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RAVAGO ART COLLECTION Curated by David Benrimon Fine Art


RAVAGO ART COLLECTION 2017 Edition U.S. Headquarters Orlando, Florida


TABLE OF CONTENTS


9

Roy Lichtenstein

143

Shawn Meharg

13

Hank Willis Thomas

147

Charles Fenner Ball

17

Fernando Botero

151

Wayne Thiebaud

21

Robert Longo

155

Morris Louis

27

David T. Kessler

159

James Wyper

31

Ignacio Munoz Vicuno

163

Erin Hanson

35

Bernie Taupin

173

Amy Donaldson

39

Shay Kun

179

Libby Smart

49

Thanasis Lalas

183

Margaret Juul

53

James Nares

195

Keith Haring

63

Gerhard Richter

203

Romero Britto

67

KAWS

214

Installation Shots

71

Trey Speegle

75

Lauren Benrimon

89

Eric Zammitt

93

Jasper Johns

97

Andy Warhol

119

Mark Rothko

123

Vincent Van Gogh

127

Jessica Torrant

131

Amy Dixon

135

Jeffrey Beauchamp

139

Rob Delamater


8


Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997) began his formal artistic training at the Ohio State University in Columbus from 1940-1943. Following his studies, Lichtenstein served in the military during World War II until 1946 where he returned to Columbus to complete his Master of Fine Arts in 1949. During this early stage in the artist’s career, his style and subject matter were primarily influenced by biomorphic abstraction and artists like Pablo Picasso, Wassily Kandinsky, and Joan Miró. During the 1950s, Lichtenstein was heavily influenced by Abstract Expressionism and Cubism. From 1957 to 1963, Lichtenstein taught at the State University of New York, Oswego followed by Rutgers University, New Jersey; knowledge gained from teaching would also inform his practice. As the sixties approached his output of abstract canvases also began to include loosely drawn cartoon characters. Lichtenstein realized forms of visual communication were changing and as a result, he became increasingly interested in the themes of domesticity found in advertising and other images created by hired draughtsmen rather than creative artists. In 1961, Lichtenstein began to exclusively create works that mimicked commercial printing techniques by appropriating images from comic strips and advertisements. To achieve the look of commercial processes, the artist used Ben-Day dots, thick black lines, text balloons, and hand lettering. The difference however, was that each image was meticulously created by the artist’s hand. Leo Castelli Gallery in 1962 presented Lichtenstein’s first solo exhibition of Pop art. As Lichtenstein gained popularity in the United States and internationally, he continued to closely imitate appropriated comics in addition to looking back into the history of art and imitating works by great artists such as Picasso and Monet.   9


WATER LILIES WITH WILLOWS S C R E E NP RIN TED EN A MEL ON STA INLES S S T EEL 58 X 104 IN . 1992

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As a photo-conceptual artist, Hank Willis Thomas (b. 1976) explores issues of identity, history, race, and class through emotionally charged images. He describes himself as a visual-culture anthropologist who is interested in the ways that popular imagery informs how people perceive themselves and the world. His main goal is to change how “black history” is separated from American history and instead intertwine them; making one apart of the other. Willis Thomas also culls imagery that is often overlooked in today’s culture—the artist selects advertisements from 1968 a pivotal year in the Civil Rights Movement to present day. These advertisements are removed from their original context in order to make the viewer question cultural stereotypes.

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THE LIVES OF OTHERS B LA C K U RETHA N E RES IN 57 X 5 IN . 2014

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Fernando Botero Angulo (born 19 April 1932) is a Colombian figurative artist and sculptor. Born in Medellín, his signature style, also known as “Boterismo”, depicts people and figures in large, exaggerated volume, which can represent political criticism or humor, depending on the piece. He is considered the most recognized and quoted living artist from Latin America, and his art can be found in highly visible places around the world, such as Park Avenue in New York City and the Champs-Élysées in Paris. Self-titled “the most Colombian of Colombian artists” early on, he came to national prominence when he won the first prize at the Salón de Artistas Colombianos in 1958. Working most of the year in Paris, in the last three decades he has achieved international recognition for his paintings, drawings and sculpture, with exhibitions across the world. His art is collected by many major international museums, corporations, and private collectors. In 2012, he received the International Sculpture Center’s Lifetime Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award.

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MAN ON HORSE BRON ZE 50 3/ 4 X 30 3/ 8 X 24 IN. 2010

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Robert Longo (b. 1953) gained notoriety in 1983 for his iconic large-scale drawings of businessmen in expressive contortions. Over the past three decades since the debut of Men in Cities, Longo has continued to produce brash, bold works of art that have evolved to include complex themes that explore politics, power, and life. Like an Old Master, Longo expertly achieves extreme ranges of emotions through his use of chiaroscuro. Known mainly as a draughtsman and for his large-scale charcoal drawings, Longo has since worked with film, sculpture, and photography and is fascinated by symbols of power and violence and the anxiety that can result.  

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UNTITLED (FLAG) DIG ITA L PIG MEN T PRINT 40 X 80 IN . 2013

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FROM MEN IN THE CITY DIG ITA L PIG MEN T PRINT 40 X 26 IN . EA C H 1979 - 1987

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David T. Kessler (American, b. 1950) is an exceptional contemporary artist, renown for his unique photo-realistic paintings. For over twenty years, Kessler has created visual illusions of waterscapes, ponds, and the Arizona desert, where he resides. He achieves space and depth in his works through transparent layers of airbrushed paint on polished and abraded aluminum. The simulated painted reflections and refracted light on the etched metal beneath it give the viewer an illusion of looking through clear, moving water. Kessler’s oeuvre highlights painting’s paradox of being both realistic and holographic, as it gives the impression of depth on a flat surface. David T. Kessler’s works are widely collected by museums across the United States and internationally, including the Brooklyn Museum, the United States Embassy and the Minnesota Museum of Art. Kessler’s paintings are also in the permanent corporate collections of IBM, AT&T, McDonald’s, and Bank of America.

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SILVERED CATS CLAW A C RYLIC ON A LU MIN IUM 48 X 84 IN .

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Ignacio Muñoz Vicuña was born and raised in Santiago, Chile where he has exhibited his work extensively. Vicuña has created a unique body of work based on his fascination with anatomical construction. With these “skins” of acrylic paint, the artist creates sculptural paintings as he bends, folds, and stretches the skins across the stretcher bars. Vicuña has received degrees in Architecture, Gastronomy, Visual Arts, and Illustration and Graphic Narration. His work resides in important Chilean collections including the Museum of Chilean Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art of Valdivia.

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PLATEADO A C RYLIC ON STRETC HER BARS 71 X 71 IN . 2013

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Bernard John “Bernie” Taupin (b. 1950) is a renowned lyricist and contemporary visual artist. Taupin describes his artistic practice as a visual extension of his songs, mobilizing color and form to express emotions. Deeply inspired by Hans Hoffman’s basic colors, and Robert Rauschenberg and Anslem Kiefer’s complexity of mediums, Taupin creates bright sculptural paintings with paint and found materials. His method of wrapping found twine and nails around his canvases, in what he calls web and weave technique, creates dynamic layers and angles. American flags, and its colors, red, white and blue, are recurring themes throughout his oeuvre. Taupin’s mixed media works are shown in galleries and art fairs across the United States.

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RED | WHITE | BLUE MIX ED MEDIA ON C A N VAS 36 X 36 IN . EA C H 2015

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Shay Kun (b. 1974) is an Israeli-born artist who produces vivid and technical paintings that are an amalgam of the painted image. Evoking deep philosophical ideas on the nature of our personal reality, collective reality, and memory, Kun combines idealized atmospheres and outrageous imagery to create distorted images with the intent to bring forth positive memories. The artist is aware of the limitations in the language of painting and hopes that his paintings will cause the viewer to question their visual perception and the fine line between reality and fantasy.

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REINCARNATION OIL ON C A N VA S 60 X 60 IN . 2011

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UNTITLED A R C H I VA L P I GMEN T A N D A C RYLIC PAINT ON CANVAS 48 X 80 IN . 2011

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ISLAND OF THE BLUE DOLPHINS OIL ON C A N VA S 65 X 60 IN . 2011

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NEUTRAL GRAIN OIL ON C A N VA S 48 X 72 IN . 2011

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Thanasis Lalas is a Greek painter and sculptor renown for his surrealist fantasy world that features colorful human figures. His unique compositions of flying figures, dancing bodies and grotesque faces recount inner processes and diverse realities of human existence. Lalas’ clear lines, flat areas of color and thick black outlines suggest movement and intensity, and infuse his alternate world with passion, fantasy, exuberance, irony and humor. Thanasis Lalas is also an innovative journalist and progressive publisher working between Athens, Paris and Miami. His artwork has been presented in solo and collective exhibitions, and resides in public and private collections worldwide.

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UMBRELLA OIL ON C A N VA S 54 X 40 IN . 2015

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James Nares (b. 1953) frequently makes his non-objective paintings using a single, calligraphy inspired brushstroke as a way to record the passage of time across the canvas. With these singular but intricate strokes, which are made with brushes of the artist’s own creation, Nares seeks to capture the exact moments of his paintings’ creation. Works by Nares have been featured in films, numerous solo exhibitions, and have been exhibited at institutions such as the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and at the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Spain.  

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CATEGORY V SC REEN PRIN T ON PA PER 37 X 19 IN . EA C H 2015

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YOU DON’T SAY 1 SC REEN PRIN T ON PA PER 28 X 75 IN . 2011 - 2012

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YOU DON’T SAY 2 SC REEN PRIN T ON PA PER 28 X 75 IN . 2011 - 2012

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YOU DON’T SAY 3 SC REEN PRIN T ON PA PER 28 X 75 IN . 2011 - 2012

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Trey Speegle (b. 1960) juxtaposes formal attributes of paint-by-numbers with large-scale typography to explore themes of hope, love, longing, and transformation. Speegle creates this visual vocabulary by overlaying words and phrases on to cartoonish urban and nature scenes to subvert the original meaning of the text while playing off of the kitschy nature of paint-by-numbers.

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YES (YOU COMPLETE THE PICTURE) A R C H I VA L P I GMEN T A N D A C RYLIC PAINT ON CANVAS 72 X 96 IN . 2009

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Gerhard Richter was born in Dresden, Saxony and grew up in Reichenau, Lower Silesia, and in Waltersdorf in the Upper Lusatian countryside. He left school after tenth grade and apprenticed as an advertising and stage-set painter. In 1950 his application for membership in the Hochschule für Bildende Künste Dresden (Dresden University of Visual Arts) was rejected. He finally began his study at the Dresden Academy of Arts in 1951. Many of Richter’s paintings are made in a multi-step process of representations. He shoots or finds a photograph, then projects the image onto a canvas in which he traces the exact forms captured by the cameras lens. He then uses a color palette similar to that of the photo in an effort to replicate the original image. This process transformed into his signature “blur” paintings, in which the application of a softening effect or an aggressive smear simultaneously add to the photographic effect on the canvas while testifying to the painters action. In some cases, Richter blurs his painting to the point of disrupting the image, nullifying the subject; creating a fragile illusion and a fleeting conception for the viewer, allowing the individual to reflect upon the constant reshaping of the world around them. In his abstract work, Richter builds up cumulative layers of paint to create nonrepresentational forms: using the same techniques implemented in his representational paintings, blurring and scraping to veil and expose prior layers. Richter exalts spontaneous, intuitive mark-making to a level of spatial logic and believability. Nearly all of Richter’s work demonstrates both illusionistic space that seems natural and the physical activity and material of painting.

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FLOW LA C QU ER ON G LA SS 39 X 78 IN . 2013

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KAWS is an American graffiti artist, painter, product designer, illustrator and toymaker who blurs the boundaries between fine and commercial art. Born Brian Donnelly in 1974, KAWS initially worked in animation after receiving his BFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York City. In the 1990s, he began his career as a graffiti street artist and toy designer, reworking advertisements in his distinct cartoonish style that includes characters with X-ed out eyes. KAWS is renown for repurposing Pop icons, such as Snoopy and Mickey Mouse, into bright prints, paintings, miniature toys and monumental sculptures. KAWS’ contemporary work resides in galleries and museums across the United States and abroad, including the High Museum in Atlanta, the Museum of Modern Art of Fort Worth, and the Rosenblum Collection in Paris. His artwork is featured in both private and permanent collections of public institutions.

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NO ONE’S HOME SC REEN PRIN T 36 X 29 IN . 2015

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Lauren Benrimon (b 1992) is a New York City based artist known for her vibrant, wild use of color and texture, and her rhythmic paintings. As the daughter of a gallery owner, Lauren has grown up around a variety of artists who have largely influenced her such as Andy Warhol and Jackson Pollock. Her art is inspired by her individual perception of beauty and her freedom or restriction of color and canvas. Lauren’s visions stem from her day-to-day experiences that are then translated by her free hand on canvas and her love for pop culture.

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UNTITLED A C RYLIC ON C A N VA S 72 X 60 IN . 2014

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GOLDEN TAPES A C RYLIC ON C A N VA S 48 X 48 IN . 2014

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BROKEN RECORDS A C RYLIC ON C A N VA S 36 X 36 IN . 2014

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LINDA A C RYLIC ON C A N VA S 50 X 50 IN . 2015

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BLUE RIVER A C RYLIC & SPAYPA IN T ON CANVAS 60 X 48 IN . 2015

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UNTITLED A C RYLIC ON C A N VA S 84 X 48 IN . EA C H 2014

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Eric Zammitt (b. 1960) alludes to the dynamics of duality and alludes to the interplay of matter vs. energy, spirit vs. body, and emotion vs. intellect. He accomplishes this through minimalistic and abstract techniques. Color and pattern are also integral to Zammit’s body of work, as they are primal to mankind’s history.  

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YE LLOW MAG ENTA ST RI P / Y EL LO W P I N K L O N G

S AND E D A N D POLISHED C OLORED P LAS T IC 32 X 2 IN . 2014

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Jasper Johns (b 1930) was born in Georgia and studied for three semesters at the University of South Carolina, before moving to New York City where he briefly attended the Parsons School of Design in 1949. In New York, Johns met artist Robert Rauschenberg and the two artists had adjacent studios. During a visit with Rauschenberg in 1958, Leo Castelli met Johns and offered him a gallery show. The exhibition resulted in the artist’s first sale with the buyer being the Museum of Modern Art in New York. With American flags, targets, maps, and numbers as his subject matter, Johns quickly rose to fame in the New York art scene. By using these symbols that are simultaneously powerful yet monotonous, Johns created a unique body of work in a variety of media including oil, encaustic, ink, and collage. As a result, Johns has garnered attention as a Neo-Dadaist, Abstract Expressionist, and Pop artist.

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MAP 47 X 68 IN . 1961

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Beginning in 1960, Andy Warhol (1928-1987) began to focus on establishing himself as a painter and desired to be taken seriously as a fine artist. He began by creating works based on advertisements and comic strips. These works, however, were rejected for their vulgarity. Warhol continued to refine his skill and by 1962 almost all of his paintings were made exclusively by screen-printing photographic images of money, consumer products, and news clippings onto painted backgrounds. Many of these works were produced with the help of assistants in his studio, which was aptly named The Factory. By removing himself from the process and by using repeated images, Warhol challenged the concept of unique, one-of-a-kind art. Critics argued that his machine-like process and repetition of celebrity portraits, Campbell’s soup cans, Coco-Cola bottles, and disaster scenes made the works meaningless. While visiting Paris in 1965, Warhol decided to retire from painting. In the subsequent years, his focus switched to experimental films, multimedia events, producing The Velvet Underground, and launching Interview magazine. In 1968, Warhol began to distance himself from the eccentric characters that formed his entourage and began to focus on relationships with wealthy and fashionable members of society after Valerie Solanas made an attempt on his life. In the 1970s, Warhol primarily created commissioned portraits from Polaroid photos and his series,Oxdation Paintings. As the next decade approached, Warhol began collaborating with younger artists, Francesco Clemente and Jean-Michel Basquait marking his first return to painting-by-hand since the mid-sixties. The last works produced by Warhol included images based on the works of Renaissance masters.

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FLOWERS 44 X 44 IN . EA C H 1964

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COW 56 X 38 IN . EA C H 1976

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SUNSET 32 X 32 IN . EA C H 1972

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DAISY 32 X 32 IN . EA C H 1982

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ABSTRACT PAINTING 62 X 50 IN . 1982

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GOLD MARILYN MONROE 67 X 48 IN . 1962

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TRIPLE ELVIS 68 X 50 IN . 1963

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MARILYN 40 X 30 IN . 1979 - 1986

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DETAILS OF RENAISSANCE PAINTINGS 26 X 38 IN . 1984

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STATUE OF LIBER TY 54 X 54 IN . 1962

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Mark Rothko (1903-1970) immigrated to the Portland, Oregon from Russia in 1913 with his mother. After adapting to his new home, Rothko excelled academically and developed keen interests in the humanities. In 1921, he received a scholarship to Yale University but left without completing his degree to move to New York. In New York, Rothko educated himself in the fine arts by taking sporadic classes, attending exhibitions, and visiting artists’ studios. When he began painting in the 1920s, his work consisted of Expressionist landscapes. In the following decade, Rothko’s paintings conveyed a sense of mystery and dread while depicting figures in small environments. The 1940s mark a turning point in the artist’s practice. Using watercolors, gouache, and tempera with supple brushes, Rothko would add ink to the wet media so the colors would bleed together. As he continued to develop this practice, Rothko began to use oil paint as though it were also a watercolor. To achieve this, the oil paint was thinned and applied in overlapping layers. The years 1947-1950 are key to Rothko’s development. The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art held exhibitions of his work. Rothko also spent summers teaching at the California School of Fine Art where he worked closely with artist Clyfford Still. During these years, Rothko also abandoned the figure in his paintings. In these early canvases, masses of color were spread across the canvas. By 1949, Rothko began creating paintings with luminous rectangles of color that appeared as though they were floating on a larger field of color. As the sixties approached, Rothko began receiving large commissions. He also changed his palette from the bright colors seen in his earlier works to darker colors; maroon, black, and olive green were particular favorites. This change in palate was due to the artist preferring the sense of tragedy conveyed through darker colors and his desire to convey his view of the human condition. Since Rothko’s death-by-suicide in 1970, there has been speculation that his later paintings are a reflection of his depression but during his lifetime, Rothko emphasized that his paintings were a means of communicating his ideas regarding the mankind’s condition.

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THE OCHRE 40 X 26 IN . 1954

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Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) is a Dutch painter who in popular culture is epitomized as the tormented artist who sold but one painting in his lifetime. Regardless, in the ten years van Gogh was active as a painter he created more than two thousand works of art and left behind a trove of detailed and expressive letters to his brother Theo. Many of the olive tree paintings were produced in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. During the second half of 1889, van Gogh wrote to Theo that he was “struggling to catch [the olive trees]. They are old silver, sometimes with more blue in them, sometimes greenish, bronzed, fading white above a soil which is yellow, pink, violet tinted orange...very difficult.” Van Gogh also said that he found that the “rustle of the olive grove has something very secret in it, and immensely old. It is too beautiful for us to dare to paint it or to be able to imagine it.”

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THE OLIVE TREES 29 X 31 IN . 1889

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Jessica Torrant explores abstract visual language as a mode of artistic expression that translates emotional, physical and spiritual experiences in ways words cannot. Torrant’s colorful and dynamic landscapes of water, mountains and meadows are continuously inspired by lived moments and life experience. She hopes her works will inspire others and resonate with viewers on an intimate level. Torrant lives in rural upstate Connecticut and exhibits her work in galleries across the United States and abroad.

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FULL COLOR FREQUENCY 32 X 22 IN . EA C H

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Amy Dixon (b 1959) approaches her paintings intuitively and with free expression. Her work is about color, immediacy, and an intuitive response to her interaction with the world. Dixon’s own journey has challenged her to investigate peace, harmony, chaos, fear, and to connect with the soul in her work. “Anything is possible,” believes Dixon, “if the art spirit is right.”

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ORCHARD IN ORCHID 37 X 52 IN .

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Jeffrey Beauchamp merges representation with abstraction in his bright, bold works, which are centered upon energetically painted landscapes devoid of human presence and filtered through human imagination. “As kids we are generally encouraged to use and cultivate our imaginations, though once we reach adulthood” says Beauchamp “pressures of everyday existence tend to hone our more practical survival skills and leave our younger minds to fend for themselves. As an artist I can postpone certain aspects of growing up in the name of staying creative: while painting, for instance, I find a sort of disciplined daydreaming works quite well.”

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VIEW THAT STAR TLED GRIEG 26 X 36 IN .

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Rob Delamater is a San Francisco artist who creates abstract compositions that evoke organic shapes and motifs from the natural world, as well as the human figure and other representations from his city life. His prints, paintings and collages combine simplicity and the Japanese concept of “wabi sabi,� meaning finding beauty in imperfection. Delamater draws inspiration from nature, the Northern California coast, and seascapes. His works are featured in private and public collections, in national exhibitions, and on television series.

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SPRING TIDES III 28 X 36 IN . 2016

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Shawn Meharg aspires to elevate object to symbol and renders his work with a focus on light and the progression of physical change. This concentration on change references not only a precarious future but also an imagined past. Before turning his attention to fine art in 2001, Meharg worked as a scenic artist and designer.

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SHOR TCUT CHORUS 26 X 26 IN .

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SHOTGUN LULLABY 44 X 72 IN .

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Charles Fenner Ball (b. 1968) is an American artist who renders landscapes in a representational style, with a dose of impressionism and a slightly contemporary edge. Moving from the West to East coast, Ball’s paintings capture beautiful American landscapes, most notably New England seascapes, Southwest Mountains, and the railroad. His compositions are carefully painted to depict reflections, shadows, and glimmering light on water, clouds and rooftops.

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AFTERNOON AT BIRCH BEACH 15 X 30 IN . 148


PERFECT DAY AT BIRCH BEACH 14 X 21 IN . 149


Wayne Thiebaud (b. 1920) is an American born artist best known for colorful still lifes of consumer objects and edible treats, such as pies, cakes, candies, desserts and toys. His career began as a commercial artist, briefly animating for Walt Disney studios and drawing comic strips for the Air Force during World War II. Thiebaud is associated with the Pop Art movement for his ability to capture an American sensibility and depictions of mass culture. The artist describes his renderings of everyday items as interpretations of “Americanness.” His signature figural style, which includes heavy pigment, exaggerated colors, outlined forms, and hyper-realistic shadows, explores texture, light, color and composition. Thiebaud’s work resides in important collections of the Whitney Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among others. He has received numerous honors, most notably the National Medal of Arts in 1994.

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NINE JELLY APPLES 20 X 20 IN . 1964 152


CAKES 28 X 32 IN 1963 153


Morris Louis (b. 1912) was one of the earliest Color Field painters of the 1950s, most notably known for his “stain” paintings. Working in Baltimore and Washington D.C., Louis simplified the idea of what constitutes a finished painting by eliminating the gestural compositional painting of Abstract Expressionism in favor of large areas of raw canvas, solid planes of thin paint, and flat intense color. Louis’ style is characterized by layered veils and rivulets of paint on unprimed canvas. His bold, primary-colored paintings are iconic of the Color Field movement and his influence on American painting has been profound. Morris Louis’ work resides in major private and museum collections. His many honors and exhibitions include a retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 1963, and another survey at the Museum of Modern Art in 1986.

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NUMBER 99 24 X 34 IN . 1959 156


POINT OF TRANQUILITY 24 X 32 IN . 1959 157


James Wyper aims to act as a clear vessel for higher consciousness and hopes to illustrate the glowing presences of unity behind every apparent duality. During a camping trip with a group of Buddhist monks and nuns on a sacred mountainside in 1998, Wyper witnessed the grace and joyous aurora of a nun one morning. This interaction caused him to have a spiritual awakening, which led to his vow to create and share beautiful objects.

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ENTRY POINT 44 X 44 IN . 160


KALEIDOSCOPIC 32 X 32 IN . 161


Erin Hanson’s painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature; moving to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon. Over the years, Hanson has continuously been inspired by nature and continues to explore new areas, which she then transforms into an abstract mosaic of color and texture.

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PASOSCAPES LEFT & RIGHT 28 X 28 IN. EACH

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HILL COUNTRY WATERS 28 X 36 IN.

GREEN PASO 24 X 36 IN.

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SUMMER IN TRIPTYCH 32 X 22 IN., 20 X 26 IN., 32 X 22 IN.

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COLORS OF BRENHAMN 32 X 26 IN., 32 X 32 IN., 32 X 26 IN.

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CATALINA HILLS 44 X 44 IN.

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FICUS MOSAIC 29 X 38 IN.


SCARLET GRASS IN TRIPTYCH 22 X 22 IN., 20 X 26 IN., 22 X 22 IN.

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DESER T GARDEN 26 X 38 IN.

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WILD IN FLOWER 20 X 26 IN.

CRYSTAL HILLS 24 X 30 IN.


AGAINST THE COAST 26 X 34 IN.

CALIFORNIA SKY 40 X 31 IN.

CRYSTAL LIGHT II 22 X 32 IN.

THE PATH 26 X 38 IN. 171


Amy Donaldson’s strong sense of color and understanding of space is achieved by her union of crushed, powdered pigment and oil paint. With the use of untraditional tools, Donaldson uses additive and subtractive methods to cover the surface of the canvas. The natural erosion of an aging city, the atmospheric depth of hazy light, and graffiti are some of her sources of inspiration and are evident in her work.  

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ALL CONSUMING 26 X 26 IN.

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BLUE IVY 26 X 26 IN.


EVERLASTING COMPASSION 22 X 22 IN.

ANGELIC 26 X 26 IN.

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NEW MERICES 26.5 X 21.25 IN. 176


ALL OF ME 20 X 38 IN.

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Libby Smart is a self-described colorist who sees beyond what people notice in nature. She believes that while color and brushwork are important in a painting she also believes that an artist must elevate the subject so it becomes exciting for the viewer.  

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ALONG THE RIVER BANK 28 X 67 IN.

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TREES IN BLUE GREEN 44 X 44 IN.

DISTANT COLOR 44 X 44 IN.

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Margaret Juul has explored numerous coastal landscapes that are inspired by the shores of New York to Chicago’s Lake Michigan to the tropics of Tampa Bay. Water has captivated the soul of the artist and through her paintings, Juul hopes to pay homage to the environment and this precious element.

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SHIMMERING 46 X 68 IN.

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LIGHT GLIMMERING WAVES 40 X 20 IN.

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DEEP DIVE 24 X 36 IN.

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REFRESHING SWIM 36 X 48 IN.

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HIGH WAVE 30 X 65 IN.

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SPRING RAIN 22 X 62 IN.

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UNDER WATER REFLECTIONS 38 X 74 IN.

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SAILING AT SUNRISE 39 X 54 IN.


TURQUOISE BEACH 50 X 66 IN.

UNDER WATER MOVEMENT 50 X 66 IN.

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SHARP RIPPLES 26 X 17 IN.

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CUR VING UNDER WATER 66 X 50 IN.


FALL REFLECTIONS 38 X 29 IN.

DESER T OASIS 38 X 29 IN.

POURING 68 X 46 IN.

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Keith Haring, born in Reading, Pennsylvania, was a promising artist that made his initial mark through graffiti art in New York City subways in the early 1980s. He used rhythmic lines that seamlessly flowed together, images based largely on the broad themes of love, birth, death, sex, and war. Haring was able to unite his iconic imagery with strong social messages on these topics. His technique was simple and his artwork was primal enough for children and others to identify with. Haring’s art featured bright colors and direct messages making him a leading proponent of the Pop Art movement. Haring achieved his first public attention with chalk drawings in the subways of New York. The direct, unvarnished line allowed him to make powerful images on these concepts gaining him international notoriety at a young age. In fact, in the 1980s he had over 100 solo and group exhibitions in galleries and worked on collaborations with dozens of prominent artists. Keith Haring established the Keith Haring Foundation in 1989, its mandate being to provide funding and imagery to AIDS organizations and children’s programs, and to expand the audience for Haring’s work through exhibitions, publications and licensing of his images. Unfortunately Haring passed a due to AIDS related complications at the young age of 31 in New York.

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POP SHOP: 3 PLATES 30 X 38 IN. EACH

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UNTITLED 32 X 32 IN. EACH

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FIGURES 30 X 40 IN.

UNTITLED 17 X 62 IN. 198


CUP MAN 46 X 34 IN.

LIBER TY 46 X 34 IN.

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UNTITLED (HEAR T) 32 X 32 IN.

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HEAR TS 32 X 32 IN.

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Romero Britto (b 1963) uses vibrant colors and patterns to create a visual language to emphasize positive affirmations of hope, happiness, and optimism. After traveling from Brazil to Europe where he was exposed to Matisse and Picasso, Britto settled down in Miami, Florida where he has since opened his public studio. Britto has created public art installations that have been exhibited worldwide. In 2010, he was the official artist for the FIFA World Cup Brazil and he has collaborated with numerous brands including Coca-Cola, Disney, Audi, Mattel, and Bentley.

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HAPPY HAPPY HAPPY 16 X 36 IN.

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THE HUG 60 X 18 IN.

205


ANGEL 24 X 20 IN.

206

THE APPLE 20 X 16 IN.

HEAR T BUTTERFLY 28 X 32 IN.


FLOWER POWER MULTI 36 X 48 IN.

207


HEAR T TRIPTYCH 16 X 36 IN.

208


HAPPY FISH 16 X 36 IN.

209


I LOVE TENNIS 16 X 32 IN.

210


I LOVE ICE CREAM 20 X 36 IN.

211


SUMMER 24 X 20 IN.

212

LATTE LOVE 20 X 16 IN.


IN THE PARK 36 X 40 IN.

I LOVE SOCCER 32 X 22 IN.

213


Profile for David Benrimon Fine Art

Ravago Catalog 2017  

Ravago Catalog 2017