Page 1

THE DAVID SHELDRICK WILDLIFE TRUST USA 2017 Fiscal Year Report to Contributors

S l i f e Tr u s t U

A

W

ild


DSWT MISSION STATEMENT The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust embraces all measures that complement the conservation, preservation, and protection of wildlife. These include antipoaching efforts; safeguarding the natural environment; enhancing community awareness; addressing animal welfare issues; providing veterinary assistance to animals in need; and rescuing and hand-rearing orphaned elephants, rhinos, and other species so that they can ultimately enjoy a quality of life in the wild.


THE DSWT: CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF CONSERVATION

1


ABOUT THE DAVID SHELDRICK WILDLIFE TRUST Born from one family’s passion for Kenya and its

The DSWT, which celebrated its 40th anniversary in 2017,

wilderness, the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is the most

has become a global force for wildlife conservation. Since

successful orphan-elephant rescue and rehabilitation

its inception, it has successfully rescued and raised over

program in the world and one of the pioneering

230 orphaned elephants, accomplishing its long-term

conservation organizations for wildlife protection in

conservation objective by reintegrating them back into

East Africa.

the wild herds of Tsavo. Working in collaboration with

As the first warden of Tsavo East National Park, David Sheldrick charted a new course for conservation in Kenya, securing wilderness, studying flora and fauna, and

2

the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), the DSWT’s field efforts extend across Kenya, preserving wilderness and protecting its wild residents.

combating poaching and other threats to wildlife. Daphne

The Sheldrick family remains at the heart of the

worked alongside her husband, and their home quickly

organization; David and Daphne’s daughter Angela serves

became a haven for all manner of orphaned animals,

as CEO and has been overseeing the DSWT for nearly

with the first elephant and rhino orphans arriving in

two decades. Her husband, Robert Carr-Hartley, and their

1952. After David’s passing in 1977, Daphne founded the

sons Taru and Roan, are equally passionate about Kenya’s

DSWT to realize his vision and build on the conservation

wildlife and work alongside Angela to ensure that David

foundations they had laid in the preceding decades.

and Daphne’s legacy continues.


THE SHELDRICKS: A LEGACY OF CONSERVATION DAVID LESLIE WILLIAM SHELDRICK, MBE David Sheldrick is the namesake of and the inspiration for the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. He devoted his storied career — which spanned two decades with the Royal National Parks of Kenya — to the preservation of nature. As the founding Warden of Tsavo East National Park, David transformed the previously inhospitable and over-poached land into the country’s largest National Park. The DSWT builds on the legacy of conservation that David left behind.

DR. DAME DAPHNE SHELDRICK, DBE Daphne Sheldrick is the founder of the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and an internationally-renowned conservationist. Born in Kenya, she grew up surrounded by animals. This dedication to the wild world extended into adulthood, when Daphne worked alongside her husband David in Tsavo East National Park. She founded the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in his memory in 1977. Perhaps best known for her pioneering work in wildlife rehabilitation, Daphne is widely credited as the first person to perfect the milk formula and husbandry necessary to raise orphaned elephant and rhino calves. She received numerous honors and awards for her accomplishments, including an honorary doctorate from Glasgow University, the Moran of the Order of the Burning Spear by the Kenyan government, and BBC’s Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2006, she was appointed Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire.

ANGELA SHELDRICK Angela Sheldrick heads The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and all its operations in Kenya, a role she has held since 2001. Daughter of David and Daphne Sheldrick, Angela was brought up in the wilds of Tsavo East. In 1996, she married Robert Carr-Hartley, who, like herself, is a fourth generation Kenyan and had a similarly unique childhood growing up amidst Kenya’s wildlife. Angela and Robert designed the very successful digital fostering program in 2001, and with the help of a dedicated team, they have grown the DSWT into the internationally recognized organization it is today. 3


REMEMBERING DAME DAPHNE SHELDRICK 1934 - 2018 In her 83 years on earth, Daphne Sheldrick touched countless lives — from the generations of elephants who are thriving today through her trailblazing conservation work, to people all over the world who drew inspiration from her. Daphne is testament to the difference that a single person can make. Her legacy lives on through the groundbreaking animal husbandry practices she perfected, the field teams she galvanized, and the remarkable organization she founded.

“Daphne was a national treasure and a conservation icon. Her legacy is immeasurable and her passing will reverberate far and wide because the difference she has made for conservation in Kenya is unparalleled.” – Angela Sheldrick

4


5


DSWT USA: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The mission of The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

DSWT USA contributors consist of individuals,

USA (DSWT USA) is to support the work of the David

corporations, private foundations, and public charities.

Sheldrick Wildlife Trust (DSWT) through financial support,

All financial support to the DSWT by DSWT USA is

educational outreach, and public awareness initiatives

made through grants, which are requested by written

that promote wildlife conservation in Kenya. Each year,

application. All grants are approved by the Board of

DSWT USA compiles its annual report to contributors,

Directors and are the subject of written grant agreements

highlighting the DSWT projects and programs that it

with the DSWT, which require proof of expenditure.

funded during the fiscal year.

Thanks to a thriving donor base, the impact of DSWT USA

DSWT USA, formerly known as US Friends of the

continues to grow year-over-year. In the 2017/2018 fiscal

David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, operates with minimal

year, DSWT USA delivered a record total of $4,678,394 in

administrative overhead and has earned a 4-star rating

grants to the DSWT. These grants provided vital funding

from Charity Navigator for its commitment to transparency

for the DSWT’s various conservation programs, including

and accountability. As a Section 501(c) (3) non-profit

the Orphans’ Project, De-Snaring and Aerial Surveillance

organization whose charitable purpose is to support

Teams, Mobile Veterinary Units, Saving Habitats initiatives,

programs and initiatives of the DSWT, contributions made

and general operational support.

to DSWT USA are tax-deductible to the extent provided by law. Funds are managed by its Board of Directors and

Amounts and frequency of grants are dictated solely

disbursed at the Board’s discretion to further DSWT USA’s

by the needs of the Trust and, therefore, annual dollar

charitable purpose.

amounts vary considerably.

TEN YEARS OF DSWT USA FUNDING TO THE DSWT $4,641,920

$1,647,345

$301,990 2008

$422,667 $518,805 2009

2010

$610,291

$552,344

2011

2012

2013

$4,249,372

$4,678,394

$1,344,284

2014

2015*

2016/17

2017/18

*Contributions made during DSWT USA’s fiscal year beginning 4/1/2015 and ended 3/31/2016. Total grants to DSWT between 1/1/2015 and 3/31/15 totaled $801,198. 6


DSWT USA: DELIVERING RESULTS FOR KENYA’S WILDLIFE Together, we’re helping the DSWT make great strides in its conservation efforts. This year, DSWT USA granted over $4.6 million to support the DSWT’s work, encompassing:

$150,981

Mobile Veterinary Units

$254,891

Operational Support

1 $1,045,468

2018

2 Orphans’ Project 3   4   5   6  

$667,078

Aerial Surveillance Program

$1,617,531

Saving Habitats Initiatives

$942,443

De-Snaring Units

7


8


DSWT CONSERVATION PROGRAMS The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust takes a 360-degree approach to conservation, operating six key programs that work in tandem across the country. Through its keystone Orphans’ Project, the DSWT rescues orphaned elephants and raises them until they are ready to be reintegrated back into the Tsavo Conservation Area. Its field teams, veterinary units, and pilots work with the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) to ensure the safety of Kenya’s wildlife and protect its wild spaces. Through its community outreach and habitats initiatives, the DSWT educates Kenyans about the importance of conservation, secures endangered habitats, and mitigates human-wildlife conflict.

ORPHANS’ PROJECT

DE-SNARING UNITS

MOBILE VET UNITS

Rescues, rehabilitates, and raises orphaned elephants and other wildlife until they are ready to be reintegrated back into protected wilderness areas.

Patrol the Tsavo and Meru Conservation Areas to provide anti-poaching support and thwart all manner of threats to wildlife.

Work across Kenya to provide quick and effective treatment to animals in need, saving hundreds of wild lives each year.

AERIAL SURVEILLANCE UNIT

SAVING HABITATS INITIATIVES

COMMUNITY OUTREACH

Pilots take to the skies to safeguard wildlife, monitor for illegal activities, and provide vital support to ground teams.

Safeguard wild spaces across Kenya, protecting habitats for the future and providing viable solutions for the challenges of today’s increasingly developed world.

Strive to improve the living conditions and educational standards of local Kenyans, encouraging communities to protect their wildlife and environment. 9


10


ORPHANS’ PROJECT

RESCUING & RAISING KENYA’S ORPHANED ELEPHANTS The Orphans’ Project, which sits at the heart of the DSWT’s conservation efforts, has gained worldwide recognition for its trailblazing elephant rescue and reintegration program. Each orphan is given personalized care by a team of dedicated Keepers, who serve as the orphans’ surrogate family during the long and complex rehabilitation process. While DSWT is predominantly known for rescuing and raising baby elephants, the Orphans’ Project extends to rhinos, giraffe, and numerous other animals who are orphaned due to poaching, human-wildlife conflict, habitat loss, drought, or the separation from their mothers. The end goal is that each and every orphan rescued by the DSWT is eventually reintegrated back into the wild. To date, the DSWT has rescued and raised over 230 orphaned elephants, with 150 now living wild.

DSWT USA makes yearly grants to support this vital program, finding vital necessities such as specialist milk replacer, veterinary services and supplies, stockades upgrades, and Keepers’ salaries across the Nursery and three Reintegration Units. In 2017, DSWT USA grants also covered costs for extensive renovations at the Voi Reintegration Unit, encompassing the construction of new stockades, fencing, and staff accomodations. The harsh drought that struck Kenya in the latter half of 2017 presented several challenges, and DSWT USA was able to finance several projects that helped the DSWT respond to this crisis. One such initiative, the drilling of a new borehole at Ithumba, provides a safe drinking source for the orphans there and their wild counterparts. DSWT USA also funded the construction of two new stockades at the Nairobi Nursery to accommodate the influx of elephants left orphaned by the drought. Since 2005, DSWT USA has supported the DSWT’s Orphans’ Project through grants totaling $4,363,197.

AT A GLANCE: ORPHANS’ PROJECT 4

230

29

150

units

elephants raised

known wild-born calves

former orphans now living wild

FIVE YEARS OF DSWT USA SUPPORT FOR THE DSWT’S ORPHANS’ PROJECT $1,045,468 $697,383

$184,954 2013

$674,784

$321,570

2014

2015*

2016/17

2017/18

* Represents new DSWT USA fiscal year of 4/1/2015-3/31/2016. Funds granted to Orphans’ Project from 1/1/2015-3/31/2015 totaled $227,133. 11


12


DE-SNARING UNITS

ENFORCING CONSERVATION EFFORTS ACROSS KENYA The DSWT works across the Tsavo Conservation Area to protect wildlife from poachers and other threats. As Kenya’s biggest national park, covering an area roughly the size of Maine and home to the country’s largest population of elephants, Tsavo is a critical location for conservation. To safeguard this land, the DSWT launched its first DeSnaring Unit in partnership with the Kenya Wildlife Service 1999. Now encompassing 11 teams and a Canine Unit, the DSWT has over 60 rangers, plus four tracking dogs and their handlers, working on the front lines to protect Kenya’s wildlife. In 2017, DSWT/KWS field teams arrested 429 wildlife offenders and removed 3,810 snares from the Tsavo Conservation Area.

DSWT USA’s annual grants help the DSWT continue to provide best-in-class wildlife protection. In addition to covering crucial operating expenses, such as ranger salaries, vehicle maintenance, equipment, and rations, DSWT USA also supports new and large-scale initiatives. In 2017, DSWT USA grants helped the DSWT expand and improve its Canine Unit, funding an expert assessment and advanced training for the dogs and their handlers. Human-wildlife conflict remains a looming issue; in 2017 alone, DSWT field units safely moved 577 elephants from community lands. To support these efforts, DSWT USA purchased a specialized vehicle used to transport the elephants back to the safety of protected areas. With rhinos increasingly under threat, DSWT USA grants also established four units devoted to monitoring and protecting the species. Since 2005, DSWT USA has supported the DSWT’s wildlife protection field initiatives through grants totaling $4,558,025.

AT A GLANCE: DE-SNARING UNITS 11

64

429

3,810

De-Snaring Units

DSWT Rangers

arrests made in the TCA in 2017

snares removed from the TCA in 2017

FIVE YEARS OF DSWT USA SUPPORT FOR THE DSWT’S DE-SNARING & WILDLIFE PROTECTION INITIATIVES $1,082,791

$942,443 $781,896

$770,846

$144,587 $0 2013

2014

2015*

2016/17

2017/18

*Represents new DSWT USA fiscal year of 4/1/2015-3/31/2016. Funds granted to De-Snaring & Wildlife Protection initiatives from 1/1/2015-3/31/2015 totaled $288,065. 13


14


AERIAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM FLYING FOR KENYA’S WILDLIFE

The DSWT’s Aerial Surveillance Unit takes to the skies to further the Trust’s conservation initiatives. Working together with the Kenya Wildlife Service, the team complements efforts on the ground by deterring illegal activities, mitigating human-wildlife conflict, and detecting injured wildlife. Four DSWT pilots man a fleet of five fixedwing aircraft and two helicopters, carrying out daily patrols to enhance the security of Kenya’s threatened habitats. In 2017, the Aerial Surveillance Unit flew a total of 1,701 hours and covered 127,989 miles on patrol.

DSWT USA helps keep the Aerial Surveillance Unit in flight. Its annual grants fund essentials such as fuel, equipment, and maintenance for the DSWT’s seven aircraft. In 2017, DSWT USA covered the costs of two crucial helicopter accessories: a Bambi Bucket to support aerial firefighting efforts and a cargo swing to transport external loads. DSWT USA also funded the 2017 operational costs of the Sky Vets program, which flies veterinarians and rangers to the most remote corners of Kenya to treat ill and injured wildlife. Since 2015, DSWT USA has supported the DSWT’s Aerial Surveillance initiatives through grants totaling $2,852,524.

AT A GLANCE: AERIAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM 5

2

4

1,701

fixed-wing aircraft

helicopters

DSWT pilots

hours flown in 2017

THREE YEARS OF DSWT USA SUPPORT FOR THE DSWT’S AERIAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM $1,190,885 $994,561 $667,078

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18 15


16


MOBILE VETERINARY UNITS

PROVIDING A LIFELINE FOR WILDLIFE IN NEED Quick and effective treatment is often the difference between life and death for injured wildlife, and thousands of animals are alive today because the DSWT was able to provide just that. Led by KWS Field Veterinary Officers, the DSWT’s Mobile Veterinary Units and Sky Vets work across Kenya to treat wild patients of all species and ages. In October 2017, it launched its fifth unit, operating in the Mount Kenya area — and already the team has demonstrated its worth, from treating an injured white rhino to de-snaring a zebra to relocating a rogue buffalo.

DSWT USA helps the Mobile Veterinary Units save more wild lives through a variety of grants, subsidizing everything from medical supplies to vehicle maintenance. DSWT USA funded all 2017 operational costs for the Amboseli Mobile Veterinary Unit, which was responsible for one of the most satisfying success stories of the year: the Christmas Eve treatment of a baby elephant who had a cable snare cutting deep into her neck. Not only was the team able to safe the calf’s life, but they also reunited her with her mother, thus preserving another wild family.

In 2017, Mobile Veterinary Units treated 543 wild patients, with an overall success rate of 77%.

Since 2013, DSWT has supported DSWT’s Mobile Vet Units through grants totaling $772,615.

AT A GLANCE: MOBILE VETERINARY UNITS 5

77%

543

5,270

Mobile Veterinary Units

success rate

animal cases treated in 2017

animal cases treated overall

FIVE YEARS OF DSWT USA SUPPORT FOR THE DSWT’S MOBILE VETERINARY UNIT $352,739

$186,229

$150,981 $82,666

2013

2014

2015*

Note: In 2016, all associated program costs for the Mobile Veterinary Units were funded by outside sources. * Represents new DSWT USA fiscal year of 4/1/2015-3/31/2016.

2017/18

17


18


SAVING HABITATS INITIATIVES SECURING KENYA’S WILD SPACES

In the face of encroaching human settlements and agricultural development, securing Kenya’s wild spaces has never been more critical. Since 2007, the DSWT has erected over 100 miles of fence lines to protect park boundaries and preserve migration routes. Its water projects — constructing and maintaining wells, boreholes, and windmills — gives wildlife a lifeline, particularly during droughts like the one experienced in 2017. The DSWT works with the KWS, Kenya Forest Service (KFS), and local communities to manage and protect endangered habitats in the Tsavo Conservation Area, Kibwezi Forest, Amu Ranch, Witu Forest, Peregrine Conservation Area, Mara Conservancy, and Mount Kenya. The DSWT also supports the Mwaluganje Elephant Sanctuary, which is home to some 500 elephants, and the Kimana Sanctuary, which is a crucial migratory corridor for elephants.

DSWT USA supports the DSWT’s Saving Habitats initiatives through a variety of grants. In 2017, it provided the annual salaries for staff stationed at Amu Ranch and Witu Forest, subsidized operating costs in the Galana Conservancy, and funded the construction of permanent bases to bolster security around Mount Kenya. Other grants covered the costs of a backhoe loader and tipper truck to combat invasive plant species in the Tsavo Conservation Area. DSWT USA also funded upgrades to the Meru Rhino Sanctuary, funding the construction of two new security bases and an extended electric perimeter fence. The newand-improved sanctuary, which is currently home to 61 white rhinos and 28 black rhinos, offers a safe haven for the threatened species to flourish. Since 2007, DSWT USA has supported the DSWT’s Saving Habitats initiatives through grants totaling $6,162,132.

In 2017, DSWT Saving Habitats initiatives secured crucial wildlife corridors and endangered lands across Kenya.

AT A GLANCE: SAVING HABITATS INITIATIVES 20,000

15

5,700

89

tree seedlings planted in the Kibwezi forest in 2017

boreholes in TCA providing safe drinking spaces for wildlife

acres of elephant migratory routes protected by the Kimana Sanctuary

rhinos protected in the Meru Rhino Sanctuary

FIVE YEARS OF DSWT USA SUPPORT FOR THE DSWT’S SAVING HABITATS INITIATIVES $2,102,337 $1,617,531 $1,299,128

$193,372

$158,150

2013

2014

2015*

2016/17

2017/18

* Represents new DSWT USA fiscal year of 4/1/2015-3/31/2016. Funds granted for Wildlife and Habitat Protection from 1/1/2015 to 3/31/2015 totaled $123,000. 19


DSWT USA’S IMPACT BY THE NUMBERS Here are some highlights of what your support helped make possible this past fiscal year:

20

12 MONTHS OF SALARIES

4 NEW KENNELS

89 RHINOS

for Keepers at the Nursery and three Reintegration Units

for the DSWT/KWS Canine Unit

protected in the upgraded Meru Rhino Sanctuary

1 ELEPHANT MOVER

2 LAND CRUISERS

3 REINTEGRATION UNITS’

to transport elephants to safety

for the De-Snaring Units to use on patrols

worth of milk formula for the older orphans

4 RHINO MONITORING UNITS

7 AIRCRAFT FUELED

2 TIPPER TRUCKS

to protect the species across Kenya

and maintained for the Aerial Surveillance Unit

to combat invasive species in the Tsavo Conservation Area


23 ORPHANED ELEPHANTS

543 WILD ANIMALS

2 NEW STOCKADES

enjoying upgraded facilities at the Voi Reintegration Unit

treated by the Sky Vets Unit

at the Nursery to accomodate an influx of orphans

3 NEW BOREHOLES

105 INJURED WILDLIFE

20 STAFF MEMBERS

to provide safe drinking sources for wildlife

treated by the Amboseli Mobile Veterinary Unit

to protect Amu Ranch and the Witu Forest

21


DSWT USA FINANCIALS DSWT USA works hard to ensure that as much of every dollar contributed goes directly to the DSWT programs that need them most. We are proud to share that in the 2017/18 fiscal year, more than 91 cents of every dollar went directly to the DSWT’s key conservation programs.

ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURE 2018 2% Income Generation

3% Mobile Vets 5% Operational Support

8% Management/Admin

Mobile Vets   Opera/onal  Support  

31% Habitat Preservation

2018

20% Orphans’ Project Orphans’ Project                         Aerial  Surveillance                   De-­‐Snaring/An/  Poaching   Habitat  Preserva/on           Management/Admin   Income  Genera/on  

13% Aerial Surveillance 18% De-Snaring/Anti Poaching

STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENSES 2018 REVENUE: Contributions Fundraising and Other Merchandise Sales (Gross Profit) TOTAL REVENUE

$4,752,260 $122,067 $28,830 $4,874,327

EXPENSES: Program Expenses Management, Admin Income Generation TOTAL EXPENSES

$4,874,327 $414,808 $94,976 5,291,716*

DSWT USA 2017/18 EXPENSE RATIO: Program Expense 90.4% Management/Admin 7.8% Income Generation 1.8% *Total includes expenditure of a portion of net assets totaling $417,389 from income received in previous years. All figures presented are based on the DSWT USA audited financial reports of the 2017-18 fiscal year prepared by an independent and certified accounting firm.

DSWT USA takes great pride in its transparency and commitment to financial integrity. In 2017, it was once again awarded a four-star charity rating on Charity Navigator and a gold seal of transparency on GuideStar.

22


23

23


STATESIDE SUPPORT FOR THE DSWT DSWT USA spearheads initiatives across the United States to support and raise awareness for the DSWT. It plays a crucial role in connecting Americans with the plight of Africa’s wildlife, bridging the gap between donors and the DSWT, and ultimately increasing the DSWT’s impact on the ground in Kenya. Since its inception, DSWT USA’s goal has been to minimize overhead, maximize grants to the DSWT, and provide outstanding service to supporters. We focus our efforts on communication by: • Distributing regular editions of our electronic newsletter • Supporting donor-driven fundraisers • Providing information about DSWT developments to donors • Running education programs in schools across the country • Advocating legislation around conservation

• Organizing outreach events

The organization takes a multi-pronged approach, spanning legislative support, merchandise offerings, in-person events, and educational outreach. A few highlights from 2017 include:

24

ENORMOUS ELEPHANT RUN

EDUCATION INITIATIVES

Following in the footsteps of successful events in London and New York, DSWT USA brought the Enormous Elephant Run to the West Coast for the first time on March 10, 2018. The run, which took place in Griffith Park in Los Angeles, was an enormous success in terms of both funds and awareness raised:

Every year, DSWT USA focuses efforts on fostering the next generation of wildlife conservationists. Its education initiatives bring the DSWT’s work into schools around the country, teaching students about elephants and how they can contribute to securing their future. The program gained momentum in 2017, with:

$101,853.56 raised for the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

$10,377.97 raised by students for the DSWT in 2017/18

1,136 participants

2,287 new student ambassadors created


WAYS TO GIVE Your contributions allow DSWT USA to provide a steadily increasing level of financial support to the DSWT and its lifesaving programs. When you make a gift to DSWT USA, you make an important impact on wildlife conservation. Below are some of the many ways you can help:

One-time donation

Recurring monthly contributions

Gifts in honor or in memory

Corporate matching gift programs

Estate gifts, including: Bequests Life insurance gifts Retirement Account Beneficiary

Stock contributions

THE DSWT USA TEAM BOARD OF DIRECTORS

STAFF MEMBERS

R. Brian Miller Anne Eisele Jackie Cittone-Magid Jack V. Robertson Stephen Smith

Melissa Sciacca Lauren Becker Heather Carr Mennette Mizrahi

President Vice President/Treasurer Secretary Director Director

Executive Director Donor Relations Associate Fundraising & Events Coordinator Administrative Assistant

Photos Š The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, with thanks to Mia Collis, Freya Dowson, and Leigh Michael Copyright 2018, David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, USA, Inc., All Rights Reserved


S l i f e Tr u s t U

A

W

ild

The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust USA 25283 Cabot Road, Suite 101 Laguna Hills, CA 92653 TEL: EMAIL:

949-305-3785

infous@sheldrickwildlifetrust.org

WEBSITE:

www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org TAX ID:

30-0224549

Profile for Sheldrick Wildlife Trust

DSWT USA Annual Report- Fiscal Year 2017/18  

The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust USA's annual report highlights contributions received by DSWT USA and the expenditure of those funds thro...

DSWT USA Annual Report- Fiscal Year 2017/18  

The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust USA's annual report highlights contributions received by DSWT USA and the expenditure of those funds thro...

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded