to give to loved serving in Young her on her birthday. If you Women! She and Ralph would like to be included, served a mission in Battle Mt. send your greeting by Nov. 10, Nev., where he suddenly died in any of the following forof a brain aneurism. After mats: written: Dee Child, PO she came home from her misBox 206, Hyde Park, UT sion she had the opportunity of serving President and Sister 84318 Child295@mac.com, or voice message at 1-435-770Benson, along with two other 3732. sisters, as a companion in

Dav i s m ov i es

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Missionary deadline: Friday, Nov. 18, 5 p.m.

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INK

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The TEENS’

Homecoming is over, and by now your dress has sat pretty in your room for at least a few days, and its decision time ladies. What are you going to do with the dress? The way I see it, you’ve got three choices.

Choice number one: Sell your dress and make a buck. There are tons of consignment stores in the area. Take your dress to the dry cleaners, fluff it up all pretty-like, and strike a deal. Be cut-throat here! The more sparkly your dress is, the higher you jack up the price. Your dress is made of silk? Raise your price. Fancy designer? Raise the price. Good condition? Raise the price. Now, I know that no one really wants to give up the gorgeous dress, but it’s not like we’ll be wearing them again. So, if you’re feeling the need for some money, sell it. Choice number two: Save it. Now, we all know

that you won’t be wearing the dress again, because you can’t wear the same dress twice, let alone in the same year, but many of us have little sisters or cousins or friends who may want the dress sometime in the future. If that’s the case, save the dress, look at it when you’re feeling nostalgic, try it on again a few months down the road, and be ready to give it up when the time comes.

Choice number three: make your dress into your art project. Warning: this option is not for the faint hearted. This will require some cutting, ripping, and sewing. Make your dress into a few throw pillows or a collage on your wall, or, my personal favorite, a super pretty blanket. Whatever you choose to do with your dress, remember this: do not let it sit in your closet with no purpose in mind! Clutter is a no-no people, and no one wants to see a pretty dress go to waste. So, sell it, save it, or create something with it. -Clara Ashton

BHS Food Drive Aims to Fill Food Pantry Shelves No one wants to hear their stomach rumbling in protest from lack of food, not knowing when their next meal might come. Yet, this unpleasant situation is becoming more and more common in the United States. According to a 2006-2008 study by the USDA, there were 117,281 “food insecure” children under the age of 18 in Utah alone last year. One can’t guess just by looking around who might be going hungry because they can’t afford any food. In order to do its part to combat hunger in Utah, Bountiful High is putting on a food drive tomorrow — Friday, Nov. 4, under the direction of the BHS Student Service Club. Other schools in the area have also been doing food drives this week, and will be bringing what they’ve collected to Bountiful High on Friday. All the donations will then be sorted into bins and stacked in the back of a semi truck which will be parked at the school by service club members. Once everything has been sorted and placed into the truck it will be taken away and delivered to the food pantry. “Last year we were able to collect 22,732 lbs of food and $1907.58,” said Karen Packard, a PTA service club mom, in response to a question about the success of the food drive in previous years.  “Also, last year Jiffy Lube matched the donations so all of what we collected was doubled, however, this year they are unable to do the matching.  So our goal will be to collect at least 23,000 lbs of food and $2,000.”  With this goal in mind, the service club is hoping for the food drive to be both well received and successful. Any contribution would be welcome as they are looking to gather nonperishable foods along with hygiene items such as soap, shampoo, and laundry detergent. Even a single can of food or one extra bar of soap can make a difference in someone’s life, just give what you can. It will make a difference. By Laura Densley

r e i k s t e j s s a l c d l r o w stin,

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High School Events

Viewmont: November 5

November 17

•Homeless Dinner

• Harvest Dance and State Football Quarter finals

Davis:

November 16-18

• HOSA week

• Auditions for school musical ‘Guys and Dolls’

November 22

• Guadalupe fund-raising begins

Woods Cross: November 16

•College/scholarship Night

November 7-11 November 11-12, 14-19 • Davis High Musical November 28-30 • One Act Play auditions

Bountiful: November 7-11

• Red Ribbon week

November 16 • Academic Olympiad at USU November 18 • Football state championship

District wide: November 4-5 • State Volleyball tournament at UVU November 24-25 • Thanksgiving recess

E

A RISING ARTIST

So,

u A k c Bro

Thursday, 11 Nov. 3, 20

nthusiastic, outgoing, and strange. When I asked Chloe Monson to describe herself in three words this is what she comes up with. Chloe almost seems like an average senior at Woods Cross, until you take a look at her incredible artwork. “All my art is kind of distorted and strange, and kind of hard to explain over words,” she proclaims. Every day I had walked into one of my classes at Woods Cross and I had noticed a huge canvas with a half-finished creepy-green face on it, a strangely enticing thing to look at. I always wondered whose artwork it was until one day on Facebook, I noticed a photo that Chloe Monson had posted featuring that very same painting. I began to “stalk” Chloe’s Facebook photos and I was instantly consumed in a world much different from a normal high school

student’s Facebook. These photographs on her Facebook page contained random quirky things from insects to people, and the best part of all; they aren’t posed and seem like, well, life. Photography isn’t her main focus however, it is painting. “My favorite kind of art is painting, specifically oils and watercolor. I like to draw, mainly just in a sketchbook, and I like taking pictures — but just of stuff in my life, nothing posed or anything,” said the artist.

When I asked Chloe what she wanted to be when she grew up, I wasn’t too astounded when she replied by saying, “I don’t want to be anything. I want to ‘do’ a whole lot, but I never want to ‘be’ a whole lot. But, nonetheless, I think it’d be really cool to be an art teacher or a writer for National Geographic.” After high school she plans to go to an art school in either Seattle or Portland and pursue whatever her interests turn to. “I’ll just have to wait and see where life brings me,” she said. I think we all can learn something from Chloe’s easy going, gowith-the-flow attitude about life. Chloe knows where her interests lie, but she is still willing to search for what she loves to do. Hopefully, in the future, we will see more of Chloe Monson’s strange and alluring pieces of art. By Lauren McMullen


Davis

Bringing Christmas to kids

Life

Local churches help out, Page A15

Local teacher honored

Part of UEA’s top 10 in state, Page A16

A11 Thursday, Nov. 3 2011

Exploring the icier side of Disney magic BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer BOUNTIFUL – It turns out

that dwarves, lions and pirates are all pretty good skaters. Disney on Ice’s latest show, “Treasure Trove,” is coming to EnergySolutions Arena Nov. 9-13, and legions of Davis County families will be making the drive south to take in the sight of Snow White, Aladdin, Simba, Rapunzel, and a host of other Disney characters twirl around on the ice. To help decide whether your family should be making the trip as well, here are a few points to help you decide. Make sure your kids are the right age The best audiences for any Disney on Ice are young skating fans or young Disney fans enchanted by the thought of seeing their favorite characters in real life. The dialogue is piped in over the loudspeakers and is pulled directly from the movies, so there will be no trouble with not being able to hear or the characters not sounding “right.” Don’t expect the Olympics Show skating tends to be less dramatic than competition skating, in no small part because the performers have to do it night after night. Also, some of the characters wear bulky enough costumes – Timon and Pumba, for example – that merely being able to seem so light on their feet should get them a medal. Watch for your favorite characters “Treasure Trove” manages to work in an enormous chunk of Disney’s most well-known movies, portrayed by both large scale skating numbers (like dance numbers, but on ice) and key scenes from the movies. All of the Disney princesses make an appearance, and the action manages to travel through Wonderland, Never Never Land (specifically the bit with the pirates) and Simba’s corner of the pridelands. Have a plan when faced with high-priced treats

Like most events, both snacks and souvenirs are going to be both expensive and incredibly appealing to young kids. EnergySolutions is strict about not bringing in food from the outside (bags are checked in the security line), but kids might be content with a treat on the way home. Also, make sure to plan time for dinner before heading into the arena. Take the magic where you can find it The performers won’t mind if you’re watching your kids while they’re watching the show. The joy that lights up a kid’s eyes when they’re watching Aladdin and Jasmine fly across the ice is its own kind of magic.

CHARACTERS from the new Disney on Ice show, coming Nov. 9. Courtesy photos

Good advice in children’s book by local author BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer LAYTON – There’s a monster inside

all of us, and it can come out if we don’t take care of ourselves. That’s the message of “The Hungry Monster,” the new children’s book by local author Mark Pittman. The author, who also makes school appearances (he’ll be speaking at Kaysville’s Morgan Elementary this Friday), was inspired by his own tendency to forget important things when he got too involved in something. “Being called the ‘Hungry Monster’ came after years of skipping breakfast,

THE COVER of the new book, “The Hungry Monster,” by Layton author Mark Pittman. Courtesy photo

caffeinated sodas, fast food meals, and late nights working on projects that just ‘had to get done,’” he explained. “The end result of these bad habits were being tired and hungry —the main ingredients to become a Hungry Monster.” Pittman’s wife was the first one to give him the nickname, and also ended up being the one to suggest that he turn it into a children’s book. In the story, a little boy who is a big baseball fan learns what can happen when he focuses too much on the game he loves and stops taking care of the things his body needs. Pittman also added a sister to help the boy work through it. “I wanted to give both boys and girls someone to root for,” he said, adding that he modeled the characters on his grandkids.

Initially, Pittman had some trouble finding the right illustrator for the book, and he only found Jamie Reeve after his initial choice didn’t work out. “I’d previously interviewed Jamie for the illustrator job, and one day she called me and asked how things were going with the book. I said ‘Well, actually ....’” Pittman explained with a laugh. Reeve also published the book. “I couldn’t have asked for a better person to work with.” The book is available online at thehungrymonster.com, along with information about how to arrange a school appearance by Pittman. Copies of the book are also available for purchase at Hastings Books, Music and Video, Rainbow Gardens Gift Shop, and Wisebird Bookery in Ogden. jwardell@davisclipper.com


A12

Business CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

How would cities handle ‘Occupy’ groups? BY TOM BUSSELBERG Clipper Editor BOUNTIFUL — The mosquitoes would probably drive Occupy Wall Street movement members away from Syracuse, while in Fruit Heights they’d have to take down camp by dark. Layton, meanwhile, would “encourage free speech, maybe send them to Antelope Island.” Those were the halfserious responses by mayors of various cities who, along with table-mates, were asked to discuss ramifications of the now nationwide movement – if such a group came to their communities. The exercise was part of the Davis Chamber of Commerce’s annual Mayors’ Luncheon, which was held recently at the Wight House, here. Mayors from Clearfield, Centerville, Farmington, Fruit Heights, Kaysville, Syracuse and Woods Cross participated with short updates about their cities – and how they’d handle such a protest group if it wanted to camp within their boundaries. “No changes would be

CLEARFIELD MAYOR DON WOOD, center, discusses challenges faced by his city, and all others, in providing necessary services for residents. Photo by Tom Busselberg made (in city ordinances or park rules) to let them do it (camp),” said Clearfield Mayor Don Wood. “I think we should hold everybody to the same rules.” His and other cities would have to assure they have proper rules in place to handle such a situation, Wood said. “I can’t really imagine them occupying space in our city, maybe at Nicholls Park,” said Fruit Heights Mayor Todd Stevenson. “We

don’t allow overnight camping and would enforce our ordinance.” “It would be difficult to say that we made an exception for them,” Kaysville Mayor Steve Hiatt said. “We have a beautiful park – Jensen Park,” said Syracuse Mayor Jamie Nagle. “It’s a great place to be until sunset,” when mosquitoes arrive, at least in warm weather. “If they came to Layton, we would invite them rather

than resist,” Mayor Steve Curtis said. “We encourage free speech,” and then maybe would send them to Antelope Island. “We would use a conciliatory tone, provide some acceptance, try to find some accommodations,” Woods Cross Mayor Kent Parry said, indicating the city park next to city hall might serve as a camping spot. “The Boy Scouts get a permit to sleep in the park, and we do provide free speech,” Farmington Mayor Scott Harbertson said. “But we can’t have anyone in the parks after 10 p.m. or we get a call.” “We embrace, respect diversity, want to make people feel welcome,” said Centerville Mayor Ron Russell, inviting the audience to visit the city’s new Megaplex Theatre. “You don’t do this due to a desire for excessive power,” Chamber President Jim Smith said to the mayors. “There is an opportunity to serve,” he added, noting the good relationship between the chamber and its business focus and municipalities and other governments. tbusselberg@davisclipper.com

On the Move Burt joins SDCH board

BOUNTIFUL — Ron Burt recently joined the South Davis Community Hospital (SDCH) as its newest member to the Board of Directors. Burt is the co-founder of Burt Brothers Tire & Service, Inc. Burt and his brother Wendel own and operate seven tire and service centers along the Wasatch front and Park City. SDCH is pleased to have someone with Burt’s talents join the leadership team to further build and promote the SDCH campus of specialty health care services.

Vets job fair set for Nov. 4 SANDY — A “Hiring Our Heroes” Job & Veterans Benefit Fair is set for Friday, Nov. 4, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the South Towne Expo Center, 7575 S. State Street, here. Co-sponsored by the Davis Chamber of Commerce, the fair aims to aid veterans, guardsmen/reservists and their spouses to find employment. Register to attend at HoH.GreatJob.net. For accommodations to attend, contact HiringOurHeroes@ USChamber.com.

Maurice’s to open Nov. 5 CLINTON — A new Maurice’s will open here Saturday, Nov. 5. Its store will be at Park Place, 1799 W. 1800 N., Clinton, next to Kohl’s. The national chain, which also has a store in Layton, gears itself to clothing and accessories for young women.


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Opinion A13

Letters Current council represents well Editor: I am one of the Kaysville citizens who chose to donate my time and support to the KaysilleTruth. com website concerning the upcoming election. I could not support the “bloc” candidates supported by the PAC, Kaysville Citizens for Responsible Government, because I disagree with their desire to drastically change Kaysville city’s form of government as stated in their ballot initiative campaign. I support the candidates Mark Johnson, Ron Stephens and Brett Garlick, who although not running together, are being endorsed as a group because they support the current form of government in the city. One of the most gratifying things about working on the website and mailer that went out was to see the diversity of people who wanted to be listed as endorsing these candidates. The list of endorsements grows daily. I am not, nor never have been, a city employee or elected official. I support Johnson, Stephens and Garlick because I want a citizen/servant form of government vs. one that

encourages professional politicians running my city. I want the expertise of city employees who can spend their time developing skills and a knowledge base that creates continuity and stability through election cycles rather than spending time raising money and campaigning. I do not want geographical voting districts primarily because it dilutes the responsibility council members have to every citizen in the city. More affluent districts could press their representatives to vote for projects that cost the city money that would be burdensome to areas that have more residents on fixed incomes. Controversial or unpopular decisions that impact a specific neighborhood (traffic, road, zoning and construction issues) could be passed more easily. The issues concerning controls on power company finances are best handled through the current budget review system and truth in taxation forums. The city has received nothing but positive reviews from watchdog groups concerning their transparency in financial matters. Elected officials should always be

evaluating how the city generates income and how it is used. I would not rush to tie the hands of the city in how they use income by way of rules created in ballot initiatives. There are better ways to review the role of the power company in the city’s finances. I have been at meetings where rate increases were discussed to cover external rate increases that had to be passed on. Rate increases are often considered rather than tax increases because they spread cost across all entities, based on consumption. I am concerned about the city’s overreliance on property tax for revenue. While I support the decision to limit the kinds of business and retail we want to have in the city we must pay the price for that decision. I also do not want to have a community that is so dependent on property taxes that we price families out of living here. I trust Johnson, Stephens and Garlick. I believe they will continue to represent Kaysville with honesty, integrity and dignity. Vicki Wright Kaysville

Story paints ‘rosy’ picture of Kaysville Editor:

This is in reference to an article in last week’s Clipper painting a “rosy picture of Kaysville’s financial situation.” It also addresses a touchy issueuse of electric fund monies. A current city council member is quoted about past council’s use of the electric fund balance. As one of those past council members I can tell you that not all agreed with how money was spent and neither would most citizens if they knew. Most citizens know that Kaysville has its own electric company. What they don’t know is that it is a cooperative and they are the share holders. The excess money belongs to them. And they sure didn’t know that over the last 30 years Kaysville has spent over $21 million of excess funds, half of

which has been on real estate speculation. I fought this when I was on the council, however only recently was I made aware of the extent of the large amount. While transferring these monies may be legal, it begs the question of its use. There are only two legitimate uses: First is power company infrastructure upkeep, the second is return excess to the shareholders by either reducing rates or giving a rebate. Neither has been done. How fair is it for the city to use up these monies and then turn right around and raise our rates? If the city needed more money, there are three avenues to obtain it: First, reduce spending, i.e. wants vs needs, and I can tell you right now that will generate a lot

more money than raising taxes. Second, raise taxes in which case there must be a Truth in Taxation hearing, and third and the least desirable for the citizens, is raise rates. Should they go this route, they needed to do what other cities do, such as Provo, and hold a public hearing and let the citizens decide if that is how they want their excess funds used. Recently a group of citizens attempted to petition the city to address these concerns and was turned down. The only resort we have, it seems, is to elect new members to the council and re-petition them. That’s why I support the three challengers, Barton, Draney and Lee. H. Lynn Galbraith Kaysville

Grading schools has its benefits Editor:

The concept of giving grades to the education system seems sound — but only within reason. Putting a grade on a school can help in a variety of ways, such as pointing out corrections to be made. However, the evaluation walks a thin line. Setting a letter on

schools could result in mass exodus from lower schools to supposedly greater, with little forethought on the parents’ part. For instance, a top student — someone with real potential — could be transferred from an average school to a less educating environment on the basis of its higher rating, caused by a high

Letters policy

focus on weaker students. Despite these challenges, this system has its benefits. Schools can see what they need to improve, setting in motion a more capitalist style in education rather than jumping for the closest school. Edward Lore Centerville

All letters must (1) be signed, (2) be brief (generally under 300 words in length) (3) list the author’s city, and (4) give the writer’s telephone number. We reserve the right to edit all letters for length or content. For letters arriving by e-mail, we will use the author’s e-mail address in lieu of a signature. Letters without proper identification will not be printed.

Replanting, repairing Trees are being planted along the swath of land torn up by the Kern River Gas Transportation Company for its Apex expansion. The expansion, which took place over the summer, has added about 28 miles of new 36-inch diameter pipeline through the Wasatch Mountains in Morgan, Davis and Salt Lake counties, according to their website. According to Rebecca Houtz, communications specialist,100,000 trees and shrubs are being planted over a 12-mile stretch of the pipeline in Davis and Morgan counties. Photo by Louise R. Shaw

Chamber summit coming Nov. 16 LAYTON — Those signing up for the Nov. 16 Davis Chamber of Commerce’s Northern Utah Business & Economic Summit by Friday, Nov. 4 can get a discount on registration. The cost is $59 for one person or $99 for two by Friday and can be done

Useful things you can do with today’s newspaper. . . (after you read it, of course)

20

#

Use letters for ransom notes.

online at www.davischamberofcommerce.com or by calling 801-593-2200. “Thriving in a Rebounding Economy” is the theme for the 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. event which will be held at the Weber State UniversityDavis campus. Lt. Gov. Greg Bell will

be the keynote speaker at 8:30 a.m., followed by a presentation on National and Local Economic Trends by Dr. Jeff Steagall, dean of the Goddard School of Business & Economics at WSU. Breakout sessions will follow. tbusselberg@davisclipper.com


O bi tu a ry A14

Obituary CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Marilyn Blake 02/03/1946 - 10/30/2011 BOUNTIFUL — Marilyn Blake passed away Sunday, Oct. 30, 2011 at Lakeview Hospital at the age of 65. She was born Feb. 3, 1946 to Ray Fred Blake and Clara (Cardon) Blake in Safford, Arizona. She was the fourth of five children. Marilyn lived most of her life in the Phoenix area, but spent the last two years in Bountiful. Marilyn was a faithful member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She loved little children and enjoyed serving in the Sunday School and Primary organizations. Marilyn had a special connection with young children and her dog CoCo. They seemed to be drawn to her kind spirit. Marilyn was preceded in death by her parents and younger brother, Jesse. She is survived by her sisters, Jeannette (Dale) Hubbard, Carroll Brockman; brother, Ray (Susan) Blake; and numerous nieces and nephews. Marilyn enjoyed the friendship of so many friends at Heritage Assisted Living including Lorraine Kocherhans and Elmer Spencer. The family wishes to thank the Heritage staff and LDS Branch for their loving kindness and service. Her family is appreciative of all who nurtured her. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011 at Russon Brothers Bountiful Mortuary, 295 North Main, where a viewing will be held from 9:45-10:45 a.m. prior to services. Interment will be in Phoenix, Arizona. Online guest book at www.russonmortuary.com

Lucille Stastny Galloway October 13, 1930 - October 29, 2011 With love and affection we say good-bye to a lovely beautiful lady, who has won the hearts of so many with her sweet, generous ways. She passed away at home surrounded by her family Oct. 29, 2011 after her courageous battle with cancer. She was born in Ely, Nevada Oct. 13, 1930 to LaVern Larkin and John Stastney. Her life was devoted to her family. She enjoyed reading books. She was selfless, loving, full of charity and would enjoy sharing a Creamie or some donut holes with anyone. It is true, you only had to meet her once to love her. She is survived by her husband of 57 years, LaVel Galloway, Centerville, UT; four children: Jeri (Mike) Weight, Citrus Heights, CA., Karalee Fairclough, West Valley, UT., David (Peggy) Galloway, Holladay, UT., and Lynette (John) Dickson, Kaysville, UT.; 16 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. She loved the Lord whom she served all her life. She devotedly served in many positions in the LDS Church. She served twice as Young Women’s president. Ward chorister for about 20 years and in many positions in the Relief Society. She retired as Woods Cross City Treasurer after working for 33 years. When she retired she was told that they lost “that good ole home town feeling from the city.” She was Mom to many and Grandma to all. The funeral will be held at 11 a.m., Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011 at the Porter Lane 3rd Ward, 400 West Porter Lane (400 South), Centerville, Utah. A viewing will be held Friday evening from 6-8 p.m. at Russon Brothers Bountiful Mortuary, 295 North Main, and Saturday morning 9:30-10:45 a.m. at the church prior to services. Interment-Lakeview Cemetery. Online guest book at www.russonmortuary or llgalloway8@comcast.net.

Darlene Ora Petersen Gregersen Jensen 1937-2011 Darlene Ora Petersen Gregersen Jensen, who loved bright, clear colors and designing flower gardens at Temple Square, died Oct. 28, 2011, of lung cancer, although she had rarely been anywhere near a cigarette. She had a happy marriage of 47 years with her husband, Juel. Two of their seven children and her husband died much too young. After dealing with these heart-breaks she said, “If my life is to be happy, then I have to create it.” She found happiness in a second marriage with Boyd Jensen of Farmington. Darlene was born Feb. 27, 1937, to Ora Hutchinson Petersen and Holger Peter Petersen in Salt Lake City. She grew up there and graduated from Olympus High. At age 18 she began a two-and-a-half-year mission in Denmark for the LDS Church while her father was president of the Danish Mission. One night in Denmark she did dishes with a fellow-missionary, her future husband, Juel D. Gregersen. She married Juel March 30, 1959, in the Salt Lake Temple. They worked together, getting him through the University of Utah with both bachelor’s and master’s degrees, building a home in North Salt Lake, and rearing seven children. An active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints, she held many positions of responsibility including Relief Society President in both the Orchard Third Ward and the North Salt Lake Parkway Stake. She was a bishop’s wife twice and served with Juel in Albania for LDS Social Services. Darlene never completely lost her Danish. She and Juel used it to discuss things they didn’t want their children to hear. Darlene was concerned about good nutrition dedicated to serving healthy food that tastes good and is served attractively. She excelled at decorating and design of all kinds. Always creative, Darlene delighted in sewing for herself and family. She even learned to make jeans and a polyester suit for Juel. She enjoyed piecing colorful fabrics together for quilts and got a kick out of going “junking” at garage sales. She took pleasure in growing things and had a large garden. Darlene and Juel were married for 47 years. Their close family got together often. They (along with their miniature Dachshund, Holly) traveled in their Fifth Wheel to bluegrass festivals throughout the West. She volunteered as a Temple Square Garden Tour Guide and just when her husband retired from LDS Social Services, she found herself with a paid job making floral arrangements for temple entrances and other church buildings. She often worked 12 hours a day getting ready for Conference or Christmas. Her husband, Juel, died March 9, 2005, with Darlene caring for him as he suffered from Lou Gehrig’s disease. Later, her brother, Gerald, introduced Darlene to his long-time friend, Boyd Jensen. They married Sept. 19, 2009. They had a short but happy marriage in Farmington. He was her loving companion in her final illness. Darlene was preceded in death by two of her children: Julia, 20, and Marvin Gregersen, 40, a brother, Barr Petersen. She is survived by her husband, M. Boyd Jensen, Farmington; four sons, a daughter and four daughters-in-law: Mark J. and Mona Gregersen, Clinton; Kent B. and Jennifer Gregersen, Woods Cross; Michael R. and Camille Gregersen, Centerville; Alan P. Gregersen and Tonya L. Gregersen, both North Salt Lake; and a daughter-in-law, Leslie Gregersen, Denver, Colo.; 13 grandchildren; and a brother, Gerald R. Petersen, Driggs, Idaho. Funeral services were held Nov. 2, at the Farmington South Stake Center. Online guestbook at www.russonmortuary.com.

Lillian Houston

Kathleen Elizabeth McBride

1924-2011

1937-2011

Martha Lillian Bingham Elder Houston, age 84, of Tabiona, passed away quietly surrounded by her family on Oct. 27, 2011 at the Uintah Basin Rehabilitation and Sr. Villa. Lillian was born on Sept. 1, 1924 to Esdra and Martha Bingham. She married Duane Abram Elder on June 2, 1949 and later divorced. She married Ray D. Houston on March 6, 1982. He died Sept, 4, 1996. Her charity on this earth has been a great example to all who knew her. She always gave of herself and her possessions. As long as she had a dollar to her name she would give it away. She was a great mother and grandmother, friend, neighbor, aunt and sister. She was loved by everyone who knew her. She served a mission in the Carolina-Virginia mission many years ago. She has remained a faithful member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. She could carry on a conversation with anyone whether she knew them or not because she was so friendly. She lived a very long and wonderful life in spite of her trials. Her children and her grandchildren were her life and her joy. She is survived by her seven children and their spouses: Brenda Elder (Tom) Bird, Linda Elder (Michael) Barneck, Randall Duane (Irene) Elder, LaRae Elder (Daniel) Roberts, Rodney Dean (Trudy) Elder, Diane Elder (Louis) Simmons, Raymond Paul (Heidi) Elder, 32 grandchildren, 58 greatgrandchildren, sister, Clara Bingham Fye, brother, William (MaryLou) Bingham, four stepchildren, and many step grandchildren that she loved. She was preceded in death by her parents, two sisters, five brothers, two granddaughters, Jacki and Justine Barneck. The father of her children, Duane Abram Elder, and her second husband Ray D. Houston. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011 at 11 a.m. at the Tabiona LDS Chapel. Friends called Tuesday evening at the Hullinger Mortuary, and Wednesday at the church one hour prior to service. Burial in the Tabiona Cemetery. Condolences shared at www.hullingermortuary.com

Kathleen Elizabeth McBride passed away peacefully, Oct. 25, 2011 after a courageous and very long battle with Multiple Sclerosis. Kathleen Elizabeth McBride was born to Marye B. Whaley & Barney Marietta, Sept. 4, 1937 in Rock Springs, Wyoming where she graduated from high school. She was a beautician for a short time and then spent most of her working career as a Dental Assistant in Beaverton, Oregon. She was married to Forest, her beloved husband for over 48 years. Kathleen loved traveling around the world with Forest, watching the waves on the Oregon coast and trying new foods and recipes. Kathleen is survived by her husband, Forest; son, Dan; daughter, Lori; sisters, Barbara, Georgia and Maryanne. Also her brother, Ronald; granddaughter, Shayla; two great-grandchildren, Camryn and Keily; and countless friends and family whom were blessed to know her. Kathleen touched the lives of many people with her smile, sense of humor, kindness, and maintained her trademark courage all the way to the end. Friends and family attended a memorial service at 11 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 29, 2011 at the 1st Baptist Church, 1901 S. Orchard Dr. (400 East) Bountiful, Ut., with a visitation starting at 10 a.m. prior. Online guest book at www.russonmortuary.com . In lieu of flowers the family requests donations be sent to WRAP MS Attn: MS Rehabilitation and Wellness Program, 520 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, Utah 84018, in remembrance of Kathleen. God saw that she was getting tired, And a cure was not to be, So He put His arms around her And whispered, “Come with Me.”

Wilford Ray Hardy 1920-2011 Wilford Ray Hardy, beloved husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather, passed away peacefully on Oct. 26, 2011 following a brief illness. He was born Oct. 4, 1920 to Alma Harold Hardy and Bertha Stahle Hardy. He married his sweetheart, Mary Piepgrass, on March 5, 1943 and they were later sealed in the Salt Lake Temple. During WWII, Ray served in the European theater of combat, as an Army artillery officer. He continued his service in the Army Reserve where he retired at the rank of Colonel. He graduated from the University of Utah as a Civil Engineer. He worked for the Bureau of Reclamation in Ogden and on many phases of the Central Utah Water Project where he retired as the Chief Engineer of the Duchesne Office. Ray was an active member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, where he faithfully served in many ward callings. He was an ordinance worker in the Salt Lake and Bountiful temples for over 20 years. An excellent marksman, he loved to hunt and fish and passed this passion on to his son and grandsons. He loved dogs and enjoyed working with tools and could build or fix nearly anything. He was always willing to help a neighbor or family member work on a project. Preceded in death by his wife Mary; his parents, and three sisters; Edna Hendricks, Vonda Burningham and Faye Richards. Survived by his two children; Kent R. Hardy (Josie) Lewistown, MT and Joan H. Taylor (Jerry), North Salt Lake, UT; seven grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren, many nieces, nephews, good friends and neighbors. Funeral services was held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29, 2011 at the Bountiful Tabernacle, 100 South Main Street. Friends called Friday, Oct. 28, from 6-7:30 p.m. at Lindquist’s Bountiful Mortuary, 727 N. 400 E. and Saturday 12:30-1:30 p.m. at the Tabernacle prior to the services. Interment at Bountiful City Cemetery with military honors.

Raymond George Fraser April 19, 1933 - October 31, 2011 Grandpa Ray Raymond George Fraser, our cherished husband, brother, father, grandfather and friend, returned home to the loving arms of family and friends Oct. 31, 2011. Ray had a heart and smile that was larger than his physical stature. His humble and kind nature touched the lives of countless people. Ray was born in Boulder, Colo, on April 19, 1933 to William Fraser and Gertrude (Weaver) Fraser. He was the fourth of five children. On June 5, 1954, he married Betty Ann Kaiser in Denver, Colo. and the two were soon blessed with four beautiful children. During their early life together, Ray and Betty relocated over 25 times across the United States before finally settling in Woods Cross, Utah in 1974. Ray met and made many close friends working for Boyles Brothers Drilling company for over 30 years. After retirement, he spent several years working as a school bus driver for the Cathedral of the Madeleine Choir School where all the children were ecstatic to begin and end their day with their beloved “Grandpa Ray.” Ray was an avid outdoorsman. When he wasn’t working hard providing for his family, he enjoyed exploring the world around him through camping, hunting and fishing. Ray was also a dedicated member of the Elks, serving as Exalted Ruler of the Bountiful B.P.O.E. from 1990-1991. Ray was preceded in death by his mother and father; brother, Donald; sister, Francis; and children, Carl, Melonie and Craig. He is survived by his loving wife, Betty; daughter, Stephanie (Randy) Smith; granddaughters, Jenna, Jaleen, and Jessi; sister, Metta Sager and Shirley (Everett) Coleman; and also numerous nieces, nephews, friends and loved ones. Memorial services will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011 at Russon Brothers Bountiful Mortuary, 295 North Main where friends may call from 1-2 p.m. A luncheon will be held in celebration of Ray’s life at the Bountiful Elk’s Lodge, 544 West 200 North following the memorial services. A memorial service will also be held in Boulder, Colo. at a later date yet to be determined. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Bountiful Elks for the Camp Wapiti program. Online guest book at www.russonmortuary.com.

www.davisclipper.com

With tearful eyes we watched her, And saw her fade away. Although we loved her dearly, We could not make her stay. A golden heart stopped beating, Hard working hands to rest. Got broke our hearts to prove to us He only takes the best.

League donates money

MARINE CORPS LEAGUE: Picture above are Matthew Graham, Brad Baggiano, Eric Hattabaugh, Neil Weil, Randall Cates, Krista Baggiano, Robert Bruhn, Richard Wheelock, Richard Newton, Joe Villanueva and Edward Klint. At the Bountiful Sizzler on Tuesday, Oct. 11, Commandant Robert Bruhn of the Marine Corps League, presented a check for $500 to Commander Randall Cates of American Legion Post 79. This money will be used to help build a Veterans Memorial Wall to honor all who have or are serving in the military from South Davis County. L/Cpl Dion J. Stephenson Detachment 14 of the Marine Corps League in Bountiful collects donations through Walmart throughout the year to support many organizations in the community. In the

last few years donations have been made to Primary Children’s Hospital, Police Dare Program, Safe Harbor Domestic Violence Shelter, Wounded Warriors and the Metro Fire Dept. for fire safety programs in the schools. If anyone would like to join either of the above organizations your support would be welcomed. Please contact the Commandant or the Commander.“Once a Marine, always a Marine;” however you do not need to be a Marine to join the League.Anyone may become an associate member.

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CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Church/News

A15

Christmas aid program gets local help BY MELINDA WILLIAMS

Clipper Staff Writer

WEST BOUNTIFUL Youth City Council meet to plan upcoming activities and service projects. Photo by Clipper Staff

W.B. youth council looks to serve others BY BECKY GINOS

Clipper Staff Writer WEST BOUNTIFUL — There are some fresh, new faces on the city council in West Bountiful — youth council that is. Brayden Wilcox was recently sworn in as the new youth council mayor along with 14 other members. “I’ve been on the council for five years, serving as treasurer and mayor pro tem,” said Wilcox, a senior at Bountiful High. “I wanted to do my part to help the community, it’s great.” The group holds monthly activities that are usually centered around service. They just had a Halloween stomp on Saturday and a safe Halloween activity on Monday. On Nov. 19 from 9 a.m. to noon, they plan to have a turkey and food collection to provide meals to the food bank for Thanksgiving. The mission of the youth council is to make a difference in the community by giving the youth an opportunity to serve and develop leadership abilities, according to member Jace Allen. “We can grow to become educated and responsible citizens,” he said. “We make new friends and have fun activities we plan and partic-

ipate in. It’s a great college opportunity.” Former youth mayor, Ashlie McConkie, who is now serving as secretary, said it’s a lot more work than it seems. “It’s a fun time,” she said. “It’s all worth it in the end.” The council’s meetings are anything but stiff and formal. Laughter and constant chatter fill the small council room when they meet, but then they get down to business, trying to find ways to serve and help the community. “I just love the kids,” said the council’s adult leader, Tonya Boswell. “This has been a great experience for me. It’s so much fun and it gives me the opportunity to watch the kids learn about government.” Other council members include, Brady Evans, Courtney Evans, Darcy Lytle, Ethan Till, Hollie Petersen, Kazley Gordon, Lyndsy McConkie, Megan Nadauld, Sydnee Ripplinger, Teresa Romney, Tyrel Morse and Austin Ahlstrom. The youth council is still looking for applicants through Nov. 12. Members serve for one school year. Go to the city’s website www. westbountiful.utah.gov to apply. bginos@davisclipper.com

Numerous activities planned at art festival SALT LAKE CITY — Davis County residents are invited to attend two events scheduled as part of the Jewish Art Festival, Nov. 12-13. The festival’s opening night will be a comedy show featuring the New York City comedian “MODI,” at 7 p.m. at the I.J. and Jeanne Wagner Jewish Community Center, 2 N. Medical Drive, Salt Lake City. MODI was voted one of the top 10 comedians in New York City by two separate publications. There will also be a Havdallah celebration (Havdallah is a religious ceremony marking the symbolic end of the sabbath and ushering in the new week) with Rabbi Ilana Schwartzman of Congregation Kol Ami, in Salt Lake City and food by Mazza restaurant. Cost will be $36 per person in advance or $46 per person at the door. Tickets are on ale at wwwslcjcc. com or by calling Michelle

Oelsner at 801-581-0098, ext. 119. Then on Sunday, Nov. 13 Festival Day will be held from noon-6 p.m. at the Jewish Community Center. The event will feature Klezbros, Desert Wind, the Joy Spring Band and Deep Fried Confusion for a musical variety to Laja Field Dance, JCo Dance Troupe and Ririe Woodbury Dance Company. There will also be adult lectures by MODI and TV and film critic Jack Amiel and story telling by Anthony White. Local artists will be selling their wares and there will be a Jewish Book Fair. Organizers say the event, “makes being Jewish in Salt Lake great. The festival embodies the Jewish Community Center’s mission by bringing together people of all faiths and communities to celebrate and experience the rich history of Jewish arts and culture.” mwilliams@davisclipper.com

BOUNTIFUL— A shoe box doesn’t hold a lot, but to a child in need, it may contain the knowledge that someone cared to give them perhaps their only Christmas gift. Again this year, churches in Davis County will participate in Operation Christmas Child, a project of international Christian relief and evangelism as part of Samantha’s Purse, which provides toys, school supplies, hygiene items and notes of encouragement for needy kids overseas. Local collection sites will again be the First Southern Baptist Church, 696 N. 400 East in Bountiful, where boxes will be collected during National Collection Week, Nov. 14-21 on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, 10 a.m-2 p.m., Wednesday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 6-8 p.m., Saturday 11a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday, 2-7 p.m. Call 801-292-8095 for further information. Calvary Chapel, Wasatch Front 564 S. 800 East, Clearfield, will also serve as a collection site that same week, on Monday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Tuesday and Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Wednesday through Friday 10 a.m.-7 p.m. and Sunday noon-4 p.m. Both sites will be closed Nov. 21. Grace Lutheran Church in Bountiful will also be collecting boxes within the congregation and will deliver them to a collection site church. Organizers recommend those interested in participating should enlist the help of families, churches Scout troops, community groups and businesses.

THREE CHURCHES in Davis County will participate in Operation Christmas Child. Here, children in the Philippines open gifts. Photo courtesy of Samantha’s Purse ministry Shoe boxes should be filled with items recommended at www.samaritanpurse.org/occ. Participants are asked to fill a standard size shoe box or plastic container. The box may be wrapped, but the lid should be wrapped separately. Participants are asked to decide whether the gift will be for a boy or a girl and an age category: 2-4, 5-9, or 10-14. On the Web, are printable boy/girl labels, which should be taped to the top of the box. Small gifts (no liquids) may be packed in the box. Other restrictions include no damaged or war-related

items, chocolate or food, or out-of-date candies, medications and vitamins. Organizers ask that participants give $7, either by check or online. If a check is written, it should be placed in an envelope on top of the gift items in the box. A rubber band should be placed around the box and taken in to a donation site. Gift ideas include: small cars, balls, dolls, stuffed animals, kazoos, harmonicas, yo-yos, jump ropes, small Etch-a-Sketch, toys that light up or make noise (with extra batteries), and Slinkies. School supplies include pens, pencils and sharpeners, crayons or markers, stamps

and ink pad sets, writing pads or paper, solar calculators, coloring and picture books. Hygiene items include: toothbrush and toothpaste, mild bar soap in a plastic bag, comb, washcloth. Also such items as hard candy and lollipops (double bagged), mints, gum, T-shirts, socks, ball caps, sunglasses, hair clips, toy jewelry, watches, flashlights with extra batteries. Participants may include a personal note and a photo of themselves or their family. Those who include a name and address may receive a note back from the child. mwilliams@davisclipper.com

America focus of free chamber concert BY JENNIFFER WARDELL Clipper Staff Writer KAYSVILLE — In some ways Veterans Day is like a prelude to Thanksgiving, focusing our gratitude in one particular area before we spread it out to the whole world. The free chamber music concert set for Nov. 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the Kaysville Tabernacle (198 W. Center St.), manages to embrace both holidays. Presented by the Davis Arts Council in conjunction with the Wasatch Chamber Music Society, the “Songs of America” concert will feature well-known soprano Celena Shafer and others focusing on the music of our country. “It’s to honor veterans and help us get ready for Thanksgiving,” said Kathy Skidmore, one of the concert organizers. The 75 minute concert, which like the rest of the series is sponsored by the radio station Classical 89, will open with a specifically patriotic tribute to veterans. Bugler Paul Kapp will perform, as well as the musical group The Other 3 Tenors, and John Finley. Mat Shaw, Blaine Hickman, Gabriel Gutierrez, Lindsay Hickman, and Melinda Taylor will be performing Copland’s “The Promise

Next month: • The next entry in the free chamber concert series will be Dec. 9 at the Kaysville Tabernacle. The theme will be “Carols of Christmas.”

of Living.” “It’s a wonderful Americana piece,” said Skidmore. “It’s also good for Thanksgiving.” Shafer, a Centerville native who currently lives in Layton, will be the featured soloist for the concert. The singer, who has performed with well-known orchestras and opera houses across the country, also regularly performs with the Utah Symphony and the Utah Opera. “She’s probably one of the finest, most in-demand sopranos on the scene today,

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and she loves to volunteer her time and perform for the community,” said Skidmore. “She’s one of the best of the best, and it will be a real treat to get to hear her for free.” The Davis Arts Chamber Music Series features

monthly free concerts held in the Kaysville Tabernacle from September to May. All the concerts are family friendly, but are only open to children six and older. For a complete list of concerts and more information, visit davisarts.org.

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A16

Youth/Education CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Youth Beat Safety at Stewart gets boost CENTERVILLE —Stewart Elementary in

Centerville was the first runner-up in a state-wide competition that encouraged Utah students to walk or bike to school at least three days each week during the first month of school. “We commend Stewart Elementary for starting the school year off on the right foot by walking and biking to school and for setting a good example not only for its students and their parents but also for other schools,” said Robert Hull, UDOT Director of Traffic and Safety. “The efforts of Stewart Elementary and other schools throughout the state have reduced traffic around schools and have encouraged healthy activities for students.” Stewart was awarded $250, which is to be used by the school’s safety committee. Students are encouraged to follow the safest route to school, walk with a buddy or group, walk on sidewalks where possible and look left, then right and cross only at crosswalks. Those who bike should also wear helmets, with bright clothing or a bright handkerchief tied around a backpack. Students should never walk or ride with headphones, according to the Utah Department of Educations’s Student Neighborhood Access Program (SNAP), who sponsored the promotion.

Essay contest open to students DAVIS COUNTY — Area students are invited to participate in an essay contest based on the U.S. Constitution and sponsored by the History Channel. The contest is being administered by the Bill of Rights Institute, a non-profit educational organization in the Washington, D.C. area devoted to educating young people about the Constitution and the founding principles, according to a release. Essays written this year should answer the question, “How does the Constitution establish and maintain a culture of liberty?” Cash prizes will be awarded the top three student winners from each of five geographical regions in the country. Prices are $1,000 for first place, $500 for second and $250 for third. Teacher sponsors for each student will also receive a cash prize of $100. The contest opened last month. Final entries are due by Dec. 15 at midnight and should be submitted to www.BillofRightsInstitute.org/Submit. More information is available at www.Billof RightsInstitute.org/ Contest. lshaw@davisclipper.com

Educator honored for extra effort BY LOUISE R. SHAW

Clipper Staff Writer WOODS CROSS — The reward comes in seeing the confidence that develops when students start feeling better about themselves. “It’s huge,” said Donna Tippetts. “It’s why I became an educator and a coach to begin with – to make a difference for kids.” Tippetts recently received another reward as well, when she was recognized at the Utah Education Association’s Superstars in Education banquet with an Excellence in Teaching Award. The Woods Cross teacher was one of 10 Utah teachers to receive the award, which included a $1,500 check from the Arch Coal Foundation, this year’s sponsors. “I see myself amongst so many great teachers here at Woods Cross,” said Tippetts. “I definitely feel honored to be nominated amongst my peers, but to win is definitely a very nice recognition.” Tippetts has been a teacher for 18 years. It was about five years ago that she saw the need to help students improve their fitness. Some were struggling with weight, others recovering from injuries, and some were disabled. “It sparked me to want to do something a little different,” she said. She worked with Vicki Ingram, then principal, and John Robison, healthy lifestyles coordinator in the district, applied for Trust Land funds and together they turned a former area of bleachers into a work-out room. She now teachers three Fit for Life classes, one Get Fit class and another

FOR HER WORK helping students not only in school but in life, Donna Tippetts, was recently honored with a UEA Excellence in Teaching Award. “At all levels, kids can be helped so much,” said Tippetts, shown above working with Tenli Beck. Photo by Louise R. Shaw conditioning class, where she helps about 110 students understand the need to remain active and eat wisely. “Donna Tippetts has become somewhat of a personal trainer to students in her P.E. classes at Woods Cross High School,” said Michael Kelley, director of communications for the UEA, in announcing the award. “She helps each one set goals, then designs exercise and nutrition programs to help each meet those goals. One senior who had been overweight her entire life set a goal to lose 35 pounds. With Tippett’s help, the student began changing her habits. After graduation, the student returned to the school to report she had reached her goal, but more importantly, she was a healthier, happier person because of the skills learned in Tippett’s class.” “I’ve seen so many

changes,” said Tippetts. “Not just with my students but with my students’ families.” She said some parents have told her that her guidance has made a big difference in their homes. “If change doesn’t start there it doesn’t really ever work,” she said. In her first year with the Get Fit class, Tippetts said 34 students lost a cumulative 42 inches from their waists and 20 from their hips. “We don’t always see weight loss because they could be gaining muscle,” she said. “My biggest push is not only increasing kids’ physical activity,” she said, which she said has declined due to video games and television, “but to help educate kids about food and the danger of a lot of sugar in their diet.” Information from a training program she once

attended indicated that with obesity trends, one in three children would become Type 2 diabetics. She said increasing physical activity and making wiser nutritional choices will lead to healthier lives. “The main thing is to stay active,” she said. “It doesn’t take being a marathon runner to benefit. You just need to be getting out and moving, finding something you love and continuing to do it and cutting down on calories from soda, high sugar foods and trans fats.” Award recipients were nominated by their peers and chosen based on their work with individual students. Other teachers honored included those in elementary, junior high and high schools in districts throughout the state. lshaw@davisclipper.com


Sports From the sidelines Shain Gillet

Twice bitten once too many

S

ome teams have all the luck in sports. Others, well, aren’t so fortunate when things come down to just a single opportunity. For the Viewmont Vikings girls soccer team, it was an all-too-familiar scene as they were once again faced with beating just one team to claim the 5A state title. And once again, they were turned away with the same exact score that befell them last season. One goal, one loss. Thanks for all the hard work, but better luck next year. Again. And that just plain stinks for them. It’s one thing to get there the way they did in 2010: the underdog who had to play an extra game just to get into the playoffs beats all the “powerhouse” teams just to lose on a goal that wasn’t really a goal (I still have that image stuck in my head). It was a completely different story this year: a new region that they

Thanks for all the hard work, but better luck next year...again. simply ransacked through while only losing one game during the regular season, then dropping by a single goal on a good shot by Alta. But no matter how you put it, they still lost both finals games by the same sour score: 1-0. If there was ever a team that deserved redemption for their tough finals loss in 2010, it was the Lady Vikes. And they were primed and ready to take home the title too. Through talking with coach Eric Landon over the weeks while they ran over all their region games, his one constant message was that they were ready to take home the state title. n See “FROM” p. B4

SECTION

B

State volleyball preview

Local teams prepare for state title run, Page B2

Thursday, NOV. 3, 2011

See upcoming events

And more on the calendar page, Page B5

4A Playoff Preview: Bountiful at Olympus

Braves face another familiar foe Friday BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Sports Editor

and defense are coming off a very strong performance against the Timber Wolves. BOUNTIFUL — Offensively the The Bountiful Braves Braves are coming off football team easily one of their strongest dispatched the Timber performances since Wolves of Timpanogos week nine when they last week. beat Woods Cross 44-21. This week they face In the Braves 42-27 another familiar foe in win over TimpanoOlympus Friday night, gos, quarterback Cam having to travel to Salt Zollinger threw for four Lake City in order to touchdowns and 239 make their way back to Rice Eccles Stadium for yards on just 12 completions, a near 20-yard per the state semi-finals in completion clip. 4A. For Zollinger, it was The two teams’ hishis second four-touchtory goes back quite a down passing perforfew years, but most remance on the season cently the Braves were the beneficiary of a pair and third of his career, having thrown for four of region wins over the Titans in 2009 and 2010. touchdowns last season against Spanish Fork. When both teams Benefitting from were in Region 5 dating Zollinger’s strong perback to at least 2001, formance was Jack Fabthe Braves were 3-1 rizio, who caught three against Olympus during passes for 73 yards and that span giving them a finished with over 100 record of 5-1 over the total yards that game. past six meetings. Mo Manu, Luke LarThe pair were once sen and Tanner Redding again split apart for the were the other benefi2011 season when the ciaries of Zollinger’s Titans made the move good day, each catching to Region 7 thanks to two balls with at least the realignment. one touchdown recepBountiful will have tion. a lot more than just Following Jakob history on its side Hunt’s 79-yard, one entering Friday night, as the Braves’ offense n See “BRAVES” p. B4

BOUNTIFUL’S CAM ZOLLINGER threw for nearly 240 yards and four touchdowns last Friday against Timpanogos. He’ll lead the offense against one of the best defenses in 4A Friday night against Olympus High School. Photo: Jen Barnett www.photo-jen-ics.com.

Vikings host high-flying Jordan in next round BY SCOTT SCHULTE

Clipper Correspondent

VIEWMONT’S JOSH STAPLES (NO. 12) and Parker Beyeler have helped Viewmont reach the quarter finals this season. Photo: Jen Barnett www.photo-jen-ics.com.

BOUNTIFUL — The Viewmont Vikings and Jordan Beetdiggers have been two of the feel good stories of the 2011 prep football season. The Vikings, newcomers to the Region 2, captured the title playing teams with much more size and in most cases while learning a new complex offensive system. Jordan has been the team starting a freshman quarterback who has proved to be one of the best in the state with his arm and legs causing grief up and down the Wasatch Front. On Friday, one of these stories comes to an end.

“We’re excited to be in this position,” said Viewmont coach Brad Lloyd. “I’m proud of the team. We started the season with a new offense and it took the pre-season for the guys to get it under their belts, but they stuck with it, had confidence in what we were doing. “Then it clicked and they have been playing well ever since then.” The offense, led by the steady leadership of senior quarterback Josh Staples, has found the gaps in opponents’ defense for scores. Haden Heath has emerged as one of the state’s best tight ends. n See “VIKINGS” p. B4

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B2

Sports CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

All four local schools in 4A, 5A playoffs BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Sports Editor

DAVIS COUNTY —

It was a fun season for most south Davis County team’s in volleyball. And after the dust settled on a few last-game rivalries, all four local schools will be representing their three regions as they head to the state 4A and 5A volleyball playoffs. This year’s playoffs will again be held at the UCCU Center on the campus of Utah Valley University in Orem. In 5A, the Davis Darts will enter the playoffs as the No. 1 seed from Region 1 after claiming yet another title. With this year’s region race a little closer than last year’s (Davis was 9-1 in region play, followed by Fremont who was 8-2), the Darts have won nine straight matches entering the state tournament. They also have the most wins (26) among all 5A teams heading in, and will look to avenge their quarterfinal loss last year against Lone Peak, who is also in this year’s tournament. Davis will play the Jordan Beetdiggers (8-13, 3-5 in Region 3) in the opening round. The Viewmont Vikings didn’t fare too well after moving down from Region 1 to Region 2, finishing in a tie for third place in the region. And although the team’s five region wins include a split over Kearns, but the Vikings will still enter the 5A tournament with a tough road as the No. 4 seed.

They will have to face a tough opening round opponent in Lehi, who finished as the No. 1 seed from Region 8 after tying with Pleasant Grove and Lone Peak for the top spot. The Vikings (6-17, 5-5 in Region 2) will have to fight hard against the Pioneers (15-4, 8-2 in Region 4) should they want to move onto the winner’s bracket and stay in the race for the title. In 4A, both the Wildcats of Woods Cross and the Braves of Bountiful will be entering the state tournament, doing so after finishing 1-2 in the Region 6 race. With a share of the Region 6 title, the Wildcats will enter the 4A tournament as the No. 1 seed from the region. Winners of 12 of their last 13 matches, including nine of 10 in region play, the Wildcats swept the Braves 3-0 on the final match of the regular season to obtain the No. 1 spot. Woods Cross’ (17-8, 9-1 in Region 6) opponent will be the Orem Tigers (12-14, 7-7 in Region 8), who lost three straight matches in region play to fall to the No. 4 seed in the biggest region in the 4A class. The Braves, after dropping from No. 1 to the No. 2 seed, will have to go through the same scheduling road in the playoffs as they did last season should they keep winning. After winning through the loser’s bracket to finish sixth in 2010, the Braves (20-9, 9-1 in Region 6) were bumped to the No. 2 seed entering the 4A tournament this season, where they’ll

BOTH THE WILDCATS (above) and the Vikings (right) will be making their way into the state 4A and 5A volleyball playoffs starting Friday. Photo: Jen Barnett www.photo-jen-ics.com. face Maple Mountain in the opening round. The Golden Eagles (16-5, 7-5 in Region 8) enter the 4A playoffs riding a small two-game win streak, and

finished just ahead of Orem for a playoff spot after missing the playoffs in their first two seasons. The tournament will begin Friday, Nov. 4, and will

start with the 4A schools. Bountiful’s match will begin at 9 a.m., with the Wildcats taking the court at 10:30 a.m. Davis will follow at 3:30

p.m. with Viewmont playing at 5 p.m. For a complete bracket of both 4A and 5A schools with other playing times, visit www.uhsaa.org.

High school swimming jumps into new year DAVIS COUNTY —

There was a lot of action during last year’s swimming season. As well as a few firsts. And once again, the high school swimming season has already kick-started for all the local high schools in the south Davis County area. With most of the teams already finishing at least one meet, Bountiful, Davis, Viewmont and Woods Cross have even more events coming up this week. For the Darts, an early swim meet on Oct. 13 was all that was scheduled between then and Nov. 1, where they competed at home against other region rivals. The Darts next meet is scheduled for Friday, Nov. 5 at Logan. The Vikings, fresh off their region titles for both boys and girls, will also have a swim meet starting this Friday, Nov. 4.

During that time, the Vikes will be in St. George for a weekend event before taking part in the Region Relays on Nov. 10. The Braves and Wildcats have a scheduled meet against each other Friday at the South Davis Recreation Center as the Wildcats attempt to defend both their region and state titles. Afterward, the Braves have a scheduled meet on Tuesday, Nov. 8 against East High School. The Wildcats have a pair of meets afterward; first heading to Utah State University for the Grizzly Invite, then a home date on Friday, Nov. 11 against Clearfield. Woods Cross’ battle against the Falcons will be at the South Davis Recreation Center. For more information or to find out future swim meets visit the respective school’s website.

Useful things you can do with today’s newspaper. . . (after you read it, of course)

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CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Sports

B3

Darts, ’Cats gone after first round BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Sports Editor

DAVIS COUNTY —

TRAVIS KOURY and the rest of the Vikings hit the ice to start up the 2011-2012 hockey season. Photo: Courtesy of Blake Palmer, Shutterspeed Photography.

High school hockey laces up the skates BY SHAIN GILLET Clipper Sports Editor

DAVIS COUNTY —

As the weather starts to get colder outside, many of the winter high school sports are starting to make their way inside. One such sport that kicked off Wednesday night was high school hockey, which got under way after all the local teams played through a few preseason games. The Viewmont Vikings, the summer league champions who also made a deep playoff run last winter season, started the year off with a match up against arch-rival Davis Wednesday night. The score from that game came in after press time. The Vikings were 3-0 in their preseason games, outscoring their opponents 22-5 in the process. The Darts, who also made the playoffs last winter, started the preseason on a strong note after a 12-5 win over Juan Diego. They dropped their next

two games, however, to Park City and UCI South, losing to UCI by just a single goal. After the duo’s match up, the Darts’ next opponent will be the Salt Lake Independent Sabres, with Viewmont taking on the Weber County Independent Wolves. Both games will occur Wednesday, Nov. 9 at the South Davis Recreation Center. The DCI (Davis County Independent) Eagles, who won the independent title during the winter, went through their preseason games with a 2-1 record after beating UCI North and Riverton. They opened up the regular season with a 7-1 loss over Murray on Oct. 26 and have a game against the Cache Valley Independent Wild Monday. For more information about the high school hockey league, along with schedules and times for each team, visit www.highschoolhockey.com. sgillet@davisclipper.com

It was a tale of two different teams heading into the state 4A and 5A football playoffs last Friday. The Darts, fresh off a loss to the Northridge Knights, ended up facing one of the toughest offenses in the league in Jordan. The Wildcats, who dropped two of their last three games but still made the playoffs, was up against the potent offense of Timpview. Both, in the end, suffered losses against their respective teams and were oneand-one in the state playoff picture. The Darts entered the game against Jordan having one of the best defenses in the league. At 98 points entering Friday night, the Darts ranked as one of the top five defenses in all of 5A. However, the defense quickly had the Darts behind the eight-ball that night. Jordan’s 21-point first quarter proved to be too much of a deficit for Davis. And even though they had closed the gap to 28-24 at one point, Jordan scored 14 points in the fourth quarter to pull away 42-24 and move on in the state 5A playoffs. The Darts’ defense had a difficult time stopping freshman quarterback Austin Kafentzis, who accounted for each of Jordan’s first three touchdowns for the 21-3 first quarter lead. Kafentzis’ pair of touchdown passes, combined with his three-yard scamper for a score, helped the Beetdiggers build a 28-17 half time lead. Davis was able to cut the score to 28-24 after Mark Christiansen rushed for his only touchdown of the game. Karter Chrisholm also had a big day for the Darts,

Get the word out!

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Deadline: Fridays, 4pm If your group or organization has an event coming up, let people know with the Clipper Calendar. E-mail the details, such as date, time, place, cost, etc. to rjamieson@davisclipper.com, or bring the info to the Clipper office, 1370 S. 500 W., Bountiful.

Calendar listings will be published at our discretion on a space-available basis.

KARTER CHRISHOLM, seen here against Layton earlier, led the Darts in receiving with 51 catches, 636 yards and six touchdowns on the season. Photo: Jen Barnett www.photo-jen-ics.com catching eight passes for 163 yards and two touchdowns, but it still wasn’t enough to catch up to the Beetdiggers. Jordan’s pair of fourthquarter touchdowns came on a pair of rushing touchdowns, one from Kafentzis and one from Austin Grant, to pull away from the game. Davis finished the season with a 5-4-1 record, including a bizarre tie with Brighton in the first game of the season. Tyson Denney finished with 1,500 yards and 10 touchdown passes with seven interceptions. Christiansen was the leading rusher for the Darts, piling up 733 yards with six

touchdowns this season. Woods Cross had a chance early on against Timpview in the opening round, tying the game at 14 at half time after Sean Barton rushed for his second touchdown of the game in the second quarter. But a pair of rushing touchdowns from Gregson Aspinall in the second half doomed the Wildcats, whose high-flying offense was shutout in the second half and fell 31-14. For Barton, his pair of touchdowns were his eighth and ninth rushing touchdowns on the season to go along with six receiving touchdowns.

Skyler Farnes, who threw for at least 200 yards and one touchdown in nearly every game, was shut down after passing for 203 yards and no passing touchdowns. Farnes ended the Wildcats (4-6, 2-3 in Region 6) season just two yards short of 2,600 on the year with 20 touchdown passes. He also led the team in rushing yards with 455. Barton ended the season with over 900 yards receiving with six touchdowns while also rushing for 413 yards and nine touchdowns. Nick Sefakis caught 35 balls for 727 yards and nine touchdowns on the year.

Jone Olson Insurance Agcy Inc Jennifer Bassarear Ins Agy Inc Eckman Ins and Fin Svcs Inc Toby H Gonzales Insur Agcy Inc Mark G Kano Insur Agcy Inc Jone Olson 94 West 200 North Bountiful, UT 84010 Bus: 801-292-8413

Jennifer Bassarear CASL/CLU 107 N Main St, Ste 104 Bountiful, UT 84010 Bus: 801-292-8291 Fax: 801-292-1344

Wayne Eckman LUTCF 98 West 200 North Bountiful, UT 84010 Bus: 801-292-7291

Toby H. Gonzales 465 South 200 West, Suite 2 Bountiful, UT 84010 Bus: 801-292-9424

Mark Kano LUTCF CLU 21 S. 200 W., P.O. Box 807 Bountiful, UT 84011 Bus: 801-298-2636


B4

Sports CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Braves face another familiar foe Friday Continued from p. B1 touchdown performance on offense was the stellar play of the defense, who also helped put points on the board after Redding returned an interception for a touchdown. For Redding, it was his second interception of the season, tying him with Rylee Gautavai and Adam Alvey. Gautavai, the team’s leading tackler, finished with 13 against the Timber Wolves to push his total past the 100 mark. Ryan Curtis’ 12 tackle, one interception performance gives him 46 on the year with three interceptions. Olympus followed their move to Region 7 with a region title and a No. 1 seed in the playoffs, dispatching their opponents by more than 15 points in region play. In the Titan’s five point win over Box Elder last week, quarterback Scott Porter and running back Brandon McBride each had a touchdown while holding off the Bees to advance to Friday night. Porter and McBride, the team’s leading passer and rusher respectively, have accounted for 33 of the team’s 39 offensive

BOUNTIFUL’S MO MANU is one of three receivers with four touchdown receptions for the Braves, who will face Olympus Friday night in Salt Lake City. Photo: Jen Barnett www. photo-jen-ics.com.

touchdowns, with Porter throwing for 22 passing touchdowns this season. Porter’s two favorite targets are Calvin Escobedo and Nate Sorensen, who have a combined 1,366 yards and 14 touchdowns. The defense, led by Matt Bourne’s 51 tackles and 10 sacks, has averaged giving up roughly 17 points per game while posting a 9-1 overall record. Should the Braves decide to throw the ball, they’ll have to be aware of where Chandler Thornton and Cole Benson are on the field. Between the two of them, they have a combined nine of the team’s 14 interceptions on the season. They also have 66 tackles on the year between them. The Titans’ points allowed this season (173) are the best in Region 7 and rank second among all team’s in the 4A classification. The Braves and Titans are scheduled to kick off at 5 p.m. Friday night. The winner will move on to play either Highland or Logan next Thursday. sgillet@davisclipper.com

Vikings host high-flying Jordan in next round Continued from p. B1 The 4.0 student is being courted by the likes of Yale and Harvard. Viewmont’s front line, often undersized, has proven tough enough to give the backfield its chance to get its work done. On Friday at 4 p.m. at Viewmont, the Vikings will be challenged to stop the wily kid, 14-year-old Austin Kafentzis, who chewed up a tough Davis High defense with 284 yards and two touchdowns in the air and 215 yards rushing and three more touchdowns. Five times the quarterback found pay dirt in leading the Beetdiggers to victory. “This is a very talented young man,” said Lloyd. “For any quarterback to have those numbers against a team like Davis is impressive, but for a ninth grader to do it is really special.” Lloyd and Viewmont are certainly not intimidated nor afraid by the lofty offensive numbers Jordan High has put up through the season in the tough Region 3. The Vikings have been smaller but one of the harder hitting defensive teams proven by the way they handled American Fork.

From the sidelines Continued from p. B1 It didn’t matter how they got there, as long as they got there and won. They had the players (nine returning starters and several who were sophomores two years ago when they started their playoff runs), the determination, and the mind set that they were going to take the title for themselves.

BRADEN WAITERS, seen here against Hunter earlier, has been another strong player in the back field for the Vikings. Photo: Jen Barnett www.photo-jen-ics.com.

Lloyd has confidence in defensive coordinator Roger Farnsworth and the team’s ability to understand how to make necessary adjustments to slow down the

Beetdiggers. “You know with Jordan they are going to move the ball,” Lloyd said. “But I know Roger has great ideas as to how to prepare for

And while they didn’t get the chance to face Brighton again, they didn’t care. A win and a state title was all they were eyeing for. And it showed in their playoff games leading to the finals. Two of the team’s three games were won by three goals while they escaped in a shoot out win over former Region 1 rival Northridge. Then they got to the finals and, once again, lost 1-0. The one thing I could take away from that game

was it wasn’t like last year. They had the time to tie the match and send it to overtime for the second straight year. And they had their chances too. While Alex Cook was busy stopping the remainder of Alta’s attacks, the rest of the team had their chances to get at the net and tie the match. They simply ran out of time. So while fans and supporters take a look back at the Lady Vikes 2011 season,

each game. “This is no different.” Senior standout Chris Bednar has been a leader on both sides of the ball for Viewmont and explained one of the points of emphasis to the team’s success. And it has nothing to do with the physical aspect of the game. “Not too high, not too low,” Bednar is known to always say. “When good things happen we don’t get too excited and when things go bad we don’t get too down. We try to remain steady in our emotions and whatever happens in a play or game we get ready for what’s next.” Added Bednar, “We are all really excited for the opportunity to play this week. “We will work hard all week and be very prepared and confident when kick off rolls around. Jordan has some great players, but so do we and we feel good about how we’ll match up. “When we are working hard and succeeding in playing the game we love, there is nothing better.” The winner of Friday’s game earns a spot in the state 5A semi-finals to be played at Rice-Eccles Stadium next week. news@davisclipper.com

they can take pride in knowing that the team was just as focused as last year’s to bring home a state title. But will have to settle for another second place finish, and another second place trophy. “Better luck next year,” is how the saying goes. In the case of the Lady Vikes, next year was just as hurtful as the year before. And next year will be a different year for certain. sgillet@davisclipper.com

FEARLESS FORECAST Shain Gillet

A

4-0 week meant that two teams, Woods Cross and Davis, were sadly eliminated from the playoffs. However, it’s nice to know that two teams are still in the running for a state title. And these are some tough games too. Here goes.

Bountiful: 21 Olympus: 17 The Braves have owned the Titans even dating back to the times where they both were in Region 5. It only took me a quick peak to notice that the Braves are 5-1 in the duo’s past six meetings, with Bountiful winning comfortably in most of them. The biggest amount of fun fans will have in this game is watching both defenses go at it. The Titans and Braves both rank in the top 10 in fewest points allowed this year, so look for this year

to be a low-scoring affair with the Braves moving on. Viewmont: 21 Jordan: 24 If there were a few teams in the playoffs that nobody wanted to face, one of them has to be Jordan. Against the third-best scoring defense in 5A, the Beetdiggers put up 42 points on the Darts in the first round, more than any other opponent Davis faced this year. Viewmont will have to show Jordan that they have the defensive fortitude to beat them, having posted the fifth-best scoring defense in 5A while putting up solid numbers on offense. A key for the Vikings will be getting pressure on Jordan quarterback Austin Kafentzis, who’s only a freshman yet has accounted for more than 4,000 yards of offense with 36 combined touchdowns. If they can get to him early, the Vikes may have a shot. Until next time. Last week: 4-0 For the year: 27-8-1


EVENTS B5

Calendar CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Nov. 3 • Weber State students and alumni are hosting the third annual Love is Fashionable Charity Fashion show, 7-10 p.m. in Ballroom A of the Union Building at WSU. Money raised will benefit the International Rescue Committee’s efforts in Eastern Africa.

Nov. 5 • Armed Forces Recognition program will begin at 11 a.m. at Davis High School, 325 S. Main, Kaysville.

Nov. 5-6 • Fall Orchid Show, Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Red Butte Garden Orangerie. Saturday, 2:30 p.m., there will be an open forum discussion on the culture and care of orchids. For more information, call Bruce at 801-243-3151.

Nov. 7 • WSU’s Executive Lecture Series presents Chantel Chase, Davis area president of Zions First National Bank, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Weber State University Davis Room 110 (2750 N. University Park Blvd., Layton), free, 801-395-3482 or brucedavis@weber.edu.

Nov. 8 • Caring Connections: A Hope and Comfort in Grief Program will hold its annual Grief and the Holidays event from 78:30 p.m. in the University of Utah College of Nursing’s Annette Poulson Cumming building, 10 S. 2000 E. on the University of Utah Campus. This year’s Grief and the Holidays’ program, titled “Finding Light in Darkness”, is an opportunity for individuals to come together and cope with the loss of a family member or friend while keeping the memory of that loved one alive during the difficult holiday season. The program’s featured speaker, Margaret Wahlstrom, lost her mother-in-law, Mary Alice Wahlstrom and her sister-in-law, Carolyn Wahlstrom Beug in the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center 10 years ago. The event is free to the public. Parking available on the first level, north end of the building. For a map and information call 801585-9522. • Weber State University Davis will host a groundbreaking ceremony for the expansion of the WSU Davis campus, 10:30 a.m., WSU Davis campus (2750 N. University Park Blvd., Layton), free, 801-626-6789.

Nov. 13 • Antelope Island State Park — Syracuse: Mulberry Grove Hike: Enjoy an easy one-mile roundtrip hike to a relatively unknown area within the park. Hike begins at 1 p.m., at mile marker nine along the eastside road. 801-721-9569

Nov. 17 • Davis County Library will host Jennifer Chiaverini, New York Time best selling author of the Elm Creek Quilt series, at the South Branch Library, 725 South Main, Bountiful, Utah at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 p.m.). The public is encouraged to come early for best seats. Jennifer will discuss her career and present her new book,“The Wedding Quilt.”

This event is free. After the program Jennifer will be available to sign books and visit. The King’s English bookstore will provide books for sale at the event. The South Branch Library is wheelchair accessible. For patrons with other special needs contact Chris Sanford or Rosalie Taylor at 801451-2322. • Natural History Museum of Utah Grand Opening Community Gala. Celebrate the Natural History Museum of Utah’s new home, the Rio Tinto Center, at the community gala, at 7 p.m. New exhibits immerse visitors in the evolution, diversity and mystery of life on Earth, as Utah reveals it. One night only, get face-to-face with the craftsmen who built it, the designers who envisioned it, and the scientists whose stories it tells. For guests 21 and older, $45 per person. http://www.nhmu.org/gala

Nov. 19 • Turkey Bowl, 11:15 a.m. 12:15 p.m., 12:30-1:30 p.m. and 1:45-2:45 p.m. Davis Lanes Bowling Alley, 1396 N. Main, Layton. $3.50/person. Reservations required. Lanes must be paid in full to the Layton Recreation dept. by Monday, Nov. 14 at 5 p.m. 801-336-3924 for info.

Nov. 21 • Family Art Night, BDAC, 78:30 p.m. Free to the public and treats are included. Project is building and decorating boxes. 745 S. Main, Bountiful. ww.bdac.org. 801-292-0367. blog:bdartcenter.blogspot.com

CONCERT Nov. 4

at anytime during the series. A complimentary lunch is provided but an RSVP by each Monday at noon is required to receive a meal. Contact Megan at 801-525-5088. No reservation is required to only attend the class. • Nov. 4, 11:30 a.m., Golden Years Activity Center, Bountiful. Topic: A Window into the World of Alzheimer’s and Dementia presented by Art Smith, Right At Home. No class Nov. 11. Nov. 15, noon, Legacy Village, 1201 N. Fairfield Road, Layton. Topic: Caregiver Rejuvenation presented by Avalon Cosmetology School. Nov. 18, 11:30 a.m., Golden Years Activity Center, Bountiful. Topic: Caregiver Rejuvenation presented by Avalon Cosmetology School.

Fall Orchid show, Nov. 5-6. See ‘Events’ for complete information. LDS church. Scott Rowley, Music Director for the Church of the Resurrection in Centerville, will serve as the organist for the evening, and Matt Jensen, North Salt Lake City Council member will be the emcee.

Nov. 3, 10 • South Davis Family History Center, classes, 3350 South 100 East, Bountiful, Utah, 801-2994239 Training Classes, 7-8 p.m. • Nov. 3, Beginning Online Searching • Nov. 10, Additional databases

Dec. 3 • The Choral Arts Society of Utah presents the 14th annual Holiday Pops Concert, 7:30 p.m., Cottonwood High School, 5715 S. 1300 E., SLC. $15. www.smithtix.com, 801-467-8499 or (800)-888-8499. Featured will be The Choral Arts Society of Utah, West Valley Symphony and One Voice Children’s Choir.

STAGE Oct. 17-Nov. 12

• CenterPoint Legacy Theatre presents the musical “Sleepy Hollow” at the Davis Performing Arts Center, 525 N. 400 W., Centerville. For tickets and more information, call 801-298-1302.

Nov. 4-5, 8-9 • WSU’s Department of Performing Arts presents “Xanadu,”

• Temple Square Concert Series, 7:30 p.m., Assembly Hall. Bobbi Blood, flute.

Nov. 9, 16

the hilarious, roller-skating, musical adventure about following your dreams, 7:30 p.m., Val A. Browning Center Eccles Theater, $11/$8, 800-WSU-TIKS or 801626-6431.

CLASSES Tuesdays

• Rainbow Squares dance on Tuesday nights at the Bountiful

Community Church, 400 E 150 N., from 8:30 – 10 p.m. , $5. Couples and singles welcome. Call Ron and Audrey Poulson 801-4518837 or Don and Lynne Rasmussen 801-292-0113.

Nov. 4, 15, 18 • Davis County Health Department’s Family Caregiver Support Program is offering an eight-week series of classes for individuals caring for family members who are older or frail. These classes are free to the public. Individuals may attend

• South Davis Family History Center, 3350 South 100 East, Bountiful, Utah, 801-299-4239 Training Classes, 6 p.m. • Nov. 9: Using Legacy Family Tree to Find Duplicate People, Merge them together, View two databases with split screen. • Nov. 16: See how two people are connected with Legacy Family Tree Relationship calculator and Chart, Fix Potential Relationship Problems, Add another set of Parents. For a map and hours go to http:\\www.SouthDavisFamilyHistoryCenter.org. The FHC does not have a mailbox. Phone: 801-299-4239 Email: UT_SouthDavis@ldsmail.net

DAVIS CLIPPER 1370 S. 500 W., BOUNTIFUL, UT 84010

Nov. 5 • Temple Square Concert Series, 7:30 p.m., Assembly Hall. Sound Choir.

Nov. 8 • WSU’s Department of Performing Arts will present the WSU Symphonic Band, 7:30 p.m., Val A. Browning Center Austad Auditorium, $6/$5, 1-800-WSUTIKS, or 801-626-6431.

Nov. 11 • Utah Voices will presents its fall concert titled “Hometown Praise.” They will perform sacred choral music written or arranged by Utah composers, 7:30 p.m. at Libby Gardner Hall at the University of Utah, 1375 E. President’s Circle, SLC. Tickets are $10 and available online at www.utahvoices.org. or at the door.

CALL FOR ENTRY It’s that time of year again to begin planning for The Christmas Light Parades in:

a. BOUNTIFUL, Friday, Dec. 2, 6 p.m. b. KAYSVILLE, Monday, Nov. 28, 6 p.m.

Nov. 13 • North Salt Lake City is hosting a Thanksgiving Interfaith Hymn Festival, to be held at 6 p.m. This free event provides an opportunity for members of all faiths to sing together hymns of thanksgiving to God. Organists from various local churches will accompany the audience as they sing the beloved hymns of the Thanksgiving season. Hymn texts will be provided. The Hymn Festival will be held at the LDS Chapel at 261 E. Center, North Salt Lake. Local churches that will be participating include the Abundant Life Church, Bountiful Community Church, Bountiful Heights, Church of the Resurrection, Grace Lutheran Church, St. Olaf’s Catholic Church, and the

This year’s parade route for Bountiful will be the same as the last year. It will begin at 400 South and Main St., go north on Main St. to 400 North then left on 400 North to 200 West then right on 200 West and end at the South Davis Rec. Center where we will be having entertainment, refreshments and Santa Claus. Kaysville will be the same as the last several years. We will let you know of any changes in the parades. A warm thank you to everyone who helped make last year’s parades meaningful family events. We felt everything went very well. Everyone is excited about this year’s parades and we are anxious to expand them. If you know of anyone else that may be interested in participating, have them contact the Clipper at the numbers noted below. A BIG ADDITION for the week of the parade in Bountiful will be The BAR J WRANGLERS. Performances Wednesday evening, November 30 at Woods Cross High. Tickets are available at the Bountiful City Offices, Dick’s Market in Bountiful and Centerville and Winegar’s in Bountiful. If you are interested in being a part of this year’s parades, please fill out this entry blank below, and send it to the Davis Clipper. FAX: 801-295-3044

For this years parade: Are you interested in participating in one or both? ____ Yes – a - b (circle the one or ones you would like to participate in), or ___ No If yes:

Name _________________________________________ Address _______________________________________ Phone # ________________________

Tell Davis County what you’re doing! Send in your events, concerts, plays, and community events to rjamieson@davisclipper.com to get it included in the calendar.

Fax # __________________________ What is the nature of your entry? (float, band, horse, individual, etc. number of people involved) ___________________________________________________________________

Please fax this form to the Clipper, 801-295-3044, attention John Buist. If you need any additional information, call Jorgina at 801-295-2251 ext 101 or John at ext 117. Thank you for being a part of our Electric Light parades!

The Davis Clipper


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Q: I’m writing to inquire about “Human Target.” Is it coming back this fall, or maybe as a midseason replacement? At the end of the program last summer, it said it was the season finale, not the series finale. -Fran N. in Ohio A: Everyone involved in a show is always hopeful that it will get picked up for another season, hence the wording of “season finale” versus “series finale.” After the second-season finale aired, Fox decided not to renew “Hu-

man Target” for a third season. But hey, at least it got to have two seasons. Even more of this fall’s new shows have been canceled after airing only a few episodes, including the CW’s “H8R,” ABC’s “Charlie’s Angels” (which will air its remaining produced episodes) and CBS’s “How to Be a Gentleman,” starring “Entourage” star Kevin Dillon. On the critical list are NBC’s “Prime Suspect” and ABC’s “Man Up!” NBC’s “Pan Am” started fairly well, but has been hemorrhaging viewers left and right. However, this seems to be NBC’s darling, so it might get the network support it needs to survive the season. *** Q: When will “Merlin” return for another season on Syfy? -- Mary D., via Facebook A: Syfy confirmed at this summer’s San Diego Comic-Con that

Kevin Dillon

“Merlin” will return in early 2012 for its fourth season. However as of this writing, no firm date had been set. Also, BBC-One, which produces and airs the show first in the U.K., has approved a fifth season of the popular fantasy, and considering its good ratings on Syfy, there’s a great chance we’ll get a fifth season here as

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The Price Is Right The Doctors Today Varied Body Varied Programs Super Dinosaur Live Regis & Kelly Justice Judge G. Paid Paid The Daily Dish

Young & Restless Good Things Utah Rachael Ray Martha WordWrl WordWrl Sid The Dr. Oz Show Better Utah Paid Paid Don Cheto Maury

Let’s Make a Deal The View Studio 5 Sesame Street Unfi Number Devo LDS FOX 13 News at 11 Judge Mathis Paid Paid Chuper Chuper Jeremy Kyle

Paid Varied Programs Paid CSI: Miami The Sopranos The Sopranos CSI: Miami Paid Paid Rifleman (7:45) Movie Varied Programs Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Robison J. Meyer Paid Varied Programs Phineas Phineas Babar Tinga Little Chug Mickey Pirates Mickey Mickey Little Little SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Minis Life J. Meyer Varied Boy Boy What What Full Hse. 700 Club The 700 Club Paid Paid Paid Paid Movie Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs Reba Reba Will Will Will Will Chris Chris Chris Chris Desp.-Wives Max, Rby Max, Rby Bubble Bubble Dora... Dora... Umi Umi Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Movie Varied Programs Paid Paid The Dan Patrick Show Paid Paid Varied Programs Movie Movie Varied Programs (9:15) Movie Movie Paid Paid Repo Repo CSI: NY CSI: Crime Scene CSI Varied CSI Varied Movie Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs Charmed Charmed Supernatural Supernatural Smallville Las Vegas Law Order: CI Varied Programs Prince Prince Prince Payne Browns Browns Payne Jim Yes Dear Yes Dear Amer. Earl

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2 News at Noon Fresh Bold The Chew One Life to Live KSL 5 News Today Super Sid Dinosaur Cat in Raggs Varied Programs News Barney Sesame Street News TMZ Judge Judge True Hollywood Matlock Varied Programs Cine de la Tarde Jerry Springer Maury

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The Talk General Hospital Days of our Lives Martha Cyber

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Inside Family News News Ellen DeGeneres News Access Nate Berkus Dr. Phil WordGirl Wild Electric Fetch! Saddle Varied Programs Clifford Martha Arthur WordGirl Wild Electric Judge B. Judge B. Jdg Judy Jdg Judy The Dr. Oz Show The People’s Court Law Order: CI Law Order: CI Lagrimita y Costel The Doctors

Estrellas Hoy Life Life

THURSDAY EVENING 6:30

News Ent News Two Men News News PBS NewsHour (N) TV 411 Work Little House/Prairie Simpson 30 Rock Wheel Jeopardy Monk ’ Estudio 2 Two Men Big Bang

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Write to Cindy at King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475; or email her at letters@cindyelavsky. com. (c) 2011 King Features Synd., Inc.

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Big Bang Rules Charlie’s Angels Commun Parks America-Prime Journal Moneytrk PBS NewsHour (N) The X Factor Million. Million. Criminal Minds ’ A Que-Puedes Vampire Diaries

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News News News Arthur

CBS ABC News Business

Curious News Insider

Brady News Jeopardy

En Vivo Noticiero A Que-Puedes Anderson Raymond Mother

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News Ent A Gifted Man (N) News Two Men Extreme Makeover News Gme Chuck (N) ’ PBS NewsHour (N) Wash. Need TV 411 GED Journal Mack Little House/Prairie PBS NewsHour (N) Simpson 30 Rock Kitchen Nightmares Wheel Jeopardy Million. Million. Flashpoint ’ Flashpoint ’ Viernes De Concierto “Ramón Ayala” Two Men Big Bang Nikita “Clawback”

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CSI: NY (N) Blue Bloods (N) ’ Extreme Makeover 20/20 ’ Grimm (N) ’ Dateline NBC Give Me the Banjo (N) ’ Conversation “Robot Monster” This Old House Hr Globe Trekker ’ Fringe “Novation” News Funny Videos Friends Friends Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Tengo Talento Alarma Noticiero Supernatural (N) ’ News Raymond

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Person of Interest Grey’s Anatomy (N) Office Whitney Antique Roadshow Teaching Channel NOVA (DVS) Bones Funny Videos Criminal Minds ’ Tengo Talento The Secret Circle

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The Mentalist (N) Private Practice (N) Prime Suspect (N) Midsomer Murders Miller Ctr. Forums NOVA (DVS) News Friends Friends Criminal Minds ’ Alarma Noticiero News Raymond

News Letterman Late News Nightline Access Extra (N) News Jay Leno Late Wine Wait... Masterpiece Scully Work Euromx Statistic Steves Perry Mason My 3 Seinfeld Simpson 30 Rock Seinfeld Office Office Scrubs Scrubs Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Secretos Chuper Pagado Pagado Big Bang Mother ’70s Jim

The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 The First 48 (N) Border Border ››‡ “The Quick and the Dead” (1995) ››‡ “The Quick and the Dead” (1995) “Mystic Pizza” American Chopper Chicago Cash American Chopper American Chopper Gold Rush ’ Storm Chasers (N) ANT ANT Shake It Good Jessie ANT Shake It “Phineas and Ferb” Jessie ANT College Football Florida State at Boston College. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) 70s 70s Funny Videos ››‡ “Bruce Almighty” (2003) ›› “Evan Almighty” (2007, Comedy) “Day-Tomorrow” Mother Mother Mother Mother Two Men Two Men Two Men Two Men Sunny League “Marathon Boy” (2010) ‘NR’ Face off Bored Hung ’ Taxi Confessions America Enlighten “Up in the Air” ‘R’ Project Accessory Project Runway (N) Project Accessory Project Runway Project Accessory Project Runway Sponge. Sponge. ’70s 70s George George Friends Friends Friends Friends ’70s 70s “Cagney & Lacey: True” (7:40) “Everything Is Illuminated” (2005) ››› “Year of the Comet” (11:10) “The Deep” Tennis Champions Series: Boston. Women’s College Soccer Dan Patrick MLS Soccer “Waiting-Forevr” “From the Sky Down” (2011) Teller Gigolos Old Porn Gigolos Old Porn Shaquille O’Neal Jail Jail iMPACT Wrestling (N) ’ “The Stranger” (2010) Steve Austin. GTTV Race(5:50) ››› “Tangled” ’ Studio (7:50) ››› “Secretariat” (2010) ’ ›››‡ “The Social Network” (2010) CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ Burn Notice Burn Notice Burn Notice Burn Notice Burn Notice Burn Notice (N) Fam Guy Fam Guy Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) Office Office Conan

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The Early Show (N) Good Morning (5:00) Today (N) ’ Angelina Builder Quilt Art Quilting Angelina Thomas Paid M*A*S*H Paid Paid Paid Paid Pagado Pagado Paid Paid

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Busy Busy Health Food Willa’s Pearlie Woods. W’wright Arts Workshop Kitchen Cook’s Paid Paid Kds Holly Paid Paid Pagado Pagado Yu-Gi-Oh Yu-Gi-

Rangers Horse Paid Leeza Paid Paid Victory Greener Look-Learning Zonya’s Rachel Paid Paid Paid Money Paid Paid Pagado Pagado Dragon Dragon

Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Simply Lidia Artifacts Fict. Katie Garden Adven. Animals Old Paid Paid Paid Fabrica Fabrica Tai Chi Yu-Gi-Oh

Kettle Paid Paid Twist House House House House House House Flip This House Rifleman Rifleman ››› “El Dorado” (1967, Western) John Wayne. ››› “Silverado” (1985) Kevin Kline. Paid Paid Sexy Paid Cindy C Look Paid WEN MythBusters MythBusters Phineas Phineas Chug Little 3rd & Mickey Mickey Pirates Phineas Phineas Phineas Fish SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) College GameDay (N) (Live) College Football Michigan at Iowa. (N) Walk Fit Paid Paid Paid Boy Boy ››‡ “Nanny McPhee” (2005) “Mary Poppins” 1 Minute Paid Paid Thin ›› “Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties” College Football Texas Tech at Texas. ›› “The Rite” (2011) ’ ‘PG-13’ 24/7 “Education Dee” ››› “Men in Black” (1997) Dilemma Sexy Paid Paid Paid Paid Cindy C Reba ’ Reba ’ “Lies in Plain Sight” (2010) Premiere. Fanboy Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Parents Sponge. Sponge. Power Ninjas Sponge. Sponge. (5:40) ›› “Greedy” (1994) (7:35) “Fierce Creatures” ’ “Revnge-Nrds 4” (10:45) ›› “Airheads” ’ Grt Pil Memory Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid Football College Football Oregon at Washington. Inside the NFL NASCAR ›› “Lovely, Still” (2008) (9:15) ››‡ “Everybody’s Fine” “Summer-Gen” Paid Mag Walker, Ranger Flip Men Flip Men Restore Restore Trucks! Muscle UFC Unleashed ’ “Country Strong” (7:05) ›› “Blue Crush” (2002) ’ ›› “Astro Boy” (2009) ’ (10:35) ›› “Eat Pray Love” Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ Falling Skies The Closer ››› “The Legend of Bagger Vance” Paid Mag Monk Paid Paid Paid Fat Loss Psych Covert Affairs Earl Earl Jim Yes Dear Yes Dear “Lemony Snicket’s Series” (10:25) “Daddy Day Camp”

SATURDAY AFTERNOON

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News Letterman Late News Nightline Access Extra (N) News Jay Leno Late Wine Wait... Viewers’ Choice Gullah GED Between Jammin’ Steves Perry Mason My 3 Seinfeld Simp 30 Rock Seinfeld Office Office Scrubs Scrubs Flashpoint ’ Flashpoint ’ Secretos Chuper Pagado Pagado Big Bang Mother ’70s Jim

Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ ›‡ “Lake Placid” (1999) Bill Pullman. The Walking Dead Talk ›‡ “Lake Placid” (1999) Bill Pullman. Walk Gold Rush: Alaska Gold Rush: Alaska Gold Rush ’ Gold Rush ’ Gold Rush (N) ’ Flying Wild Alaska Good Good Shake It Good Jessie ANT Wizards ANT Jessie Fish Vampire Good Coll. Football Live College Football USC at Colorado. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) 70s ’70s Funny Videos Funny Videos Funny Videos Funny Videos Funny Videos Two Men Two Men Two Men Two Men Mother Mother Mother Mother ››› “Tropic Thunder” (2008) “Knight and Day” Ring Life Bored Real/Bill Maher Real/Bill Maher Hung ’ 24/7 ››› “Big Stan” Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Reba ’ Fred 2 Sponge. 70s 70s George George Friends Friends Friends ’ 70s 70s ›› “Problem Child 2” ’ (7:35) ›› “Big Bully” (1996) (9:10) ››‡ “Prelude to a Kiss” ’ “Paranormal Hour” Stampe Count. Football College Hockey Minnesota-Duluth at Denver. (N) Dan Patrick College Basketball ›› “Peep World” (2010) ‘R’ ›‡ “Push” (2009) Chris Evans. “Sex, Lies, and Videotape” Inside the NFL (5:42) Gangland ’ (6:55) Gangland ’ (8:08) ›››‡ “The Fugitive” (1993, Suspense) Harrison Ford. ’ Gang Eat Pray (6:35) ››‡ “The Hulk” (2003) Eric Bana. ’ Boss “Listen” Boss “Reflex” ’ Boss “Swallow” (N) ›› “Seven Pounds” (2008) Will Smith. Premiere. ›› “Seven Pounds” (2008) Will Smith. ››› “Selena” NCIS “Kill Ari” NCIS ’ NCIS ’ NCIS “Nine Lives” NCIS ’ NCIS “Aliyah” Browns Browns Payne Payne ›››› “The Wizard of Oz” (1939) “Lemony Snicket’s Series”

SATURDAY MORNING 2:00

CSI: Miami The First 48 Hoarders Intervention Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Movie Varied Movie Movie Varied Programs Chopper Varied American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper Mickey Mickey 3rd & Oso Varied Pirates Varied Programs SportsCenter Report Football NFL Live Around Pardon SportsCenter Varied Programs Gilmore Girls Still Stnd Still Stnd Grounde Grounde My Wife My Wife 8 Rules 8 Rules 70s 70s (11:30) Movie Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs Grey’s Anatomy Grey’s Anatomy Mother Mother Reba Reba Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Varied Programs Family Varied (12:10) Movie Varied (1:45) Movie Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs Varied Programs Movie Movie Varied Programs CSI: Crime Scene Varied Programs Movie Varied Programs Las Vegas The Closer Law & Order Law & Order Law & Order Varied Programs Varied Programs Raymond Raymond Raymond Raymond Friends Friends Friends Friends King King Seinfeld Seinfeld

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B6

Georgia A: Netflix recently reversed its decision — in a rare move of a big corporation actually listening to its customers! — of having two separate websites/companies for its DVD-mailing service (which was to be Qwikster) versus its streaming service (Netflix). Because customers did not want the hassle of having two separate accounts, movie queues and billing statements if they wanted both mail and streaming DVDs, they voiced their complaints, and Netflix listened. Look for everything at Netflix to remain the same — at least for the time being.

FRIDAY EVENING 7:30

The Early Show Good Morning America Today Curious Cat in Super Dinosaur Sit-Be Fit Fetch! WordGirl Curious Cat in News News Paid Paid Paid Justice Varied Programs Bible Varied Nature Noticiero Gran Cine ABC News at 7 ABC News at 8

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well. *** Q: Is “Shark Tank” gone from TV? I loved that show. Will it come back? --Anonymous, via e-mail A: “Shark Tank” will be back midseason 2012 on ABC for its third season, along with “Secret Millionaire,” which returns for its second season. Producers for the hit entrepreneurial reality show have not yet announced an exact airdate for the season premiere of “Shark Tank,” but if past seasons are any indication, expect it sometime between January and March 2012. And keep checking the Celebrity Extra website (celebrityextraonline.com) for late-breaking info on all your favorite shows. *** Q: What is going on with Netflix? Is it still going to be around, or is it going to be Qwikster? I am so confused. -- Dee Dee T. in

TV Listings

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Paid Football Football College Football Army at Air Force. (N) (Live) 2 News at 5:00pm Horse Racing Breeders’ Cup. College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) News News Health Deeper Figure Skating NFL Turning Point Paid Paid Paid News Cuisine Mexico Primal Kitchen Kitchen Cook’s Sara’s Rough Home This Old House Hr Ebert Expand. Canon Reading Reading Science Science-Focus Economics Class Fly Fish Aviators Victory Old Home Work Steves Burt Wolf Antique Roadshow Nature (DVS) Cheetah Man ’ Eco Co. Career Into Wild Into Wild Paid Paid The Closer M*A*S*H M*A*S*H News Fam Guy Paid Paid ›‡ “Scary Movie 2” (2001, Comedy) Money Paid Friends Paid Paid Friends George › “Cobra” (1986) Sylvester Stallone. ››‡ “The Quick and the Dead” (1995) ’ “Outlaw Josey” “Hecho de Coca” Diana Golden. Lagrimita y Costel Historias Delirantes Alarma Estrellas Humor-Héctor Red Pictures ››› “An Officer and a Gentleman” Chris Chris Ugly Betty ’ Jim Raymond

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Flip This House Sell: Extreme Flip This House Monster Monster Monster Monster Border Border (10:00) “Silverado” ››‡ “Young Guns” (1988) Emilio Estevez. ››‡ “Young Guns II” (1990) Emilio Estevez. American Chopper American Guns ’ Behind Bars County Jail Underworld Cops & Coyotes Jessie ANT Wizards Wizards Good Good Shake It Shake It Random Random Wizards Wizards College Football Score Horse Racing Cup Classic College Football (11:00) ›››› “Mary Poppins” (1964) ››› “Casper” (1995) Christina Ricci. ››› “Hook” (1991) Dustin Hoffman. College Football Mother ›› “Christmas With the Kranks” Mother Mother Mother Two Men “Percy Jackson & the Olympians” ›› “The Rite” (2011) ’ ‘PG-13’ (4:15) ›› “The Transporter” (2002) ’ “Amish Grace” (2010, Docudrama) “The 19th Wife” (2010) Chyler Leigh. “The Perfect Child” (2007, Drama) Sponge. Sponge. iCarly ’ iCarly ’ Big Time Big Time Victo Victo Sponge. Sponge. Big Time Victo Airheads (12:20) ›› “Greedy” (1994) (2:15) ››‡ “The Real McCoy” (1993) (4:05) ›› “Alaska” (1996) Thora Birch. Bensin Football PAC College Football Texas-El Paso at Rice. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) College Football Summer (12:35) “Sympathy for Delicious” (2010) (2:25) The Love We Make Dexter (iTV) Homeland (iTV) ’ UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ “Eat Pray Love” ››› “Easy A” (2010) ’ (2:35) ›› “All About the Benjamins” (4:20) “Country Strong” ’ Legend ››› “Freedom Writers” (2007) Hilary Swank. ››› “Selena” (1997, Biography) Jennifer Lopez. ››‡ “Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins” (2008) ›‡ “I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry” Law & Order: SVU Daddy ›› “Bedtime Stories” (2008) King Friends Friends Friends Friends Big Bang Big Bang


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, Nov. 3, 2011

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College Football LSU at Alabama. (N) (Live) College Football Teams TBA. (N) (Live) News Gme Harry’s Law Prime Suspect ’ Antique Roadshow Lark Rise Doc Martin J. Bird Wild Native Gener Grt-Foot Race Bonanza ’ Lawrence Welk Hogan Lucy Simpson 30 Rock Cops (N) Cops (N) Terra Nova Office Office ›‡ “Scary Movie 2” (2001, Comedy) (5:00) “The Outlaw Josey Wales” (1976) Psych ’ Estrellitas del Sábado A Que-Puedes Two Men Big Bang Bones ’ House “Airborne”

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Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Hoggers Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage ›››› “There Will Be Blood” (2007) Daniel Day-Lewis. Premiere. ›››‡ “No Country for Old Men” (2007) Texas Drug Wars Extreme Drug Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Good ››‡ “Tinker Bell” (2008) Good Good Jessie ANT Good Wizards Wizards Jessie College Football (8:15) SportsCenter SportsCenter (N) Football Final SportsCenter (N) (4:00) “Hook” Pixar Short Films ›››› “Beauty and the Beast” (1991) “Aladdin” (1992) Two Men ›› “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (2008) ›‡ “Armageddon” (1998) Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Thornton. ››‡ “Due Date” (2010) 24/7 Boxing 24/7 (10:45) Boardwalk Empire ’ “The Pastor’s Wife” (2011) Premiere. Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries (10:01) “The Pastor’s Wife” (2011) Big Time Ninjas iCarly ’ iCarly ’ 70s 70s Friends Friends Friends Friends My Wife My Wife ›› “Airheads” (1994) ’ (7:35) “Fierce Creatures” ’ (9:15) ››‡ “The Real McCoy” (1993) “Rollercoaster” (5:00) College Football Missouri at Baylor. (Live) College Football Oregon at Washington. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) Liebman-Taller Boxing Lucian Bute vs. Glen Johnson. (N) NASCAR Homeland (iTV) ’ Dexter (iTV) UFC 138: Leben vs. Munoz (N) ’ (Live) Blue Ways Ways Ways TBA Ways Country ›› “Blue Crush” (2002) ’ (8:20) ››› “Easy A” (2010) ›‡ “The Roommate” Country ››‡ “Last Holiday” (2006) ›› “Seven Pounds” (2008) Will Smith. “The Pursuit of Happyness” Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Big Bang Big Bang Grinch ›››› “The Wizard of Oz” (1939) (9:45) ››‡ “17 Again” (2009) Zac Efron.

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Paid Made Good Morning Animal Mat Contrary Religion Enviro Wild Devotional Address Paid M*A*S*H Paid Paid Turning Discov. Pagado Pagado Paid Paid

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NOVEMBER 6, 2011

Paid Paid Paid Paid Paid BackJoy Paid Bra Running New York City Marathon. Space-NASA Antique Roadshow French Destinos English Dragon’s Squad Biz Kid$ Lawrence Welk (11:00) NFL Football Regional Coverage. True Hollywood Paid Paid ›› “Striking Distance” (1993) ’ “Un Ángel para los Diablillos” (1993) ›‡ “Thirteen Ghosts” (2001, Horror)

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60 Minutes (N) ’ The Amazing Race The Good Wife (N) CSI: Miami (N) ’ News Talkin’ Sports Criminal Funny Videos Once Upon a Time Desp.-Wives (9:01) Pan Am (N) News Red Cindy C Homes (6:15) NFL Football Baltimore Ravens at Pittsburgh Steelers. (N) Sports News Sports BYU History Globe Trekker ’ America-Prime Masterpiece Contemporary (N) ’ Lark Rise MI-5 “The Special” Travel Spain Iceland Quilts Teachings-Tree Song of Mountains Inner... Closer Over World Lit Antique Roadshow Anne/Green Anne/Green Antiques Rdsho Mormon-Choir Veterans-Tribute Simpson 30 Rock Simpson Allen Fam Guy Amer. News Sports Simp Fam Guy Fturama (5:00) ›› “Pearl Harbor” (2001, War) History J. Smith Insider Rock The Fan McCarv Without a Trace ’ (4:30) “Die Hard 2” ›› “Lethal Weapon 4” (1998) Mel Gibson. ’ ››‡ “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” (1986, Comedy) ’ “Volví a Caer de Mi Nube” (2005) “Revancha en el Palenque” (2004) Secretos Secretos Pagado Pagado Bones ’ ›› “Entrapment” (1999, Action) Big Bang Mother Big Bang Two Men Two Men 70s Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ The Walking Dead The Walking Dead Hell on Wheels The Walking Dead Talk The Walking Dead Talk Gold Rush: Alaska Gold Rush ’ Gold Rush ’ Gold Rush ’ Life Before Birth Anatomy of Sex ’ Good Good Random Shake It Wizards Random Good Shake It ANT Jessie Random Random BCS Countdown MLS Soccer Teams TBA. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) Pixar ›››› “Beauty and the Beast” (1991) ›››‡ “Aladdin” (1992, Fantasy) ››› “Cars” (2006) ›‡ “Armageddon” (1998) Bruce Willis, Billy Bob Thornton. ››‡ “The Day After Tomorrow” (2004, Action) Day (5:15) “Due Date” Boardwalk Empire Hung (N) America Boardwalk Empire Hung ’ America “Love-Other Drg” “The Pastor’s Wife” (2011) ›› “A Walk to Remember” (2002) (10:01) “The Pastor’s Wife” (2011) TeenNick HALO Awards (N) 70s 70s My Wife Friends Friends Friends ’ My Wife My Wife ›› “The Scout” (1994) ’ (7:45) “Sibling Rivalry” (1990) (9:15) ››› “FX2” (1991) Bryan Brown. “Skin Game” Women’s College Volleyball World Poker Tour: World Poker Tour: Stories Football World Poker Tour: Homeland (iTV) ’ Dexter (iTV) (N) ’ Homeland (iTV) (N) Dexter (iTV) Homeland (iTV) ’ Gigolos Old Porn “The Chronicles of Riddick” (7:18) ››› “The Rundown” (2003) ’ (9:38) ››› “The Rundown” (2003) The Rock. ’ (5:00) “The Karate Kid” ’ ›‡ “The Roommate” ’ (9:11) ››› “The Other Guys” (2010) Boss “Swallow” ’ ››› “Hitch” (2005) Will Smith, Eva Mendes. ››› “Hitch” (2005) Will Smith, Eva Mendes. “Guess Who” NCIS ’ NCIS “Recoil” ’ NCIS “Child’s Play” NCIS ’ “John Sandford’s Certain Prey” (2011) “Wizard of Oz” (7:15) ›››› “The Wizard of Oz” (1939) ›› “She’s the Man” (2006) MrsDou

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News Ent Mother Broke Two Men Mike Hawaii Five-0 (N) News Two Men Dancing With the Stars ’ (9:01) Castle (N) ’ News News The Sing-Off (N) ’ Rock Center PBS NewsHour (N) Antique Roadshow Antique Roadshow Looking for Lincoln TV 411 GED Journal Asia 7 Cheese Vanishing of the Bees Little House/Prairie PBS NewsHour (N) American Experience “Jimmy Carter” Simpson 30 Rock Terra Nova (N) ’ House (N) News Wheel Jeopardy Million. Million. Funny Videos Friends Friends Jumpin ›› “Lethal Weapon 4” (1998) Mel Gibson. ’ Criminal Minds ’ Estudio 2 A Que-Puedes Tengo Talento Alarma Noticiero Two Men Big Bang Gossip Girl (N) ’ Hart of Dixie (N) ’ News Raymond

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News Ent News Two Men News News PBS NewsHour (N) TV 411 Work Little House/Prairie Simpson 30 Rock Wheel Jeopardy Criminal Minds ’ Estudio 2 Two Men Big Bang

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NCIS (N) NCIS: Los Angeles Last Man Man Up! Dancing With Stars The Biggest Loser (N) ’ Freedom Navigat Women, War Journal Asia Biz Leading Living PBS NewsHour (N) Nature Glee (N) ’ New Girl Raising Million. Million. Funny Videos Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ A Que-Puedes Tengo Talento 90210 (N) ’ Ringer (N) ’

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Unforgettable (N) In the Spotlight Parenthood (N) ’ Frontline (N) Gener Growing Nature’s Power News Friends Friends Flashpoint (N) Alarma Noticiero News Raymond

6:00

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

News Letterman Late News Nightline Access Extra (N) News Jay Leno Late Wine Wait... Independent Lens On One Work Journal Cheese Steves Perry Mason Lucy Seinfeld Simp 30 Rock Seinfeld Office Office Scrubs Scrubs Flashpoint ’ Criminal Minds ’ Secretos Chuper Pagado Pagado Big Bang Mother ’70s Jim

The First 48 The First 48 Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage ›› “Rocky IV” (1985) Talia Shire ››‡ “Rocky V” (1990) Sylvester Stallone. ››‡ “The Sandlot” (1993) Auction Auction Cash Cash Dirty Jobs ’ Auction Auction Auction Auction Kings (N) Auction Phineas Phineas ANT ANT Good Shake It Shake It “My Babysitter’s a Vampire” Shake It Good Roll Tide/War 2011 World Series of Poker Final Table. SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) 70s ››‡ “Van Helsing” (2004, Fantasy) Hugh Jackman. ›› “Gone in 60 Seconds” (1974) H.B. Halicki. Mother Mother Mother Mother Two Men Two Men ››‡ “Step Brothers” (2008) Sons of Anarchy ››‡ “Due Date” (2010) Face off 24/7 Enlighten Bored Boardwalk Empire “Harry Potter-Deathly Hall.” Unsolved Mysteries “Iris Johansen’s The Killing Game” Unsolved Mysteries Unsolved Mysteries “Killing Game” Sponge. Sponge. ’70s 70s George George Friends Friends Friends Friends ’70s 70s “Mighty Morphin Power” “Dirty Dozen: Fatal Mission” (9:15) ››‡ “Godzilla vs. Mothra” ››‡ “Dragnet” Count. Game College Football Oregon at Washington. (Taped) Dan Patrick UEFA Soccer Extra (6:25) ››› “Humpday” ‘R’ Dexter (iTV) Homeland (iTV) ’ Gigolos Old Porn ›› “Manderlay” Auction Auction Auction Auction Auction Flip Men Flip Men Flip Men Auction Auction Auction Flip Men (5:45) ››‡ “The Crazies” (7:35) ››‡ “The Hulk” (2003) Eric Bana. ’ ›‡ “The Roommate” ’ Bur Bones ’ Bones ’ Bones ’ Southland ’ CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Law & Order: SVU Covert Affairs (N) Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) Office Office Conan

WEDNESDAY EVENING ^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

News Letterman Late News Nightline Access Extra (N) News Jay Leno Late Wine Wait... Secrets of Dead Hinojosa GED Ideas Drexel Steves Perry Mason My 3 Seinfeld Simpson 30 Rock Seinfeld Office Office Scrubs Scrubs Criminal Minds ’ Criminal Minds ’ Secretos Chuper Pagado Pagado Big Bang Mother ’70s Jim

The First 48 The First 48 Hoarders Hoarders Hoarders (N) Monster Monster ›››› “Rocky” (1976) Sylvester Stallone. ››› “Rocky II” (1979) Sylvester Stallone. ››› “Rocky III” American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper American Chopper American Guns (N) Wizards Wizards Jessie Good Jessie ANT ANT “Princess Protection” Shake It Good C’ntdown NFL Football Chicago Bears at Philadelphia Eagles. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) NFL PrimeTime (N) 70s 70s Funny Videos ›› “Along Came Polly” (2004) “Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story” “The Departed” Mother Mother Two Men Two Men ››› “Live Free or Die Hard” (2007, Action) Bruce Willis. (5:00) “The Rite” Bored Enlighten Boardwalk Empire Bored Enlighten Boxing Unsolved Mysteries ››› “Julie & Julia” (2009) Meryl Streep, Amy Adams. Unsolved Mysteries “Julie & Julia” Sponge. Sponge. ’70s 70s George George Friends Friends Friends Friends ’70s 70s ›› “Canadian Bacon” ’ “Perry Mason: Skin-Deep” (9:15) ›› “White Water Summer” ’ “Least Among” Jay Bensin Boxing Mercito Gesta vs. Manny Perez. World Poker Tour: Dan Patrick College Football (5:15) “The Switch” Dexter (iTV) Homeland (iTV) ’ Dexter (iTV) Homeland (iTV) ’ “Hessen Con” Ways Ways Ways Ways Ways Ways Ways Ways Ways Ways Ways Ways Men (6:45) “Disney’s A Christmas Carol” ’ (8:40) › “Old Dogs” (2009) (10:15) ›› “The Tourist” (2010) ’ Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ The Closer CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ CSI: NY ’ NCIS “Frame-Up” NCIS “Probie” ’ NCIS ’ NCIS “Boxed In” WWE Monday Night RAW ’ Fam Guy Fam Guy Fam Guy Fam Guy Fam Guy Fam Guy Conan (N) Office Office Conan

6:00 ^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

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NOVEMBER 7, 2011

TUESDAY EVENING

5:30

The Sopranos ’ The Sopranos ’ ›››‡ “Donnie Brasco” (1997) Al Pacino. Border Border Border “Young Guns II” ›››‡ “No Country for Old Men” (2007) ››› “Enter the Dragon” (1973) Bruce Lee. Gold Rush: Alaska American Guns ’ Almost, Away Almost, Away Almost, Away Almost, Away ANT Random Wizards Wizards Good Good Shake It Shake it Jessie Fish Phineas Phineas Countdown NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: AAA Texas 500. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) ››‡ “Hocus Pocus” (1993, Comedy) ››› “Cars” (2006) Voices of Owen Wilson. Pixar Short Films Hellboy 2 ››› “Hellboy II: The Golden Army” (2008) Ron Perlman. ›› “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (2008) “Marathon Boy” ’ Tower ››› “Ocean’s Eleven” (2001) ‘PG-13’ ›› “Clash of the Titans” ’ (5:15) “Due Date” “Sins of the Mother” (2010) Jill Scott. ›› “A Walk to Remember” (2002) “Like Dandelion Dust” (2009) Premiere. To Be Announced “Sibling Rivalry” (12:50) ››‡ “Diamonds” (2:20) ››› “FX2” (1991) (4:10) ›› “Mrs. Winterbourne” (1996) MLS Soccer Count. Women’s College Soccer Bensin Game Football “How to Lose” ›‡ “Push” (2009) Chris Evans. ›››‡ “The Hours” (2002) ‘PG-13’ Dexter (iTV) (11:35) ››‡ “Major League” (1989) CSI: Crime Scene CSI: Crime Scene Investigat’n “The Chronicles of Riddick” “The Roommate” (1:15) ›› “Can’t Hardly Wait” (1998) ›› “Just Go With It” (2011) ’ “The Karate Kid” “The Pursuit of Happyness” ›› “Seven Pounds” (2008) Will Smith. ››‡ “Last Holiday” (2006) NCIS “Switch” ’ NCIS ’ NCIS “Iced” NCIS ’ NCIS ’ NCIS ’ (12:15) ››› “Mrs. Doubtfire” (1993) Robin Williams. ››‡ “17 Again” (2009) Zac Efron. “Wizard of Oz”

6:00

A&E AMC DISC DISN ESPN FAM FX HBO LIFE NICK PLEX ROOT SHOW SPIKE STARZ TNT USA WTBS

3:30

NFL Football Denver Broncos at Oakland Raiders. (N) 2 News at 5:00pm Million Dollar Dancing With Stars Pictures Homes News ABC Rain: A Tribute to The Beatles on Ice News News Football Night NOVA (N) Steve Jobs-One Nature (N) ’ News Utah Sewing Sew It Paint Art Wood Woods. Garden P Allen Inside Group BYU Healthy Little House/Prairie Growing Hope NFL Football Regional Coverage. (N) ’ (Live) The OT Paid Paid Money Wheel Paid Paid “Pearl Harbor” ››› “Traitor” (2008) Don Cheadle. Premiere. ’ ››› “Die Hard 2” (1990) “El Hijo de la Tiznada” (2001, Acción) Lo Mejor de TTMT Jose Luis en Ugly Betty ’ Chronicles House ’ Cold Case ’

SUNDAY EVENING ^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

The NFL Today (N) Light Paid This Week Young Paid Mormon History Prostate Carol B Martha Wash. Aviators MotorWk Fitness Opinion Healthy Simple WordGirl Wild Electric Cyber FOX NFL Sunday NFL Football Utah Money Paid Paid Inspiration Ministry Campmeeting ’ Pagado Pagado Fabrica Fabrica › “Wild Wild West” (1999) Will Smith.

(5:30) Free Money Paid Paid Parking ›››› “The Untouchables” (1987) The Sopranos ’ ››› “Hondo” (1953) John Wayne. ››‡ “Young Guns” (1988) Emilio Estevez. ››‡ “Young Guns II” (5:30) Paid Program Paid Tomor Paid Jentezen Osteen In Touch How Evil Are You? Flying Wild Alaska Phineas and Ferb Chug Babar 3rd & Mickey Mickey Pirates Phineas Phineas Good Shake It SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Sunday NFL Countdown (N) (Live) Football Final (5:30) Paid Program Smile Mass ››‡ “Nanny McPhee” (2005) ››› “Casper” (1995) Christina Ricci. MagicJack Plus Paid Paid Smarter Smarter Smarter ››› “Hellboy II: The Golden Army” (2008) ›› “Clash of the Titans” ’ Boxing 24/7 Watch Real/Bill Maher Marathon Hour of Power Osteen Paid Chris Chris Mother Mother ›› “Nights in Rodanthe” (2008) Fanboy Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. Sponge. To Be Announced Dia (6:20) ›› “The Scout” ’ (8:05) “Karate Dog” (2004) ›› “Mrs. Winterbourne” (1996) ’ SiblingRi Paid Meals! Paid Paid Hunter Outdoor Hunting Bowhun Paid Paid Paid Paid Inside the NFL NASCAR “The Tillman Story” (2010) (9:15) ›‡ “Waiting for Forever” iTV. “How to Lose” Paid Walk Fit Auction Auction Auction Auction Restore Restore Trucks! Muscle Flip Men MajorLea (5:35) ››› “Easy A” (2010) ’ (8:10) ›› “Just Go With It” (2011) ’ (10:10) “Wrongfully Accused” Room Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ Law & Order ’ “Pursuit-Happy.” (5:30) Paid Program Monk Paid Paid Paid Osteen Burn Notice NCIS ’ Friends Friends Friends Friends ›› “Good Boy!” (2003) Liam Aiken ›› “She’s the Man” (2006)

1:30

6:00

^ KUTV $ KTVX % KSL _ KUED ) KUEN + KBYU ` KSTU . KJZZ 0 KUPX 8 KPNZ > KUWB

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

Paid Health CBS News Sunday Morning Nation Paid Record County Homes Leisure Paid Today (N) ’ Meet the Press (N) Sunday Music Curious Cat in Super Dinosaur Arthur WordGirl Miffy Anne Peep Patrol Biz Kid$ Quest BYU LDS I Believe Music Curious Arthur Good Day Utah Weekend Edition (N) Fox News Sunday Paid V’Impe Paid Canyon Cindy C Utah In Touch Int. Mass Paid Paid Pagado Pagado Pagado Pagado Pagado Pagado Live Life Pets.TV Mad Missing Rescue Pets.TV

12:00 12:30 1:00

MONDAY EVENING

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

Entertainment Ton. News Spo Hooked Criminal CMA News Sport Leisure Extra (N) Law & Order: SVU News Sports Outdoors Gme New Tricks Red Dwarf Doctor Who Vanilla Crab Theater Wayne Woodsongs (9:14) Perry Mason (10:05) “The Thin Man” Griffith News Seinfeld Hell’s Kitchen New Girl Law & Order Law & Order Brothers & Sisters Psych ’ Psych ’ Psych ’ “Mecánica Nacional” (1971) Lucha Villa Pagado Pagado Big Bang Mother Two Men Saturday Night Live (N)

TV Listings

6:30

7:00

NOVEMBER 9, 2011 7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

News Ent Survivor-Pacific Criminal Minds (N) CSI: Crime Scene News Two Men The 45th Annual CMA Awards (N Same-day Tape) ’ News News All Night All Night Harry’s Law (N) ’ Law & Order: SVU PBS NewsHour (N) Nature (N) ’ NOVA (N) NOVA (DVS) TV 411 GED Journal Truth Bataan Home Asian Little House/Prairie PBS NewsHour (N) Sherlock Holmes Poirot ’ Simpson 30 Rock The X Factor “Live Performance” News Wheel Jeopardy Million. Million. Classic Jazz: NBA Basketball Friends Ghost ››‡ “The Quick and the Dead” (1995) ’ Criminal Minds ’ Mi Sueño es Bailar Tengo Talento Alarma Noticiero Two Men Big Bang Ringer ’ Top Model News Raymond

News Letterman Late News Nightline Access Extra (N) News Jay Leno Late Wine Wait... Doc Martin America GED Global Under Steves Perry Mason My 3 Seinfeld Simpson 30 Rock Seinfeld Office Office Scrubs Scrubs Criminal Minds ’ Without a Trace ’ Secretos Chuper Pagado Pagado Big Bang Mother ’70s Jim

The First 48 The First 48 Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Hoggers Hoggers ››‡ “Mission: Impossible” (1996) Tom Cruise. ››‡ “Mission: Impossible” (1996) Tom Cruise. “History-World” MythBusters MythBusters MythBusters MythBusters MythBusters Penn & Teller Jessie Jessie Shake It Good Wizards Phineas Phineas ››‡ “16 Wishes” (2010) Shake It Good College Football Miami (Ohio) at Temple. (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) ’70s ››› “The Mask” (1994) Jim Carrey. ››› “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” (2001) Daniel Radcliffe. “Step Brothers” Two Men Two Men Two Men Two Men ››› “Taken” (2008) Liam Neeson. Horror Story Ring Life REAL Sports America Boardwalk Empire Real/Bill Maher Enlighten Bored 24/7 My Soul Unsolved Mysteries “The Client List” (2010) Cold Case Files ’ Unsolved Mysteries “The Client List” Sponge. Sponge. 70s ’70s George George Friends Friends Friends Friends 70s ’70s ›› “The Quest” (1996) ’ (7:40) › “The Avengers” ’ (9:15) ››‡ “The Organization” “I’ll Do Anything” Barfly Count. College Football Missouri at Baylor. Dan Patrick Football Football Homeland (iTV) ’ Inside the NFL (N) NASCAR Teller Inside the NFL Dexter (iTV) NASCAR Liebman UFC Unleashed ’ UFC Unleashed ’ Ultimate Fighter Blue Blue UFC Unleashed ’ Ultimate Fighter (5:20) “Step Up 3” (7:10) ›››‡ “Toy Story 3” (2010) (8:58) ›› “How Do You Know” (2010) Boss “Swallow” ’ The Mentalist The Mentalist ›››› “Saving Private Ryan” (1998) Tom Hanks, Edward Burns. Preview NCIS ’ NCIS “Bloodbath” NCIS: Los Angeles NCIS ’ NCIS “Kill Screen” Psych (N) Fam Guy Fam Guy Fam Guy Fam Guy Big Bang Big Bang Conan (N) Office Office Conan


B8

News CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

In this together

Let’s all pitch in and help rebuild the barn

I

have an idea. It’s a crazy sort of idea. But crazy in a simple sort of logical way if you think about it long enough. So let’s think about it for a while. I’m thinking that since we’re all Americans and since we all recognize we’ve had a spending problem and now have a debt problem, and since we want to make it better, I say let’s all pitch in. Kind of like what happened in the old days when somebody’s barn burned down and the town came out and helped put up a new one. We’re not pitching in right now. We’re standing around pointing fingers. And when we’re not pointing fingers we’ve got our arms folded and our noses up and we’re refusing to wield a hammer because it was someone else’s fault that the barn burned down and because our other neighbors have bigger barns anyway and because we don’t like the mayor to boot. So the barn isn’t getting built. But how about if we didn’t wait around for Congress to work

out a solution because they’re not. How about if we didn’t wait for the president to create more jobs because jobs generally come from somewhere else. How about if we made it happen all by our American independent, capable selves. It could start with those wealthy men who committed half of their wealth to charity. What better cause than the United States of America? It could be embraced by those millionaires who say they wouldn’t mind a tax 5 percent higher at all. They wouldn’t have to wait for a new tax law, they could just go out and pay it. It could continue to the farmers who had a good year after all and really don’t need the farm subsidy that once kept them afloat. They could refuse to accept it or return the checks uncashed. Those homeowners who want to contribute to a good cause could not take the mortgage deduction. And those 47 percent who don’t pay anything to the government anyway (oops, thought it

was someone else’s problem?) could contribute what they can just because they want to. I know this is against our nature. We like a good deal. We like getting our loopholes and subsidies and our deductions. We hate paying taxes. We like getting that refund. But how about if we all combined our collective, ingenious resources. How about if CEOs whose needs and wants are already being met took a few extra millions from their bonuses and gave it back to the company for hiring, or for divvying out holiday bonuses? How about if the hospitals realized that maybe if they didn’t charge $5,000 for a night’s stay that the government would be able to stay out of their business all together. How about if banks worked out new loans for people whose houses were underwater to keep them paying their mortgages even if it’s for longer, thus preventing more crises and more government-funded solutions. I’ve Googled many things

Registration open for Gobbler Gallop KAYSVILLE — Families, including toddlers in strollers, are invited to the Nov. 12 Gobbler Gallop at the Davis Applied Technology College campus, here. Both a 5K and 10K will be held, starting at the campus, 550 E. 300 South. If pre-registered, cost is $25 or $35 the day of the race. Activities start at 8:30 a.m. for this annual event, which is a fund-raiser to provide scholarships to DATC students through the school’s foundation. A performance shirt will be included for the first 200 registrations, T-shirts for all others.

“It’s set up for a family to participate, for people to bring toddlers in strollers, for runners and walkers,” said James Larson, the college’s public information director. “It’s a way for people to give back to the community,” he said. All proceeds will go to provide scholarships for low to moderate income students seeking enrollment at the college. Last year, $5,000 was raised in this first Gallop sponsored by the college. This year’s goal is to raise $6,500. For decades, the event was sponsored by the old

South Davis/Bountiful Area Chamber of Commerce. When that group folded into the Davis Chamber, the event continued for several years under its auspices. A Rotary club also reportedly carried it on for a time. Sponsors are also being sought, with their backing ranging from $150 to $2,000. Different awards will be given for different age categories, etc., including gift cards from area hotels and restaurants. To register, visit www. davisgobblergallop.com or call 801-593-2310. tbusselberg@davisclipper.com

County residents satisfied with courts BY MELINDA WILLIAMS

Clipper Staff Writer Davis County residents, and Utahns in general, reported a high level of satisfaction with the state’s court system when it comes to access and fairness. The Administrative Office of the Courts on Tuesday released the results of a survey conducted statewide mainly during June and July. What the survey showed was that in almost all areas, 90 percent or more of respondents rated each district court within the state as adequate or better on a five-point scale. The survey questioned those in the courts in 20 areas from ease of parking, to safety in the courtrooms, to the time and ease of conducting court business. In the 2nd District Court, encompassing Davis, Weber and Morgan counties, courtrooms in each city were rated, including courtrooms in Farmington, Layton and Bountiful. In all three locales, respondents gave ratings of 90 and above in nearly every category. However, there were a few exceptions.

Only 77 percent of survey takers in Bountiful found it easy to do business in that courtroom, down from 89 percent in 2008 and 85 percent in 2007. Eighty-one percent said they finished their court business in a reasonable time in Bountiful. That percentage was up from 79 percent in 2008. Eighty-eight percent of those responding said they understood what was happening with their case, a drop from 100 percent in 2008. Only 77 percent of those attending court sessions in Farmington said the court made it easy to do business, down from 89 percent in 2008. Also in Farmington, only 76 percent said they felt both sides had been treated the same in the hearing, down from 91 percent in 2008, and 78 percent said they believed the hearing to be fair, down from 91 percent in 2008. In the Layton courtroom, the lowest score was 91 percent, in the category of the respondent understanding what was happening in the case. That number was down

from 94 percent in 2008, but up from 87 percent in 2007. Ninety-three percent of those responding in Bountiful said they felt safe in the courtroom, while 98 percent in Farmington and 95 percent in Layton said they felt the courtroom was safe. Court administrators said that statewide, categories receiving the lowest marks were still relatively positive. “It is gratifying to see such a positive response from the public, especially considering the downsizing and heavy work load the court system has faced the past few years,” said Utah State Court Administrator Dan Becker. “The courts have worked to enhance services for the public even as our budget has been reduced.” The survey is conducted annually in each district courthouse in the state for one day. Individuals, including attorneys, litigants, their family and friends, witnesses, victims, social service agency staff, jurors, paralegals and law enforcement personnel are asked to take the survey. mwilliams@davisclipper.com

in my day. I’ve Googled to get names spelled correctly, to learn the words in an acronym, to find out the story in an Italian opera, to find a word that has an ending that rhymes with a phrase in a poem I’ve been writing. I have the utmost confidence in Google to find whatever answer I’m looking for. But I wasn’t sure I’d get an answer to the information I requested last week. I Googled “make a donation to the U.S. government,” with not the slightest confidence in a response. But I got one. You actually can make a donation to the United States Government. You know, that institution that keeps you free, that protects you from outside invaders, that builds interstate freeways and secures your deposits and the safety of your food, that ensures your ability to speak your mind and worship at will. You can actually send them money. So I did. And I used two stamps as a further donation. And even though it said the donated money is considered “an unconditional gift to the United

LOUISE R. SHAW

States Government,” I wrote on the “For” line: “debt reduction.” And it felt good. A lot better than paying taxes. And it didn’t even matter that I didn’t know if my contribution was tax deductible (there would be a smiley face here if this was an e-mail) (the link to IRS that might have answered my question took too long to open – probably has 16,000 pages). So let’s start our own movement. We could call it “Give back to America,” or “The buck starts here,” or “Change we can make ourselves.” Or send me your suggestions. Just send your check to Gifts to the United States, US Department of the Treasury, Credit Accounting Branch, 3700 East-West Hwy., Room 622D, Hyattsville, MD 20782. This is government “of the people, by the people, for the people.” Let’s step up people. I know it’s crazy. Certifiably. But let’s think about it.


KAYSVILLE

FRUIT HEIGHTS

FARMINGTON

CENTERVILLE

WEST BOUNTIFUL

WOODS CROSS

NORTH SALT LAKE

BOUNTIFUL


Voter’s Guide CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

C2

Centerville Candidates

Kevin Daly

Kay Ashton W

e moved our young family to Centerville in 1988 with the dream of raising our children in an environment which supported our efforts; we haven’t been disappointed! Our four children are now grown. We’ve appreciated the excellent schools, recreational opportunities and our Centerville neighbors. I don’t have a passion for politics; I do have a passion for our city, state and nation. While I’ve been involved in community Kay Ashton efforts in several ways, now is the time for me to give back by serving on the city council. I’m committed to building upon the solid foundation by making a positive difference.

Ken Averett M

y goal is to preserve what makes Centerville great — quiet neighborhoods, a small town feel, a terrific place to raise a family — even as we see an era of unprecedented growth and development on the city’s west side. To that end, I support historic preservation, oppose hillside development and want to see that new public transit, if it happens at all, taps into the new business area west of I-15. As a fiscal conservaKen Averett tive, I opposed additional funding for UTOPIA, and will do all I can to ensure that we manage our precious resources wisely and live within our means.

I

love living in Centerville. As a member of the city council, I will work to make sure Centerville remains an attractive and sought after place to live. I have a strong financial background and will be able to understand the important issues facing the city including budgets, proposals and development. Some of my priorities will be: to limit the growth of city government and minimize government’s impact on our lives, preserve the foothills as a Kevin Daly unique recreation asset, and promote effective and responsible commercial development west of the freeway. For more information visit centervillematters.blogspot.com.

Annadel Nelson T

ransparency — We need to make it easier for the citizens to be involved in city government. One way is by making the website more user- friendly. Broadcasting the meetings over the Web would enable citizens to stay home and still be involved. I would also like to implement an email alert system to inform citizens of “hot button” issues. Fiscal responsibility – I would Annadel Nelson like to see the city work toward a pay-as-you-go system and stop paying interest on debt. Interest payments get us nothing. When our citizens’ tax dollars go to interest payments we are not using their dollars wisely.

John Higginson Lawrence Wright I

love Centerville, and I am passionate about maintaining our quality of life.  Like most of Centerville’s residents, I am concerned about our city’s future.  Some of my positions on important issues are:  I oppose light rail running through our city.  I want to preserve the foothill’s natural beauty.  I want to explore options with UDOT to help alleviate congestion from I-15 to Parrish Lane.  I do not agree with using John Higginson city revenues to support projects like UTOPIA.  I feel our residents’ voices are more important than my own, and should be heard.  Please visit www.votehigginson.com for more information.

If re-elected I will: 1.  Amend the South Main Street Corridor Plan making it clear that light rail will not go down Main Street. 2.  Push UDOT to construct a pedestrian walkway over I-15 at Parrish Lane to connect to west side and Legacy Trails before a pedestrian accident occurs. 3.  Improve city and community emergency response and disaster preparedness (i.e., CERT) capaLawrence Wright bilities. 4.  Push for a thorough review of city ordinances and adopt a fair code enforcement policy. 8.  Continue the restoration of the Whitaker home and preserve the history of our community. 7.  Learn more at www.lawrencewright.org.

“I want to thank the many current and former city leaders for their encouragement and endorsements. However, the endorsements I value most are those of the good people of Bountiful, who I hope to serve. I would appreciate your vote on November 8th.”


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Voter’s Guide

C3

Farmington Candidates

Justin LeCheminant I

’ve lived in Farmington for six years and it is absolutely the best place I have ever lived. I want to continue to see our community grow but keep its great way of life. I see future growth as the biggest issue facing Farmington. Farmington has seen very rapid growth over the past several years. As Farmington grows we will face an ever increasing need for Justin LeCheminant public services. We need to be able to balance growth with the needed revenues for these services. Station Park is a great example; it was done in a responsible manner that has promoted business but allowed Farmington to keep its small town charm.

F

Nelsen Michaelson

armington is a great city and a wonderful place for my family to call home. I have been serving on the Planning Commission for the past two years and have been able to learn a lot about the general land use plan for Farmington. I am supportive of the plan as it is designed to balance the growth of both residential and commercial development. This Nelsen Michaelson is key to managing the cost of providing services without raising property taxes. Throughout my service on the Planning Commission and Board of Adjustments, I have worked to protect the integrity of Farmington. (Go to www.nelsenmichaelson.com for more information.)

C

NN Money recently ranked Farmington the 12th best place to live in America, calling it “more small town USA than suburb.” This is no surprise to those of us living here. I love the closeness, the feeling of safety, and knowing we all work hard to keep Farmington a fun and friendly town. However, with exposure comes growth. It’s important to Dustin Siler manage residential and business growth without losing our small town values. I strongly desire to serve the community I call home. I’d like to offer a fresh voice in this growing community hoping to maintain its identity.

Cory Ritz F

Tyler Turner G

rowth is necessary for Farmington City to be successful.  With prudent business and residential growth, we as a city can maintain a balanced budget without having to raise property tax. As far as the West Davis Corridor, I support the Shepard route and will fight for a fair settlement from UDOT for any Farmington citizen that will be affected by their ultimate

decision. As city councilman, being open, honest and working as a team to make prudent decisions is a top priority. Over the years I have developed a passion for our beautiful community and want to serve as a force driving improvement. 

James Young I

care deeply about Farmington and her residents.  I am interested in representing the whole community and advancing our status as one of the greatest small towns in America to call home.   James Young I am in my fourth

year on the Planning Commission and the reality is we are undergoing a huge transformation in Farmington that calls for seasoned, thoughtful voices as we deliberate issues affecting our identity and destiny.  As with the vision of Farmington Station, I support broadening our tax base to lighten the tax burden on residential property owners. However, the build-up must be clean, upscale, low-rise, well planned, well placed and orderly.

Something on your mind? contact: letters@davisclipper.com

Useful things you can do with today’s newspaper. . . (after you read it, of course)

18

#

Emergency toilet paper.

All voting will be held at the City Hall East Entrance. Hours for voting are 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Tyler Turner

Dustin Siler

armington has fairly defined residential and commercial and mixed use building sections. Blending the two is the challenge. From my time on the Planning Commission and the city council, I have gained experience and knowledge regarding how important it is to blend effectively. Continued wise management of growth, and of assets to meet city Cory Ritz infrastructure needs, will continue to be a priority.  It is unfortunate that the road (West Davis Corridor) needs to be built and our community affected. If you would like to view my full opinion on the corridor, go to savefarmington. org and page down to “Letter from Farmington City Councilman Cory Ritz.”


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Voter’s Guide CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV 3, 2011

Fruit Heights Candidates

Diane Anderson I

Jim Biorge J

will bring an earnest, fresh voice to our city council. Twenty-three years of living, walking, working and volunteering in our city has deepened my resolve to serve. My background in civic and community projects and my commitment to fostering a spirit of Fruit Heights City are qualities that will serve the interests of all our citizens, young and old. Diane Anderson Though just an ordinary person, I feel an extraordinary interest in and responsibility for the future of the PEOPLE of our city, a trust that is reflected in my pre-election promises: To be sensitive, attentive and effective.

ames (Jim) Biorge loves America, and our God given rights of liberty. In 1986 Jim served as president in charge of all cell phone sales, installations, and service in Utah. Jim invented two patents, led two other companies, and developed the most successful school fund raising project to date (featured in INC. Magazine). Jim trains business owners and governJim Biorge ments in Lean Six Sigma/bottom up leadership strategies. Jim’s greatest assets are his beautiful wife Debi and their five daughters. A vote for Jim, is a vote for transparency, a vote for citizen empowerment, a vote for you — and what you want!

Craig Hill

Kris Christensen A

fter my first term on the city council I have strong feelings about several things. Fruit Heights should be a pay as you go city. We should mange our appetites for services to match our revenues by budgeting expenditures less than our conservatively planned revenues. We have beautiful city parks that need to be maintained and developed within established Kris Christensen budgets. A city cemetery is currently being considered but only if creative ways to fund and manage are found as to not raise taxes. This truly is a “City of Good Neighbors” and every reasonable effort should be made to keep it that way.

Eileen Moss

I

A

t has been an honor and privilege to represent the citizens of Fruit Heights on the city council the last four years. Our city is unique not only in its beauty and friendly environment, but also in being able to provide for its growth without public debt. If re-elected I would continue to help plan for future needs by living within the responsible means of the city today and setting aside for the ‘rainy days’ ahead. I strongly believe in limited government, community service Craig Hill and activities that bind our communities together, modern technology, and fiscal responsibility.

s a 30 year resident of Fruit Heights, I realize how much local government contributes to our quality of life. I have been involved with our local government in several areas for many years serving on the Planning Commission (9 years), City Council (8 years) and with the Emergency Preparedness Committee (10 years). I’ve listened to many of your concerns and comments and have brought many of those issues to the council and staff. My past experience working for you can help our city keep our expenses low and our satisfaction high — let me continue to work for you!

Eileen Moss

Kaysville Candidates

Ron Barton T

hree things that I will bring to the city council are accountability, accountability and accountability. As a member of the Kaysville City Council I will be accountable to the citizens of Kaysville, just as I was when I served as a Kaysville City Policeman and Detective, and as I currently am to the Utah State Attorney General’s Office. I have spent my entire Ron Barton life serving the community and state that I love and look forward to protecting and serving Kaysville as a member of the city council. Please remember to “Vote for 3, Barton, Draney & Lee.”

Orwin Draney A

s a retired school administrator, I understand the need to build a budget that fits the amount available to you to operate. Essentials come first, wants follow only when essentials are met. In a recession, spending must be reduced, not taxes and utility rates increased. As a city councilman, I would represent the citizens that elected me. I commit to listen to the people. I would set two times a Orwin Draney month, a date, time and place where the citizens of Kaysville could come to discuss with me their concerns and suggestions for the council. Remember, VOTE THREE, Barton, Draney, Lee.

Mark Johnson

NOTICE OF NORTH SALT LAKE CITY MUNICIPAL ELECTION

I

am a Kaysville City councilman and proud of it! According to the Utah Tax Payer Assoc. Kaysville is the second most efficiently run city of 20,000 or more population. We have one of the lowest tax rates in the county, and I don’t want to pay any more taxes than I have to. I work with the Youth City Council and the Youth Court and Mark Johnson bring over 30 years of experience as an educator working with youth to this assignment. Thank you for your vote on Nov. 8. n See

Useful things you can do with today’s newspaper. . . (after you read it, of course)

more Kaysville candidates on p. C5

I, Barry Edwards, North Salt Lake City Recorder, hereby give notice in accordance with 20A-5-101(4) of the Utah Code for the General Election to be held on November 8, 2011for all eligible registered voters. Persons wishing to vote must be 18 years of age and a registered voter in North Salt Lake at least 30 days prior to the election. All voters are required to present valid voter identification. A list of valid voter identification types can be found on the website of the Davis County Clerk Auditor. Voters who do not have identification with them can cast a Provisional Ballot and then present valid voter identification to the county clerk within five business days after the election. If your name or address has changed, you will be required to vote a Provisional Ballot and will have to show proof of residency for the new name and/or address at that time. All polling locations are designated as Vote Centers and registered voters will be able to vote at any location. POLLS ARE OPEN 7:00 AM TO 8:00 PM Vote Center Polling Location

Voting Precincts

#

North Salt Lake City Hall 10 East Center Street

NS01, NS02, NS03, NS04, NS10

Use for wrapping gifts.

Eaglewood Golf Course 1110 Eaglewood Loop

NS05, NS06, NS08, NS09

17

Brett Garlick A

s a current council member, I have thoroughly enjoyed serving the citizens of Kaysville. I have better learned the importance of listening and considering before deciding. I believe in fiscal responsibility. I work hard to keep taxes low. I will act to retain the unique feel Kaysville enjoys. I will make the safety of our children and citizens a high priority. I will Brett Garlick labor thoughtfully, carefully, but decisively to manage Kaysville’s growth and commercial development. As a longtime Kaysville resident, I believe in Kaysville and want to endow the same great city to my children.


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Kaysville Candidates

Susan Lee I

f elected, I am willing to stand up for conservative values and principles. I believe in smaller government and less intrusion in our lives. I will focus on: (1) Lower taxes and rates – Fiscal responsibility, (2) Restore transparency – Talks should be open, (3) I will bring common sense to the council in dealing with issues and be responsible to the citizens Susan Lee of Kaysville and (4) I’ve lived in Kaysville for over 40 years, I know the community and our values. I will work to preserve our Heritage. Remember to “Vote for 3” Barton, Draney & Lee!

Ron Stephens I

pledge to continue to be an advocate for fiscally responsible government by maintaining our conservative spending habits (currently Kaysville’s property tax is the second lowest in the county) and keeping these taxes and our fees and utility rates low. I will work to maintain our hometown values and preserve our unique community atmosphere and continue to be an Ron Stephens available and responsive listener, ensuring citizens have a voice in our city. I will continue to be an advocate for transparency in government, continue to support and encourage others to support our local businesses and explore ideas for appropriate business growth.

North Salt Lake

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Candidates

Stan Porter

Lynn Ballard M

y wife, Julie, passed away unexpectedly Oct. 1, so I have limited my campaign activities. I would still be honored to represent you again. When I left the Council four years ago, the city had a large surplus. Questions? lynnlballard@msn.com Points to consider; Stay within our budget. Keep taxes down. Actively seek ways to make city better. Involve more people from all parts of city. Good balance of residential and business development.

Voter’s Guide

I

f elected I will continue to analyze the budget and make sure that the residents of North Salt Lake are getting the most value for their money.  I will continue to seek out ways to make North Salt Lake a better place to live, providing essential services, by providing recreation in the form of parks and trails, by using my 20 years of experience to provide sound judgment on Stan Porter critical decisions and policies. I will make sure that all residents continue to be represented.  I will serve the residents of North Salt Lake with dedication, experience and integrity.  See www.stanporter.com

Lynn Ballard

Reva Wadsworth F

riends: I proposed a library and lower taxes for North Salt Lake. Vote for me: Write-in my name: Reva Wadsworth. Seek life, liberty and happiness. Life: Brush mind and body daily, Pray always! Drink water, avoid milk products, rancid oils, sugars, excess flour, all drugs. Transporting, selling, Reva Wadsworth gifting drugs promises penalty by law. Liberty is prudence, moderation, frugality! Avoid poisonous sprays, debts, credit, contracts, zoning, unions! Beware of tolerance, without cause, breeding begging, blushing, unworthiness. Read: therein, work, find wealth! Be prepared! Happiness is doing unto others as you would have them do unto you. Repent! Forgive, share, care, guard and protect private property. After all, Families are forever! There-in, I can serve you. Thanks!

M

Conrad Jacobson

y wife, Carolyn, and I have lived in North Salt Lake for 24 years, and have raised two children here. I have served on the Planning Commission, and as a past and present member of the city council. My philosophy: - Government exists to meet the needs of its citizens. - Government should not unnecessarily intrude into peoples’ lives. - All people deserve equal repre- Conrad Jacobson sentation. - Government should be fiscally responsible. I retired after 30 years of service as a federal investigator, and have a combination of knowledge and experience that will enable me to continue serving the citizens well.

Polling Places Loop • Adelaide Elementary North Salt Lake, UT 84054 731 W. 3600 So. Bountiful, UT 84010 • Ellison Park • Antelope Elementary Elementary 1810 South Main Street 800 North Cold Creek Way Clearfield, UT 84015 Layton, UT 84041 • Bountiful Library • Farmington City 725 South Main Community Center Bountiful , UT 84010 120 S. Main Street • Centerville Elementary Farmington, UT 84025 350 North 100 East • Fruit Heights City Centerville, UT 84014 Hall • Clearfield City Hall 910 South Mountain Road 55 South State Street Fruit Heights, UT Clearfield, UT 84015 84037 • Clinton Recreation • Heritage Elementary Admin. Building 1354 West Weaver Lane 1651 West 2300 North Layton, UT 84041 Clinton, UT 84015 • Holt Elementary • Davis Applied 448 North 1000 West Technology College Clearfield, UT 84015 550 East 300 South Kaysville, UT 84037 • Kaysville Bible Church • Eaglewood Golf 181 North Flint Street Course Kaysville, UT 84037 1110 East Eaglewood Continued from p. C5

• Layton Christian Academy 2352 East Highway 193 Layton, UT 84040 • Layton High 440 Lancer Lane Layton, UT 84041

• Legacy Events Center (Fair Grounds) 151 South 1100 West Farmington, UT 84025 • North Salt Lake City Hall 10 East Center North Salt Lake, UT

84054

Bountiful, UT 84010

• Northridge High 2430 North 400 West Layton, UT 84040 • South Davis Recreation Center 50 North 200 West

• South Weber Family Activity Center 1181 East Lester Street South Weber, UT 84405

FARMINGTON CITY GENERAL ELECTION November 8, 2011 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Farmington City General Election will be held on Tuesday, November 8, 2011. The polls will be open from 7:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. Farmington City’s 11 voting precincts have been combined into two voting centers. The locations are as shown below. Voting Center #1 Davis County Legacy Center 151 South 1100 West FA0l, FA02, FA03, FA04, FA11 Voting Center #2

Farmington Community Center 120 South Main Street

FA05, FA06, FA07, FA08, FA09, FA10 The candidates for office are as listed on the sample ballot. Utah Election laws now require every voter to provide valid voter identification before being allowed to vote. DATED this 25th day of October, 2011.

Farmington City Council (Vote for THREE)

Justin LeCheminant Nelsen Michaelson Cory R. Ritz Dustin Siler Tyler Turner James Madison Young Write-in Write-in Write-in

• St. Olaf’s Catholic n See

more Polling on p. C7


Voter’s Guide CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

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West Bountiful Candidates

James Ahlstrom I

have served the past six years on the Planning Commission, including the last four as chair. I hope to use that experience to encourage further development that will increase our tax base. My experience as a shareholder at a local law firm also will allow me to help the city recover financially and avoid costly and unproductive legal battles. I am determined to avoid further tax increases and to keeping the golf course and a James Ahlstrom local police force, both operating as efficiently as possible. Visit www. Ahlstrom4CityCouncil.com for more information about me.

M

Scott Strong T

he differentiating factor that sets me apart from the candidates is my professional experience. Throughout the last 12 years, I have identified and implemented creative solutions to many issues similar to the financial problems our city faces. I will focus my attention: 1. Creating synergy between our citizens and city management 2. Increasing revenues by generScott Strong ating business opportunities, not through tax or fee increases 3. Operating the golf course under a concession contract and charging a 7 percent — 15 percent fee 4. Conducting independent cost-benefit analysis 5. Controlling costs within the police department 6. Changing the RAP tax code to include funding operating costs

Dave Tovey M

I

enjoy service. I have had a lot of opportunity to work with people toward solving problems and achieving their dreams. I have served in leadership positions in my church, in the Boy Scouts, and in the community. I will provide leadership to work toward creating a solid community based in good judgement, fairness, and foresight. As a concerned citizen, I have spent most of my Tuesday nights over the past 14 years attending James Bruhn city council or planning and zoning meetings. I will be a voice of reason for the common citizen of West Bountiful. I will listen to your concerns and do my best.

Alan Malan

Bud Ingles

y purpose in running for the West Bountiful City Council is to try to help our city.  As a retired person, I have both the time available and the desire to help our city government be more efficient and less costly to the residents of West Bountiful. As a city councilman, I would like to look in more detail at some of our city services, their costs to the city, and us citizens, and possible changes that would save us Bud Ingles money or be more beneficial. I have had extensive experience in government and the impact of government decisions upon individuals, families, homeowners, and businesses. 

y family and I love the community feel in West Bountiful.  Over the last five years I have been involved as a member of the Planning and Zoning Commission and, for the past year and a half, on the city council.  We have faced and made tough decisions recently, but I believe the key to keeping West Bountiful a great place is to look ahead and prepare for our future needs.  I am committed to studying every issue includDave Tovey ing tax and water rates, growth, the golf course, roads, and park and trail maintenance while keeping a long-term perspective.

Laura Charchenko

James Bruhn

M

y wife and I have lived in West Bountiful for over 16 years, raising our girls here, and I would like to give back to the community and serve on city council. I have attended city council, and planning and zoning meetings for about 10 of those years. I have been involved as a member of the historic commission, chairman of the historic commission, on planning and zoning, and Alan Malan as a member of the South Davis Transit Draft Environmental Impact Statement sub-committee. I would like to represent you as a member of the city council.

I

felt like I needed to become more involved in the city when the water rates were raised. As I attended city council and budget meetings, I felt the cuts weren’t as deep as they needed to be. In this sluggish economy we can’t afford to keep the niceties when people are struggling to pay for the necessities of life. My top three concerns for our city are streamlining the budget, Laura Charchenko increasing community involvement and establishing a comprehensive plan for the city’s future development. If you have any questions about my stance on any issues, please email me at charchenko4citycouncil@mail.com.

Debbie McKean I

love West Bountiful and I love serving the citizens of West Bountiful. If elected, I will strive to preserve the high quality of living that we enjoy in our city, through my experience, enthusiasm, and excellence in serving. I want to work for the citizens of West Bountiful while listening to and representing their voice when making important decisions for the future of our city. Uniquely this year, four of the five council seats will be Debbie McKean filled. I encourage you to take time to vote. Should you desire to know my platform, please contact me at votemckeantoday@ gmail.com.

Centerville City General Election There will be two polling places in Centerville for the November 8 general election to elect three city council members. Voters living west of Main Street will vote at Stewart Elementary School, 1155 North Main (Precincts CE01, CE06, CE07, CE09, CE10 and CE11). Voters east of Main Street will vote at Centerville Elementary School, 350 North 100 East (Precincts CE02, CE03, CE04, CE05 and CE08).

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CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Woods Cross Candidates

Jill Evans

Dave Hill I

suppose serving the community is in my DNA. My great-grandfather was the first Sexton of the Bountiful Cemetery and was also the Water Master on the Stone & Barton Creeks in Bountiful. He was also one of the signatories to the petition to the state of Utah to incorporate Bountiful City. My father was also very informed in and involved in the community. I have also desired and enjoyed being involved in the Dave Hill community in a variety of ways. I work hard at learning and studying the issues that come before the Council. I don’t take this responsibility lightly.

I am running for re-election because I would like to see some of the projects we have started come about. We have done a lot of work on the Legacy Gateway and I would like to see that area start to develop. One of the biggest accomplishments while being in office is hiring a new Police Chief. I think this is something that should have happened years ago. Hiring Chief Butler has been one of the best Jill Evans changes for our city. I think our residents and police officers are happy with our decision.

Rick Earnshaw M

y family moved to Woods Cross when I was 3 years old and other than the two years I served on an LDS mission to Japan and the first two years of my marriage, I have lived in Woods Cross. I have always had a desire to make sure that those who choose to live here in Woods Cross, are welcomed with open arms. I served on the Planning Commission for two years prior to running for city council and I am now in my 16th Rick Earnshaw year as a city council member. I want to continue to serve my community and do my part to keep it safe, united and a great place to raise families.

Ryan Larsen R

yan Larsen is currently an owner of Four Pillar Fitness in Bountiful. Ryan uses his talents to motivate and inspire others to live a more active life. Ryan also uses his talents in business as an agent for Foundations Real Estate. Using his experiences running a small business and serving others in the community, Ryan has acquired unique skills that make him a perfect fit for a city council Ryan Larsen position. Along with his wife Tina, and two daughters, Ryan has chosen to make his home in Argyle Acres. Ryan wishes to apply his passions and energy into continuing to help Wood Cross City evolve.

Kaysville City General Election Kaysville City will hold a General Election on November 8, 2011 to elect City Council Members. Candidates for this election are:

Voter’s Guide

C7

Polling Places Continued from p. C5

School 1793 Orchard Drive Bountiful, UT 84010 • Stewart Elementary 1155 North Main Street Centerville, UT 84014 • Sunset City Hall 200 West 1300 North Sunset, UT 84015

• Voting by mail Sunset, UT • West Bountiful City Hall 550 North 800 West West Bountiful, UT 84087

• Syracuse Community Center 1912 West 1900 South Syracuse, UT 84075

• West Point City Hall 3200 West 300 North West Point, UT 84015 • West Point Elementary 3788 West 300 North West Point, UT 84041

• Valley View Golf Course 2501 East Gentile Layton , UT 84040

• Woods Cross City Hall 1555 South 800 West Woods Cross, UT 84087

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CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Voter’s Guide

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Bountiful Candidates Continued from p. C8

Beth Holbrook I Official Ballot for Bountiful City Utah Municipal Election Held November 8, 2011

Bountiful City Recorder INSTRUCTIONS TO VOTERS: To vote for a measure or candidate of your choice, fill in the oval next to your choice. • , and write in the candidate's name on the To vote for a candidate whose name is not printed on the ballot, fill in the oval • blank line(s) provided for a write-in candidate. • Use ballpoint pen with dark ink (not red). Do not use pencil. • If you tear, deface or wrongly mark this ballot, contact the County Clerks office or Poll Worker. WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG

CORRECT

Bountiful City Council (Vote for THREE)

am running for re-election for Bountiful City Council. I have been on various committees for my first four years and I am running again because I can positively impact our community. Economic development is a large part of what I do daily as the Director for Zions Bank-Business Resource Center; and I want to continue to develop our local commercial tax base. There is a Beth Holbrook growing movement in the small business community to keep things on a more regional/local basis and I believe that Bountiful can customize our commercial areas to ultimately draw more of our community to look at local options when purchasing. www.votebethholbrook.com

Ernie Cox Micah J. Day Richard L. Higginson Beth Holbrook John Marc Knight Scott C. Myers Write-in Write-in Write-in

John Marc Knight I

End of Ballot FRONT Card 11 SEQ# 1 FOR PROOF ONLY 09/23/11 08:58:11

have enjoyed serving Bountiful the past four years on the city council. I am passionate about my love for our great city and have a deep respect for those who came before me to make Bountiful the greatest city in Utah. My goals for the city are to provide quality leadership, NOT RAISE TAXES, encourage business development and protect our hillside. My greatest John Marc Knight success has been as the advisor to the state champion Bountiful City Youth Council, my biggest failing was my inability to limit the new scaring east of Bountiful by the Kern River pipeline, votejohnknight. org, 801-864-7004.

Scott C. Myers I

am grateful for the opportunity to serve as a city council member for the past five years. I am a father, husband and businessman and value the many great city facilities, departments, employees and citizens. We must continue proper budgeting and fiscal management. I have the following goals for our city: Improve traffic flow and zoning, promote and attract Scott C. Meyers businesses to increase tax revenue, continue to support community events, entertainment and recreation; and facilitate the voice of citizens. My experience dealing with many important issues has prepared me to continue to serve you and represent this great city.


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Voter’s Guide CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

Bountiful Candidates

T

Ernie Cox

op priorities: Make sure Bountiful City operates within its income and without raising taxes. Review all departments’ actual incomes, costs and budgets for the impact that our slower economy has caused. Develop contingency plans for operating on smaller revenues so tax increases can be avoided. Provide quality city services (police, power, water, streets, fire, recreation etc.) Ernie Cox within the city’s lower revenues. Taxes and utility rates: keep these as low as possible. Businesses: create incentives to new business partners to locate in Bountiful. Volunteers: look into using community volunteers to lower city operating costs. Recreation Center: keep it operating within its income so no additional subsidies will be needed.

Micah Day M

y wife and I love living in Bountiful. We have a long life ahead of us here and want to ensure that the same standard of living we have today will carry into the future. To do so needs better representation from our elected officials. I will work to proactively pursue small business growth for our community to diversify our tax base and limit the increases in fees we have seen over the past four years. I will make sure that Micah Day our city funds are spent wisely on tax building projects rather than tax draining. We have a rich heritage as Bountiful citizens that must be preserved now and for future generations and I would appreciate your vote for a brighter “DAY” on Nov. 8.

Richard Higginson B

ountiful is a wonderful place with a proud heritage and storied history. As our city faces some of today’s serious issues (economic uncertainty, declining revenues, unaffordable housing, infrastructure decline, crime), I am reminded that it is Bountiful’s wonderful people that have made Bountiful great...and it is the same wonderful people that will help pull Bountiful Richard Higginson through these challenging times. I am committed to working with, and listening to, the people of Bountiful and to provide the kind of leadership that will allow our wonderful city to continue to be...Bountiful. I would very much appreciate your vote.


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CLIPPER • THURSDAY, JNOV. 3, 2011

Classifieds

100 HELP WANTED

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115 YARD WORK

120 SERVICES

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* AJ’s MAINTENANCE Service* Fall Clean-up Winterize Swamp Coolers Rain Gutter Cleaning Junk Removal/Painting Garage Floor/Cleaning & Scrubbing Window Washing Anything else that needs to be done.

MAINTENANCE HELP Wanted Full time maintenance person wanted for 314 lot manufactured home community in Farr West. Knowledge of basic maintenance techniques including, electrical, plumbing, HVAC, landscaping and more required. Must be able to pass criminal/credit background check. 1-801-9208320 WINDOW AND Door Installer Experienced Window and Door installer needed. Must have own tools, clean driving record and be drug free. Position of Installer helper also available. Email resume to: resglass@aol.com Fax:801-298-9028 DRIVERS: CENTRAL refrigerated is growing! Hiring experienced & non-experienced drivers. CDL training available! Emply today! Avg $40,000 $70,000 1-800-525-9277 OPENING FOR Hair Stylist, permanent makeup artist or Esthetician and massage therapist. 1/2 off 1st month booth rent 801-292-8177 or 801-6998303 BE YOUR own boss! Come experience a highly profitable and dynamic world of Miche Bag Hand Bags. Teri 801-597-7197 www.my.michebag.com/tlc/ SERVERS & DELIVERY wanted Start making tips right away. Most Servers/delivery drivers average between $10-20/hr. Apply in person at Pizza Perfect Italian Restaurant 104 South Main St. Centerville No phone calls. TELEPHONE OPERATOR F/TP/T opening for mature, dependable person to answer phones/light office duties. Must handle busy multiple phone lines, have good typing and computer skills/great with people. 18 or older. Apply in person at 359 S Main, Bountiful or fax resume to 801-298-1051 **BUSSERS CASHIER** Must be 16 and No Smokers. NO SUNDAYS, Need to be legal resident of USA. Evening shifts. Please apply in person Monday to Friday 3-6pm. EL MATADOR 606 S MAIN BOUNTIFUL PT BOOKKEEPER needed. Assisted Living community. QuickBooks and ADP experience a huge plus. $15/hr. email resume to dave@rlg.net LOCAL HVAC Company seeking F/T experienced installer. Good pay and benefits. Call for appointment 801-296-2600

TEACHER (PRIVATE School) Learn to teach children to think for themselves in a fast-paced academic environment. Challenger School is seeking exceptional individuals for teaching positions in the Salt Lake City area. To apply, submit a cover letter, resume, and brief essay discussing your view of America to HR@challengerschool.com. LEGACY HOUSE of Bountiful is seeking dependable, hardworking employees. F/T-P/T CNA positions avail for all shifts. Candidates must be within 30 days of receiving their CNA license. 8/hr shift required. Responsibilities are assisting residents with daily living activities. We have wonderful seniors in a home like atmosphere. Call 801-294-2925 for Rose, fax resume to 801-298-7914, or apply in person at 79 East Center Street. 6 NEW Positions Tri-County ILC a nonprofit organization is currently hiring. For more information visit our website www.tricountyilc.org or call 801-6123215 with questions. P/T/INSIDE SALES w/huge earning potential, calling B2B setting appts. Ideal for homemakers/retirees/college students. $10-15/hr with incentives/Commissions. Bountiful. 46hrs M-F send Resume to jobsut@vanguardcleaning.com RECEPTIONIST NEEDED P/T recept/file clerk needed for high end dealer in Davis County. Hours needed Tues-Fri 3p-7p and Sat 9a-5p. send resume to star@landroverutah.com. EOE PART TIME Book Keeper Needed Precision machine shop needs sharp individual to keep books up to date. Must know Quick Books and accounting practices. Other responsibilities include, parables and receivables. Able to create job travelers from E2 shop software, will train. Job scheduling and some purchasing. Parts preparation and shipping. Also, help with job scheduling. Hours needed, 3-4 hours a day 4-5 days a week. Hours are flexible. Send detailed resume to quality@xmission.com Att. Shane

DRIVERS: NO-FORCED Dispatch! Solos & Teams! Great Pay, Benefits, Hometime! CDLA, 2yrs. Exp. Req. Miller Brothers Express, x123, x103: 1866-823-0361

115 YARD WORK

HANDY ANDY’S LANDSCAPE & HAULING LOCAL PROMPT SERVICE

LANDSCAPING SERVICE: TREES, SHRUBS, YARD CLEAN UP. trimming/removal, flower beds, hauling, mowing, concrete. Affordable rates- references. Senior Discount. Dan 801-518-7365 LARSON YARD Service Fall Aeration, Fall Clean-up, Snow Removal www.LarsonYardService.com 801.725.5666 - lic and ins. KARL’S TREE & YARD SERVICE Pruning, Trimming, Removal, of Trees/Bushes. Fall Cleanup! Hauling. Most Yard Jobs, Snow Removal. Free Estimates. Karl 801-298-0610

120 SERVICES HANDYMAN SERVICES Complete home improvement & repair including remodels, kitchen & bathroom upgrades, hardwood & tile flooring, electrical, concrete, plumbing, roofing, & drywall. Competitive pricing, certified home inspector and insured. References available upon request. Please contact Ken with Baughman Home Improvement & Repair 801-4980400. PAINTING GET READY FOR THE HOLIDAYS! SPECIALIZE in Interior/Exterior All aspects of prep & finishing all surface types. Clean, Fast, Dependable. Local references. Senior Discounts Call Kim 801-2945423, 801-991-0181

Go w/this familiar & dependable name in Davis County. Over 30 years experience & commitment to customer satisfaction. Where quality is not just a word, it’s our only way of doing business.

INSIGHT WINDOW CLEANING Holiday clean up, windows, gutters, power washing, sealing/staining, concrete/wood. Great before freezing. Fall clean up. Loca/licensed. 801-893-2228

Fall Cleanup is Our Specialty! • Complete tree services • Clean & Haul

WE DO IT ALL Licensed - Insured Free Estimate

296-1396

**SPRINKLER SHUTDOWNS** Winterize your system the “Right Way” using an air compressor. Our method is guaranteed against frozen and cracked pipes. Lic/Ins. WE GUARANTEE IT! 801-292-0450

30234

Do you have ink in your veins? The Davis Clipper is looking for a part-time small press operator. Must be familiar with Heidelberg QM-46. Send a resume to rstahle@davisclipper.com - No Phone Calls Please -

“Call 801-759-3631”

S

C11

120 SERVICES CARPET CLEANING HOLIDAY SPECIAL! 3 Rooms $89.99 EcoLogo products available. Also offering Drain cleaning & Home Repairs. Lic/Ins 801-577-1971 Joel CLEANING LADY Consistently thorough, Dependable. Licensed. Bonded. Insured. Call Style Cleaning Services. 801295-7895


C12

Classifieds CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011

120 SERVICES

270 WANT TO BUY

SNOW REMOVAL Residential/small commercial. Ice melt available. Fall cleanup and landscaping also available before snow fly’s. Davis County 801-292-0450.

BOOKS WANTED! I pay cash for old LDS & other books. Also old photos & historical memorabilia Call 800-823-9124

PAINTING & DRYWALL With over 12 years of experience you can trust us to get the job done right. Owlrock Maintenance. 801201-6439 *PROFESSIONAL PAINTER* 35 yrs. exp. excellent references Int/Ext. Please call Scott for Free Estimates. No Job Too Small 801-699-1942 WINDOW CLEANING Please call Scott for cleaner springs and summer window. No job too big or small. 801-6991942 CONCRETE & MASONRY SERVICES Driveways Floors Patio Walkways Parking Lot 20+ years Exp. Competitive Rate Jay (801)-702-2467 You can never go wrong with quality and experience

290 HOME FURNISHINGS CREAM COLOR Queen hide a bed couch in good condition, $50 OBO. Very comfortable mattress. Great for when you have guests and no extra beds. Entertainment Center (Saunders) for up to a 44” TV, CD’s storage, in good condition, $25 OBO. 4 tall mirrors, $5 each.. Call 801-864-3743.

330 AUTOS FOR SALE 310 SOUTH MAIN STREET BOUNTIFUL, UTAH 84010

801-298-5820

GARAGES CLEANED and organized. Junk hauled off. Any overwhelming area. We will amaze you! Call Jared 801-6523028

NO CREDIT REQUIRED! $299 Deposit

HOUSE CLEANING SERVICE Are you looking for someone to clean your home? Lets us do it for you! We do excellent work. Sr. Citizen discount. 801-2958095 or 801-755-7706

520 INSTRUCTION/TUTORING

HOUSE CLEANING - Bntfl Area. Experienced, Efficient, and Dependable. References available. Call Kyra 801- 577-0008 GARAGE DOORS & Openers Repairs on all makes & models, Broken springs, free est on new doors. Mountain West Doors 801-451-0534,801- 294-4636 FREESTONE PLUMBING Plumbing services. Most credit cards accepted! Allen @ 801808-0812. or go to www.freestoneplumbing.com.

130 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES BE YOUR own boss! Come experience a highly profitable and dynamic world of Miche Bag Hand Bags. Teri 801-597-7197 www.my.michebag.com/tlc/

220 MISCELLANEOUS VENDORS WANTED for large Holiday Boutique in Bountiful. Nov 12th, 9-7 and Nov 13th, 9-4. Booth space is $50 per day. Call Danielle 801-725-0628. Danielle@xmission.com

240 FOR SALE LAKEVIEW MEMORIAL Estates Two burial plots in the Reverence Garden section, $1500.00 for both plus transfer fee. Plots sell for $1498.00 each. Tamra 801-698-6342. STORAGE AUCTION @ Freeway Storage Auction Detail: Held at Freeway Storage 400 S. 700 W. Ste 390 Bountiful Utah 84010 on Thursday 11/10/11 @ 11am, silent auction will be held on the following occupants storage units. www.freewaystorage.com 801299-0904 Occupant Name and Address: i.Jose Sanchez 3937 West 5500 South Roy, UT 84067 ii. units F04, H07 boxes, tools, misc. items Occupant 2 Name and Address: Bitrage Inc. Michael Newman of 6816 Southpoint Parkway #601 Jacksonville FL 32216. ii. units G02 and E12, boxes and misc. items

250 GARAGE SALES IN GARAGE SALE! Bedroom set, hospital bed, other furniture and home items Extensive BOOK collection (mysteries, poetry, LDS books, etc.) Mostly hardbacks, Sat, Nov 5. 8-4, 189 S. 650 E. Bountiful. HOLIDAY CHRISTMAS Boutique. Lots of vendors. Nov 19th, 9-3. 316 S 200 W, Farmington.

WWW.KANDJAUTO.COM

EXPERIENCED PIANO Teacher Author: “Magic Piano Keys” Series. Expertise: Beginning & intermediate Students. Bountiful, 3893 South 725 West, 801-2922357 GUITAR LESSONS, Beginner to advanced. All ages, and types of music. Experienced teacher. Call 801-419-1794 GETTING BEHIND in school? Tutoring in Bountiful all subjects, grade school through College. Specialty in reading, writing and SAT’s. 801-419-1794 REIKI HEALING Class Natural Japanese energy healing technique. Releases physical and emotional pain. First Degree class/certificate, $125. Wed/Thurs Nov 16/17, 10-3. Reiki Master, Beth Young, 801557-6709 PTSD HEALING Effective natural healing technique, Rapid Eye Technology, releases physical and emotional pain, stress, trauma. Group session/Bountiful, Wed, Nov 16th, 7pm. $30, bring a friend FREE. Beth Young, 801557-6709 I WILL work with your child/adult with disabilities. Either in your home or the community. BS degree in psychology and 10yrs experience. Call 801-916-2251 with questions/rates.

550 CONDO FOR RENT KAYSVILLE TOWNHOUSE 722 N 400 W, #1. 2bd, 1/5bth, D/W, W/D hookups, unfinished/basmt, storage, A/C. No smokers/pets. $750/mo. 801-718-6585, 801499-7757 BOUNTIFUL 3 bedroom/1.5 bath Ground floor condo. Gas fireplace, W/D, refrigerator, 2 covered parking stalls. No smoking/pets $1,000/mos. includes cable/gas service. Jada Properties 801-573-5330 CENTERVILLE Large 3bd, 2bth, double garage, full kitchen, W/D hkups, A/C. No pets. $1025/mo 801-635-7709, 801628-6113 TOWNHOUSE Centerville 2Bd, 1-1/2 Bth. Pool, covered parking, W/D hkups. $650/mo., heat Included.No Pets/Smoking. Call 801-295-6676

570 APARTMENT FOR RENT BEAUTIFULLY REMODELED 1bd 1bth ground level apt. Great Bntfl location – W/D hookups, covered parking. No smoking/pets. $575/mo 400/dep Call (801) 294-7040 NSL REMODELED 2bd, $739$759/mo. W/D hook-ups, covered parking, fitness center, spa, and more. Pets welcome. Call 866-791-3946. $299 moves you in.

570 APARTMENT FOR RENT BOUNTIFUL TOWNHOUSE Large 1800sqft, 307 W 200 N. 3bd, 1.5bth, quiet, Covered Parking, patio, A/C, Appliances, D/W, W/D hook ups. Free cable. Ref. No smokers/pets, $975/mo, $500/deposit. 801-298-5820 Avail now. FARMINGTON - 1BD Upstairs Apt. 1bth, D/W, A/C, no pets/smokers. $450/mo 801-5974965 #1 SUPER OFFER! 2bd, Great location! Pets ok. Just remodled. 167 N Hwy 89, NSL. 801-8097228 2BD TOWNHOUSE 1.5 bth, 1100sqft, W/D hook-ups, great location. All new paint. $749/mo, $500 deposit 801-397-0567. Pets ok. LARGE 2BD, 1bth. Good NSL location. W/D hookups. dishwasher, A/C, Carport. No pets/smokers $620/mo 801-7182234 2135 S MAIN St, Bountiful. 3bd, 1.5 bth. W/D hookups. A/C, covered parking, lots of storage. No smokers/pets. 1yr lease. References & credit check required. $850/mo, $405 deposit. Call Kathy 801-292-5789 FARMINGTON 2BD, fireplace, W/D hook ups, carport, A/C, patio or balcony. No smokers/pets, 801-451-5223, 801-451-7187 BOUNTIFUL DUPLEX 3926 S 850 W. Large 2bd, 1bth, hook ups, covered deck, fireplace,, carport, big yard. $775/mo, $500 deposit, central air. No pets/smokers. Avail. Sept 15. Bonded Realty 801-359-7979 NSL 2BD, 1BTH, upstairs unit, 319 E Odell Ln #3D, 10 mins from SLC. $625/mo, $300 deposit. 801-558-8022 BOUNTIFUL TOWNHOUSE Large 1200sqft. 945 S. Main. 2bd, 1.5bth. Quiet, cv’d pkg, patio, central air. New paint, carpet, appliances, fixtures, D/W, W/D hook ups, satellite/cable hookups. No smokers/pets, $895/mo Deposit $450. 801292-1774.

575 DUPLEX FOR RENT DUPLEX FOR Rent 2Bd, 1Bth. Garage. Lots of storage. New carpet, new windows. No Smoking/Pets W/D hkups. $900/mo. 801-295-9370 FARMINGTON HUGE 4bd 2bth, 2 family rooms, 1800sqft, really clean and nice. Must see. NO smokers, pets nego. $985/mo, $650 deposit. 801-231-3320 BOUNTIFUL 3BD, 2BTH. Duplex. D/W, W/D Hookups, carport, bonus room, fenced Backyard. No Smoking/No Pets. Available 10-20-11. $825/mo. 801-597-4965

580 HOME FOR RENT OFFICE & HOME. 5th S, Bountiful. totally renovated & restored wood floors, high ceilings, no yardwork. 2bd, office, receiption area, Handicap ramp. PO zone $1000-1, 300 900-1, 300-2,300 sqft. 801-989-1602 or 801-292-2882 BOUNTIFUL ATTRACTIVE neighorhood. 4 Excellent bdrms 2 modern baths, hardwood floor, tile, carpet, family room, utility room includes W/D, lovely landscaped yard w/established trees. $1300/mo Call Marjorie 801-2778463 801-792-0799 BOUNTIFUL 5BD, 2bth, D/W, W/D hk-ups, 2car/garage, new carpet/paint/appliances, No smokers/pets. $990/mo $900/deposit, 1yr lease. Call 801-597-4965, 325 E 650 N. CLEARFIELD 3BD Great location close to everything. Fenced yard. A/C all appliances included. Pets nego. $1000/mo, $700/deposit. Refs 801-9799325 Bonnie after 5:00pm. Avail Now AMAZING 3BD 1bth rambler located at 1647 W Stanford St, Layton. Great deal. $795/mo. Call today! 801-627-1132 or 801574-5918

580 HOME FOR RENT

620 OPEN HOUSE

EAST BOUNTIFUL cul-de-sac 3200sqft, new carpet, new paint, appliances. 6car garage. 4bd, 3bth. $1600/mo Josh 801-6349839

SATURDAY 11/05 1-4pm. 1203 S. 450 E., Kaysville. Nice home on quiet cul-de-sac. 5Bd,3Bth. 2790sqft. $254,900 Lrg.Mstr Bath w/jacuzzi tub. Prudential Utah Real Estate. Kevin 801-580-8392

BOUNTIFUL EASTBENCH, 2600sqft. 2/3acres. Landscaped. 5Bd, 3Bth, $1465/mo. 2-car gar. Newly remodeled. Fenced Bkyrd. W/D hookups. Great local/neighborhood. No smoking/pets. Call anytime for showing. 801-295-3970, 801651-7132, 801-580-9375 BOUNTIFUL COZY 4bd, 2bth, fenced yard, 2car garage, appliances, large storage, W/D hookups, A/C. No smokers! $1350/mo, $1000/deposit. 781 E 650 N, 801-910-2684, 801-4511333 NEWLY RENOVATED home in Layton. 4bd, 1.75bth, 1728sqft. Gorgeous backyard, brand new carpet, tile, paint, fixtures, and newly upgraded kitchen cabinets and counter tops. NO smokers/pets. $1050/mo Call Cory 801-695-2020

590 STORAGE FOR RENT ANN & JOHN RENTALS 12’ x 25’ security gate. $90/mo 1197 W 500 S, WX. 801-295-5100 or 801-390-7467 JENKINS STORAGE Units for Rent. Best Location: 900 So. 700 W. Bountiful. $80/mo.101/2 x 25, $45/mo 8x10. Call 295-6214 or 499-9229

700 LAND FOR SALE

OFFICE & HOME. 5th S, Bountiful. totally renovated & restored wood floors, high ceilings, no yardwork. 2bd, office, receiption area, Handicap ramp. PO zone $1000-1, 300 900-1, 300-2,300 sqft. 801-989-1602 or 801-292-2882

820 HOME FOR SALE BOUNTIFUL, 2080 S. 50 W. $186,000. 2436 sqft. 0.27 acre lot. 4BD, 2Bth, Appliances. Walkout Basement. 2-Car Garage. 801-814-1155

sion. Les Mora, 27, West Bountiful PD, simple assault.

Monday, Oct. 24

Wednesday, Oct. 26

Jose Solis-Rivera, 27, Layton PD, carrying a concealed weapon, threat-terroristic, disorderly conduct. Austin Lee Elmer, 25, Layton PD, property damage, larceny from a vehicle. Ian Cade Harvey, 25, Centerville PD, driving on suspension, shoplifting. Marcus Lee Thompson, 24, Clearfield PD, criminal trespass. Michele Christy Overby, 42, DCSO, amphetamine possession. Kristine Michelle Green, 45, Layton PD, simple assault, domestic violence, intoxication. Curtis Scott Williams, 49, DCSO, unauthorized use of vehicle. Ambere Dawn Allred, 29, DCSO, shoplifting, no proof of insurance. Darren Wendell Shorter, 29, Centerville PD, contempt of court, shoplifting. Deborah Marie Brown, 42, Kaysville PD, stopping violation, improper lane change, DUI alcohol. Justin J. Eldredge, 41, DCSO, unauthorized use of vehicle. Bradley Russell Godfrey, 55, Sunset PD, intoxication, disorderly conduct, resisting/ interfering with police. Emanuel Lucas-Gonzalez, 32, Layton PD, no insurance. Marc Allen Wilson, 26, Bountiful PD, theft, criminal trespass. Schuyler Robert Sherwood, 27, Clinton PD, narcotic equipment-possession, hallucinogenpossession, marijuana posses-

900 MONEY TO LOAN

750 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT/SALE

The following is a list of bookings with total fines and/or bail exceeding $1,000.

Tuesday, Oct. 25

STEEL BUILDINGS Reduced Factory Inventory 30x36 – Reg $15,850 Now $12,600 36x58 – Reg $21,900 Now $18,800 866609-4321 Source# 1A0

10 ACRE Cabin Lots Strawberry and Starvation Reservoirs. Scenic, peaceful, wooded view lots. 12x16 overnight cabin. Leveled pads for RVs/Campers. Hunt, fish, camp, ATVs... Starting at JUST $29,750. Owner Financing, Everyone Approved. Low down and monthly payments starting at $350. Call for more info. (435)901-3172.

D a v i s B oo k in g s

Ricky Lee Huber, 43, DCSO, sex offenses free text. Shane Kenneth Dustin, 26, DCSO, DUI alcohol. Zachry William Jenson, 26, DCSO, marijuana possession. Jeremy J. Jones, 39, Morgan County Sheriff, narcotic equipment-possession, driving on suspension, no insurance. Dallen J. Tubbs, 28, DCSO, DUI alcohol. Jordan Taylor Allred, 19, DCSO,liquor free text,speeding. Jerry Robert Nance, 48, UHP, marijuana possession, narcotic equipment-possession, liquor free text. Scott A. Nead, 48, UHP, DUI alcohol, liquor free text, improper lane change.

830 BUILDING SUPPLIES

Brodie Antonio Sepulveda, 29, DCSO, heroin possession. Joseph Spillers, 23, Clinton PD, narcotic equipment-possession. Dennis Keith Sumrow, 39, Layton PD, reckless driving. Guy Wayman Nielsen, 27, DCSO, theft. Zachary Dean Wright, 22, DCSO, amphetamine possession. Leif Duane Erickson, 29, Layton PD, no insurance. James Brandon Griffith, 25, DCSO, service FTA warrant, no insurance. Phillip Mata, 25, DCSO, no insurance, traffic offense, no motorcycle license. Trevot Scott Jackson, 21, Layton PD, theft. Corrine Jill Crobridge, 53, Bountiful PD, theft. Paul Leslie Benge, 51, Bountiful PD, reckless driving, amphetamine possession.

Thursday, Oct. 27 David Allen Jabczynski, 42, UHP, false police report, stolen property. Katie Lynn Murdock, 25, Layton PD, disorderly conduct, DUI drugs. Jeffrey James Lybbert, 41, DCSO, no insurance. Justin Rankin, 34, Bountiful PD, possess forged documents. Krista Lynn Messer, 29, DCSO, DUI alcohol. Richard Kay Gemar, 37, Clearfield PD, obstructing justice. Kaylon John Sawyer, 41, Clearfield PD, DUI drugs, traffic offense, no motorcycle license, leaving the scene of an accident. Elmathan Posey, 33, Centerville PD, robbery. Jason Everett Myers,40,Sunset PD, theft. Jessica Price, 29, Syracuse PD, fraudulent activities. Nee Elizabeth Tupai, 46, Bountiful PD, no insurance, refusing to aid officer, service FTA warrant. Grant Otte, 25, Layton PD, simple assault, damage property private.

Friday, Oct. 28

Classified deadline Tuesday, noon 801-295-2251 www.davisclipper. com John Cullen Lockhart, 27, DCSO, liquor free text, DUI alcohol, reckless driving, driving unsafe vehicle. Jacob Wayne Wilkinson, 29, Clearfield PD, DUI alcohol. Karson Rick Child, 21, Kaysville PD, DUI alcohol, narcotic equipment. Alison Anne Allsop, 43, Farmington PD, synthetic narcotic-possession. Louis Caballero, 42, Farmington PD, amphetamine possession. Jaime Miranda, 36, Layton PD, reckless endangerment. James Rowley Christensen, 45, Centerville PD, theft. George Hodgeson Zinn, 57, Syracuse PD, disorderly conduct, theft. Kodie Allen Fasig, 22, DCSO, synthetic narcotic-possession. Jason Stephen Allen, 40, Clearfield PD, DUI alcohol. Merecce David Jones, 25, Clearfield PD, marijuana possession, DUI drugs, evading. K. Michael Christensen, 24, Bountiful PD, violation protective order. Matthew Grant Wall, 33, DCSO, DUI alcohol. Angela Maria Elena Lobato, 36, Layton PD, false police report. Leon Joseph Roybal, 34, Centerville PD, contempt of court. Audrey Mae Gividen, 29, UHP, traffic offense, no insurance. James A. Merrill, 38, Bountiful PD, synthetic narcotic-sell. Matthew Harley Crabtree, 30, Bountiful PD, DUI alcohol. Mark Allen Henninger, 43, Layton PD, heroin possession. Jonathan Howard Morris, 37, DCSO, no insurance, stolen property.


CLIPPER • THURSDAY, JNOV. 3, 2011

PLUMBING SERVICE HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING Manufacture & utility rebates available

HVAC CONSTRUCTION, INC.

HEATING • VENTILATION • AIR CONDITIONING $64 Furnace Clean & Check

FURNACE & AIR CONDITIONER Service & Replacement

www.smedleyservice.com • 801-544-4480

801-298-4822 HVAC@READYTEK.NET

BOUTIQUE

AUTOMOTIVE

Come Visit Us!

The Country Cottage has antiques, home decor and just what you are looking for in a perfect gift for that special someone. It would be worth a trip to Farmington to see what we have.

BIRDING SPECIALTY STORE GENERAL CONTRACTOR

Feed The Birds And More Backyard Birding Specialty Store

10% off Window Feeders • Bird Feeders & Baths • Bird Houses • Optics • 13 Varieties of Bird Seed • Books • Gifts 197 South 500 West • Bountiful

801-683-8361 VACUUM REPAIR

FURNITURE RESTORATION

is now at

385 West 500 South Bountiful, UT

801-292-5281

Stop in for

FR vacu EE

a

um belt *

10% off All Repairs or any reconditioned vacuum 00 * Belt not to exceed $3.

HOME IMPROVEMENT L Overow head Low Rate s

I can do it...or we can do it.

“I’m your GENERAL” contractor. 801-718-9888 Repair, Remodel, New Construction Licensed, Insured, +26 Years Experience

WHAT’S GOING ON?

Find out with the Calendar! Plan fun for the week ahead every Thursday. Email the details to rjamieson@ R U O Y davisclipper.com, or bring the info to the LIST 1370 S. 500 W., Bountiful. EVENT. Clipper office, Deadline: Fridays, 4pm ! E E R IT’S F Listings will be published at our discretion on a space-available basis.

Classifieds

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C14

9000

Classifieds CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011 LEGAL NOTICES

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 11-029-0102 Trust No. 1314968-07 Ref: Daniel R Stephensen TRA: Loan No. IMPORTANT xxxxxx0479. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED November 29, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THIS PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On November 22, 2011, at 10:30am, James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under a Deed of Trust recorded December 05, 2006, as Instrument No. 2225074, in Book 4172, Page 1574-1596, of the Official Records in the office at the County Recorder of Davis County, State of Utah, executed by Daniel R. Stepensen, A Married Man, will sell at public auction to highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. Successful bidders must tender a deposit of $5,000 in certified funds to the trustee at the time of sale, with the balance due by noon the following business day, at the office of the Trustee. At the main entrance of the davis county district court Bountiful Department, 805 South Main Street Bountiful Utah all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Lot 102, fernwood hollow no. 6, layton city, Davis county, Utah, according to the official plat thereof on file and of record in the office of the davis county recorder.. The street address and other common designation of the real property described above is purported to be: 2566 East 200 North Layton Ut 84040. Estimated Total Debt as of November 22, 2011 is $349,169.32. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is: Aurora Loan Services, Llc. The record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are: Daniel R Stephensen. Dated: October 19, 2011. James H. 10808 River Front Woodall Parkway, Suite 175 South Jordan Ut 84095 (801)2549450 (800)245-1886 (Hotline) Hours: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Signature/by: James H. Woodall R-393754 10/20/11, 10/27/11, 11/03/11 C-8027 ANNOUNCEMENT OF APPOINTMENT AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of John Stephen White Deceased Probate No. 113700379 Barbara Ann Gingery 3007 East 3135 South Salt Lake City, Utah 84109 John Stephen White, Jr. 1283 South 200 East Farmington, Utah 84025 The above listed individuals have been appointed Personal Representatives of the abovelisted estate. Creditors of the estate are hereby notified to (1) deliver or mail their written claims to the Personal Representatives at the Personal addresses above; (2) deliver or mail their written claims to the Personal Representatives attorney of record, Craig E. Hughes at 170 South Main, Suite 375, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101, or (3) file their written claims with the Clerk of the District Court in Davis County, or otherwise present their claims as required by Utah law within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice or be forever barred. Date of first publication: Oct. 27, 2011 Craig E. Hughes HUGHES ESTATE GROUP, PLLC Attorney for the Personal Representatives C-8053 10/27-11/10

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LEGAL NOTICES

SUMMONS IN THE NINTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT OF THE STATE OF NEVADA IN AND FOR DOUGLAS COUNTY ALFREDO GARCIA, Plaintiff, AIDA FLORES, Defendant. THE STATE OF NEVADA SENDS GREETINGS TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANT: You are hereby SUMMONED and required to serve upon plaintiff, ALFREDO GARCIA, whose address is 1190 North 2775 West, West Layton, UT 84041, an ANSWER to the Complaint which is herewith served upon you, within 20 days after service of this Summons upon you, exclusive of the day of service. In addition, you must file with Clerk of this Court, whose address is shown below, a formal written answer to the complaint, along with the appropriate filing fees, in accordance with the rules of the Court. If you fail to do so, judgment by default will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This action is brought to recover a judgment dissolving the contract of marriage existing between you and the Plaintiff. The filer certifies that this document does not contain the social security number of any person. DATED this 5 day of October, 2011. TED THRAN Clerk of Court by M. Biaggin Deputy Clerk Ninth Judicial District Court P.O. Box 218 Minden, NV 89423 C-8054 10/27-11/3/10/17/2011 NOTICE OF HEARING FARMINGTON CITY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN OF a public hearing to be held by the Farmington City Council at the City Offices, 160 South Main Street, Farmington, Utah, at its regularly scheduled meeting on TUESDAY, December 6, 2011 at 7:00 p.m., or as soon thereafter as business permits, to consider an application from Rocky Mountain Power petitioning the City Council to vacate a portion of 100 North Street at approximately 150 West. The public is invited to attend and give written and oral comments. DATED this 24th day of October, 2011. CHRISTY J. ALEXANDER Associate City Planner C-8059 10/27-11/17 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Monday, November 21, 2011, at the hour of 4:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Edwin Lusk and Anna Lusk, in favor of Argent Mortgage Company, LLC, covering real property located at approximately 2140 North 175 West, Sunset, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: LOT 5, EVES GARDEN SUBDIVISION NO. 4 AMENDED, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDERS OFFICE 13-091-0005 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Edwin Lusk and Anna Lusk. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustees sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is

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to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 15th day of October, 2011 Marlon L. Bates Successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-2414 C-8031 10/20-11/3 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, November 21, on Monday, 2011, at the hour of 4:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Kevin B. Parkin and Jennifer L. Parkin, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, covering real property located at approximately 639 East Eagleridge Drive, North Salt Lake, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: ALL OF LOT 217, EAGLEPOINTE ESTATES, PHASE 2, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDERS OFFICE. 01-255-0217 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Kevin B. Parkin and Jennifer L. Parkin. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustees sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 11th day of October, 2011 Marlon L. Bates, Successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-1843 C-8032 10/20-11/3 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the Justice Complex, Court’s Building, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah 84025, on November 30, 2011, at 3:00 p.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated November 5, 2008, and executed by PETER MARES, as Trustor, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary, which Trust Deed was recorded on November 12, 2008, as Entry No. 2404353, in Book 4655, at Page 590, in the Official Records of Davis County, State of Utah covering real property purportedly located at 252 North 500 West, Clearfield, Utah 84015 in Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: LOT 38, YORKSHIRE PLACE SUBDIVISION NO. 1, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. MORE CORRECTLY

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DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 3B, YORKSHIRE PLACE SUBDIVISION NO. 1, A PLANNED UNIT DEVELOPMENT, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER’S OFFICE. Tax ID: 12-127-0006 The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is UTAH HOUSING CORPORATION, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is PETER MARES. Bidders must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 2:00 p.m. the day following the sale. Both the deposit and the balance must be paid to Lincoln Title Insurance Agency in the form of a wire transfer, cashier’s check or certified funds. Cash payments, personal checks or trust checks are not accepted. DATED: October 11, 2011. LINCOLN TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY by: Paula Maughan its: Vice President Telephone: (801) 476-0303 web site: www.smithknowles.com SK File No. 11-0743 C-8033 10/20-11/3 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Wednesday, December 7, 2011, at the hour of 4:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Herbert L. Santizo, in favor of Argent Mortgage Company, LLC, covering real property located at approximately 275 East Eagleridge Drive, North Salt Lake, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: LOT 104, EAGLEPOINTE ESTATES PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER, UTAH. 01254-0104 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is Bank of America, National Association as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank NA as Trustee for Washington Mutual Mortgage Pass-Through Cerificates WMALT Series 2007HY1 Trust, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Herbert L. Santizo. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustee’s sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 27th day of October, 2011 Marlon L. Bates Successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-1858 C-8068 11/3-17 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder on December 8, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. at the Main Entrance to the DAVIS County Courthouse, 805 SOUTH MAIN, BOUNTIFUL, UT 84010, in the County of DAVIS by BRYAN W. CANNON, as Successor Trustee, and CitiFinancial Mortgage Inc., current Company,

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Beneficiary, under the Deed of Trust dated July 31, 2000, made by SCHALONACA BRUNSILIUS, as Trustor recorded August 2, 2000 as Entry No. 1606087 in Book 2676 at page 1162 of official records of DAVIS county, given to secure indebtedness in favor of CitiFinancial Mortgage Company, Inc. by reason of certain obligations secured thereby. Notice of Default was recorded June 29, 2011 as Entry No. 26090409 of said official records. Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder payable in lawful money of the United States, without warranty as to title, possession or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender the purchase price in the amount bid within 24 hours of the sale by cashiers check. The address of the property is purported to be 147 North Willow Street, Layton, UT 84041 more particularly described as follows: LOT 15, CHURCH STREET SUBDIVISION, LAYTON CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF. 10-0990015 The undersigned disclaims liability for any error in the address. The record owner(s) of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default are Schalonaca Brunsilius. This sale is for the purpose of paying obligations secured by said Deed of Trust including fees, charges and expenses of Trustee, advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, interest thereon and the unpaid principal of the note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as in said note and by law provided. Bidders must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon the day following the sale. The deposit must be in the form of a bank or credit union cashier’s check or bank official check payable to Bryan W. Cannon and Associates. The balance must be in the form of a wire transfer, bank or credit union cashiers check, bank official check or U.S. Postal money order payable to Bryan W. Cannon and Associates. Cash payments are not accepted. A trustee’s deed will be delivered to the successful bidder within three business days after receipt of the amount bid. DATED this 3rd day of November, 2011 BRYAN W. CANNON 8619 South Sandy Parkway Building A, Suite 111 Sandy, Utah 84070 www.cannonfirm.com Office Hours: M-F 8am – 5pm Phone: (801) 255-7475 Cannon File # 90020865 C-8067 11/3-17 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale, at the Justice Complex, Court’s Building, 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah 84025, on December 7, 2011, at 3:00 p.m. of said day, for the purpose of foreclosing a trust deed dated May 30, 2007, and executed by KATHY J. ERICKSON, as Trustor, in favor of AMERICA FIRST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION as Beneficiary, which Trust Deed was recorded on June 4, 2007, as Entry No. 2276671, in Book 4296, at Page 1681, in the Official Records of Davis County, State of Utah covering real property purportedly located at 597 West 1750 North, Clinton, Utah 84015 in Davis County, Utah, and more particu-

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larly described as: LOT 24, DEANETTA SUBDIVISION, AMENDED PLAT, UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, ON FILE IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER. Tax ID: 13-095-0024 The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is AMERICA FIRST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is KATHY J. ERICKSON. Bidders must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 2:00 p.m. the day following the sale. Both the deposit and the balance must be paid to Lincoln Title Insurance Agency in the form of a wire transfer, cashier’s check or certified funds. Cash payments, personal checks or trust checks are not accepted. DATED: October 28, 2011. LINCOLN TITLE INSURANCE AGENCY by: Paula Maughan its: Vice President Telephone: (801) 476-0303 web site: www.smithknowles.com SK File No. 11-0060 C-8069 11/3-17 T.S. No. 201000058 - 33314 Title Order No. 10-01122 Loan No. 5000001932 Notice of Trustee Sale The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances, payable in lawful money of the United States, at At the main entrance of the Davis County District Court Bountiful Department 805 South Main Street Bountiful, Utah 84010, on 11/29/2011 at 10:30 a.m., for the purpose of foreclosing a Trust Deed dated 02/01/2007 and executed by Cary A. Valerio and Jodee S. Valerio, as Trustor in favor of America West Bank, as Beneficiary, covering the following real property located in Davis County, Utah; Lot 130, SummerWood Estates A Subdivision, Phase 1, Subdivision of Part of Section 7, Township 1 North, Range 1 East, Salt Lake Base Meridian Parcel I.D. No. 01-244-0130 The street address of the property is purported to be: 4140 South Summer Meadow Drive, Bountiful, Utah 84010 The undersigned disclaims any liability for any error in the street address. The current Beneficiary of the trust deed is 2010-2SFR Venture, LLC and the record owner of the property as of the recording of this notice is reported to be Cary A Valerio and Jodee S Valerio. Bidders must be prepared to tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 10:00 am. the day following the sale. Both payments must be in the form of a Cashier’s Check. Cash is not acceptable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. James H. Woodall 10808 River Front Parkway, Suite 175 South Jordan, Utah 84095 Office: (801) 254-9450 Hours: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Date: October 25, 2011 Sale Information Line: 714-480-5690 Sale Information Website: http://www.ascentex.com/websales/ Reinstatement and PayOff Requests: (714)-480-5472 THIS NOTICE IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE TAC: 948515 PUB: 11/03 11/10 11/17/11 C-8061


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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Monday, November 21, 2011, at the hour of 4:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Brent J. Sorensen, in favor of Maverick Financial Corp, covering real property located at approximately 819 West 75 North, Kaysville, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: ALL OF LOT 64, BARNES COUNTRY ESTATES NO. 5, KAYSVILLE CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF 11-355-0064 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Brent J. Sorensen and Kristen Sorensen. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustee’s sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 17th day of October, 2011 Marlon L. Bates, Successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94084-1113 C-8039 10/20-11/3 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Monday, November 28, 2011, at the hour of 8:30 a.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Clark Spencer and Lindsay Spencer, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, a Washington corporation, covering real property located at approximately 1296 Elk Hollow Road, North Salt Lake, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: ALL OF LOT 1117, EAGLEWOOD COVE PHASE 11, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDERS OFFICE. 01-264-1117 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Clark Spencer and Lindsay Spencer. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustee’s sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the

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money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 18th day of October, 2011 Marlon L. Bates, Successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 51121-17 C-8042 10/27-11/10 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Monday, December 5, 2011, at the hour of 3:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Garrett Grundy and Tamara Grundy, in favor of Long Beach Mortgage Company, covering real property located at approximately 2371 North 1220 West, Clinton, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: LOT 6, SHRON ESTATES NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, RECORDS OF DAVIS COUNTY, STATE OF UTAH. 13-228-0006 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-1, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Garrett Grundy and Tamara Grundy. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustee’s sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 31st day of October, 2011 Marlon L. Bates Successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-1706 C-8072 11/3-17 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS Notice is hereby given that the Woods Cross Planning Commission will hold a public hearing to consider a proposed amendment to the City General Plan on Tuesday, November 22, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. in the Woods Cross City Municipal Building, 1555 South 800 West, Woods Cross, Utah. Furthermore, the Woods Cross City Council will hold a public hearing on the same matter on December 6, 2011 at 6:30 p.m. in the Woods Cross City Municipal Building, 1555 South 800 West, Woods Cross, Utah. The proposed General Plan amendment deals with the area west of Redwood Road between 5th South and approximately 1300 South. You are invited to attend these meetings and provide your input. If you wish to comment, but are unable to attend, contact the City Planner at 292-4421. A copy of the proposed amendment is available for review at the Woods Cross City Municipal Building at 1555 South 800 West, Woods Cross, Utah. C-8073 11/3

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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 12-370-0044 Trust No. 1330204-07 Ref: Jared L Stoddard TRA: Loan No. IMPORTANT xxxx9402. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED November 14, 2002. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THIS PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On November 22, 2011, at 10:30am, James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under a Deed of Trust recorded November 21, 2002, as Instrument No. 1806571, in Book 3172, Page 851-865, of the Official Records in the office at the County Recorder of Davis County, State of Utah, executed by Jared L. Stoddard and Shelly L. Stoddard, Husband And Wife, will sell at public auction to highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. Successful bidders must tender a deposit of $5,000 in certified funds to the trustee at the time of sale, with the balance due by noon the following business day, at the office of the Trustee. At the main entrance of the davis county district court Bountiful Department, 805 South Main Street Bountiful Utah all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: All of lot 44, parkwood estates phase iv, syracuse city, Davis county, according to the official plat thereof.. The street address and other common designation of the real property described above is purported to be: 2480 South 1375 West Syracuse Ut 84075. Estimated Total Debt as of November 22, 2011 is $216,895.12. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is: Bac Home Loans Servicing, Lp Fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing Lp. The record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are: Jared L Stoddard and Shelly L Stoddard. Dated: October 19, 2011. James H. Woodall 10808 River Front Parkway, Suite 175 South Jordan Ut 84095 (801)2549450 (800)245-1886 (Hotline) Hours: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Signature/by: James H. Woodall R-392435 10/20/11, 10/27/11, 11/03/11 C-7986 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 08-385-0075 Trust No. 1330531-07 Ref: Jeff B Moore TRA: Loan No. xxxxxx4729. IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED November 30, 2009. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THIS PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONOn TACT A LAWYER. November 22, 2011, at 10:30am, James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under a Deed of Trust recorded December 07, 2009, as Instrument No. 2497840, in Book 4915, Page 71-78, of the Official Records in the office at the County Recorder of Davis County, State of Utah, executed by Jeff B Moore and Crystal W Moore Husband And Wife As Joint Tenants, will sell at public auction to highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. Successful bidders must tender a deposit of $5,000 in certified funds to the trustee at the time of sale, with the balance due by noon the following business day, at the office of the Trustee. At the main entrance of the davis county district court Bountiful Department, 805 South Main Street Bountiful Utah all right, title and interest conveyed to and

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LEGAL NOTICES

now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Lot 75, webster farms no. 3, according to the official plat thereof as recorded in the office of the Davis county recorder, state of Utah.. The street address and other common designation of the real property described above is purported to be: 611 South Wellington Drive Kaysville Ut 84037. Estimated Total Debt as of November 22, 2011 is $325,351.57. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is: Gmac Mortgage, Llc. The record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are: Jeff B Moore and Crystal W Moore. Dated: October 19, 2011. James H. Woodall 10808 River Front Parkway, Suite 175 South Jordan Ut 84095 (801)2549450 (800)245-1886 (Hotline) Hours: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Signature/by: James H. Woodall R-392485 10/20/11, 10/27/11, 11/03/11 C-7987 RESOLUTION NO. 2011-10-1 A RESOLUTION CANCELLING THE CENTRAL DAVIS SEWER DISTRICT 2011 ELECTION FOR DISTRICT TRUSTEES WHEREAS, the pursuant to Section 17B-1-306 of the Utah Code Annotated, as amended, the Central Davis Sewer District (“District”) is authorized to call an election for the election of persons to the District’s Board of Trustees to coincide with municipal general elections held in odd numbered years; and WHEREAS, with respect to the 2011 trustee election, the number of candidates for at-large trustee positions does not exceed the number of open atlarge District offices for trustee for which the candidates have filed; and WHEREAS, there are no other District ballot propositions to be submitted for election; and WHEREAS, Section 20A-1206 of the Utah Code Annotated, as amended, authorizes the District’s Board of Trustees to cancel the trustee election due to the foregoing circumstances; and WHEREAS, the Board of Trustees has determined that cancellation of the trustee election will eliminate unnecessary expenses and will be in the best interest of the public; NOW, THEREFORE, IT IS HEREBY RESOLVED BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE CENTRAL DAVIS SEWER DISTRICT AS FOLLOWS: 1. Findings and Declaration. Steven Brough and Carol Page have filed as candidates for the two open offices of District Trustee and are unopposed. Accordingly, the Board of Trustees hereby declares them to be elected as District Trustees with their respective to terms to commence on January 1, 2012. 2. Cancellation of Election and Notice. The Districts Board of Trustees hereby cancels the 2011 District Election for Trustees and directs staff to give notice of cancellation of the Trustee Election for 2011 as follows: A. Posting a copy of this Resolution on the Statewide Electronic Voter Information Website and on the District’s website for 15 consecutive days prior to Tuesday, November 8, 2011. B. Publishing a copy of this Resolution at least twice in a newspaper of general circulation within the District prior to November 8, 2011. Effective Date. This 3. Resolution shall become effective immediately upon its passage. PASSED AND ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF CENTRAL DAVIS SEWER DISTRICT ON THIS 3RD DAY OF OCTOBER, 2011 CENTRAL DAVIS SEWER DISTRICT By: SUSAN HOLMES

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Classifieds

LEGAL NOTICES

Chair, Board of Trustees ATTEST: JOHN THACKER CLERK C-8007 10/13, 11/3 NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND THE ANNOUNCEMENT OF APPOINTMENT Probate No. 113700363 EI In the Second Judicial District Court for Davis County, State of Utah. In the matter of the Estate of: EVA GERALDINE HAMBLIN BARTON, Deceased. In the Estate of EVA GERALDINE HAMBLIN BARTON deceased, JEFFERY HALE BARTON, whose address is 8 Saddle Ridge, Fort Morgan, Colorado 80701-4202, has hereby been duly appointed the Personal Representative of the Estate of the above-named Decedent on October 25, 2011. Creditors of the Estate are hereby notified to present their claims to the above-named Personal Representative or to the Clerk of the above Court within three [3] months after the date of the first publication of this notice or be forever barred, pursuant to the provisions of UTAH CODE ANN. §75-3-801 et. seq., [1993], as amended. DATED this 28th day of October, 2011. FRANK A. ROYBAL, Attorney for the Estate of Eva Geraldine Hamblin Barton C-8074 11/3-17 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Monday, December 5, 2011, at the hour of 3:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Dennis M. Walsh, in favor of Residential Mortgage & Investment, Inc., covering real property located at approximately 850 West 600 North, West Bountiful, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT “A” FOR LEGAL DESCRIPTION PARCEL NO.’S 06-036-0122, 06-036-125 AND 06-036-0127 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Long Beach Mortgage Loan Trust 2005-WL1, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default was Haycock Family Preparedness, LLC. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the The following business day. trustee reserves the right to cancel the foreclosure after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so cancelled, the only recourse of the purchaser is to receive a refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 31st day of October, 2011 Marlon L. Bates Successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-122 EXHIBIT “A” BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, NORTH MILL CREEK PLAT, IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST, SALT LAKE BASE AND MERIDIAN; AND RUNNING THENCE WEST 896.28 FEET MORE OR LESS; THENCE NORTH 0°57’52” WEST 176.16 FEET MORE OR

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LESS TO A POINT 175.5 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 2; THENCE EAST 320.36 FEET MORE OR LESS, TO THE PROPERTY CONVEYED IN BOOK 1526 AND PAGE 1083; THENCE SOUTH 0°15’ EAST 156.57 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF A 16.5 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY; THENCE NORTH 89°56’46” EAST 310 FEET TO A POINT 16.5 FEET NORTH AND 272.25 FEET WEST OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 2; THENCE EAST 269.25 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 16.5 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO: BEGINNING AT A POINT 16.5 FEET NORTH AND 272.25 FEET WEST AND NORTH 0°15’ WEST 156.42 FEET AND NORTH 89°58’35” WEST 110.0 FEET FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, NORTH MILL CREEK PLAT, SAID POINT BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF PARCEL DESCRIBED IN BOOK 796, PAGE 264; AND RUNNING THENCE NORTH 89°58’36” WEST 200 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0°15’ EAST 156.57 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF A 1 ROD RIGHT OF WAY; THENCE NORTH 89°56’45” EAST 200.0 FEET ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY TO A POINT 379.25 FEET WEST OF THE WEST LINE OF A 72 FOOT WIDE STREET; THENCE NORTH 0°15’ WEST 156.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM ANY PORTION CONTAINED WITHIN THAT CERTAIN QUIT CLAIM DEED DATED DECEMBER 26, 1992 AND RECORDED DECEMBER 31, 1992, AS ENTRY NO. 1010736 IN BOOK 1569 AT PAGE 1183-1184. TOGETHER WITH A RIGHT OF WAY FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS TO BE USED IN COMMON WITH OTHERS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY AND RUNNING THENCE EAST 579.25 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF A STREET; THENCE 16.5 FEET SOUTH ALONG SAID STREET; THENCE WEST 579.25 FEET; THENCE NORTH 16.5 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO: BEGINNING AT A POINT WHICH IS SOUTH 89°45’46” WEST 865.80 FEET ALONG A FENCE LINE ON THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, NORTH MILL CREEK PLAT, BOUNTIFUL TOWNSITE SURVEY FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 2, SAID POINT OF BEGINNING BEING ALSO SOUTH 89°44’06” WEST 236.34 FEET TO REFERENCE AND NORTH MONUMENT 4°44’54” EAST 386.19 FEET TO AN EXISTING BRASS MONUMENT AT THE CENTERLINE INTERSECTION OF 400 NORTH STREET AND 800 WEST STREET AND NORTH 0°21’19” WEST 699.48 FEET ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF 800 WEST STREET AND SOUTH 89°45’46” WEST 898.80 FEET ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 2 FROM THE CENTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST, SALT LAKE BASE AND MERIDIAN, AND RUNTHENCE SOUTH NING 89°45’46” WEST 29 FEET ALONG A WIRE FENCE ON SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 2; THENCE NORTH 0°57’52��� WEST 176.16 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO AN EXISTING WIRE FENCE; THENCE NORTH 89°51’22” EAST 29 FEET ALONG SAID WIRE FENCE; THENCE SOUTH 0°57’52” EAST 176.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A RIGHT OF WAY TO BE USED IN COMMON WITH OTHERS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, NORTH MILL CREEK PLAT, BOUNTIFUL TOWNSITE SURVEY WHICH POINT IS ALSO SOUTH 89°44’06” WEST 236.34 FEET TO REFERENCE MONUMENT AND NORTH 4°44’54” EAST 386.19 FEET TO AN EXISTING BRASS MONUMENT AT THE CENTERLINE INTERSECTION OF 400 NORTH STREET AND 800 WEST STREET AND NORTH 0°21’19” WEST 899.48 FEET ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF


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Classifieds CLIPPER • THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 2011 LEGAL NOTICES

800 WEST STREET AND SOUTH 89°45’46” WEST 33.00 FEET FROM THE CENTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST, SALT LAKE BASE AND MERIDIAN, AND RUNNING THENCE SOUTH 89°45’46” WEST 894.8 FEET ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 2 AND AN EXISTING FENCE LINE; THENCE NORTH 0°57’52” WEST 16.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89°45’46” EAST 894.96 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0°21’19” EAST 16.50 FEET ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID 800 WEST STREET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. MORE CORRECTLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, NORTH MILL CREEK PLAT, IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST, SALT LAKE BASE AND MERIDIAN; AND RUNNING THENCE WEST 896.28 FEET MORE OR LESS; THENCE NORTH 0°57’52” WEST 176.16 FEET MORE OR LESS TO A POINT 175.5 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 2; THENCE EAST 320.36 FEET MORE OR LESS, TO THE PROPERTY CONVEYED IN BOOK 1526 AND PAGE 1083; THENCE SOUTH 0°15’ EAST 156.57 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF A 16.5 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY; THENCE NORTH 89°56’46” EAST 310 FEET TO A POINT 16.5 FEET NORTH AND 272.25 FEET WEST OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 2; THENCE EAST 269.25 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 16.5 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO: BEGINNING AT A POINT 16.5 FEET NORTH AND 272.25 FEET WEST AND NORTH 0°15’ WEST 156.42 FEET AND NORTH 89°58’35” WEST 110.0 FEET FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, NORTH MILL CREEK PLAT, SAID POINT BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF PARCEL DESCRIBED IN BOOK 796, PAGE 264; AND RUNNING THENCE NORTH 89°58’36” WEST 200 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0°15’ EAST 156.57 FEET TO THE NORTH LINE OF A 1 ROD RIGHT OF WAY; THENCE NORTH 89°56’45” EAST 200.0 FEET ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY TO A POINT 379.25 FEET WEST OF THE WEST LINE OF A 72 FOOT THENCE WIDE STREET; NORTH 0°15’ WEST 156.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM ANY PORTION CONTAINED WITHIN THAT CERTAIN QUIT CLAIM DEED DATED DECEMBER 26, 1992 AND RECORDED DECEMBER 31, 1992, AS ENTRY NO. 1010736 IN BOOK 1569 AT PAGE 1183-1184. TOGETHER WITH A RIGHT OF WAY FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS TO BE USED IN COMMON WITH OTHERS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY AND RUNNING THENCE EAST 579.25 FEET TO THE WEST LINE OF A STREET; THENCE 16.5 FEET SOUTH ALONG SAID STREET; THENCE WEST 579.25 FEET; THENCE NORTH 16.5 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING ALSO: BEGINNING AT A POINT WHICH IS SOUTH 89°45’46” WEST 865.80 FEET ALONG A FENCE LINE ON THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, NORTH MILL CREEK PLAT, BOUNTIFUL TOWNSITE SURVEY FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 2, SAID POINT OF BEGINNING BEING ALSO SOUTH 89°44’06” WEST 236.34 FEET TO REFERENCE AND NORTH MONUMENT 4°44’54” EAST 386.19 FEET TO AN EXISTING BRASS MONUMENT AT THE CENTERLINE INTERSECTION OF 400 NORTH STREET AND 800 WEST STREET AND NORTH 0°21’19” WEST 699.48 FEET ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF 800 WEST STREET AND SOUTH 89°45’46” WEST 898.80 FEET ALONG SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 2 FROM THE CENTER OF SECTION 24,

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TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST, SALT LAKE BASE AND MERIDIAN, AND RUNNING THENCE SOUTH 89°45’46” WEST 29 FEET ALONG A WIRE FENCE ON SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 2; THENCE NORTH 0°57’52” WEST 176.16 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO AN EXISTING WIRE FENCE; THENCE NORTH 89°51’22” EAST 29 FEET ALONG SAID WIRE FENCE; THENCE SOUTH 0°57’52” EAST 176.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A RIGHT OF WAY TO BE USED IN COMMON WITH OTHERS OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLOWING: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, BLOCK 6, NORTH MILL CREEK PLAT, BOUNTIFUL TOWNSITE SURVEY WHICH POINT IS ALSO SOUTH 89°44’06” WEST 236.34 FEET TO REFERENCE MONUMENT AND NORTH 4°44’54” EAST 386.19 FEET TO AN EXISTING BRASS MONUMENT AT THE CENTERLINE INTERSECTION OF 400 NORTH STREET AND 800 WEST STREET AND NORTH 0°21’19” WEST 899.48 FEET ALONG SAID CENTERLINE OF 800 WEST STREET AND SOUTH 89°45’46” WEST 33.00 FEET FROM THE CENTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 NORTH, RANGE 1 WEST, SALT LAKE BASE AND MERIDIAN, AND RUNNING THENCE SOUTH 89°45’46” WEST 894.8 FEET ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 2 AND AN EXISTING FENCE LINE; THENCE NORTH 0°57’52” WEST 16.50 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89°45’46” EAST 894.96 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 0°21’19” EAST 16.50 FEET ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID 800 WEST STREET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. C-8071 11/3-17 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Monday, December 5, 2011, at the hour of 3:00 p.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Scott Gilbert Adamson and Patricia H. Adamson, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, a Washington corporation, covering real property located at approximately 940 East Windsor Lane, Bountiful, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: LOT 1122, CHELSEA COVE SUBDIVISION, PLAT NO. 11, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER. 01-132-1122 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is Bank of America, National Association successor by merger to LaSalle Bank NA as trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2005-AR15, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Scott Gilbert Adamson and Patricia H. Adamson. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustee’s sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to THIS IS AN the trustee. ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 26th day of October, 2011 Marlon L. Bates, Successor trustee

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Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-902 C-8066 11/3-17 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED FEBRUARY 22, 2008. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT THE PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. The following described property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. The foreclosure sale through public auction will be held on the front entrance of the Davis County Courthouse in Farmington at 800 West State Street, Farmington, Utah on Thursday, December 1, 2011 at 8:30 a.m. This sale is being held for the purpose of foreclosing a Deed of Trust originally executed by Brett and Suzanne Zaugg, the Trustor, in favor of First National Bank of Layton, covering real property located in Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: PARCEL 1: Brett & Suzanne Zaugg: 64 North Canyon Cover, West Point, Utah A PART OF LOT 132, MOUNTAIN SHADOWS, WEST POINT CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 132 AND RUNNING THENCE FOUR COURSES ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 132 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 0°09’35” EAST 97.98 FEET, NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS CURVE TO THE LEFT 96.02 FEET (LONG CHORD BEARS NORTH 24°46’27 EAST 81.93 FEET) NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC OF A 30.00 FOOT RADIUS CURVE TO THE LEFT 15.92 FEET (LONG CHORD BEARS NORTH 15°02’28” WEST 15.73 FEET) AND NORTH 0°09’35” EAST 27.39 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89°39’25” EAST 273.50 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF SAID LOT 132, THENCE NORTH 89°45’ WEST 303.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF LESS AND BEGINNING. EXCEPTING: A PART OF LOT 132, MOUNTAIN SHADOWS, WEST POINT CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH, BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT SAID LOT 132, AND RUNNING THENCE SOUTH 0°09’35” WEST 104.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89°39’25” WEST 273.50 THENCE NORTH FEET, 0°09’25” EAST 104.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89°39’25” EAST 273.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 2: Zaugg Construction: 1891 West Ridge Point Drive, West Point, Utah ALL OF LOT 131, MOUNTAIN SHADOWS, WEST POINT CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH. PARCEL 3: Zaugg Construction: 61 North Canyon Cove, West Point, Utah ALL OF LOT 134, MOUNTAIN SHADOWS, WEST POINT CITY, DAVIS COUNTY, UTAH. The current beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is First National Bank of Layton and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is Brett and Suzanne Zaugg. The successful bidder must tender to the trustee a $5,000.00 deposit at the sale and the balance of the purchase price by 12:00 noon on Friday, December 2, 2011 in the Trustee’s Salt Lake office. Both the deposit and the balance must be in the form of a wire transfer, cashier’s check or certified funds payable to Richards, Brandt, Miller Nelson. Cash payments will not be accepted. A trustee’s deed will be delivered to the successful bidder within three business days after receipt of the amount bid. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, con-

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dition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. DATED this 19th day of October, 2011 /s/ Wayne Z. Bennett Trustee Richards Brandt Miller Nelson 299 South Main Street, 15th Floor Salt Lake City, UT 84111 (801) 531-2000 C-8046 10/27-11/10 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE APN: 12-457-0010 Trust No. 1330602-07 Ref: Michele Page TRA: Loan No. xxxx0238. IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED May 08, 2003. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THIS PROCEEDING, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On December 06, 2011, at 10:30am, James H. Woodall, as duly appointed Trustee under a Deed of Trust recorded May 14, 2003, as Instrument No. 1865731, in Book 3290, Page 877-891, of the Official Records in the office at the County Recorder of Davis County, State of Utah, executed by Michele Page, An Unmarried Woman, will sell at public auction to highest bidder, payable in lawful money of the United States at the time of sale. Successful bidders must tender a deposit of $5,000 in certified funds to the trustee at the time of sale, with the balance due by noon the following business day, at the office of the Trustee. At the main entrance of the davis county district court Bountiful Department, 805 South Main Street Bountiful Utah all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Lot 10, springfield estates phase 1 subdivision, according to the official plat thereof, records of Davis county, state of Utah.. The street address and other common designation of the real property described above is purported to be: 94 East 2275 South Clearfield Ut 84015. Estimated Total Debt as of December 06, 2011 is $146,342.83. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The current beneficiary of the Trust Deed as of the date of this notice is: Bank of America, N.a., Successor By Merger To Bac Home Loans Servicing, Lp Fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, Lp. The record owner of the property as of the recording of the Notice of Default is/are: Michele Page. Dated: October 27, 2011. James H. Woodall 10808 River Front Parkway, Suite 175 South Jordan Ut 84095 (801)2549450 (800)245-1886 (Hotline) Hours: 9:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Signature/by: James H. Woodall R-393563 11/03/11, 11/10/11, 11/17/11 C-8026 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Monday, November 28, 2011, at the hour of 8:30 a.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by Sarah Seifert, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., covering real property located at approximately 278 West 870 North, Sunset, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: LOT 12, BLOCK H, SCOTTSDALE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN

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THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER, STATE OF UTAH. 14-074-0135 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is Citibank, N.A. as Trustee for the Certificateholders of Structured Asset Mortgage Investments II, Inc., Bear Stearns ALT-A Trust, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-4, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is Sarah Seifert. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustees sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 21st day of October, 2011 Marlon L. Bates, Successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 31045-143 C-8049 10/27-11/10 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE The following described real property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, purchase price payable in lawful money of the United States of America at the time of sale, at the east main entrance of the Davis County Courthouse, 800 West State, Farmington, Utah, on Monday, November 28, 2011, at the hour of 8:30 a.m. of that day for the purpose of foreclosing a deed of trust originally executed by David C. Wolfard, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank fsb, covering real property located at approximately 989 East Canyon Creek Drive, Bountiful, Davis County, Utah, and more particularly described as: LOT 713, CHELSEA COVE SUBDIVISION, PLAT NO. 7, ACCORDING TO THE OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, ON FILE AND OF RECORD IN BOOK 2112 OF PLATS, AT PAGE 1516 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE DAVIS COUNTY RECORDER. 01-1330713 The current beneficiary of the trust deed is JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, and the record owner of the property as of the recording of the notice of default is David C. Wolfard. The trustee’s sale of the aforedescribed real property will be made without warranty as to title, possession, or encumbrances. Bidders must be prepared to tender $5,000.00 in certified funds at the sale and the balance of the purchase price in certified funds by 10:00 a.m. the following business day. The trustee reserves the right to void the effect of the trustee’s sale after the sale based upon information unknown to the trustee at the time of the sale, such as a bankruptcy filing, a loan reinstatement, or an agreement between the trustor and beneficiary to postpone or cancel the sale. If so voided, the only recourse of the highest bidder is to receive a full refund of the money paid to the trustee. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 21st day of October, 2011 Marlon L. Bates Successor trustee Scalley Reading Bates Hansen & Rasmussen, P.C. 15 West South Temple, Ste. 600 Salt Lake City, Utah 84101 Telephone: (801) 531-7870 Business Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Trustee No. 94100-2320 C-8050 10/27-11/10

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NOTICE TO WATER USERS The following applications requesting an EXTENSION OF TIME WITHIN WHICH TO SUBMIT PROOF OF BENEFICAL USE have been filed with the State Engineer. It is represented that additional time is needed to place the water to beneficial use in Davis county. For more information or to receive a copy of filings, visit http://waterrights.utah.gov or call 1-866-882-4426. Persons objecting to an application must file a CLEARLY READABLE protest stating FILING NUMBER, REASONS FOR OBJECTION, PROTESTANTS` NAME AND RETURN ADDRESS, and any request for a hearing. Protest AND A $15 PROCESSING FEE MUST BE FILED with the State Engineer, Box 146300, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6300 ON OR BEFORE NOVEMBER 23, 2011. These are informal proceedings as per Rule R655-6-2 of the Division of Water Rights. (The Period of Use is generally year-round except irrigation which is generally from Apr 1 to Oct 31 each year.) EXTENSION(S) 31-2284 (A22912): South Davis County Water Improvement District is/are filing an extension for 0.2 cfs. from groundwater (North S.L./Val Verda/Bountiful) for MUNICIPAL: In South Davis County Water Improv. Dist. 31-4889 (A62513): Utah State University is/are filing an extension for 5.0 cfs. from the Barton`s Pond (in Kaysville) for IRRIGATION. 31-5179 (F70960): Mike and Robbin Jung is/are filing an extension for 0.015 cfs or 1.0 ac-ft. from groundwater (West Farmington) for IRRIGATION; DOMESTIC. Kent L. Jones, P.E. STATE ENGINEER C-8047 10/27-11/3 Stock-N-Lock Storage Auction Notice 240 N. 400 W., 181 N. 400 W., Kaysville, UT 84037, Friday, November 18th @ 11:00 am Ronn Zowerwein, 37 W. 1070 S., St. George, UT 84770 Household Goods, skis, mountain bikes Kyle Hirase, 4902 Choctaw Ave., W. Valley City, UT 84120 Household Goods, clothes John Scott Simonich, 3450 S. 8000 W. #324, Magna, UT 84044 Household goods, furniture, cabinet, sofa, tool cabinet, entertainment center, mountain bike, skis Jeff Hughes, 95 S. 600 E., Kaysville, UT 84037 TV’s, lawn mower, household goods, gas grill, crib, toys, clothes RaNae Thompson, 600 W. Mutton Hollow Road #103, Kaysville, UT 84037 Household Goods and Personal Items C-8075 11/3-10 NOTICE TO CREDITORS MILDRED E. HARMAN, Deceased Pursuant to Section 75-7-508, Utah Code Annotated, WYNN J. HARMAN, whose address is 2140 West Dakota Drive, Farmington, Utah 84025, as Trustee of the Harman Family Trust, dated March 30, 1989, hereby gives notice that MILDRED E. HARMAN, the Trustmaker of said Trust, died on Oct. 31, 2011. Creditors of the deceased Trustmaker are hereby notified to deliver or mail their written claims to the Trustee at the address above within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice or be forever barred. William L.Prater, Attorney DATED this 31st day of October, 2011. WYNN J. HARMAN, Trustee Date of first publication: Nov. 3, 2011. C-8076 11/3-17 SOUTH DAVIS WATER DISTRICT NOTICE OF CANCELLATION OF 2011 BOARD OF TRUSTEES ELECTION Pursuant to Utah Code Ann. §§ 17B-l-306(4)(g) and 20A-1206(3) and (4), notice is hereby given that the 2011 South Davis Water District Board of Trustees Election is cancelled because there is only one seat up for election, the lone candidate is unopposed, and there is no other District ballot proposition to be considered by the voters. Anyone having questions should contact Lynne Johnston, District Clerk, at (801) 295-4468. C-8048 10/27-11/3


Davis Clipper November 3, 2011