Page 1


BALLY OF SWITZERLAND

From our executive collection: "The Kelton" dress slip-on in four solid and three two-tone colors. Available in widths from M to EEE. 163. Our newest, elegantly styled briefcase, 435. The companion attache, 380. Accessories: calfskin agenda books, 35. to 75., calfskin wallets from 30. to 80., ties from 32. to 38.

washington Square, 1022 Connecticut Avenue NW We welcome the American Express Card.

429路0604


Care Package

leEiizabolh Ardon,

1985

THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN THAT HAS IT ALL!

BEVERLY HILLS

CHEVY CHASE

CHICAGO

CORAL GABLES

DALLAS

NEW 'IORK

PALM BEACH

THE SALON

PHOENIX

SAN FRANCISCO

SOUTHAMPTON

WASHINGTON, [)C


.I

:ription ::;are

AN INVITATION 10

i

Inside the doors ofHeller, you willfind a remarkable collection ofmerchandise. An extensive variety offine diamonds, gemstones, pearls, gold and silver. A visit to us is a must.

HEJ,tER FOR FINE jEWELRY & SILVER 5454 WISCONSIN AVENUE, CHEVY CHASE, MD 20815 (301) 654-0218 .Monday through Saturday 10 am to 5:30pm


-.

~--~-

--~--~~

. .....---

--

--

--

-----------~-.·-·

Published by Adler International Ltd3301 New Mexico Ave. NW. Washington, D. C. 20016 (202) 362-4040 DAVID ADLER

_ _ _ _ _ _P,_r_es_i_de_n_ti_Ed_it_o_ri_ai_D_irec_to_r_ _ ____ SONJA ADLER

Editor KITrYCHISM

Managing Editor TOM SUZUKI

Design Director S. CLAIRE CONROY

Assistant Managing Editor J ENNIFER JOHNSTON

Assistant to the Editor VJOLADRATH

Arts Editor ROBERT MCD ANIEL

Food Editor CAROL CUTLER

Restaurant Critic ANNE M. BURNHAM

Diplomatic Correspondent MAGGIE WIMSATT

Social Calendar Editor ANNE DENTON BLAIR RICHARD KROLJK KATHRYN TIDYMAN

Contributing Editors J. R. BLACK PETER GARFIELD GARY IGLARSH JOHN WHITMAN

Contributing Photographers

------

JONATHAN ADLER

Publisher DONNA KORMAN Vi~ President/Advertising Director

-------

LORRAINE KRUSEL MARIAN MORGAN SANDRA SATTERWHITE DEBORAH THEIL

Account Executives MABEL JONES

Advertising Services Coordinator

New York Sales GOOD MAGAZINES SO EAST 42ND ST. NEW YORK, N.Y. 10017 (212) 682-038S

Los Angeles Sales 1800 N. HIGHLAND AVE. SUITE 717 HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 90028 (213) 462-2700

CUISINE

---------

PAMELA S. GOODNOW

Controller/ General Manager

Design Cuisine Caterers/Washington, D.C., Virginia (703) 849-9400

CHERYL BEDARD

Bookkeeper

-----------

EDWARD SHANNON

_____________c_ff_cu __ w_ti_on__D_ff_~_t_o_r___ __________ GEORGE GUERRERO NANCY ATKINSON

J!t~

cul:inary .lnndma~k of V.t'rgimct.' .Evans Fa..r~n .Inn, 171

..M~J/!iU1...-

Production Assistants BILL OSTEN

TYpographer JILL FINSTER

Administrative Assistant MONICA CARPENTER R~eptwmst

_--:-;;;

ror

mot, 1 ~2~r~jt

The Washinaton Dossier (ISSN 0149-7936) is published one year; $32 ror two yean; overseas S4S per )Ur: Can• hiriJIO'" ~ by Adler International Ltd ., 3301 New Mexico Ave. NW,hYf'; 0n, p.C~bO,.c 20016, (202) 362~. Second class postage paid al Was 10 e 10 the Ltd· additional mailina offices . Postmaster: Send addreu chana p~~tion.J o5 i&' address. Entire contents copyriaht C> 1985 by Adler or ph~llited

ln:

::Y ~::f'~~t =:a'::~(~ ~0~~~~ ~~'ted in the

States. We will not be responsible for unsolicited manu1Cf1PU· . ns 1o t~e 3110 FOR SOCIAL COVERAGE: please send all invit e. 81 Social Secretary .., early .., possible to schedule cover AUDIT APPLIED FOR.

'Puh4

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

-ABC

0S


N

=

td.


FASHIONS

FINERIES

GOURMET FEASTS

FANTASIES

FESTIVITIES

An eclectic collection of specia lty stores and restaurants w ith unparalleled seNice in a sophisticated atmosphere. Uve Saturday Concerts, And April Art Shows, Open To The Public Free-Of-Charge.

MAZ7A GALLERIE

3o 1 ll.Jiv; town l

temP<

88 I lly R hit

a;

low.c

-

Open Mon.-Fri. 10a.m.-8p.m .. Sat. 10a.m.-6p.m. Wisconsin And Western Avenues, Chevy Chase/Washington,D.C.

M. 路Take The Metro Red Une To Friendship Heights Station, Or Drive Your Car And Park Two Hours Free (202) 966-6114


N April 1985

Vol. 10, No. 1

DEPARTMENTS 8 DOSSIER DISPATCHES

Eliot Janeway

p.38

Reader's commendations and condemnations.

10 SOPHISTICATE'S ITINERARY A selection of events and exhibits about town.

19

WASHINGTON CIRCLES

Hot rumors around the federal town.

55

PRESTIGE LIVING

By S. Claire Conroy. Foxhall Road is still the glamorous haven of Washington's upper crust.

62

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

A listing of pricey home sales in the area.

73 ALONG PARTY LINES A king's visit, a tribute to Iwo Jima and a waltz for old Vienna.

90 THE EDUCATED PALATE JQtn

es Palmer

P.2J

Bo Richard Krolik. Toss out the Grecian lttar~ula, silver hair is the newest tradein~ of. power and sophistication for men haj ashmgton. To wit: seven eminent grayred men.

~~ DPLAYING THE ACCESS GAME

g0v 0 171 Bonafede. One by one, high-profile

buc~r~ment officials are heading for the big Priv sIn PR and using their connections for ate sector gain.

3o

lly v~1IDDLE EASTERN OILS tawn'?la Drath. The Alif Gallery in Georgetern Introduces a new perspective on conPorary Arab art and culture.

88

lly INTRODUCING BUFFALO hit Robert McDaniel. The latest entree to lov.,.~rea restaurants and supermarkets is a cholesterol alternative to a cut of beef.

~liE COVER PhOtographed by Peter Garfield with insert theo~g~aph of Mike Deaver courtesy of hite House. ~

By Eliot Janeway. The rise of the American dollar is hurting this country and helping others. An economist speaks out.

42

SHELTER SKELTER

By Jack Wynn. There's still a killing to be made in the Washington real estate game, but the gurus say the rules have changed.

Critic Carol Cutler reviews East Wind.

46

92

A spreadsheet of services offered by area financial institutions.

DINING OUT

A guide to fine dining.

~URES ~~ ~HE SILVER FOXES

WASHINGTON MONEY 38 THE DOLLAR DEBACLE

94 FASHION FLASH Designer shows and ideas a Ia mode.

96

SOCIAL CALENDAR

BANKING AT A GLANCE

49 THE LIVING END By Mary M. Sullivan. Dream castles to choose from if you're in the market for a new home.

Get out the black tie, it's party time again.

EDITOR'S NOTE Our most outspoken critics have sometimes complained that too many stories in The p. 73 Washington Dossier are focused on women. The criticism is justified if we think local fashion, cooking, partying, gossip and interior decorating are strictly feminine pursuits, which we don't. Nevertheless, we decided to dedicate this issue to Washington men and include some business and money matters ~1til;) we believe will interest women as well: a lively attack on the soaring U.S. dollar by economist Eliot Janeway, some tips on smart local real estate investments from the gurus and a light-hearted focus on seven silverWASHINGTON MONEY COVER photo- haired power brokers around town. graphed by Gary lglarsh; lizard card case, Our centerpiece this month is a feature gold tank watch and money clip from Les on the revolving door that now spins between must de Cartier; sterling Waterman fountain the top ranks of government and Washpen, gold Pfeil calfskin key case and Leather- ington PR firms. In reporting this story, smith diary from Camalier & Buckley; Mac- veteran writer Dom Bonafede found PR clesfield silk handkerchief from Burberrys; people remarkably candid about how access Mercedes key and silver key chain from the is bought and sold in this town. The high American Service Center; coordinated by stakes and costs involved should concern all Washingtonians, men and women alike . Jennifer Johnston. Mike Wetzel

WASH! GTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985 7


DISPATCHES

Reactions from our Readers Last Words on Hill Wives As a House spouse of 16 years and the author of the Dossier article that lllunched Washington into another of its all too frequent games of ltivial Pursuit, may I have another-if not the final-word on the subject of congressional wives? Frankly, I think this latest lapse into lascivious hysteria is more revealing of the news business than it is of Lady Leotard. While perhaps not a model of modesty or humility, Ms. Davis cannot be called dumb. She is a woman who wanted attention. Being a media consultant, she knew how to geUt. Certainly the five equally beautiful and accomplished congressional wives proftled in Dossier had created no such media waves, despite the fact that the group encompassed a law student, a Phi Beta Kappa, a professional singer, a business executive and a woman involved in the fight against famine; women about as philosophically removed from "cloying Barbie Dolls" as Mother Teresa from Alexis Carrington. Clearly the difference was skin. The women in Dossier were in ball gowns, not leotards. It's remarkable to realize that in this town of vaunted sophistication and liberation sexism still rules. In order to reign supreme, the empress still must wear no clothes. The argument goes you can't ignore news. I argue, such photographs are not news. It is as usual to see beauty in a bathing suit as it is to spy snow on the Alps. It is not unusual to see a congressional wife in briefs. How can we forget the former wife of the former congressman from South Carolina? It is unusual, however, to see a stunning blond like Grace Nelson, wife of Representative Bill Nelson cradling diseased and starving children in Africa, proclaiming a goal to end world hunger by the year 2000-yet no cameramen lent their lens, no reporters picked up pens to further that story. In their perpetual pandering to the prurient, journalists merely serve to deepen the public's conviction that our profession is much more interested in sensation than substance. Isn't it too bad that in its search for an angle about women, the media so often only responds to a curve.

Peggy Stanton Washington As a "brainless woman of the Donna Reed 1950s time warp," I'd like to point out to Marty Davis that in my day not every 8

WASHINGTON DoSSIER I APRIL 198S

cquire parent could afford to send us off to a hat· our master's degrees. We developed w ·ng ever innate talent we had-and haVI ur neither power nor money, we cultivated 0 ~b .

~

I cannot imagine my 36-year-old son use nouncing that he "has brains" just beCMid· he graduated from Choate, Corn~II, with dlebury and New York UniversitY de master's degrees in economics, world r~en and Russian language. Young peopl~ ~heir congressional wives) should be pu~ tn TheY place for flaunting their supenonty. ise think they invented exercise. My exerc program began in 1938! . . that "Gee, Jeanne, it's not surpnstng .old people don't believe you have a 36-Yeo 00 ~ son." That's what I tell myself when e a in the mirror, not, "Boy, you're surwas dynamite chick for an old broad who born in 1925!" }/errick

Jeanne ·ng Dun Lorz

The Washington 501 ___.-that As you said, there would be narnes·cked slipped through the cracks when you rhe the Washington 500 list. 1b exclu e whO Washington Post's Thomas Bosweii, waY dominates his field of sportswrit!~g th~s an Ronald Reagan dominates poht1cs, obvious omission. rJr. Power does indeed have many facewetes Boswell's ability to make games and at on a come alive on the printed page takes and power all its own. Tom Boswell's prose opens our 7yes skill ears to the fact that good writing IS aJeafll of magnanimous porportions .. w_e If be that reading good writing can JD 1tse the most stimulating of experiencesi rio¢

t

Richard Pre 0 vP· Winchester.

A Last Goodbye

_____-: '

uti fill Thank you, thank you for the bea ets of farewell to Patty Cavin. All the trumPcavill heaven must have sounded when PattY received her wings. J(eafl

Ida Jean cMse CheVY

-------------:their The Dossier encourages readers to send us comments. Letters should be addressed to:. Ave· Editor, Washington Dossier, 3301 New MeJUCO NW., Washington, D. C. 20016


acquire 1 what路 having ted our

We Don't Fumble If your game plan calls for elegant service and delectable cuisine, Braun's Fine Caterers should be on your team. Practicing a family tradition of excellence, Braun's Fine Caterers will make a corporate meeting, business luncheon, or VIP event one of quality and style. ~ ~

autifU} I 0 Pets cavifl

At Braun's Fine Caterers ... catering is no game, it's a professional commitment.

~ J(ePfl

Ch垄e ~ :if TELEPHONE (301) 559-2.00


rner that

APRIL

Prime Washington Pastimes PEHFOHMIN6 AHTS Anderson House-Air Force Chamber Players perform Bach's "Easter Oratorio," at 12:30 p.m., April 3. OAmerican Chamber Orchestra plays Bach, Haydn and Mozart, 3 p.m. April 13, 2118 Massachusetts Ave. NW (785-0540) Arena Stage-Moliere's "Tartuffe," as produced by Romanian director Lucian Pintelie, through April 14. Performances: 8 p.m. Thesday through Saturday. 7:30 p.m. Sunday. Matinees 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Sixth St. and Maine Ave. SW (488-3300)

tival presents '\o\Jessandro" at 7 p.m. on April 21. OThe Oakwood College Choir sings at 2 p.m. and the Catholic University Choir and Orchestra performs at 8:30 p.m. on April 28. OWPAS presents The Philadelphia Orchestra at 7:30 p.m. on April 29 (254-3776) Kennedy Center (Eisenhower Tbeater)-" Henry IV, Part I," starring John Herd and Patti LuPone, is the flfst American National Theater Company production, through April 20. Performances at 7:30 p. m. Monday through Saturday (254-3670) Kennedy Center (Opera House)-"My One and Only," the Broadway hit with a Gershwin score, stars Tommy Thne and Sandy Duncan, through April 14. Performances

acclaimed in New York, April 17-May 12. Call for formance times. 1712 Church St. NW (232-1132)

per·

Organization of American States presents Inter-AID.~ Music Week - All performances at 8:30 P· m. ~artok Hall of the Americas: O April 15 : En~emble R berto O April 16: Licia Lucas, piano O Apn.l 17 : ~ ceUo McCausland and Deborah Newcomb, p1ano an and 1 D April 18: Romulo Lazarde, guitar. 17th Stree Constitution Avenue NW (789-3157) sin the Phillips Collection - Sunday afternoon concert er on Music Room at 5 p. m. O April 14: Madeline Bru\ zs: piano O April 21 : Violinist Melvin Berger D ~f~JSI) pianist Richard Ratliff. 1600 - 21st St. NW (3

Arena's Old Vat Room-"Banjo Dancing," Stephen Wade's back-slapping, foot-stomping musical bit, is Washington's longest running show. Performances at 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 7 p.m. and 10 p. m. Saturday, Sixth Street and Maine Avenue SW (488-3300) Corcoran-The Cleveland Quartet performs at 8 p.m., April 20 and The Contemporary Music Forum plays music of Great Britain at 8 p.m. April 22. Both in the Frances and Armand Hammer Auditorium, 17th Street and New York Avenue NW (638-3211)

Ford's Tbeater -"GodspeU," the musical version of the gospel according to St. Matthew, returns to Washington for an extended run. Call for performance times. 511 lOth St. NW (347-4833) Hartke Theatre-"The Hartke Jubilee Review" blends highlights from the theater's past musical revues with new songs and sketches in this final show of the season. April 19 through 28. Call for performance times . Catholic University (529-3333) Kennedy Center (Concert HaU)-The National Symphony Orchestra plays pops at 8:30p.m. April 4 and 6. OChristopher Hogwood conducts an aU Mozart program with the orchestra at 8:30p.m. April 11 and 13, at 1:30 p.m. April12, and at 7:30p. m. April16. DThe National Symphony plays chamber music from Vivaldi to Stravinsky at 8:30 p.m . April 18, 19, 20, and 22, and at 7 p.m. on April 23. D Pinchas Zuckerman performs with the orchestra at 8:30 p. m. April 25, 26, and 27, and at 7 p.m. April 30. O Tbe United States Marine Band Gala, 8:30p.m. April 2. D The Oratorio Society performs Beethoven's "Missa Solemnis," 8:30 p.m. April 5 and 7. D"Tbe Thle of Peter Rabbit," a multimedia dance and puppet production, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. April 7. OWPAS presents the St. Louis Symphony playing Bernstein, Liszt and Sibelius at 8:30 p.m. on April 12. O Music from Japan at 3 p. m. April 14. O WPAS presents the Fairfax Symphony in a program of popular arias, 3 p.m. April 21. D The Handel Fes-

10 WASHINGTON DoSSIER I APRIL 1985

hon the ne ~

ar 0 bre,

one we Pie>

T

Arena's Kreeger -"lsn't It Romantic," a funny, sentimental comedy about mothers, daughters, lovers and friends . Opening April26. Performances: 8 p.m. Thesday through Saturday; 7:30p.m. Sunday. Matinee 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Sixth Street and Maine Avenue SW (488-3300)

Fol&er Theatre-Jealousy, madness and revenge converge in "Hamlet," playing through April 28. Performances at 8 p.m. Thesday through Saturday with matinees at varying times . DThe Newberry Consort, of Chicago's Newberry Library, plays French music of the 13th and 14th centuries in a special appearance at 8 p.m. April!. OThe Folger Consort presents "Measure for Measure" in honor of Shakespeare's birthday; music from his plays and Jacobean masque dances, and that of Dowland, Morley and Byrd. Performances at 8:15p.m. April13 and at 3 p. m. and 7 p. m. April 14 in the Great Hall, and at 8 p.m. April 15 in the Elizabethan Theatre. D Gordon Fox Kreplin plays guitar in a Midday Muse concert at 12:15 p.m. April 18. 201 E. Capitol St. SE (546-4000)

top.

I tht

A scene from "42nd Street" with J. Frank Lucas (lef t), Barry Nelson and Delores GraY. a National Theatre through May 5.

______.-.:

- - -- - - - - -- -- -- - - - - - - - - -- - -- - - - " and ••'fhe at 8 p.m. Thesday through Saturday and at 7:30p.m. Source (Main Stage)-"The Bald Soprano . _17. per· Sunday. Matinees at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. DThe Lesson," by absurdist Eugene lonesco, Apn11 da)l tSo9 Alvin Ailey American Dan.ce Company performs at 8 formances at 8 p.m. Wednesday through s un ' p.m. April 16-20, at 2 p.m. on April 20 and at 1:30 14th St. NW (463-1073) al of p.m. and 7:30p.m. on April21. O Ballet West performs d D mas' t e ee f . Source (Warehouse Rep)-Alexan er ~ O'fbf rom tbelT repertory at 8 p.m. on April 30, (254-3770) tragic love, "Camille," plays through Apr.il ~3Side'' bY plays in repertory open April 27: " Ladies d RoJllaD Krnnedy Cente.r (Terrace Tbeater)-A cbildrens' arts festival, "Imagination Celebration," April J-14. The Alex Finlayson; "The Holy Terrorist" by HoWaT 8 p.Jll· 1 American College Theatre Festival, April15-27. Call for and Peter Shaffer's " Equus." Performances a z.to13) 46 performance times. Pianist Peter Serkin and violinist Wednesday through Sunday, 1835 - 14th St. NW ( rarce Young Uck Kim perform at 7:30 p.m . April 30, Studio Tbeatre-"La Ronde," the clas~ic se~~:a ne"' 25 9895 < 4) that was banned after its early producuons. tbfouS~ National Theatre-The rousing "42nd Street," with translation by the Royal Shakespeare eompa~urcll 51· Barry Nelson and Delores Gray through May 5. PerformApril 21. Call for performance times, 1401 ances at 8 p. m. Thesday through Sunday. Matinees NW (265-7412) n 50 at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 1321 ESt. NW (544-1900) Univenity of Maryland _ Michaela P etri per~o;;;arte~ New Playwrights' Theatre-Spaulding Gray gives a recorder at 7:30p.m. on April 14. The c.Ievel:nc enter .o one-man show from a repertory of six monologues, plays at 7:30 p.m. on April 21. Both 1n th voivers•1Y including his "Swimming to Cambodia," which was Adult Education. "Cabaret" is presented bY


- ·A I

I

Jforper· 32)

l

AroeriCJII

n. in the e Bartok Roberto and cello treet and rts in the lruser on (\pril zs: .87·2151)

1

at tht

spectacular world-class architectural achievea 52-story residential-only skyscraper tower hat redefines the Manhattan skyline and becomes the dramatic focal point of New York's most desirable residential neighbor hood . The t unique pyramidal h0 P-comprised of a series of escalading penthouse thmes-will join such elegant historic symbols as e Chrysler Building and the Empire State as a new architectural wonder. Balconies, wrap~round terraces-homes with two and three reathtaking exposures, are the rule. There are one-, two- and three-bedroom configurations as weU as the spectacular simplex, duplex and trip1ex penthouses. The neighborhood offers all the storied ~Ures of Beekman Place, Sutton Place and aY-quiet tree-lined walks, ~~ebrated resta~ra~ts. Yet busy S td-_Manhattan, IS mmutes away. _erv1ces? In addition to the conCierge and senior staff to attend to ' needs and security, you will find a private, for-resi~ents­ only physical fitness center with individual coaches; maid, valet and housekeeping services are also available. Manned elevators and ~n-site attended garage, too. Whatever your past liv. g arrangements-whatever you may have been con~~ering up to now-the extraordinary attractions. of 0 United Nations Plaza require your serious consid~~at~on . Plan an inspection soon. a r Information and Ppointment, telebhone (212) 980-0100. Nrwrite 100 United Plaza Sales 0 ~t_ions ftce, 346 East 49 Nth St., New York, .y 10017

~ent:

100 UNITED NATIONS

sPonso,.

ASSOc . UNiTED NATIONS I'LAZA TOWER 0.v, 10 I~TES LI MITED PARTNE~SII I P; S.11 10 g~" ALBANESE DEVELOPMENT' CORPORATION; Tl)tCo K•nts: M.j. RAYNES, I C. , OMSER, INC. INor.FE~I'LETE OFFERING TERMS ARE AVAILABLE lvD 04 lNG I'LAN AVA ILABLE FROM SPONSOR

PLAZA CONDOMINIUMS

AT EAST FORTY EIGHTH STREET

A REALM APART


================~.~~

Image. . .-----... . I r;m

urt

}Our personal stoti{mery &

---~---=--

9'grt,

invitations

are mYJ11h a thousilnd wnls.

Image tells. An Invitation tells your guest more than date, time, and place. It sets the mood for the entire occasion. Ukewise, your stationery should tell as much about you as the words you write on it. We've been designing and engraving personal Images and exquisite stationery since 1896. Come to Copenhaver and let us show you how beautiful personal stationery can be.

~¢av~ Washington's stationer and engraver to the world. 1718 Connecticut Avenue N.W., Suite 220, Washington, D.C. (2 blocks from Dupont Metro) 232·1200

~~

APril Z8 Theatre at 8 p.m . April 25-27 and at 2 P· rn. r·ng . Thwes Theatre. "Jewels of the Sephar d'tm, "featud1at m Lauren Pomerantz and Peter Maund, is perforrn~ark 8:30 p . m. April 27 in Thwes Recital Hall. College (454-2201) . sat 8 Wolf 1l'ap Barns- Baritone Stephen Dickson stnS adi· ~- m. on April4. D The Mclain Family B~d plaY~ t~are ttonal and bluegrass music at 8 p. m . Apnl 5. 0 ;i!6· Dance with the Hobo String Band at 8 P· rn. AP san 00 O The Washington Ballet performs work by Ch 85 a! Goh at 8 p . m. April 10-12. O Carmen BalthrOP s•~wiJ!d 8 p.m . April 13. O Washington's Capital Wooec)!illa Quintet plays at 2 p.m. Aprill4. O Piano duo Fr at 8 and Zuloaga perform Mozart, Chopin and ot~ers at 8 p.m. Aprill9. O Jazz saxophonist JohnnY Gnffinricall p.m . April 20. O "Mozart on 5th" plays Arneime/ music at 2 p. m. April 21. D Leon Redbo?e_'s ~men: blues at 8 p. m. on April 26. O "Virgtnta en in Visions and Voices" celebrates the state's w~~ and arts and humanities. Panel discussions, theatr~ workS musical performanc~ from 9 a . m. to 5 p.m. an y·enna 1 by Virginia women at 8 p. m . 1624 nap Rd., (371-1406) . "'fhe Woolly Mammoth - The Obie Award-winntn8 reated Vienna Notes" by Richard Nelson focuses on~ dete ~is presidential candidate who attempts t? d!C~ hotel, memoirs amid terrorist attacks around h1s pos times, April 19 through May 18. Call for performance 1317 G St . NW (393-3939)

l j

GALLERIES Jonathall Addison-Ripley-Contemporary sculpture bY _zJ32l· 28 Shahn, through April 27, 9 Hillyer Ct. NW (3 d

-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Ad~~G~~~-oo~~~~m-•~u students of the Hudson River School, ! 850-l~~ZJ5Z)·

Who's Win to turn me on? anew

1985 car with used D.C. Instant Lottery tickets. Instant tickets bring big cash prizes-$50,000 . . . $1 ,000 . . . $100 .. . But if you don 't win , send in 5 non-winning Instant Lottery tickets for the Second Chance Drawing on a new 1985 car! Now there's cash , and up to 12 cars in the Instant Lottery Car Sweepstakes Irs a Capital Game! U

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

6 through 28. 3760 Howard Ave., Kensington ( . 13 APrd Anton-Tom Gibbs' abstract steel structure, JO). through May 8. 415 E . Capitol St. SE (546-7 3 ,·p

.

bers,.l

Art League Gallery-Juried mixed media mern APrill show and Fanchon (Gersten berg): recent wor~~ion 51·• through May 6. The Torpedo Factory, 101 N. Alexandria (683-1780) . drawinS5• Franz Bader - Camille Pissarro (1830-1903) : O Recent pastels and watercolors, through April 13. h MaY4. works by Gunther Gumpert, April 17 throug 2001 I St. NW (337-5440) . h· bY was Baumgartner - "Gypsy, " recent watercol?rs O LeO" ington artist Mindy Weisel, through Apnl zo. h rJaY· Berkowitz's recent paintings, April 24 throu8 2016 R St. NW (232~320) . ·r;e,

w·warn R1

Bethesda Art Gallery-Color woodcuts by I aethesd3 1920-1950, April 6- May 4 . 7950 Norfolk Ave., ·1Z (656-6665) .

APrJ

Brody' s Gallery - Gayil Nalls' recent paintings. through 27. 2031 Florida Ave. NW (462-4747) . tz· ChVO Capricorn - Pop designs in watercolor by La:Tr.Yture oilS kin , AprilS th rough 23. O Jane Mihalik's rniDia 8 4849 ' of still life and landscape, Aprill9 through MaY ' hi• Rugby Ave., Bethesda (657-3477). h0 10graP ~ Kathleen Ewing-Group show of flower P suite 2 through April. 1609 Connecticut Ave. NW. (328-0955) . . tinS

onet~~;~st

Fendrick - "The Con ingham Variations," and 40 variations by one of the original ?~~ 3059 rJ painters, Robert Cottingham , through Apnl ' St. NW (33 8-4544) . ,, oil . . . WheatleY•. JO Ftsber - "The Spnng Colors of Wartk h APril ' paintings o f international landscapes, throu8 1509 Connecticut Ave. NW (265-6255) . ason · of Re re Foxhall Gallery - " Retrospective : Studtes M· puP and Sentiment," paintings and drawings bY CVi Le(JO~ through April 17. D The Naive Pa intings ~f Ave- 1'1 from April 20 to May 18, 3301 New MextcO (244-3039).


~-

n. APril28 " featurtni rformed at Jllege park

n sings at 8

plays uadt· o squart ~- APri16· ChOO san op sings a~ woodwtn o Frechilla others at 8 8 1' riffin at American s ragtime/ a women· women t~ 1trical an and works :1., Vienna . "'f~t ed a defeat lictate ~is ,osh hotel• nee times•

un8

fiaJil ~Uct· Bethesda

,s,

APri12

togra P (tJ suite 2 ~s ,

~-------~----

Garfiockels From Karl Lagerfeld for Fendi, sure shouldering adds spice to a body conscious spring. Clean-lined shaping in curry-colored cotton twill for 6 to 12, bright fuchsiafor 4 to 10, 435.00 European Designer Boutique, Third, "F" Street.


================~·~~

~~

I

F ance bY Gallery K-New abstract paintings from r James emerging artists, April 2 - 20. O Paintings bY NVI Baumgardner, April 23 - May II , 2032 P St. (223-6955). through Gallery Ten-The sculpture of Foon Sham, phi!ll" \ April 20. D" Stone House Revisited: Fans and CriSI'" I toms," paintings and constructions by Jo Anne NVI Ellert, April 23 - May 18, 1519 Connecticut Ave. (232-3326). d" prints, Gallery West-Elizabeth McBride's mixed me ta yliCS· through April 19. Alicia Dobranski's abst_ract~~~J59)· April 21 - May 10, 1314 King St., Alexandna (5

I j

Gilpin House-Oils by Vincent Carniero, Oonal d ~: and Dick Harryman; sculpture by F. Mttchel1UO)· through April. 206 King St., Alexandria (836-0 d cast Glass Gallery-The colorful robots and bloW~~~ 4931 work of painter David Lewin, through Apnl · Elm St., Bethesda (657-3478). hS . . , photograP Govlnda Gallery- "Moments of VISion, . 34th by Dr. Harold Edgarton, April 13 - May 18, 1227

~:~~:a~~::~~~~;ery-"Enamel on Plexiglas,'~ n; paintings by Jerrald C. Balance, April 9 - MaY ' Seventh St. NW (638-6162).

d-

1

1

I

andlllll I Hull -Martha Armstrong's colorful citysc_apes ith LU~t scapes, through April 13 . ONeo-folk aru~t Ed APrU Small's wood sculpture, quilting, and patnU~~so7l· 17 - May II, 3301 New Mexico Ave. NW (36 .j APfl1 Judge Gallery-Star York's bronze sculptures, . sriSS• - IS. DThe paintings and lithographs of S~~;-0()05)· April 16- 30, 600 New Hampshire Ave. NW ( h thfOUS B.R. Komblatt-New tables by Michaellbdd • ( April. 406 Seventh St. NW (638-7657). hie

Marie Martin Gallery- Richard Misrach's phot1{~ 5t· landscapes of the Southwest, through April, 32 ·or NW (337-1822) . . "f intefl Mlcbelson's-"Patterns in Light " sull he,. c;afl . naJJSt zs.t734)· and landscape oils by Washington' tra d"tUO Shankman, April! through 27, 707 G St. NW (6 r.·ns·

"I could've sworn the Drysdales said they were buying carpet

at a discount." They did. The Drysdales bought yards and and yards of rich, sumptuous carpeting, all without a single flaw. Naturally, from Woodmont Carpet and Interiors. And the discount? Don't let that confuse you. It's as much a part of Woodmont as the quality name brands they carry. Like Karastan. And Cabin Craft. Plus investment quality oriental rugs. Even tile and hardwood floors. Wall and window

coverings too. Problem is, after years of providing consistently fine merchandise, people just forget they're discount. So next time you see a Woodmont truck parked in someone's driveway, think twice. Sure, they've got good taste. But you can bet they've got good sense as well. Come by and see what kind of surprising prices Woodmont can come up with for you.

Woodmont Carpet & Interiors (I didn't know they were discount.)

11712 Parklawn Dr., Rockville, Md. 770-4555 9301 Gaither Rd., Gaithersburg, Md. 258-8408 14

WASHINGTON DoSSIER I APRIL 1985

Alanv 1 Middendorf Gallery- Photographs by poet the BC31 0 berg of Jack Kerouac and other members ~ t ItO~ 1 generation. O "Nonsites" by earth work arttS bia Jtd· Smithson, both April 6 - May 4, 2009 Cotum NW (462-2009). c;re8 . gs and Plum-Walter Crump's prints and draw!R elrY Ji%" LeFevre's sculpture. DNortheast Regional ~~~o. 3762 l hibit with Jamie Bennett. All through Aprt Howard Ave., Kensington (933-0222) . I'~' ·nts bY . Prince Royal-Watercolors and recent prt AieJ!aO Buckley Moss, April 17 - 30, 204 S. Royal St., _.;ot· dria (548-5151). figurative!"": e Jack Sbalnman Gallery-Contemporary b0rauv. 1 11 ings by Steve Miller, through April 24. OCO ~n APfl paintings by Claude Simard and James Ha;~ 49 7J. 26 through May 22. 2443 18th St. NW (46 tUrl'

Silverman- New acquisitions of 18th and ~i~~~~~ St· European and American oils, through Apn · Asaph St., Alexandria (836-5363). . 18· bAprt1 9 Spectrum-Acrylics by Ingrid Leeds, th~ou~ • r;~aY · D Jean Garnat's sillc.screen prints, Apnl 1 1132 29th St. NW (333-0954). •riel . ·ns s• VI Studio Gallery-The mythical civilization patfl: 51· ~ of Marcia Coppel, April 3 - 27, 420 sevent (393-6266). ,vinSs . an dra 5t lllggart, Jorgensen and Putnam -AmertC 3241 P · and watercolors, April 25 through MaY 16NW (298-7676). 30 vas · · gs on c on Touchstone-"Varied Climates," ~~~~n~ 1,0 aintin8s Jpby Jo Harrop and "Faces of Chma, f.na's scU ~e canvas by Leni Liftin, April 9- 28 . D ~ ~ricaPPU~V/ tured benches and Aldith Spence Christy's 3 p 51· wall hangings, April 30 - May 19. 213 0 (223-6683). fllisOn ' VN Gallery - Recent paintings by PhiliP Ja


-

-

.

-

-

France bY

> bY J~~ p St.

n through \

~d

phaJI· I

lfllle CriSP" t Ave. r<W

.edia priPts. tel acryltCS• (549-7359)·

II

maid zolan :hell Allen. 36-<J!IO)· 7{11

and cast

ri!J2. 4931

·c

.otograpP~. 3243

Core

I~ ;ra~-"Robert Henri: Painter," a retrospective of

~loan or ~

?Y

the American artist who inspired John

httle.k Wtiham Glackens and George Luks, including and nown cityscapes and landscapes as well as portraits 11 Circle~:t studies. April20 through June 16. D "Henri's .4.tneri 1 lustrates the context of this early 20th century dents can artist through 50 works by his teachers, stu"'<rd :fd associates, among them George Bellows, Edla thr Opper, Rockwell Kent and Raphael Soyer. April &raph~~:h June 16. D"The New York School: Photo1-lt\1> y, 35-1963," Part II of three related exhibits on CaravaOrk Ph?tography, featuring work by Roy DeJo. [Jp' Ed Femgersh and others . April27 through June Sun!(· art I of the exhibit runs through April14. D "The 1 tng· L . • 17th S · outs XIV and the New World" closes April r01 treet and New York Avenue NW (638-3211) Rer Sb attica! D akespeare Llbrary-"The Kembles: A Thebooks a Ynasty" features portraits, costumes, prompt ~Prill! n~ Programs of the celebrated family of actors . try._Jut . rough mid-October. D Anne Hathaway Gal~ke El~ted mixed media show by the students of The ·~ay 2 ~ngton School for the Arts . April 7 through trtt ' I E. Capitol St. SE (544-7077) ~ r._ .. 'f ino W: he Glazed Ceramic 1!-adition of Seto and during Jares" focuses on the evolution of glazed ceramic A.pri! a~an·s medieval period, the 13th-16th centuries. 26 and Pat· t . rough Nov. 17. D "Ming Dynasty Calligraphy p,.. . scrolls sh ow a com"'•son nttng b · " H and and hangmg "'0rk or etween calligraphy and painting through the 4 or lvtani· 0 an_ists, through July 31. D "From the Hand lltu~urn; !raman Paintings from the Freer," 32 of the the 14th t s best examples of manuscript painting from 0 the 16th centuries. D "Japanese Calligraphy."

-

Giveyour .... family nothing to complain about. B&B Caterers for wedding receptions with perfection.

>ou can alUXJys be sure when you say "/do" with ~1-hshington areas most memorable cuisine and gracious sen1ice. After alL y~:rs've ~ been catering to families for

1

Caterers

Everyone will know you hall(! good taste. 7041 Blair Road NorthUX!St Washington, D.C. 20012

829-8640 WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

1S


-

--------=---~~~-------------

R.S.V.P. The Watergate Tlwse accustomed to gracious entertaining choose The Watergate Hotel f(JY intimate soirees and grand gatherings. Because only The Watergate offers superb cuisine, impeccable seroice, and breathtaking views overlooking the Potomac. To reserve a room f(JY 12 to 500 call 202-298-4490.

- - ,.

-~

ltaditional styles and cursive styles modeled o~ th,: Chinese, both through April28. O"Kyoto Ceranu~W through April 21. Jefferson Drive and 12th Street (3S7-2700) "J' [)ine: Hirshhom Museum and Sculpture Garden- ~ rks Five Themes." Ninety paintings and mixed medi~ w~hiS on hearts, robes, tools, gates and trees co~pnse wiY mid-career retrospective for the American arust. A nJ 28 . completed bronze "gate" is featured, through AP\ ooJ 3 Independence Avenue and Eighth Street SW (35 7• . froJII Museum of African Art- "African Masterpteces ost The Musee de I:Homme." 100 of the rarest ~d ~ave renowned works of African art, most of which ugb never been exhibited outside France, April 10 t:;r_? the June 9. OF~us Gallery: ''Akan Fun~rary He~oouala head of a tnbal elder, through Apnl 14. D .. nal Cameroon Boat," a dugout canoe that fuses tradit:prll and European elements of style goes on displaY 26 through July 21, 318 A St. NE (287-3490) "five CoMuseum of Modem Art of Latin Americaet. lumbian Masters." Paintings by Botero, Grau, N~rk Obregon and Villamizar, April 2 through 26. TheaJierY> of Uruguayan artist Linda Kohen in the OAS G April 9 through 26. 201 - 18th St. NW (789-3000)

National Air and Space Museum-"Edward ~:7s Heinemann and Clarence 'Kelly' Johnson: Des!S raft for the Jet Age." The careers of these talented 111 ~g5 designers are highlighted, from their childhood dra ]JefS of aircraft to models of the jet fighters and dive ~oJII" is they devised. Opens April 26. "Wings and ThinS~prll the theme of the museum's weekend open bouse red· 27-28 at its Garber Facility where aircraft ~e rest~on· Highlights include band music, model-buildtng deB-29, strations and viewing restoration work on the,. enue "Enola Gay." Sixth Street and Independence "v sw (3S7-2700)

.•. otd

National Gallery of Art-"Gallery for a Kine· atnt· Master Paintings from Dulwich" highlights 3S keY.~ain's ings from the south London gallery, one ~f BrtaninS first important museums. Rembrandt's "Gtrl Le 1 on a Window Sill" is featured, Apri114 through St~tutr O" Robert Nanteuil," SO engravings by the 17th cede of 3 printmaker and portraitist, including those. be ~ 1 ]Jel1. Louis XIV, Cardinal Mazarin and Jean-Bapuste ~ricaP through April 28. O''Ancient Art of the AfD 3o00 Woodland Indians" features 120 masterworks fr 0~ 00 gh B. C. to 1600 A. D. in stone, shell and copper, t es and Aug. 4. 0 "Leonardo's Horses: Studies of Hors ROYal Other Animals by Leonardo da Vinci from ~he froJII Library at Windsor Castle" contains SO drawtnss ricaP this unparalleled collection, on their first ~:uricC tour, through June 9. 0 "The Monotypes ~f Avenue Prendergast," through April 14. Constituuon and Sixth Street NW (737-421S) . and

.z.

National Museum of American Art-"Cr~att~~cb'' Renewal: Views of Cotopaxi by Frederic Edwtn C wings, illustrates, in 40 paintings, oil sketches and dr.~ vol· the artist's recurrent attention to the Ecuadort eolOS~ cano and his belief in the vulcanist theory of ~ f!opC• through July 14. O"Years of Challenge, Years 0hundred LIFE: The Second Decade, 1946-!9SS." '1\VO on tbe vintage photos from magazine archives foeUS work Scrabble craze, 3-D movies and the Korean war~ aor· by Margaret Bourke-White, Henri Cartier-Bresso ~ ZOO don Parks and others, through May 12. O"f~o colleC' to Art: Animal Sculpture." From the Museum ~ct- J4· tion, from baboons to mountain lions, through Eighth and G streets NW (3S7-2700) ·pg "SPann! National Museum of American HistorY- , draw· Niagara: The International Bridges, !848-1962, tite tbe ings, illustrations, paintings and photos dr_arnabridge5• engineering challenge answered by suspens•?11 person through May 14. O"Eleanor Roosevelt: Ftrs1thf 0 ~gb Singular" is a tribute to the former fust ladY. d t4th May S, Constitution Avenue between 12th an streets NW (3S7-2700) fi~e "seventY· •' National Museum of Natural HistorY- a! f!istorY Years of The National Museum of Natur and ar· marks the museum's anniversary with photos gh rJa1 chitectural renderings. Rotunda Gallery, tbfOU 16

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S


g!! i

SOPIIISIICATFS ffiNERARY ~- 0"Spotlight on Mammals," the newest section of 1 e I>ermanent fossil hall, is now open to the public, Oth Street and Constitution Avenue NW (357-2700)

~Ilion~ _Portrait Gallery- "Chester Harding," the work

'JiJII J)ine: ,dia wor~s tprise thtS t. A newlY

Po the_•~merant artist who became the most successful

in rtr~llst in America following the era of Gilbert Stuart, [J~~u~~ one of Daniel Boone, April12 through August. er••Wllham Edward West (1788-1857): Kentucky Paint. lord Byron and Gen. and Mrs. Robert E. Lee are :ong the 40 portraits by this antebellum artist, April (l7through June 23. D"Joseph Wright, American Artist 5 F 6-1793)." This Colonial artist painted Benjamin pr~~lin and made the first bust of George Washington. tba:ll~gs, graphics and the first catalog raisonne of Sc arttst, through June 9. D"Thomas Payne: A Hero thorned." Paintings, caricatures and first editions of []~• reformer's political pamphlets, through Aug. 11. b Charles Martin Conlon and the Immortals of BaseFaii,t9tS-1930," extended through May 27, Eighth and streets NW (357-2700)

tAPril 28 · (3S7-t3tXl)

eces from and most bich ba~e 0 tbrousb "the ead, al J"DOU a raditional ,laY APril

rohlnlps. Collection- "Appreciations: John Marin," the tb Urth In a series of exhibitions on American artists in w:t llluseum•s permanent collection. It features 23 oils, t.j·;colors, drawings and prints. D"Emerging Artists: le~ os Pogany-Paintings and Works on Paper." This '~<or~a~ght Hungarian-born painter and printmaker has lila· In the Metropolitan Museum of Art and other in~or collections. It is his first major show in Wash(38700· Both through May 26, 1600 - 21st St. NW ·21St)

M

A

R

T

E

CAROLINA GARDEN

lit8 ni "ick Gallery-"Material Evidence: New Color 'Il:ch~ue~ in Handmade Furniture" features witty and ic~&lnative handcrafted furniture by 19 leading Amer-

new Wo~dworkers who used Formica Corporation's ij&h 1amtnate, Colorcore, to create pieces like a table

~~~~~~ill~-.no·~~··~1~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~;~~~~~~=~

Chi t trd and last segment of this exhibit contains fro~ese~xport, hand-screened, lace and painted fans 'the late 19th century and several early 20th century tg83 .Pies, through July 21. "Chicago Furniture, 1833~d j, Art, Craft, Industry" closes April 7, 17th Street ennsytvania Avenue NW (357-2700)

-~GARDEN TOURS "'Mit

turaJ 0 th_rough 30-"The Garden Environment: Sculpl'he 1\Setllng, Setting for Sculpture"-sponsored by Sculpt Udubon Naturalist Society and The Washington ChevyUre Group-at "Woodend," 8940 Jones Mill Rd ., P.lll Chase-opening reception Apill 10, 5 to 7:30 .O.pri1';by invitation only-Luncheons, Apill 1~ and t.lich 3• 12:30 p. m.-$20 each-by reservauon'noael B~lett, speaker-exhibition, open to public ~IIi0 admtssion charge-Exhibit coordinator: Mrs. o\ M. Zimmerman.

and

tion cb'' cbut wi11S5• ~a vol· .nan ....

o\P~ ~and

geOl0>''

offl~ bUP

"Pru

tbe

.s onwor~ ar. aor·

;on. ZOO roJil uee· 's co 14· l

()CI·

22-Historic Garden Week in Virginia . hollle1a er tour in Lincoln, Loudoun County. Seven , and gardens will be open. 27 bt.;efit -S7th Annual Georgetown Garden Thurrl!st ~ fo~ the Georgetown Children's House-includes ~d I>entng of "Thdor Place" gardens and done over 'IO~~ Of "Prospect House," "Evermay" and others 18.30) a.m. to S p. m. -$10 (advance of April 12, direct -honoring Joan McDaniel, retiring executive 1\lu~f the Children's House-Chmn.: Mrs. J. Burke

"'~ru

n.

27 'sPo -Second Annual "Washington Suite Life Thur" l\lashh:10red by and for the benefit of the. Lea~ue of

&u""8ton Theatres and Ticketplace- Prestdenual and I ~r su· ll each.ltes of luxury hotels-tO a.m. to 5 p.m.-

"'~ru 27 Oid 10 -Historic Garden Week in Virginia Thur of ~d ntn Alexandria and eight privately owned homes ~ then~ &ardens and three historic sites- sponsored ~tee~ 0 arden Club of Alexandria and the Hunting aut•s C~den Club-10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.-tea, St. 1 Io. urch, 228 s. Pitt St.-2 to 4 p.m. -tickets

...

Who's going_

Win to turn me on? anew 1985 car with used D.C. Instant Lonery tickets.

Instant tickets bring big cash prizes-$50,000 ... $1,000 . .. $100 ... But if you don 't win, send in 5 non-winning Instant Lottery tickets for the Second Chance Drawing on a new 1985 car! Now there's cash, and up to 12 cars in the Instant Lottery Car Sweepstakes lfs a Capital Game! WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

17


The

Now, the best in party rental equipment can be yours ... Wonderfully designed custom linens Handblown glassware and the finest china Distinctive place plates Fifteen different chair styles

984-0963


WASHIN610N CIRCLES

The Latest Turns in the Rumor Mill

IJoh

RUMOR NO 1

L.dn East to make way for ~ole aurn d ~ thor~ . to be stepping down the e allmg Sen. John East, tan North Carolina Republi~ed W~o was recently hospital~ sl With a urinary block. He No;ted to run again in '86. Go h .Carolina pols expect Sele"路 Jun Martin, who would ct East's replacement, to

their man's direction, watches and waits for the Reagan juggernaut to collapse under the weight of the deficit.

Rep. Wirth

RUMOR NO.3 All is not well at Rickover Foundation Admiral Hyman Rickover, no stranger to pitched battles is rumored to be having one in his own nest. According to friends, wife Eleonore is reportedly livid and fighting back against what she perceives as attempts by Joann DiGennaro, who heads the Rickover Foundation, to manipulate her controversial husband for her own fmancial and political gain. There are also reports that the IRS is looking into this situation. DiGennaro allegedly has three of her relatives on the foundation payroll. She serves as its managing vice president, treasurer and executive director. Former Carterite David Rubenstein is secretary.

also a White House counsel to Nixon. While Garment and Wouk barely know each other, Garment sees the intellectual resemblance as uncanny. He should, after all, know what goes on in his own mind. Wouk, whose novel deals with the Jewish experience in America, is well-known as a meticulous researcher.

Prime Minister Bettino Craxi allegedly told President Reagan that in exchange for the status and prestige of addressing a joint session of Congress (which he did), he would consider supporting the placement of U.S. cruise missiles on Italian soil.

RUMOR NO.5

Gayle Wilson, whose husband Pete is Senator from California has struck out on her own as a television performer. The pilot of her first show, which is built around personality profiles of people in Washington, is being offered for syndication through the Storer Broadcasting chain.

Zuckerman, Steinem nuptials uncertain Those rumors of impending nuptials between media/real estate mogul Mort Zuckerman and feminist Gloria Steinem are unlikely to come true. Friends are saying "don't hold your breath."

RUMOR NO.6 Did the Italian prime minister trade a joint session speech for U. S. cruise missiles?

GAYLE'S WASHINGTON

TYING-UNTYING KNOTS It's wedding bells for food maven Jeffrey Cohen and Pat Voveris. Jeffrey is the gourmet guru behind Sutton Place Gourmet. ... Meanwhile, it's splitsville for Susan and Phil Carr.

RUMOR NO.4 Meese's attorney is model for new work by Herman Wouk Leonard Garment, who served as a special counsel to Nixon during his presidency and more recently as an attorney for Edwin Meese in his bid for attorney general, is perplexed. He sees himself, perhaps rightly, as a model for David Goodkind, the leading character in Herman Wonk's new book "Inside, Outside." Like Garment, Goodkind is

Phil Ratner and Chief Justice Burger

who persuaded Ratner to do less painting and more sculpting, a lucky choice since Ratner's commissions now inFew know it, but Supreme clude bronze sculptures on Court Chief Justice Warren Ellis Island and a bible Burger is an accomplished sculptor. Years before his high museum devoted to Ratner's court appointment, he struck works in Israel. The two are up a friendship with Washing- still sculpting buddies and the ton artist Phil Ratner, whose chief justice uses Ratner's reputation now soars world- studio for his own artistic wide. It was the chief justice endeavors.

SCULPTING BUDDIES

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

19


Gray-Haired Eminence Conquers Washington BY RICHARD KROLIK

T e i r looks are symbolic of high ower and position. They are among Washington's celebrated "silver foxes," men distinguished from other potentates not because they are sly or cunning, but because each is a roaring success in his chosen field, each has a presence. And each has a splendid head of silver hair. Gray hair can do a lot for a man. According to Milton Pitts, barber to presidents and the power elite in Washington for many a year, gray or white hair softens the lines in a man's face-in contrast to dark locks, which actually emphasize the lines. Some silver foxes have watched their hair turn gray and then white over the decades. Others went white in WASHINOTON DOSSIER I APRIL ltiS 21


their 20s. None on our list longs to change back to the color of his youth. The question: Did the distinguished whiteness above their ears contribute to their positions of eminence? Or did the hard work bring on their gray hair? Which came first, the chicken or the egg? If you sat in a box at a formal Kennedy Center opening and scanned the sea of black-tied men below, these silver-toned men would stand out like snow-capped peaks rising from a dark sea. If you were a lawyer, a politician, a public-relations counselor, a retailer, a journalist, a local government official or a lobbyist, you'd also know these men . They're leaders. We present seven silver foxes of Washington:

"It is a joy to find in one man such a fine intellect and so much humor." So says John Charles Daly, a 30-year golfing buddy from Burning 'free, who goes on to observe that watching Clark Clifford play golf explains his great success in his chosen field. "One has the impression that he has read and studied every article written about the game, and has sought to implement every suggestion therein," says Daly. "He has not been entirely successful. But his perseverance and the extent of his effort must explain in large measure his enormous success in other fields." Off the golf course, Clifford is the epitome of style, power and influence~ A successful St. Louis attorney, he carne to Washington after World War II as naval aide to the new president, Harry S. 'fruman, and then became his special counsel. After leaving the White House with 'fruman, he was invited back regularly to advise presidents and their Cabinets, and in 1968 Lyndon Johnson appointed him secretary of Defense. Clifford's hair didn't go from blond to white until he was nearly 70. Next year, he'll be 80 but there is no visible slowdown in his activities. One friend of many years calls him "incredibly organized and selfdisciplined ... he works with remarkable intensity, and has a totally controlled mind." In addition to his command of law, advice and entree, Clifford has recently taken on the chairmanship of First American Bankshares Corp., a $4 billion holding company that controls banks in Washington, Maryland, Virginia, New York and Tennessee. President Kennedy may have had the last word on Clifford when he addressed the Alfalfa Club just days after taking office. "Clark has been one of my mainstays," said JFK. "He told me he didn't want anything for himself- just advertise the name of his Jaw firm on the one dollar bills." Clifford, his friends will tell you, not only looks elegant, in carefully tailored suits and immaculately trimmed silver hair, but he sounds elegant, too. His voice is low and well-modulated, prompting listeners to lean 22

WASH! GTON DoSSIER I APRIL 198'

forward attentively. Some of his detractOrs hint that he may speak low quite deliberate1y, and, say he is unable to pass a mirror without taking a sideways glance. No matter, say his admirers-the image is worthy of the man.

The legends of public relations, including men like Ivy Lee, Edward L. Bernays and Ben Sonnenberg, and companies like Hill & Knowlton, Carl Byoir and Burson-Marsteller, may soon be eclipsed by the organization welded together by a stylish, friendly, whitehaired fellow named Bob Gray. Today, four years after it opened its doors, Gray and Co. is bringing in $20 million a year in billings for public relations, lobbying, entree and whatever else a corporate bigwig or well-heeled special-interest group wants from Washington. The man who did it all, Robert Keith Gray, 5' 9", 148 pounds, is an elegant dresser, conservative or, as one associate kidded, "He's elegant if you can call a man who always wears a blue suit with a white shirt and striped tie elegant." Gray laughs it off. "I wear dark suits because I can go on to whatever evening affair is scheduled, unless it's black tie, without going home to change." The few times he's worn a light suit or checked jacket, he says, people who know him have been concerned that something was wrong. Yet Gray can put on blue jeans and a sweater, or western wear when he's throwing a cowboy-type party, and still look as neat and well groomed as if he had just stepped out of a good tailor shop. But he claims that he buys his clothes wherever he happens to be, here or abroad, whenever he has a couple of hours between planes. A few tucks and a 39 regular off-therack fits. Gray started turning gray when he got out of the Navy after World War II, and the process continued through Harvard and his years in the White House as Eisenhower's appointments secretary and later Cabinet secretary. He went white at age 4S; today, he regrets only that people no longer call it "prematurely ara)t u White hair, Gray concedes, though sometimes taken as a sian or wisdom, is always seen as a sign or age.


t ~ number of die-hard Democrats still : k their party nominated the wrong Fritz Year. Ernest Hollings of South Carolina ~nly drew 5 percent of the vote in the crucial ew Hampshire primary. If he'd gotten 15 ~r 20 percent, they say, he could have gone n to take the South and, perhaps, the

country.

en~des, with that shining white hair, that ~ng

grin, that soothing Southern accent

lo that quick wit, the senator is seen by

~ supporters as looking more presibal than any of his competitors. a Certainly Fritz Hollings looks the part of ~tlnber of the Senate, where he serves on Pr Pr~t.igious Commerce, Budget and ApOpnattons committees. Sa~ suits look as if they are tailored on e Row in London. Actually, accord-

his aides, he shops off the rack in ...-~I!S"'"

and Washington, with no parhis favorite. And he gets his trimmed in the Senate barbershop. his Senate seat secure since 1966of the vote last time aroundrecord as governor and lieutenant 'r:!l."q'1nnr of South Carolina to draw upon, at 63 may be heard from again Presidential sweepstakes. Whether or not, his attractive wife Peatsy is to lose the sense of humor she ~~Dlte!d during the last presidential camOne day, an early morning caller to speak to the senator on their hotelPhone. "Just a minute," she said, caJling across the room, inquired, "Is llalne Hollings, honey?" Hollings is secure enough to enjoy laugh along with the seriou work he In the Senate.

Albert Hunt is the Washington bureau chief of The Wall Street Journal, a resp;:cted journalist with a respected newspaper. He's 42 now, but his hair went white before he was 30. He started with the Journal in Boston 20 years ago, moved on to Washington in 1969, and began proving himself in one of the toughest assignments in town, Capitol Hill. Eventually, the ultimate prize of Washington bureau chief came a couple years ago. Hunt is married to Judy Woodruff, Washington correspondent for the PBS "MacNeil/Lehrer News Hour." They have one small son. How does Hunt feel about being included in this group of white-haired achievers? Embarrassed. He likes to report the story, not be a part of it, he says. What about his

When a Republican White House wants to put some muscle behind its legislative program on Capitol Hill, they tend to turn to a tall, handsome, white-haired gentleman-there seems to be no other word named Max Friedersdorf, newly appointed special assistant to the president. A man of varied governmental service, he served presidents Ford and Nixon, sat out the Carter administration on the Senate Republican Policy Committee and as chairman of the Federal Elections Commission, then led the fight for President Reagan's programs during his critical first year of his first term. But his 18-hour days began taking their toll, and Friedersdorf was appointed consul in Bermuda for a change of pace. From there, he went to a vice presidency in the PepsiCo organization and was drafted back

frequent appearances on "Washington Week in Review" and other news-panel TV shows? That's different, he says, presumably because he is appearing with his professional colleagues and peers, not singled out. As to whether he is well groomed, well turned out, stylish, elegant? He might say okay to the rtrst two and guffaw at the last. The stereotype of the rumpled newsman is hard to live down, and ever since Clifton Daniel of The Ntw lbrk left town, fashion plates have been bard to pinpoint in the ranks of the news media. But his wife Judy disqrees: .. I think he' an elegant man," she says firmly...Whitehaired men are the most brDliant, the sexiest and have the best personalities. At least, AI is all of those thinp-and you can pick him out in a crowd." Another vote for the silver thatch.

to the White House when Reagan took his second oath of office in January. Says David Swanson, who worked under Friedersdorf on the Reagan legislative team: "It's remarkable in this town to find someone who's univenally liked and respected. Max has a profound respect for the leaislative process. He's totally dedicated to aovemment. I wu a Senate staffer before I came to work for him, but he taught me more about how you work with senators and bow you represent the president than I could have imqined. He' a areat leader, and a tremendous aentleman." Frieclendorf' hu been drivina a yellow Porscbe 914 for 10 years. He loves to play aolf, and hu probably played every course within 50 mDes of the White House. His hair turned from blond to white, so there' always been the hint of a snowy thatch atop his 6-foot-plus frame. He buys his

n,_

IUHINOTON DOsSIER I APRIL 1985 l3


suits off the rack in various Washington stores, and always manages to look dignified and smartly turnea out. He's 54"Same age as Clint Eastwood," he says. Is he elegant? Here's how a White House colleague, a woman, answers the question: "It's not his clothes. T}le man himself is elegant. He's kind1 he's thoughtful, he listens, he has a beautiful wife, a long-time marriage .... He's elegant from the inside out."

FASH~~ABLE

_ Running the department of corrections for the District government is enough to turn any man's hair white. Actually, Jim Palmer, the city's corrections chief, has been snow white since age 25. Thday, at 55, he presides over a $140 million budget, 2,500 employees and about 9,000 prisoners, incarcerated and on parole. In the old Grinke Elementary School in Northwest Washington, which was converted into the department of corrections in 1982, Palmer, a Washington native, works in what used to be his fifth-grade classroom. Refurbished with French provincial furniture turned out by prisoners at Lorton Reformatory, the office is a far cry from the movie stereotype of an inner-city law enforcement operation: Palmer's executive assistant Victoria Prescoli speaks three languages and came to D. C. Corrections from the State Department. A close friend and admirer of Palmer is Channel 4 news anchor Jim Vance, who met Palmer during the July 1974 four-day siege at the District courthouse cell-block area. Palmer was deputy U.S. marshal at the time. Vance and two other community celebrities were the only ones allowed in. despite one of the inmates calling hinr ". . . a tool of the white-controlled media. •• Throughout the arduous and dangerous houn of threats and nqotiations, Vance says he gained a respec:t for Palmer that has intensified over the years. In all that he does, Palmer considera his white hair an asset. "It's my trademark. It sets me apart," he said. So do his clothes. At 16 he was designated one of Washington's best dressed men. a sobriquet he has carried into his adult life. His 6 •J•. 172-pound frame fits perfec:tly into most designer suits, although his favorites are those by CaneUi (pictured at riaht). He also favors Ferragarno shoes and custom-made shirts with his initials on the cuffs. Impeccably groomed at all times. Palmer goes to his bair stylist- Modesta at Headstart-every week to have a haircut and manicure. His fuhion consultant is Louis O'Connor at Bloominadale's in 'JYson's Comer, ·who sees to it that this silverthatched pubUc servant looks his best. 24

WASHINOTON DOSSIER I APRIL l9IS

___:_F--= O~ X--

Fashions in deep, rich tones are the best choice for silver-haired men, sJ,Y buyers and salespeople at fine men 5 stores around town. "Colors with vibrancy," are wh~t Jack Rudden of Alexander Julian 1n Georgetown suggests for leisure w~· "Oversized cotton sweaters or sbirtS in mid-bright colors like reds, blu~ and greens with khaki, taupe or whttC trousers," recommends Jack GubaJlC: of Britches for new spring casual we&£ But when a gray-haired man pur· chases a suit, Rudden says he leads him toward the charcoal racks. __ 1_. ''The best color is navy blue," 5111"' Sabin Leach of Brooks BrotherS· "Dark shades of gray and mid-~! look fine, too, because it gives enou... contrast," he says. Linda DeBerry of Marc Jeffries says she steers gray-haired custom; away from fancy frills and fads suggests they wear classics. ,, "They should go for darker colors. said David Sheftell of Arthur Adlet "The two-button darted-front suit with the old-new pleated trousers are more flattering to the silver· haired man." Rudden says he usually recomrn~ white shirts, but adds that pinkS Nd soft pastels also look fine. David lis of Raleigh's suggests, "Make backgrounds conservative in CO •.. add a punch of color with a ~ ley or club tie, and never be wi~~ a complementary pocket square. • In all thinp, most experll ~...t.. silver-haired man should avoid ~ low- because it will bring out yellow tones in his hair. Als~-~ gray, because it offers no conu~;;,Jim Kessee, a hat buyer and ~~tt man at the Georgetown UniVCJ~ Shop, also puts tan and beiae on list of don'ts for the silver fox.:_, ..... But Lewis O'Connor of BlOOJJ-. , dale's says he prefers to be a bit~ darina with some of his c:u!!o~ "People who wear blue and pan-e'"~' are the hardest to change," be .ta1J: For that reason he encouriJel ~. ICI! haired customers to be a Ut~~ traditional-even to try an e~ toned suit now and then, he ~

yo:


COIFING

____ T.:. _:__:H:..=_.E-=-----F0=---=--X~ "Let it go gray," is the recommendation of most Washington area hair stylists for rnen with newly colorless locks. . As for keeping a silver thatch looking Its best, hair professionals offer a variety or suggestions. "When the hair turns white, it's much rnore coarse," said David Cohen of David's

h'lb call Herbert Haft elegant would amuse b•IJI.even more than it would his friends and ,:•ness acquaintances. Ebullient, friendly, th twd, outgoing, enthusiastic-those are ldj~tives that crop up most frequently an:n discussing this phenomenally active .successful fellow. th lils snowy thatch is whiter and fuller ~ny of his peers, and it's been that Ysmce his early 30s. ~hat does he think of it? "I think it's a good thing," he says. "When I go 10 th a Paris restaurant, and haven't been arere for a year, the head waiter says, 'How ~/You, Mr. Haft. Glad to see you again.' oro; that's either because of my white hair e bill that I fold up and slip him.'' p liaft's barber is Mr. Elie of Chez Elie in 0 lialoma~, who waxes rhapsodic a.bout t~e anJt ha1r: "Because of his beaut1ful halT llu the shape of his head, it allows me to t Out a very masculine look with soft11 .· It always gives me great pleasure to dtssoIt,''

'lib

'li:'

~aft is a regular customer of Mr. Elie, abr &him every week unless he's tra eling

:r

,. Oad. That's phenomenal, when you con.that he's kept that schedule while sellb.~~ 73 Dart drugstores for $160 million, ~ up Trak Auto Parts, buying a hefty iii;~tage of the May Company and helping he) ~n Robert with Crown Books- plus ltt~lng with charities and extracurricular f:'iities such as the Ford's Theater Board. is Ord's Theater Director Frankie Hewitt ae::eat Haft fan. Not only are the Hafts Pert· ~us contributors, Hewitt says, but they a ICtpate. "When you get Herb, you get ~~hole bunch of Hafts.'' For more than ) Y~s, Haft has been a trustee •. and t~is b~ ~Is wife, Gloria, took on the JOb while ~Otned the theater's board of governors. u., board is a group of top corporate executo~ y.'ho support Ford's with grants and tributions. ~What does Gloria Haft think of her bus" d's silver locks? "Three words," she Ys. "Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful."

Beautiful People. ''Our most successful non-peroxide treatment is Cellophane by Sebastian, which is applied every six weeks to smooth out the hair, and make it more lustrous ." Milton Pitts, barber for many a president, said one problem with gray hair is that it can become a dingy yellow if overexposed to chlorine, the sun or smoke. He recommends a product called Roux Fanciful, a rinse that comes in 50 shades. Jean Claude of Suissa Salon recommends

"crystalizing" -treating the hair with a combination of a natural ash color and a 2- or 3-percent solution of peroxide once a month-to prevent yellowing. He also advises his customers to apply a rinse called Shimmer Lights after each shampoo. Tom Ebbitt, who works at "Hair of Capitol Hill" in the Senate side of the Capitol, says he tells his white-haired clients not to smoke, because that tends to yellow the hair. But if it's already yellow, he recommends a blue rinse.


-, -.

B it 1\


~ob Gray is doing it. Carolyn Deaver is doing it. Sheila Tate is doing It. Frank Mankiewicz is doing it. Muffie Brandon is doing it. Lyn

Nofziger is doing it. Nancy Reynolds is doing it. William Bolger is

s B Y D OM B ONAFEDE

A " ' " s - t h e ve<y wo<d is lovIngly caressed simply in its saying by those Who have it-is like a fragrant lubricant smoothing the way for political and social acceptance. For in Washington, the gold ~oes not to the swiftest nor the strongest Ut to the player with the "right contacts" and access to "people who count." Here, Wealth has always been measured in political currency, in whom you know and how well You know them and whether they will discreetly barter a quid for a quo. Accordingly, over the past two decades Washington's ~Ubiic relations industry has blossomed and 0 Urished, nurtured mainly on the art of opening doors and securing entree to the movers and shakers.

But never before has having the right contacts paid so many so well. And never before has it generated the power that the public relations industry wields in this town today. Its computer-age practitioners-epitomized by Robert Keith Gray, who, with his perfectly styled white hair and handsomely tailored dark-oxford suits-suggests a cultured pearl set in onyx, are drawn from among some of the most celebrated in government, law and journalism. Even Deputy Chief of Staff Mike Deaver will leave the White House to return to the big bucks business of public relations in Washington. Says former New York congressman Seymour Halpern, "Washington

l>oLmCARDS Inc., Copyright Š 1984 by Donald Gates. Photographed by Peter Garfreld.

is overrun with PR firms. It's known as an influence market, the hub of power."

I n the nation's oapital, public <elations is less concerned with hyping a consumer product-"where to put the balloons in the shopping center," in the words of Steve Rabin, of Ogilvy & Mather-than with a melange of activities loosely called "government relations," encompassing legislative lobbying, public affairs counseling, WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S

27


media promotion and social matchmaking. ·~ lot of people in the business don't want to use the term 'public relations,' preferring instead to call themselves public affairs counselors or communications specialists," said Vic Kamber, of the Kainber Group. "But it's all the same, whether it's done by a lawyer like Tommy Boggs, a political consultant like Anne Wexler or a PR guy like Bob Gray." Former Reagan White House aide Joe Canzeri, who has opened his own public relations office in Washington, prefers to think of himself as a "facilitator. You have to keep in mind that California is glitter, New York is money and Washington is power," he said. "If you've been in the administration, you have access to a lot of contacts, and what I try to do for my clients is to get them through the system quicker than they would otherwise." In the old days when characters like Maj. Gen. Harry H. Vaughan, a poker-playing crony of President 'fruman bestowed gifts of home freezers to Administration officials, it was called influence peddling; today, with Washington a more sophisticated place, it is euphemistically referred to as access, or to be even more au courant, communications. Modesty aside, its practitioners emphasize their familiarity with the capital's esoteric tribal rites and political peculiarities and advertise themselves as specialists in issue analysis, media relations, lobbying techniques, coalition building and grass-roots mobilization. Some, such as Mary Pettus & Associate$, specialize in the orchestration of elegant dinner parties and other types of social galas that attract the creme de Ia creme of the Washington scene. Others become established as producers of corporatesponsored cultural events, a trademark of Rogers and Cowan, where Muffie Brandon, former White House social secretary to Nancy Reagan, puts to good use her intimacy with Washington's high society. As Joe Laitin, veteran government press and public affairs officer and now a private consultant, observed, "What's important is that clients believe you have access ." Thus, as with so many aspects of Washington, the perception is as significant as reality, the illusion as authentic as the event. Accessor what passes for it-may be only one element in Washington public relations but anyone without it might as well close shop.

w

tho tn>do, Bob Gn>y,

a former Cabinet secretary in the Eisenhower White House is recognized as the high priest of access, provoking a mixture of resentment and envy among his competitors. Quitting Hill & Knowlton after 20 years and starting his own firm with 14 employees in March 1981, he has in only four years built one of the biggest, flashiest 28

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

and most profitable public-relations operations in the country, largely because of his reputation as an "insider" with a direct pipeline to Washington's premier policymakers-and his recruitment of "stars." Those whose serve under his imprimatur include Frank Mankiewicz, former press secretary to Sen. Robert Kennedy and head of National Public Radio, Gary Hymel, longtime administrative assistant to House Speaker Thomas P. (Tip) O'Neill Jr., and former postmaster general William Bolger. Alejandro Orfila, former secretary general of the Organization of American States, who allegedly joined Gray and Co. even before he left the OAS, recently left the firm. On this day, Gray is seated in a glassenclosed, upstairs corner office in a Georgetown building- called Power House be cause it is a remodeled generating plant -from where he oversees his operations amid an eclectic profusion of green plants, antique furniture and state-of-the-art communications gear. "It's important to have access but not unique to have it," he remarks. "In Washington, it's a perishable commodity; if you misuse it, you lose it. If you represent important people on important issues, you have access regardless of the administration. If we have access, and I'm proud to think we do, it's because we don't misuse it." Strategically placed on tables and desks are numerous portraits of past and present Washington political potentates, including one of the president and first lady and another of Edwin Meese, James Baker and Michael Deaver when they served as the mighty White House "troika."

H

a,;,g a White Hou" connection is unquestionably a profitable asset in Washington public relations. In recent years there has been a veritable revolving door between the White House and the capital's PR offices. Deaver, Reagan's deputy staff chief and media stage director, was a partner in the West Coast public relations firm of Deaver & Hannaford, whose main revenue-producing client was then former California governor Ronald Reagan; Larry Speakes, principal deputy press secretary, was formerly with Hill & Knowlton; Craig Fuller, former Cabinet liaison recently named chief of staff to Vice President Bush, was an executive with Deaver & Hannaford; Sheila Thte, Mrs. Reagan's press secretary, who once worked at Hill & Knowlton, left not long ago to return to the business as a senior vice president with Burson-Marsteller, the nation's largest public relations firm. And former White House political director Lyn Nofziger has teamed with Mark Bragg in a new PR firm.

In addition, Nancy Reynolds, the first lady's friend and confidante, is currentlY a partner and registered lobbyist for such ~Jue· ribbon clients as General Motors, Amenc~n 10 Airlines and the motion picture industrY a consulting firm with Anne Wexler, for~~r Carter White House director of public )Ia~; son. And for almost three years, D~aver e wife, Carolyn, has been associated w1th ~~s Pettus firm where she compiles guest for swanky Washington social affairs. The\ service: a party so "memorable that a senato will afterwards remark to one of his Job?~; ists, 'I had a great time at your partY, said Pettus. d The old-boy network extends the covete connections still further: Peter D. Han_na; ford, Deaver's former partner and oneurn. · bUSI" Reagan speechwriter, conceded that hiS 1 ness has "increased steadily" over the Ia~ four years. Among his new clients: the r~: wan shoe industry, promoters of the Nor.t n west Alaskan pipeline, and several foreig d governments, including Argentina an Guatemala. . 5 Privately, most public relations execuuvet acknowledge the importance of access, b~s publicly they are like the royal descenda\ of the Hapsburgs who feel it is beneath thel dignity to flaunt their blood lines. on· Insisted Jonathan Jessar, of Burs er Marsteller, "We don't sell access. We offbe expertise in government affairs, hoW t e city works and what motivates it to rno~t from one direction to another. But we do~e tell a client we can get him in to see t d president because it wouldn't do anY go:at anyway.. .. We don't deny, however, t personal relationships are useful." .• 0 Just how useful was reflected in the 1g tense, six-figure bidding war waged arno~i­ PR firms for the services of Deaver in an.te cipation of his departure from the Whl House. . es Observed Kamber, "The firm that h1\ Mike Deaver believes he can call Ron~s and Nancy whenever he wants. He k~ 0 55 if he did that he wouldn't stay in buSI~e ,, very long-but the client doesn't knoW It·

h\

T.

B B ~

Q

M B

R J

c

PI

a G

G G

N

c

G

w

·g

e movement towards. ~~g names, plus Gray's penchant for hlfl g "stars," has drawn criticism from arn~nll traditionalists in the industry, who qu~stl~o whether they are used mainly as shills "tt attract clients. There's a sense that the ghns and glamour trivialize~ the business and r~o­ counter to the concept envisaged by PR P1 y 1 neer Edward L. Bernays, the first to aPPn· the social sciences, including studies of co 5 sumers' attitudes, to marketing techniq~eu~ 10 "We're a star-struck celebrity consC ' )3' country,'' asserted Paul Forbes, public re . 11 tions consultant and president of the w~~­ ington Public Relations Society of Amefl 85 Continued on page


the first -rentlY a 1ch bluemerican lustrY in forrner blic liai)eaver's with the lest lists rs.Their I senator 5 lobbY· .arty, '" coveted Hanna· 0 netirn.e

;Us bUSI·

the Jast the rai: North· foreign lla and

PR CLASS OF '85 Bess Abell Bess Abell Enterprises William Bolger Gray and Co. Mabel "Muffie" Brandon Rogers and Cowan Joseph Canzeri Canzeri Company

William Codus Codus Corp.

ecutives ess, but end ants 1th their

Carolyn Deaver Mary Pettus & Associates

~urson·

PUblic relations ?

ve offer .ow the o rnove redon't see the IY good er, that the in•

arnon.g in anU· I White ~t hir:s

Ronnie knows •usiness 0 wit.' '

Micbael Deaver Robert Gray Gray and Co.

Gary Hymel G? an~

~harles Manatt Ofziger- Bragg Communicators Frank Mankiewicz Gray and Co . Franklin "Lvn" Nofziger Nofziger- Bragg Cornrnunicators

~etchen Poston ashington Inc.

~ancy Reynolds ex!er, Reynolds, liarrison & Schule Inc.

~hena Tate

Orson-Marsteller

~nne Wexler eJCler, Reynolds, liarrison & Schule Inc.


IDIDDLE EA Can one tiny Georgetown gallery promote the culture of the entire Arab world here? BY VIOLA DRATH

30

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S


A

!if, you might want to know, is the first letter of the Arabic alphabet. Appropriately, the Alif Gallery at 31st and M streets chose the name when it launched in 1983 the first showplace of Arab contemporary art and culture in Washington. In contrast to other galleries, the Alif, home and flagship of the Arab-American Cultural Foundation, is a showplace with a mission . It is not commercial. As the foundation's executive director, Dr. Anita Baker, points out, its goal is "to share the many aspects of Arabian culture, its rich heritage and endless varieties, with the broadest spectrum of the American community." With a background in Arabic language and literature, Baker was last fall recruited to sharpen

the foundation's profile and help the financially troubled organization stand on its own feet. While no particular public is addressed in the gallery's rotating exhibits of contemporary works by Arab and Arab-American artists, Baker stresses that many of the cultural events organized around the shows are directed toward young people. By scheduling a sahra (soiree) for instance, she hopes to create a certain ambience by inviting young people from the featured country to bring their American friends for an evening of music, dance, poetry or storytelling. But one does not need a sahra to get a whiff of Arabian atmosphere at the Alif. The subtle effects of Arab civilization meeting the West can be ascertained at any of

1Wo examples of Arab artistry are "Fantasia" by Moroccan-born Abdenbi El Amine Demnati, left, and "The Night Horseman" by Iraqi artist Suaa AI-Attar, above. Al-Attar's works were on display at the Ali/ Gallery last December. Demnati's paintings, including this one celebrating Mororcan horsemanship, currently are on display at the gallery.

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985 31


its exhibitions. The influence of postmodem western painting and sculpture on Arab artists, often steeped in ancient traditions, can indeed produce spellbinding results. Or as encountered in one recent show of the fanciful stylized compositions by Baghdadborn Suad Al-Attar, they can be pure enchantment. Recalling Assyrian reliefs and medieval Arabian tapestries, these lush gardens of paradise convey a deceptive quietude with their luminous flowers, peacocks, flower hunters, palm trees and other enigmatic Mesopotamian motifs. At the same time they clearly relate to contemporary pattern painting. In a darker mood, this London-based artist reveals an affinity for the celebrated contemporary nightmares of Dublin-born Francis Bacon in a series of moody paintings of women with serenely floating heads

a window through which Washingtonians can get a glance at contemporary Arab culture. Oddly enough, the oil-rich Arabs, so powerful that they once were able to shake the mighty economies of the West to their very foundations, were neglectful about calling attention to their considerable cultural assets. What better way to counteract their negative image, especially in the nation's capital where the impact of so much that is done is translated into political terms. Incredibly, no such effort was made until 1978 when a group of concerned Arabs and ArabAmericans launched the Arab-American Cultural Foundation. Its purpose: "to extend and deepen the knowledge of Arab culture, particularly modem Arab culture, among the people of the United States."

Three women intimately involved with the operation of the A/if Gallery review some of the works on hand. From left are: Dr. Anita Baker, executive director of the Arab-American Cultural Foundation; Afaf Zurayk, art manager; and Lorraine Parsons, administrative secretary at the gallery.

above shattered bodies, which could just as easily derive from her Iraqi experience as from her absorption of western imagery. Another exhibited artist, Dia al Azzawi, also works in England. But even though his huge abstract themes are artictllated in a bold cubistic vocabulary, they remain firmly rooted in the Sumerian and Islamic traditions of his native Iraq. Incorporating calligraphy-a word or phrase written in Arabic -these powerful canvases with their vibrant colors, strange oriental rhythms and symbols have an unmistakable edge to them, a tension springing from the compelling mix of formal western art concepts and Arabic content. Not surprisingly, Baker discerns a greater interest in Arab art among Americans now than in recent history. Still, unlike the mounting number of Arabian restaurants in our town, the Alif is the only gallery serving as 32

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S

Strictly nonpolitical and nonprofit, the foundation set out to provide Americans with a direct experience of as wide a range of Arab culture as possible in order to broaden the understanding of the Arab people. It invited performing artists, musicians, poets and painters, as well as scholars and writers from Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Qatar, Sudan and Syria, who fascinated their audiences with the unique interaction of ancient Arab cultural traditions and contemporary western artistic expressions. In concert with Arab-Americans and western experts of the Arab world, these artists found a platform at such places as the World Bank, the Barns at Wolf 'frap and Georgetown University, a leader in contemporary Arab studies. But no matter how successful their appearances, it did not escape the foundation's founding fathers that they had made little progress in extending

their base and that reaching a wider Anter· can public would require a long-term str~~ e. Eventually an all-out effort at gaJ~g visibility was made in 1983. Under the chaJI'; manship of Hisham Sharabi, a profe~~. of European history at Georgetown lllt versity, the foundation found a perman: home in. the gallery space in Georgeto . ~ After sprucing it up and hiring a foundatlO executive director and an art manage~ fo~ the gallery, the organization embarke 0 an ambitious course of cultural eve~t~d al However, supported entirely by indiVI u e and corporate donors, the operation of thd gallery, at about $150,000 a year, ~rov~f. costly. It ran into such serious fmanc1al di ficulties last fall that it almost died. . r "It was a frustrating experience, cons1de,; ing that there is so much Arab mon~\1 Sharabi remembers. "The governments l.~n would not help." Luckily the foundatl never lacked volunteer workers. d "We are proud of what we are doing. a~e we want to do more. To accomplish t~s bO need outside support," argues Sharab~, w refers to himself as an eternal optimtst. ill "To some extent, we will always be raf fmancial straits," observes art manager A r's Zurayk, a native of Lebanon with a maste,~ degree in Islamic art from Harvard. ba5 highly specialized gallery such as ours. ·ye little chance of surviving in this competltl n field. So much is happening in Washing~on' it is hard to catch anybody's attentl~; Being nonprofit and tax-exempt, we taiJII no commissions from our artists. o.ur BY is to reach out into the commuDltY· 10 showing the best the Arab world ha5uri· offer we hope to arouse interest and c osity. Obviously this takes money." . ns The foundation relies on the donatl~e and enthusiasm of its friends, who c~est from all walks of life. Some pf its staunc 0111 supporters are collectors of Arab art~ arnJor· them, Samia and Abulhuda Faroukt, a t4 danian couple who came to Washington c· years ago to start an international constf\1 tion business. . . ·ons Baker's strategy of presenting exhtbltl her showcasing one country often enables rn· to enlist the support of the diplom~tic cokeS munity from that nation. Since t~s maelf· this part of the operation financiallY said sufficient, the policy seems to have Pent off. To the delight of the artists, reCen· events have been well attended. In h~ Jeer deavor to achieve a national balance, :iJdS has scheduled watercolor exhibitions of nill' and wildflowers from the Arabian ~e oilS sula, traditional textiles from KuwaJt, the inspired by "horses and lovers" ura· Egyptian painter Ahmed Morsy ~d ,g uch tive works depicting Moroccan subJectS ~tied as the celebration of horsemanshiP en~enbi "Moroccan Fantasia" by Morocco's Ab El Amine Demnati. of It is a program devised by a teatt;and knowledgeable professionals who unders btiC the value of artistic excellence and P.~0 . relations. Their effort deserves attentl tO The Alif Gallery is open from 10 a. ~~rn 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and ~ noon to 6 p.m. Saturdays.

r


r Atneri· struggle. gainiDS .

he chaJ!·

•rofessor wn uni· rmanent ~getoWO·

mdation ager for trked on ·ents. tdividual ,n of the prov~d lcial dlf·

d.

'·onsider·

,,

moneY. ents just mdatioO

,ing and this we ~bi, who imist ..

1

ys be ill

gerMaf master's d ''A ar· )UfS ha5 tpetitiVe lrington, tentio0• .we take Jur aifll nitY· BY 1 has t~ nd cllfl'


"A growing business needs an

''

,._,â&#x20AC;˘

Businesses today operate within a rapidly changing environment. More sophisticated consumers are seeking contemporary products and services. These new demands impose greater standards of performance and effectiveness on business managers. Through its family of insurance and fmancial services companies the Acacia Group provides managers with: investment and cash management, key employee insurance, employee and management training, 401-K and pension Plans, business valuations, long term strategic planning assistance, and commercial lending for small businesses. Over 115 years of experience in insurance planning and capital management enables the Acacia Group to lend maturity to businesses grappling with growing pains. Sound advice seasoned by a proven track record ... just What business managers require today. The

Acacia

The Acacia Group . . . join us in a winning partnership For lllOre information call: Aurora Tandberg, CLU 8201 Corporate Drive Lanham. MD 20785 (30 1) 731-0900 'fht Acacia Group or Companies:

Bruce I. Campbell 810 Glen Eagles Court Towson, MD 20204 (301) 321-0311

Gary W. Carpenter, CLU 6011 Executive Blvd. Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 881-7610

Frank R. Dick, CLU 7700 Little River Turnpike Annandale, VA 22003 (703) 750-0700

Acacia Mutuat Ufe, Acacia National Ufe. Catven Group Ltd .. Crtative Business Concepts, Inc., Acacia Financial C01p0111ion. Acacia Insurance Sales Corporation, Acacia Federal Savings Bank National Headquwn: 51 Louisiana Avenue, N.W.â&#x20AC;˘ Washington, DC 200)1 , (202) 628-4506


â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘

sw were create~

Until now.

It's not just that it's surrounded by a lush green garden and cascading waterfall. It's that it's part of the most exclusive health and racquet club in the Washington area. The Center Club. At Park Center in Alexandria. Where everY luxurious facility, every state-of-the-art machine, every member of the staff reflects an attitude of quality equal to none. From the moment you enter the elegant lobby, you'll know. This is one club where you can exercise in style.

AN EXCLUSIVE CLUB FOR A LIMITED MEMBER_g!!!': To guarantee a private, uncrowded environment for its members, The Center Club will have a limited membership. Which means there'll seldorn be a wait for one of our 12 racquetball courts. Always plenty of running roorn on our indoor jogging track, complete with lighted timers. Lots of elbow raotrl in our 25-meter pool, surrounded by a garden and waterfall. And no crowds in our luxurious locker rooms, where attendants will furnish guests with towels and complimentary toile~

AN EXCLUSIVE OFFER FOR A LIMITED TIM!:-The Center Club opens in surnrner 1985. Sign up now and you'll e~. savings of more than 40% off th~ tiation fee. lf you'd like to learn more about the club or the offer, call John Reed today at (703) 820-8900. Or write us for a free brochure.

The Center Club. An exclusive health & racquet club is coming to NorthernVirginia. 4300 King Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22032, (703) szo-Brtfl

A

c


s

-• ya rater~ x~

the b. At

!

everY

te~art

ff lto

:r the one

---

You'll get results. And, In record time.

le.

3 si-IIP: ::::::--:led ern:lorn tball -oorn )lete roofll I by a

vds 1ere

es.

R ------

:.:...-----rner >Y

-

iOi~ _0 re

1!1

If

why it's no accident that Weaver

r

• Inc. is the leasing/management agent

aor over 6 million square feet of office, retail and industrial space in Washington, D. C. · nd nearby Maryland and Virginia. S ?~r leasing representatives are spec~alists. t llectahsts with the knowledge and expenence ho get results. These men and women make ~~dreds of phone and personal calls daily to f aJor companies and retailers who are looking hor 8Pace. No matter what size. That's why ba~dly a day goes by that you're not in a Utlding Weaver Bros. has leased. A. W, So, list your property with a busy man. <:: eaver Bros. leasing representative. ~..:t:.:fi~~ a1I Barry Brown (301)986-4227. ln And get your results. record time. J\ C Weaver Bros., Inc. 0 mpany in


The soaring dollar has been hurting America and nobody,s hollering foul play B Y ELIOT JANEWAY

D

ntil a few years ago, the comp lexities of finance were wrapped in mystery, and answers to questions about Chch money were qualified with hande~. of "perhaps" and "on the other is ha · Today practically everything that arou PPening in the money world revolves high nct ? ne new fact of financial life: the agai Pnce of the U.S. dollar measured the nst every currency in sight and under rnattress . In to n the past year the dollar has soared rnonew heights and taken over as the only calc~Y the world has or will have in the lapp able future. Baffling the experts, it Cle~d a 12-year record against the West again an mark and broke all previous records the ~t t.he English pound, the French franc, ~Ven ahan lire and the Canadian dollar. Vet the Yen crumbled under its pressure . dol!a every new high notched up for the noseJ · brought forth wailings predicting liaJiz •ves far sharper than have ever matethe a~: Instead, with only occasional slips, the fi lg~ty greenback has gone on to d~fy lbe nanc1a1 equivalent of the law of gravity. da:t. ~or~ overpriced it was said to be one lhe'ne e highe~ the price it frequently brou~ht afo bxt. But It wasn't as if we were sconng . as ot .all game. It wasn't as good for Amertea G •t sounded. ~the winners have included Amer-

1

~liot J. aneway, publisher of The Janeway Letter

icans traveling abroad who are enjoying more buying power than they've had in years . But the biggest beneficiaries of the stronger dollar have been the banks in countries dependent on exports to the United States. All of them have come to hold the bulk of their assets in dollars and also have been positioned to exploit the situation by dumping undreamed-of new bargains into America's markets. After all, the more expensive the dollar, the cheaper goods priced in foreign currencies become in dollar markets. Our nonstop import boom proves it. The losers have been U.S. manufacturers whose products have become priced not only ou of overseas markets but also out of their own communities. Heavy losers, too, have been the big money playersU.S. and foreign banks included- who on the advice of their most trusted advisers have been playing spit-in-the-wind. They have bet against the dollar, speculating on outdated theories portending its fall, instead of recognizing the new realities responsible for its strength. Even Soviet banks, whose record of taking advantage of capitalist confusion is legendary, have been mutilated by stepping on their own land mines touched off by failed raids on the U.S. dollar. Market behavior, though conditioned by the old rules, has responded to the new facts of financial life. At the root of the dollar's persistent strength is the perception throughout the world that the United States has the only political system stable enough

to support a vigorous economy. What the financial bigwigs have ignored is the fear of capital loss that has taken the place of greed for earnings as the driving force in the marketplace. This momentous switch has changed the traditional rules of financial market behavior. Since safety is now more important than gain in the risk-ridden money game, there has been no safe harbor to con;tpete with the U.S. dollar; certainly not With the alternatives paying less than half as well, if at all. Meanwhile gold , traditionally the conventional alternative, has lost its luster. The old argument for a gold standard figured that the price of gold was stable, and that money backed by it would be stable too . This was true as long as the basis of gold's stability, its presumed scarcity, remained unchanged. The trouble began in the early 1970s, when the price of gold got caught up in the undertow of the runaway price of oil. When it jumped from 85 cents to $40 a barrel, and gold followed with a jump from $35 to $800 an ounce, pickaxes started separating anything that glittered yellow from the dust all over the world. When the oil bubble burst, the price of gold collapsed with it. No doubt both markets still tempt crapshooters, but they scare away capital in search of safe sanctuary. The most sophisticated private bank in Paris traditionally gold-minded, closed out 1984 dumping all of its considerable holdings of gold onto the dollar bandwagon .

SPECIAL SECTION OF THE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985 39


The Dollar Debacle Joe and Mos's serves the finest beef in town.

Other investment alternatives to the dollar-the Japanese yen, the German mark, the Swiss franc and sterling-have been laughed out of contention. The powers that be in Japan bob the yen up and down like a yo-yo and keep driving to cheapen it in order to keep down the price of their exports. Germany has felt the same pressure to ke~p down the price of German goods in the U.s." market, but Germans are also buying up the U.S. dollar as if it were going out of style. No doubt the Swiss franc would have femained the investment target for money from every trouble spot in the world if not for a small accident of geography: Zurich is now only missile minutes away from Soviet army units in Western Europe. 'llue, "The best restaurant I've Switzerland is still taking in hot money, -Ronnie Milsap never seen." but it is running through a revolving door into Eurodollars, parkable in the U.S. "Great meal, great bunch neasury notes paying double-digit rates of guys." -Eddie Murphy that have become the safe and smart outlet for hot surplus cash. ''I thought it was a Diner." -Bruce Springsteen As for sterling, after a few weak and phony shows of life, it has gen_erally _run true to form, reflecting the Umted KingBreakfast begins dom's new role as a colony of OPEC and 7:30 AM, Mon-Fri collapsing accordingly. As oil heads toward $20 a barrel, sterling is hea!fing under a Ull Connecticut Ave, NW dollar. . (202) 659-1211 If all this is not proof enough that the roaring bull market for dollars is not a flash - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - , in the pan, consider the acid test the dollar has passed with flying colors since last sumHonor Guard! Helping to n-r•r.t.P.~t:• mer. According to every established rule of the market, when interest rates fall, the Washingtonians from crime. currency they are paid in falls, too. But the drop in dollar interest rates has actually Honor Guard • a nationwide company, employs only professionally trained personnel accelerated the inflow of money into dollars who are licensed. bonded and completely and driven up the exchange value of the insured. dollar against weaker currencies- as well as gold. The world apparently got the message: Security and Protection: Four collecting less in dollars only exposes money levels of protec· to the risk of winding up with bigger losses tion personnel by switching to something else. It is better from uniformed to hold onto dollars even if the return is a guards and ushers to plain little less. clothes profesEven the astronomic budget deficit, clearly sionals. responsible for the overabundance of dollars whirling around the world today, has failed Investigations: Undercover surto inflict the promised punishment for our veillance and fiscal sins. If the law of supply and demand investigations. still ruled the market, the oversupply would Detection of already have dragged the dollar below the theft of assets and the loss of Argentine peso. Instead it has run wild as vital data. Supif Andrew Mellon were still pointing with port to attorneys pride to budget surpluses. If nothing else, in usembly of the spectacle of the dollar rising with the facta for hearsupply is a cold, unmistakable warning to ings and trials. us to give up old theories we can no longer afford to nourish and switch to a diet of reality: The dollar is not about to be nudged or kicked from its new position as the world's only money. ~i:i:Z'::-. Call Now! Commanding the premium that goes with Honor Guarde Seeurity Semcee the role the highly touted intergovernmenMaryland Washington Viqpnia tal push to cheapen the dollar and stabilize the other currencies proved to be a nonstarter in just one day. The "fluttering five" ran

683-2700

40

SPECIAL SECI'ION OF mE WASHINGTON DoSSIER I APRIL 198S

. before out of money and the will to use It 'tude they had a chance to grasp the magn~ wg of the job they were talkmg about 0ult· with what amounted to peanuts. The res tht ing fiasco had a boomerang effect on n!Y markets, and it left the dollar not ~ver. stronger but more irresistible than run~ Sterling and the rest of the currencY ort have wound up not only weaker but Ill vulnerable. not to The problem for America is hoW . to<~ . sweepm . g VIC II wind up the loser for th1s by default. To wit: all ~ • The 'freasury's growing shortf t a1 forcing our government to ~rr~w ~torlt unprecedented rate from foreig~ mve ron!• and as long as the dollar rem~ms stettiDI the foreigners we borrow from will beg sOt the highest return on any inve~tmen~ ~h~ security in the world. It's axiomatiC gain follows income. t t]lt • The growing disillusionment abo~rail u.S. national. debt, plus. th~ cash enW from paying mterest on 1t, _Is . hardeco~ U. S. interest rates all over agam m an omy that is visibly softening: a forrnu 1~.t· suffering the worst of both worlds, t]it owing more and earning less. • The dollar's straight-line use over(~ past few years has sent the u.s. trade dod! running a close second to the budget. de Profits of U.S. companies are falling under the impact of imports being into every U.S. market and wiping r1 profit margins. The problem is no Io b) the loss of exports, but the takeove~, imports with prices U.S. manufacturers ·ca'l meet. Adding insult_ to inj_ury, ArneflroO' increasing consumption of un~orted Pe--1 ucts is pouring more dollars mto for tb' banks and subsidizing more ~ports Jll: will drive even more dollars mto the vicious cycle. • The dollar's strength is also ing jitters about the international debt !em for the simple reason that global are priced in dollars. Third World are running up still more debts of . ience to American banks, "sugar1n~ books" to show interest being collect loans gone bad forever. The windfall borrowed by the Brazils of the world to no cash drain for interest catapulting them into powerful neW petitive roles as dumpers of products American markets. pt • The bottom line: As the dollar ~oed11 ues to be priced up, everything pnc dollars- and what isn't?- will go for less. Prices of American stocks, bounce on bets on dollar and interest stand to be particularly hard hit. The market, which has been peppering . by gambling on an "overdue" drop Jlli~ price of the dollar is in for a bumpY r~ The mystery is no longer how the gII'~ is played and scored abroad, but rather I' we accept dealings that make moneY others as making sense for us. ___.-/

Eliot Janeway, publisher of the fin all"~, newsletter The Janeway LetteJ; is the all 1 of "Prescriptions for Prosperity. "


befort jtude doin&

result· on the

YOUR IRA

t onlY 1 evet

I f1111U t !IIOrt

not tO victo~

SHOULD BE AS ONIQOE ASYOOARE Searching for an IRA that's just your style? Then hang your hat at Columbia First because we have exactly what you're looking for-a wide spectrum of IRAs designed to fit your budget, your future needs ... and your retirement dreams. Not to mention an immediate tax break.

,fall ~ at s1

estors. ·troll.!• 'getriDI

l8...r

Jom·

,

ver b1 rscaP,I

eric'

IproV

:ore:J

Fixed Rate IRAs with a money back guarantee ... If you're seeking the utmost security, a Columbia First Fixed Rate IRA may be just your style. You can rest assured that the money you invest in these retirement plans will grow at a steady rate for years to come. In fact, not only does your Columbia First Fixed Rate IRA come with a guaranteed rate of return, it's also insured up to $100,000 by a permanent agency of the Federal government.

... or Self-Directed IRAs for a variety of options on your investment. If you're looking for alternative ways to invest your IRA-and a broader role in managing your retirement account-visit an INVEST Center at Columbia

First. One of the INVEST Representatives will introduce you to a Self-Directed IRA program that offers a wide range of investment opportunities including stocks, zero-coupon bonds, government securities and mutual funds. Through investments like these, your IRA can respond to changes in the market and create a variety of options for yo·ur retirement nest egg.

Many happy returns. Whichever type of IRA you choose-Fixed Rate or SelfDirected-you can be sure your tax return will benefit. Remember, you can contribute up to $2,000 as an individual ($4,000 per qualified working couple) and the dollars you invest in your IRA are deductible from the gross income on your Federal tax return . In fact , every penny your money earns is taxdeferred until you retire and begin drawing on your account.

<~Columbia First

To open a Fixed Rate IRA, visit any one of our 15 convenient locations. Self-Directed IRAs can be opened through INVEST Centers at the Columbia First locations indicated below. The legal deadline for opening or contributing to a 1984 Indi· vidual Retirement Account is April15, 1985. MOST ~ ··~~ ~~ fl?fE

~

..... t ,,,....

...

_ ....

610 13th Street, N.W. 879-7100 730 lith Street, N.W. 879-7120 1101 15th Street, N.W. 879-7130 2000 L Street, N.W. 879-7140 1800 M Street, N.W. 879-7150 1200 New Hampshire Avenue. N.W. 879-7160 1700 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. 879-7170 1900 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. 879-7180 4857 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. 879-7190 4340 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. 879-7200 5005 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W. 879-7210 5301 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. 879-7220 3216 Pennsylvania Avenue, S.E. 879-7230 300 7th Street, S.W. 879·7240 4825 Cordell Avenue, Bethesda , MD 879-7250

INVEST Center locations: 1700 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. 879-7175 5301 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. 879-7226 4825 Cordell Avenue, Bethesda, MD 879-7256

Federal Savings & Loan Association


Local real estate moguls aren't sweating over the new tax laws. So where are they putting their money? B Y J ACK WYNN

few years back, the people who were dabbling in residential real estate could hardly wait to tell you about it. The cocktail party smug index was at an all-time high. Today, even small-time investors have awakened-some of them rudely-to the one fact the pros never forgot : Residential real estate in the Washington area has always been priced to make money as long as it appreciated rapidly. Granted, through the mid-'70s the appreciation was so good you had to strap yourself in to keep from getting giddy. It was a wild ride. But the recent recession and prohibitive interest rates combined to make the conversion of paper profits into real bucks a tougher proposition. It didn't matter how much money you were ahead if you couldn't sell or get out of the deal. The cocktail party chitchat turned to other things.

A

OPPORTUNITY KNOCKING

Is there still money to be made by investing in Washington area real estate? The answer to that question is a definite "yes." There is always money to be made in real estate. "But now more than ever, you have to know what you're doing," says Jon J. Prager, chairman of Finalco Group Inc., "Look, they forgot to marbleize the top of that column," said "Biackie" Auger (seated), partner in Maywash Associates, which bou~~t the Ma:y_flower Hotel in 1966 for $14 mt~lwn and ~ spending $65 million on a restoration that wt/1 make it worth over $150 million. Others include Richard Cohen (left), whose family owns 40 percent of the hotel; Kingdon Gould Jr. (right}, and the Stouffer Hotel Corp., which manages the hotel. Bernard Awenenti (center) is the hotel's general manager.

a McLean tax-advantage investment firm. "The days when you could simply sit on the back patio of your Capitol Hill town house and listen to your equity grow are over." According to Prager, there are many places in the real estate market that remain attractive investments, but there are also good reasons for being skittish. "In recent months, the infusion of more discretionary capital into the upper-middle-income and upper-income classes bas caused real estate partnerships to loom larger on the horizon than ever before," he points out. "One of the significant financial advantages of partnerships, of course, is that many offer possibilities for sheltering income as well as achieving long-term gains." ~hen a general partner organizes a group of mvestors to pool their resources to buy, the present tax laws provide them with attractive depreciation allowances on the front end and tax credits on April 15. In the meantime, normal market appreciation works to make their investment fmancially attr.active over th.e life of the partnership, defmed as the penod of time until the prop~rty is milked for as much advantage as the mvestors can gain from it and is sold. But this "can't lose" type of investment is shed?ing some of its luster, and many real estate mvestment specialists, like H. Lynn Hopewell of Hopewell Rembert Advisors Inc. in Falls Church, are raising some warning flags in front of their clients. "Until the Reagan tax program shakes out,'' says Hopewell, "we are urging caution." That's not likely to happen until 1987 when the Congress sorts out the differences and preferences in the Regan tax plan, the BradleyGephart bill, and the Kemp-Kasten bill, he SPECIAL SECfiON OF THE WASHINGTON DoSSIER I APRIL 1985 43


SHELTER SKELTER --------=-----------

I(

best

said. Until then, the most discussed chanft: J ~as is that people who have been able to wr be \Vas off expenses on vacation homes maY iJil· • lion disappointed. But there are too manY 80111 ponderables now. f tbe SOU "The thing that tends to fall out 0 ~ lllat memory banks of people looking for taU tha advantages," says Hopewell, "is th~t IY can those taxes are not forgiven; they are si.Jil~s. onh delayed until the property changes han.tal Us~ 'llue, the return comes in the form of caP~ut 11 gains, which are taxed at a lower rat;; tho sooner or later, the IRS gets its due. ek· ing1 What tends to happen to investors ~e an ties ing tax breaks is that they get caught 1 ~ lllet endless cycle of deals, each of which 0 tbe are more front-end leverage to coun~erac~eal· in gains in the out years of the previOUS 10 Pretty soon, the need for shelter staj\ne consume the investor, creating a ~eU, ground for poor judgment. Says Hope tbat "I am a firm believer in the philosophY aD' a real estate investment has to make fi~n it I cial sense on its own merits. If you're !ater J only for the tax breaks, sooner 0 ! d of you're going to get into some kill trouble."

''The days when you could simply sit on the back. patio of your Capitol Btl1 town house and listen to,, your equity grow are over. -Jon J. Prager

15th Year in Business

National Award Winning Restaurant

Open For Dinner Only Mon. thru Sat. 6 to 10:30 pm Party Room Available

./!lagyar tllerem

Conn. Ave. NW in Broadmoore Apts. reservations - 362-5624 close to major hotels and Cleveland Metro Station

44

SPECIAL SECfiON OF THE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S


--

beK~eping that in mind, Hopewell says the

write

0

aaY be . nY itJ!·

of the 'or t~

hat all sinJplY

hands· capital te, but

"

~ seek· tin aD 1

needS

iCt the s deal· ' arts to fertile ,eweJl, ~ytnat

(JJI~·

in)!

)ater of

qill tO,,

er.

st mvestments in the Washington area are longer in residential properties. The ~o?s are clear: the recent dependency .of r ashington real estate on rapid apprecta- ' ton, the uncertain tax treatment regarding so~e kinds of residential property, and the SOhdness of the hotel, office and apartment ~arkets. Hopewell is quick to point out at these negative factors don't mean you can•t make money in residential properties, only that, these days, it's tougher than it Usect to be. th Income-based partnerships, particularly in ose in hotel, apartment and office build!' &s, offer excellent investment opportuni~es . Bec.ause the most attractive are apartarent bulldings in the close-in suburbs, they i e also the most difficult to find. Investing en apartment buildings in the District is, of eourse, the surest way to consign your nest ~g to no-growth oblivion. The reason: rent ntroi. b~~e s.carcity of income-generating possith bes m apartment buildings means that bueur~ opportunities these days are in office aJ ~mgs, not only in downtown D.C., but 8 ~ ~ ~.those areas into which the downtown lle Pilling over. Here, different rules apply. v cause they are operated as profit-making ~ntures from the start, office buildings non ?e judged-as investments-on ecollltc rather than tax merits. 00

change

J

~AT EMPTOR Inco to me-based real estate partnerships seem du ~ffer the best of both worlds: income onrtng ownership and a tidy capital gain alice the property is sold. But if it were &et that simple, no one would be able to acr a Piece of the action because all the ag •on would have been snapped up long w.~· There are plenty of things to be"'e of hi Fhor o~e thing, the yields aren't always as lll!k as the salesman or general partner llo' e them sound. As one financial expert br tnted out recently, there are plenty of or~chures that promise an "average" return titn 1Percent a year for 10 years. But a little lh e With a pocket calculator will reveal Ceat an "average" rate of return of 21 per12nt for 10 years pays exactly the same as ca~ercent compounded for 10 years. If you bo &enerate the same return on a AAA to ~d ~s on a fling in real estate, you need egy e~?mk the logic of your investment stratllle~~verage rates of return" are basically Th mgless figures. ''act· e only number that makes sense is the llos J~ted internal rate of return," the closest ~ bStble thing to a ''true'' rate of return. It aJI r~ed on projections, but is adjusted for iecre evant factors impinging on those proto~ tons (broker's fees management fees, ""'es c1osing costs, etc.). ' llartn' Ask the general A.n er for this rate. eltp Other thing to watch out for, say the · llerserts f • IS the fees charged by general oart0 cal!ect ,~ Putting the deal together, a process front-loading." These fees can run

INSURED TAX· FREE INCOME A municipal bond unit trust free from federal income tax. And free from worry because it's insured and AAA rated*! •Insured•- for timely payment of principal and Interest. • AM Rated• - by Standard ~ Poor's Corporation. • Tax-Free• - no federal Income tax. • Secure - portfolio of municipal bonds diversified by type, location and purpose. • Affordable- units available In multiples of $LOOO. • Flexible - monthly, quarterly or semi-annual Income distributions, or automatic reinvestment. • Convenient- no call notices or clipping coupons. • Marketable - units may be liquidated at any time at the current market value.

MARYlAND NATIONAL BANK ®

We want you to grow. ® MEMBERFDC

Call: {301) 244-MUNI ' l l t c - o l l l t o - p o l k ) ' - - 1\11/y-ln lito - I u s ; 110 I'CpftiCfttalloo! l a - u t o 1M ' - ' • abllll)r t o - Ita aJmftllt-. 'lite IINI..Cing It due to 1n lnouronct polk)' 11111 relata 011/y to lito Uttlto o1 lito -IJ!d IlOilo lito - I n lito porllollo. 'lite IIIOUflftCC-. 1101 ,.....,.. l l ! c - r1lk alncc It -.1101 lito nluc olllto unlto. P'ortlons olll\11 murn be ...1\JCCI to ollie or local tua.

.,._..,.tee

This Ia neither an offer to Mil ,_ • sollclt.tlon of •n of(er to buy •ny or these securities. The offering Ia n\8de only by the pro8peCtus. Copies or the prospectus IN)' be obt81ncd In •ny st.te In wtllch this announcement Ia clraal•ted only r10111 such dulers or brokers u INY ••wrully otrer lheiC ICCUrltla In auch at.te. LISTED ~K ACTII'IG AS CUSTOMER'S AGEI'IT. THIS 11'1\'ESTIIIEI'IT IS I'IOT A DEPOSJr AI'ID IS l'tOT II'ISIJKED IIY PDIC.

~;;================~~~~~~~~~====:;~ Washmgton 's only late n1ght restaurant Saturday & Sunday Champagne Brunch from 11am-4pm

Early Bird Dinner Dati~ from 5pm-7pm & 10 30pm-1 OOam

24·28 M Street. Georgetown

Phone: 338-3830

Continued on Page 57 SPECIAL SECfiON OF THE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S 45


· shift· Thanks to government deregulation, ing interest rates and the changing econoliiY• the banking industry is becoming increasingly competitive, and that's good news to consumers. While many people still choose

BANKING ATA GlANCE

A Spreadsheet of Services

WASIDNGTON AMDUCANSEornuTYBANK I Sth Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW

M-Th : 9-3 F: 9-S

y

y

y

M p

N

N

y

y

y

y

N

l-4

6-8

20.00

642-4000 CAPITAL BANK, NA SIS Connecticut Ave. NW 872-1 470

2

M-Th: 9-3 F: 4-S :30

y

y

N

M

N

N

y

y

N

N

N

y

CAPITAL CITY FIDERAL SilL 4301 Connecticut Ave. NW S31-8600

9

M-F: 9-3 F: 4:30-6 S: 9-12

N

y

N

M

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

N

M-F: 9-S

y

y

y

M

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

N

M-F: 9-4 S. : 9-12

y

y

N

M

N

N

N

y

y

y

y

y

9

20.00

M-F: 9-3 F: 4-S :30

y

y

Y

M

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

N

S- IS

2S .OO

M-F: 9-2 F: 4-S:30

y

y

Y

CF

N

N

y

y

y

y

y

N

3-13

IS.OO

M-F: 9-4

N

y

N

M

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

y

7-14

N.C.

M-F: 9-2 F: 4-6

y

y

Y

M

N

y

N

y

N

N

N

N

S-9

2S.OO

M-F: 9-2 F: 4-S:30

y

y

y

M

y

N

N

y

y

N

N

N

7-9

10.00

M-F: 8:30-3 F:4-6 S: 9-12

y

y

y

N

N

y

y

N

N

N

Y

4-S

6- 10

10.00

M-F: 9-2 F :3:30-S :30

y

y

Y

M

N

N

y

y

y

y

y

N

1-4

1-14

12.00

M-F: 9-2 F: 3-5:30 S: 9-12

N

y

Y

M

N

N

y

y

N

N

N

N

S- IS

IS.OO

M-Th: 9-3 F: 9-2:30; 4-6

y

y

Y

M

N

N

y

y

y

y

y

N

3-4

6

20.00

M-Tb: 9-3 F: 9-S:30

y

y

Y

M

N

N

N

y

N

y

y

N

3-4

7

65.00

M

N

N

N

y

y

y

N

N

1-3

4-8

CF

N

N

y

y

N

y

y

N

1-2

1-2

y

y

y

N

N

N

4

y

N

N

N

N

6- 10

CENTURY A TIONAL BANK l81S I St. NW 463-8710 COLUMBIA FIRST SilL ASSOCIATION 610 - 13th St. NW 879-7100

IS

DC ATIONAL BANK 1801 K St. NW 9SS-8800 FIRST AMER.ICAN BANK OF WASHINGTO N 740 - ISth St. NW

26

20.00

4

20.001 18.00

6

30.00

20.001 20.00

22.001 JS.OO

ME

631-1S6S HOME FEDERAL SilL ASSOCIATION S22S Wisconsin Ave. NW S31-8000

6

I DUSTRIAL BANK OF WASHlNGTO 4812 Georgia Ave. NW 122-SSOO MADISON NATIO AL BANK 1730 M St. NW 4S2-SSOO

9

MeLACHLEN NATIONAL BANK 11000 St . NW 626-0100 NS&T BANK, NA ISth Street and New York Avenue NW 383-8000

16

NATIONAL BANK OF COMMERCE 1430 K St. NW 624-0400 NATIONAL BANK OF WASID GTON 619 - 14th St. NW S31-2000

22

ATIONAL ENTERPRISE BANK 17221 St. NW 429-9888 NATIONAL PERMANENT BANK, FSB 111S Pennsylvania Ave., NW 8S1-6100

IS

M-F: 9-4 S: 9-1

y

y

Y

THE RIGGS

ATIONAL BANK 800 - 17th St. NW 83S-6000

28

M-Th: 9-3 F: 9-S

y

y

Y

SECURITY NATIO AL BANK 2000 M St. NW 331-S600

7

M-Th: 9-3 F: 9-2; 4-S:30

y

y

Y

M

N

N

WASffiNGTON FEDERAL SilL S I 0 I Wisconsin Ave. NW 537-8200

14

M-F: 9-4

y

y

N

M

N

N

BANK OF BETHESDA 7500 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda 9SI-3000

12

M-F: 9-2 F: S-8

y

y

y

M

N

y

y

y

N

N

N

N

CHEVY CHASE SilL L'IIC. 8401 Connecticut Ave., Chevy Owe

18

M-Tb : 9-3 :30 F: 9-6:30

Y

Y

Y

[own)

N

N

N

Y

N

N

N

N

w.ool 20.00

20.00

ME M

IS .OO

IS

20.00

MARYLAND 3-12

18.00

28.00

r!JI ~$.00

2

~

~~~7000~------------------------------~S~:~~=J0-~1-------------------------------------------------------------------46

SPECIAL SECTION OF THE WASH INGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

a fi· hon kin< li cia!


~ financial institution for its proximity to kiorne or office, more are considering the nds and costs of services available. ci T~ help Dossier readers select a finanalJnstitution that best fits their needs, we

tornY.

;reas· .vs to 10 ose

present a quick comparison guide to some of the more important services offered at banks, credit unions, and savings and loans throughout the Washington area.

ATM Notworks C Cirrus CF Cash Flow E The Exchange M Most MC Money Command ME Money Exchange MM MOM P Pius PA Perpetual American TM Time Machine

No. of Loc:aliollS 4,099 (national) 219 8 1,000 32 121 4 3,000 (natiooal) 36 13l

I .,<'

~RYLAND (Cont.) ,001 .00 ).001

s.oo

'

~N.S BA NJt A TRUST CO. OF MD. 69!1. 7 ~ttmore Blvd., Riverdale ~~tNs NATIONAL BANK Clt!ztNs Perlhi SAL ASSOC.

~0

M-F: 8- 1 F:4-6 S: 8-12

y

y

Y

(own]

N

N

N

y

y

y

y

N

5-8

20.00

20.00/ 20.00

16

M-F: 9-2 F: l-8 S: 9-12

y

y

Y

CF

N

y

N

y

N

N

N

N

6

15.00

16.00/ 12 .00

M-Th.: 9-3 F: 9-7 S: 9- 12

y

y

N

M

N

N

N

y

16

N

N

N

N

15.00

15.00/ 15.00

y

y

y

y

N

N

N

N

y

y

y

N

72s. ~n St., Laurd

31

~a: Dr. and Fenton St. , Silver Spring

J.OOI

o.oo

C()"'Mu 19 Nrry S&L ASSOC.

M-F: 9-3 F: 5-8 S: 9-12

114

94a. 8 ~ontgomery Village Ave., Gaithersburg

15 .001 7.00

~ABLE BANK, NA

M-F: 9-2 F: l-8

y

y

y

M

N

y

N

y

N

y

24

Y

M

~~ABLE FEDERAL S&L ASSOC.

M-F: 9-3 F: 5-8 S: 9-12

y

y

Y

M

N

N

N

y

9

N

N

N

N

~ AMERICAN BANK OF MD.

M-F: 9-2 F: 4:30-7:30

y

y

Y

CF ME

N

N

y

y

26

N

N

N

N

2

~~NATIONAL BANK OF MD.

M-F: 9-2 F: 5-8

y

y

Y

M

N

N

y

y

y

y

y

26

N

2

~ \\'OMEN'S BANit OF MD.

M-Th: 9-3 F:9-6 S: 9- 1

y

y

Y

M

N

N

N

y

2

N

N

N

N

2

M-Th: 9-4 F: 9-6:30 S: 9:30-2

N

y

y

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

N

M-Th: 9-3 F: 9-7 S: 9- 12

N

y

y

N

N

N

y

y

33

N

N

N

~DtRAL S&L

M-F: 9-3:30 Th: 9-7 S: 9-12

y

y

N

M

N

N

y

y

y

ll

N

N

N

20.00

13 .00/ 20.00

~ No\TIONAL BANK

M-F: 9-3

y

y

Y

M

N

y

y

y

y

y

y

y

210

20.00

20.00/ 20.00

)~~~POUTAN FEDERAL S&L

M-Th: 9-3 :30 F: 9-7 S: 9-12

y

y

y

N

N

N

y

20

N

N

N

N

6

20.00

IS .OO/ 15.00

~~o\N 8.\NJt

M-F: 8:30-2

y

y

Y

M

N

N

y

y

y

y

83

y

N

3-5

3-9

23.00

16.00, IS .OO

M-F: 9-2 F: 4:30-7:30 S: 9- 12

y

y

Y

M

N

N

y

y

87

y

y

y

N

1-4

4-6

22.50

30.00/ IS .OO

N

N

y

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

N

y

y

Y

N

N

y

y

y

y

y

N

M-F: 9-2; 4:3().7:30 S: 9-12

y

y

N

N

N

N

y

N

N

y

N

M-F 9-7 S: 9-12

y

y

Y

N

N

y

y

N

y

y

y

M-F: 9-2 F: 4-7 S: 8-12

N

y

y

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

N

llo1~~· · Baltimoro 14'4s~orgia Ave ., Whoaton

l6s. 7 ~raia

Ave. , Silver Spring

1301] 2 ~roet , Baltimore

OOI .00

9

77o. 1 ~kvtllo P ike, Rockville

~~NMENT SERVICES S&L

62Qo C::diary or Chevy Chase S&L) ~evy Chase Dr., Lauro!

lo\'o IJoo LA FEDERAL S&L 1301] ~ · Charlos St., Baltimore 3 I.!I)

ll()i

2-7000

17g_ 1 2 ~•hon St. , Hyattsville

1301] ~St., Baltimore

t.t

sooo

9St-6~SConsin Ave., Bethosda

1-2

1-2

17.50/

20.00/ 15.00

14

21.00

IS .OO! 12.00

22.00

23.00/ 15.00

20.00

27 .50/ 12.00

20.00

20.001 ll.OO

28.00

20.00 15 .00

4

20.00/ 10.00

27o.SO:klodae Dr., Bethesda

IJN1o 2 ~- N TRU T BANK .._..t F llOIJ 332ayeue St. , Baltimore ·S7l6

VIRGINIA ~~~~ON BA NJt

M·Th: 8:30-2 F: 8:30-6:30

lla,ll~" Blvd., Arlinatoo

a,..N)( 171o

OF VIRGINIA Dr., Mclean

ll().7~ridge

31

~~~:ND HERBERT BANJt A T RUST CO.

l4g_% Fairfax St., Alexandria

~i!:L FIDELITY

l23-44oo sbura Pike, Vienna

~~ENTAL BANK A T RUST

~78&o )(eeoc MiU Rd., Sprincfleld

18

M-F: 9-2 F: 4-7 S: 9-2

M

TM

15.001 10.00

S-10

3-S

S-10

25.00

IS.OO/ 12.00

7-12

10.00

l2 .00t 7.50

22 .00

IS.OO/ IS .OO

2S.OO

15.00/ 10.00

1-3

3-7

SPECIAL SECflON OF THE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL I98S 47


BANKING ATA GlANCE

MM P PA TM

~

.#•"'

S"<F""

VIRGINIA (Cont.)

.,-

CONTINENTAL FEDERAL 4020 University Dr., Fairfax 691-4400

24

DOMINION BANX 8150 Leesburg Pike, Vienna 442-3660 DOMINION FEDEJlAL Sid. 830 I Greensboro Dr., McLean

--------------

A

~o'-'

~

-----------

1,000 32 121 4 3,000 (national) 36 135

~

#"ff

~

ffo

Y

Y

M

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

N

29

M-F: 9-5

y

y

y

M

N

N

N

y

y

y

y

N

16

M-lb.: 9-2; 3-4 F: 9-2; 3-7 S: 9-1

Y

y

y

M

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

N

M-F: 9-7

N

y

N

N

N

N

N

y

N

N

y

N

M-F: 8:30-2:30 F: S-7

N

y

y

y

N

y

N

N

N

N

M-F : 9:3G-2 F: 3-7 S: 9-12

y

y

Y

N

N

y

y

N

N

y

y

M-F: 9-2

N

y

N

N

y

N

y

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

y

N

y

N

N

7-12

14

FARMERS A MERCHANTS NATIONAL BANK East Colonial Hi&bway, Hamilton

m-3680

53

FIRST COMMERCIAL BANK 3801 Wilson Blvd., Arlinaton 851-8700

§' ~

CF ME

6

5-10

15.00

9-14

20.00

9

0

0

12.00

3-14

20.00

20.00

F:4-6 S: 9-12

FIRST COMMONWEALTH S&:L 301 S. Wubington St., Alexandria 549-4500

2

FIRST FEDERAL SAL OF NORTH VIRGINIA 121 N. Wubington St., Alexandria

10

83S-7SOO

M-F: 9-4

N

y M-lb: 9-4 F: 9-7 S: 9-12..__ __

y

Y

M

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

N

3-5

10

M

N

N

y

y

y

y

y

N

1-3

3-14

FIRST VIRGINIA BANK 6400 Arlington Blvd., Falls Church 241-4000

80

M-F : 9-7 S: 9-12

y

y

Y

GEORGE MASON BANK 11185 Main St., Fairfax 352-1100

2

M-F: 9-2 F: 4-7 S: 9-12

N

Y

y

N

N

y

y

N

N

N

N

GUARANTY BANK & TRUST CO. 8315 Lee Hwy., Fairfax 849-1200

M-F: 9-7 S: 9-12

N

Y

y

N

s

N

y

N

N

N

N

5-10

IS.OO

MeLEAN BANK 6832 Old Dominion Dr., McLean

M-F: 9-2 F:4-7 S: 9-12

Y

Y

N

M

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

N

14

15.00

M-F: 7:45-5:45

Y

Y

Y

[own)

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

y

y

y

E

N

N

N

y

N

N

N

N

5~5000

15.00

15.00

s.soi

NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 820 Follin La., Vienna 827-5000

9

PENTAGON FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 1001 N . Fairfax St., Alexandria 827-7786

6

•PERPETUAL AMERICAN, FSB 2034 Eisenhower Ave., Alexandria

55

M-F: 8:30-4:30

Y

Y

y

N

y

N

y

y

y

y

N

10

18.00

PROVIDENCE SAL ASSOCIATION 521 Maple Ave., Vienna 938-5900

9

M-lb: 1:45-5 F: 8:45-6 S: 9-1

N

Y

N

N

y

N

y

N

N

N

N

S-10

25.00

SOVRAN 3401 Columbia Pike, Arlington 892-5900

66

M-Th : 9-2 F: 9-7 S: 9-12

Y

Y

Y

N

y

y

y

y

y

y

N

1-3

5-10

22.00

SUBURBAN SAVINGS 7620 Little River Turnpike, Annandale 75G-1700

14

M-Th: 9-4

N

Y

y

N

y

N

y

N

N

N

y

2

2

10.00

Y

Y

Y

M

N

N

N

y

y

N

N

N

Y

Y

Y

C

N

N

N

y

y

y

y

N

4

4-14

6.lD

838-6077

S: 9-12 M-lb.: 9-4

20.00

F:9-6 S: 9-12 37

838-3000

M-F: 9-2

F:4-6 S: 9-12

•Perpetual American hu branches in D . C., Va. and Md .

48

CF ME

F:9-6

U ITED SAVINGS BA X SOl Maple Ave. , Vienna 281-4021 UNITED VA. BAN~ NORTH REGION 5 IS Kina St .• Alexandria

" ..~o'

cl;

Y

FAMILY S&:L ASSOCIATION 8440 Old Keene Bill Rd . , Sprinafield 569-2244

I'

~

S I ~ 'I" !\." ~ ~f,· A-!F' ,.. "' ~ .. ~ # .... ~ ~~" .o~ /~ (/'~ ~~ V' ..,.. ..... -~~ ~ A .., :il>o.... -q~- -~•"' J ,_. .,... .,_ ~o v ,.. )? )? v +off ..~... ~o~ ~~ ,-l'ff ar ar .,:."

,.

~ ,_-v - ~-·"'#"./'.\:~..~o ~, a"' ,.......~ ~ o .A B l" " "'>o ~~ ..~~- ($'~- ~+ ~o~ 4""l

~

8

M-lb: 9-4 F: 9-7 S: 9-12

448-3000

FIRST AMERICA BANK OF VIRGINIA 1970 Chain Bridge Rd ., McLean 821-7777

.<I!~-~

~4tt#

4,099 (national) 219

Cirrus Cub F1ow The Exchange Most Money Command Money Exchange MOM Plus Perpetual American Time Machine

ME

(/"-

No.ofLo<a~

AIM Networks C CF E M MC

SPECIAL SECTION OF THE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

M

1-2

18.00


al)

-

JO.iXl

,.r!JI JO.iXl

~(/JI l .oO

s.ool ).oO

.oOI .oO


1HE l1VING END

____

Pon Pict tnoc

d each home can have up to seven bedrooros an 5\li baths.

ho

1 two

FOXHALL CRESCENTS Price: $560,950 to $600,250 Location: 48th and Calvert streets Builder: Rownslcy & Kay Sales: 333-5865

·on . Reservations are being taken for the third s1uer of this development on the former Rocke :UZestate. The 26 units will offer interior cust~ All ing along with a private walled-in courtyar · ble homes feature skylights and an 11-foot III~ an whirlpool, and in the higher-priced mo?e slots elevator is available. Some houses offer s1de for a swimming pool or tennis court.

1 Wo

six tio

feat &ou the

HILLANDALE AT GEORGETOWN Price: $299,000 to $425,000 Location: 39th Street and Reservoir Road in Georgetown Builder: Hillandale Development Corp. Sales: 333-2332

wn·

The current 54-unit section of a planned 268-tO 15 house development features hardwood fl~~ 24-hour security and tennis courts. Standard 1 en· include a Jacuzzi in the master bathroo.m, a ctdt· tral vacuum system, a microwave oven 1n the chen and a marble foyer.

SPRING VALLEY

The perfect interior... one that fits your lifestyle best, blending the elements that express your taste and personality. A trained professional designer can create the ideal setting for your Georgetown pied-a-terre or rustic country home. Call our Studio of Interior Design: Washington, Chevy Chase, Wheaton Plaza, Tysons Corner, Montgomery Mall ~~ f.:..~ and Annapolis ~

WOODWARD & LOTHROP

Price: From the low to mid $400,000s Location: lUma Street and Massochusetts A venue Spring Valley Builder: WC & AN Miller Sales: 229-4016 8c,

One of the fi~st major developers of :ot~eY WC & AN Miller has now chosen Spnng kind as the next big growth area for its one-of-a: gie· houses. The company plans to build 163 sine of family homes in the next 10 to 15 years. Soiii roeS the standard features of these colonial-style hO blewill be microwave ovens, whirlpool baths, doU ovens, and a view overlooking Mill Creek.

WASHINGTON HARBOUR Price: $470,000 to $1,575,000 Location: Thomas Jefferson and K streets in Georgetown Builder: Western Development Carp. Sales: 342-7366

par~

From the company who gave us Georgetown rnent comes this 38-unit condominium develoP ble overlooking the Potomac. His-and-her III:bs, bathrooms with gold-plated fixtures, sunken te a and terraces roomy enough to accom~od~tra· swimming pool or gazebo highlight thiS luxurious development.

WESTOVER PLACE

AMERmCA I*S**B*A*C*K The June Issue of Dossier covers American Fashion, American Food and American Feeling

Be patriotic and reserve space today I Advertising Space Deadline: April 29, 1985

Camera-Ready Ueadline: May 3, 1985

Price: $265,000 to $300,000 Location: On Westover Place by Massochusetts Avenue and Ward Circle. Builder: Kettler Bros. r tbC Sales: 363-7078. You can choose between marble and slate fo se5·

foyer and frreplace in these Federal-style hO~itb Some models feature his-and-her bath~ _0nit whirlpools and JennAir kitchens. The 1 . ersi· development is convenient to American Ulllv ty and two miles from Embassy Row.

9

COPLAND POND Price: $250,000 to $290,000 bloCk Location: On Ce!pland Pond Court, one-hal/"' ·rfaX off Rte. 50 at Prosperity Avenue, rOI Builder: Copland Ponti Associates ed oil Sales: 938-5800

These 13 luxury detached town homes, situat 50

SPECIAL SECfiON OF THE WASHINGTON DoSSIER I APRIL 198S

co ho w


Picturesque quarter-acre Jots, overlook a private Pond with a floating gazebo. One four-bedroom ~ode! features a first-floor bedroom, and all ouses come standard with a gourmet kitchen and two fireplaces.

--

ms and

) ENCORE AT WENDOVER l'rtce: $325,000 to $375,000 Location: Off junction of Rte. 66 and the Beltway in Vienna 8. ~!lder: We;iford Associates Inc . . es: 938-5800

I section

kefeUer I 1tomiz·

!fd.AII marble iels an ide lots

Fifty homes are situated on one-half to one-acre ~OOded lots on curving, winding streets. With the :~to eight plans available and their many variaions, no two homes will be alike. Some homes eature vaulted ceilings; many have skylights. The ~~urmet kitchen comes with a ceramic floor and e latest in high-tech appliances.

liiCKoRY FOREST ~ce: $300,000 to $350,000

Ocation: Hunter Hill Road and Hickory Hollow ume Bu · in Oakton Sa tlder: Bob Wilson les: 620-3300

l.town·

J~~e.are five models to choose from,

including

f}OOfS,

,. illiamsburg Colonial or a Victorian farmhouse 11

i iteflll

0

llh three porches, in this development situated

a cen· ' On Private, wooded lots with gently rolling hills. ak cabinetry is available in the kitchen, and a be kit· 4 cu)(4 w.hirlpool in the masterbath, but all are b Stom1zed to suit the individual needs of the UYers. ue

~OlJRY HOMFS

AT ASHTON

t~e: .suo,ooo to $250,000 liu·:lton: Off Foxmi/1 Road in Oakton Sa! der: Bob Koury

Store all your valuables

witll Securi~

in a~ safe place

withiri easy reach.

Give your silver or irreplaceable collections the Security of a bank vault. .JP Trust your furs and rugs to temperature-controlled Security. Hang your paintings in our Art Room. ~Vintage wines age in vault storage and time-honored antiques remain ageless. stored in special containers.~ Call for information and a free competitive estimate ~ ..Jr Depend on Securityt ~nee 18,20'r'l. Washington's and the •~ I ~ world's most experienced mo r-....,. .~ ~ I ~ ing and storage company. ·w , .. ri'I':JL; • • ·

1

rn

Call234. 5600

lhes: 435-1555

c!ue~e eight two-story Colonials offer options in-

an dmg ~ardwood floors, a Jacuzzi, two frreplaces 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - ~ sohd cherry cabinets in the kitchen. Four a b OOms and 2!h baths come standard along with onus room that can be used as a guest room 0 r studio.

k~NDMARK MEWS

t~ce: . $218,900 to $300,000 liu;atton: Cotting Ham Road in Alexandria Sat der: Scott He"ick Cues: 751-2206

Stomization is the key word for this group of Zi148 18th century-style Colonial homes. A Jacuzt • e~evator and gourmet kitchens highlight the exf~nslve list of options . Hardwood finishing is caatUred on the first floor with wall-to-wall ra:ting on the other three. lWo fireplaces with a hearths are standard. Other options include airCCntraJ vacuum system, wet bar, and an electronic cleaner.

~~CLEWOOD

t tee: $300,000 to $400 000 11C::~ion: Seminary Ro~d in Alexandria Sa; er: Miracle Wood Corp. lhes: 765-4000

ese custom • European Colonials on quarter-acre Iots . are designed especially for buyers who enter1

i~n ~requently. The flexibility of the customized c enors prompted one buyer to opt for a squash houn. The extensive use of glass in the rear of the wouses offers a peaceful view of the surrounding oodland.

HILLS ~ I ~~GELEA t e: .$250,000

Potomac Asset Management Professional Money Management for Pension, Profit Sharing, 401-K Charitable Portfolios Over the past seven years (1978-84), our institutional equity composite has returned 16.3°/o annually according to SEI (A.G. Becker) thereby outperforming 71% of equity funds in this data base and the S&P 500. For further information, call or write Robert E. Long, C.F.A., Senior Vice President, Potomac Asset Management, 5247 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, #5, Washington , D.C. 20015 (202) 364-6900.

aC::ttron: On Little River 1Urnpike in Fairfax sa: der: Associated Builders Inc. 1: es: 425-4700

rach of these fine traditional homes have a difthent exterior-no two homes are e~actly alike. a de Updated kitchens feature a JennAir stove and 0 Uble wall oven, one of which is a microwave,

POTOMAC ASSET MANAGEMENT, INC. SPECIAL SECfiON OF THE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S 51


or int Pr< ch

· The

and the master bathroom features a JacuZZI· ee homes come with three to five be<koomS and thT to 4Yz baths.

b

by

an,

WALLESTON Price: $315,000 to $425,000 eel Location: Little Falls Road and North Harrison SIT in Arlington Builder: O'Hara and Co., Inc. e Soles: 836-0466

These eight Colonial-style houses on quarter-acr II" ter· lots are designed to complement the ro 1ng ua rain and the surrounding azaleas and magno ur trees. The homes with serviceable attics have fo to five bedrooms, a front and back yard and a tW~ car garage. Most of the master bedrooms have 0 fireplace, but all have the option of having tW to five fireplaces. Other features include a Jac~ zi in the master bath, enclosed porches, hardW floors and an alarm system.

~ Pri L

Bu

Sa 'th fee ed

ho ba

WENDOVER· ESTATES Price: S26ZOOO to $30Z500 Location: Rte. 123 in Fairfax Station Builder: Magna Group Soles: 425-4150

0

n

These three-level custom colonials are situated e five heavily wooded acres. The kitchens feat~ "top-of-the-line" appliances and solid che . _ cabinets. Some custom additions have included Clf cular staircases and extra bathrooms.

MAR ===ll~AN==D~-----------

We're two hours and two centuries away. The lovely Tidewater Inn is a two-hour drive and two centuries away from the pressures and pace of Washington. D.C.. Baltimore and Philadelphia. Surrounded by the charm of an 18th Century colonial capital The Tidewater Inn Is a favorite among executives favoring tasteful privacy In a traditional setting perfect for small business meetings and confe.rences. And for people who simply want to visit another century In a romantic world all its own. With superb restaurant and lounge. swimming pool conference rooms. colonial charm and contemporary convenience. Come make a little history of your own.

H. Feldhampt the Hunt $2,550.00

The area's largest collection of paintings and sculpture by Prominent American and European Artists 140 Ma in Street. Annapolis MD 21401 Washington 261 -2503 Annapolis 263-8344

Middleton

Callery

O F INTERNAT IONAL ART

52

SPECIAL SEcriON OF 1HE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

Sa p~

sto

IVj~

he

When the new PGA golf course opens near t b· elite Congressional Country Club, these FrencUstyle Colonials will be situated between two ro n 0 ing golf greens. These 15 luxury homes, built r spacious two-acre lots, feature a sky-lit maste bedroom and a Jacuzzi. All have four bedrooJIIS• a library and a family room.

ENCORE AT BRICKYARD COURT Price: $335,000 to $375,000 Location: On Brickyard Court, off River Road in Potomac Builder: Westmore Associates Inc. Soles: 938-5800 r Five homes, each with a completely different floOII'

plan, surround a private courtyard in this ne development. The houses, each on half-acre lo~ have nine-foot ceilings, cedar shake roofs and 5 d porches. The Jacuzzis and skylights are standaT perks.

ENCORE IN POTOMAC Price: $498,500 to $505,000 Location: Smoky Quartz Lane in Potomac Builder: Westmore Associates, Inc. Soles: 938-5800

Bul

111

BETHESDA COUNTRY ESTATES Price: $390,000 to $452,000 Location: Off Persimmon 71-ee Road behind Congressional Country Club. Builder: Norvail Development Co. Soles: 565-2323

~

e

These custom homes are situated on two-ac\ wooded lots. All houses feature gourmet kitchell with ceramic-tile floors. Palladian windoWS~ 8 skylights and two-story foyers give the houses g open and airy ambience, and a Wi!Jiamsbur fireplace warms the living room.

HADDENFIELD Price: $289,6()() to $303,900 n Location: Haddenfield Lane at Rte. 28 in DarnstoW Builder: Martens and Edward Development Co. Soles: 881-35# ·r

These country-style three-level homes and th~ two-acre lots abut Seneca State Park in oarnsto od horse country. The traditional exteriors of wo

lo


-

?r wood and stone are blended with contemporary Interiors with large windows and French doors, Providing a light and airy feeling. The custom kit:i. The ~hens are equipped with cooking islands, !three bOOkcases and wine racks, and the cabinets, made YAmish craftsmen, come in a choice of woods , and stains.

~ADOWS AT KENTSDALE

, street

/tce:.$375,000 and up lloc;atton: Kentsdale Road in Potomac Utlder: Norvail Development Co. Sales: 565-2323

r-acre ter·

Jhese Colonial homes in luxurious Potomac eature the latest in kitchen furnishings. Designed With an emphasis on natural light these 40 hornes offer Jacuzzis, four bedrooms and 3 !h baths.

1g

gnolia e foU! a twotave a g tWO ·acuz· tW()(J(i

~'SEDGE

~ce: $379,500 to $425,500

,

OCation: Where the C&O Canal and Potomac River ll . meet on River Road. S:tlder: Rocky Gorge Communities les: 948-5180

~~ditional exteriors blend with contemporary inhnors for the best of old and new in these custom t 01lles. Many different models are offered for a ~ge of options that include vaulted or cathedral Ceilings, wet bars, and a wraparound porch for a ~Untry flare. The homes are situated on picturesUe two-acre Jots.

ed on ;ature berrY

d cit·

Coulcl you use ~llittle l1elp with your International Affairs? If you need assistance with foreign languages, word processing , or computer programming to meet different applications in foreign markets, FORUM DATA can help you with services such as:

• CHINESE, JAPANESE, FRENCH, GERMAN, RUSSIAN, PORTUGUESE, ARABIC and SPANISH transJation and Word Processing. • MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION SERVICES, maintenance and development of International membership data base. • PROGRAMMING: DATA MANAGEMENT, BASIC, COBOL, FORTRAN

8\VAINS LOCK Price: $390,000 to '$455,000 ~ation: At Swains Lock Road and River Road ~Jlder: Norvai/ Development Co. es: 565-2323

~e ?lain attraction for these 11 homes is their emSthasls on natural light. Glass abounds in the twow?ry Colonials with French doors and large bay lndows overlooking their two-acre, tree-lined lots.

~RON

COURT

f"ce:. From $475,000 Ocatton: On Tibron Court just off River Road in llu · Potomac Sa:lder: The Construction Group es: 565-2323

~rge bright kitchens, separate breakfast rooms : solariums highlight this aevelopment of t tom contemporaries. Both two-story homes and tarnblers are available with a choice of three to t~ur bedrooms, but all feature libraries and family 0 1lls on the main level.

JoOf

new lots. suJl

1ard

,

You can drive fast Sit in luxury And bring friends along

~8Q.DMORE COUNTRY

3636 Brenbrook Rood Baltimore, Maryland 21133 Soles: (301) 521-4525 Service: (301) 521-4563

1>r; uo COMMUNITY

l.occe: .S245,000 to $675,000

.:I

llu ton: On Enterprise Road in Mitchellville Sa: der: Capital Finance Corp. t\ es: ~49-6466

cobutting Prince George's Country Club and a golf sioUrse designed by Arnold Palmer, this subdiviCUs0 offers lakeside and wooded lots for completely i tom-designed homes. Some "spec" houses have allcluded cathedral ceilings, sunken livilig rooms lld Jacuzzis in the master bath.

~.00DROCK l./,;e:.$319,000 to $340,000s llu ·:lton: Off MacArthur Boulevard in Potomac der: Leadership Corp. 111 es: 983-2015

AuthonzodDultrlot

Lotus ,4-~ ~~

Call us for a personal demonstrat1011 at your home or offiCe or V1SII us. DIIKtlonl: From Washington: 1o Baltimore Bel1way (695) Nor1h 1owor0 Towson. Exrt

18 (Liberty Rood) West loword RondolisloY.Tl, 1.8 miles lo linnbrook Rood. 1um rlahl. ~ block lo~Qlach

~~;;;;;;~,"~ ,on left.

Sa:

av d.or, traditional and contemporary homes are

b~ilable in this 45-unit development. Finished to ernents can be requested with saunas, pool quorns or wine cellars. Guests are greeted in uniOf ~foyers, some of which are two stories. A choice th Ive floor plans and 25 exteriors assure the buyer in a; n? two homes will be alike. Several options, ee\~dmg an octagonal dining room and cathedral 11 ngs , are available. lo SPECIAL SECTION OF THE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRI L 1985 53


]

1

cir !hi

A m e ri ca , wh e re th e

or

Po n e w seaso n i s g ree t ed b y thi s fr es h es t g l o w o f pink·

19; R.e

as

Fr o m the pale s t fl o werin g t o t he m os t C o rn e Ame ri ca n

Ict

L ord

bri· Jii ant ·

& T ayl or ,1 to,1

. ksl

co untry g ar de n P 10

·fe. Ii ght u p y o u r I1

gingham tha t is like no

0 ther·

kS We created these encha nting new che' . I'/ . fin'te -softer, pa ler, 1n d

on '

prettier-lor this gentle blouse thiS in larger scale,

uons.

oprondress . O ur exclus ive co oO 4 to 14 Bl ouse, 52·. wo's 1' Aprondress w ith dropped oO 4 full ski rt, 8 · e

oos

o

lord & Taylor, Washingto n-C hevy 60 -call 362-9 oO 5 Foils Church-coli 536· ~ 0 White Fl int-call 770·9 010 Fair Oaks Moll-coli 691-

0o

C

are

bill

Da


lFOXHALL ROAD f"'rfl

1

PHESII6E UVIN6

The Last Haven of Great City Estates

By S. CLAIRE CONROY . Behind the brick walls, tall trees and Circular driveways along Foxhall Road lie the sprawling and secluded enclaves of some or the city's wealthiest residents. ContemPorary architectural marvels and elegant ~30s mansions mark the hilly road between eservoir Road and Nebraska Avenue NW ~ the last bastion of privately held estates ill Washington. Many are still in the hands ~f their original owners who, by refusing bo leave, have kept new development at !ant· .ay and the address one of the most excluSive in the nation's capital. y] or , Easy access to Georgetown, the down1 1 ~Wn business corridors and the Kennedy ·tn ks enter has drawn such luminaries to the ~ea as 'freasury Secretary James Baker, Danker Joseph Allbritton and arts patron avid Lloyd Kreeger. . t ''When my wife and I began searching 1~r a site for our house, we looked in Bes· esda, Potomac and Chevy Chase. But Since we frequently attend the National /lllPhony at the Kennedy Center and par~es in town, my wife wanted to be closer f ,'' says Kreeger. In 1961, the Kreegers ll011 nd their ideal location in the six-acre °XhaU Road estate of Olga Roosevelt 0raves just below Dexter Street. Gl'he Kreegers tore down the Graves' 1930s Othic mansion and built what the Ameri~ I.nstitute of Architects' "Guide to the f chitecture of Washington" calls "a rare ~ontemporary example of the client as a satron of architecture rather than as a con11 I tner of the products of the shelter indusArchitects Philip Johnson and Richard ~ster designed the Italian travertine and ~ , Ce ige limestone villa with its triple-domed r lltrai hall to accommodate the Kreegers' pthe 1· ~nowned art collection and chamber music hec~s ncerts. ~if elY th Many Foxhall Road area residents say 0 nd• ~ chose the area for its country feeling. ' thiS ar en Elizabeth Diamond, a Realtor and uons, Shea resident, first came to Washington, )2.00 It e and her husband stayed on the former , 0 ;st, IV?ckefeller estate, "I couldn't believe it, l4.oo IVith all the land and trees around I thought ·nose Soe Were in the country." The view from gbOO lh me of the estates is also spectacular. ''From sooo or~ sculpture garden, when the leaves are goOD ll the trees," says Kreeger, "we can see illast Georgetown to the Washington Monu.0100 ~t and across the Potomac to Virginia." IV he road was named for Henry Foxall, r ho llloved to Washington in 1800 at the thquest of Thomas Jefferson and became lbe Preeminent manufacturer of arms for 11 e Young government. Spring Hill Farm, ow the site of Foxhall Village, was Fox-

J

hall's homestead and most of the area around his namesake road was farm country. Among the largest was the Palisades dairy farm, now the site of Mount Vernon College. Another was the Whitehaven farm, which became the estate of Nelson Rockefeller. Like most of the other houses along the road, the Rockefeller manse, now the home of Sargent Shriver, was built in the early 1930s. But the more impressive house of the period belongs to Marjorie Phillips, widow of the late Duncan Phillips who founded the Phillips Collection. The house is on what is

most telling sign is the development of the 28-acre Rockefeller estate into a subdivision of upscale houses designed by Arthur Cotton Moore. About 50 houses have already been completed and another 28 are going up as Foxhall Crescents West Gate. Previous houses sold in the $400,000 range, but the new homes will sell for between $560,000 and $625,000. Rumor has it that future models may be in the $1 million range. Other houses along Foxhall Road rarely come on the market, but when they do the smaller ones toward Nebraska Avenue

j

I ?''

The 30-room Belgian ambassador's residence is a replica of the Hotel de Charolais in Paris.

probably the largest private estate within the city limits. The 18-acre Phillips estate at Foxboro Street called Dun-Mar-Lin (after Duncan, Marjorie and their son Laughlin) features a mansion built with handmade Virginia brick. The Phillips commissioned architect Nathan Wyeth to design the mansion to complement their premier collection of modern art. Foxhall Road's mansions were not only suited to art collections, they were also designed for entertaining in grand Washington style. Among them, the Belgian ambassador's residence has seen some of the most glittering affairs. Built as an exact replica of the Hotel de Charolais in Paris, the 30-room mansion was purchased by the Belgian government in 1945. Another wonderful backdrop for Washington parties has been the 1930s contemporary white brick mansion of Gwendolyn Cafritz, a prominent Washington philanthropist. Still another Foxhall Road landmark is the 28-acre Mount Vernon College, which was built in 1946 as a seminary for women. Change has been slow to come to Foxhall Road, but it is coming nonetheless. The

begin at $250,000. Apart from Mount Vernon College and nearby American University, there aren't many schools in the area. Many parents send their children to the public Horace Mann elementary school at 44th and Newark streets NW and then on to one of Washington's private schools. As for grocery shopping, a favorite for many residents is Sutton Place Gourmet on New Mexico Avenue, but there is also a Safeway on MacArthur Boulevard. For clothes shopping and the like, the department stores at Friendship Heights and Spring Valley and the many boutiques in Georgetown are only minutes away. Meanwhile the future of Foxhall Road as the home to Washington's great estates is uncertain. Many residents and Realtors forsee the gradual break up of more larger tracts into subdivisions like Foxhall Crescents, but only time will tell. "The rumors of the possible break up of the Phillips estate is no surprise," says David Lloyd Kreeger, "It's inevitable with these big estates that the heirs will sell them off, otherwise how could they choose which one of them gets to live in the house?"

SPECIAL SECTION OF THE WASHINGTON DoSSIER I APRIL 1985 55


I ~ tni路 \ al\l the the J

the eac 1'riJ

err no ov

brl CllJ

--~~~~~~~~~~~~~~!!~ ....~

1'h ap

_ __.., in

lo ~

~~ We give the business traveler a better deal. Compare our on-time perfonnance. Compare our convenient schedules. Then compare all the amenities we give you. Like extra legroom and 80% window and aisle seating. Complimentary mixed drinks, fine wines and New York-style snacks on selected flights. A complimentary newspaper and coffee at the gate on weekday mornings. And service by people who really care. And New York AirTraveler, our frequent flyer program, offers you more rewards, faster, than any other airline. A free flight after 20,000 miles. 1,000 mile minimum credit on all flights. Travel to Mexico, the Caribbean, the South Pacific ... even Europe! So the next time you have business in one of our cities, remember that New York Air is beyond compare.

6 NEWYORKAIR

THE AIRLINE lHATWORKS FOR YOUR BUSINESS. FOR RESERVATIONS AND INFORMATION . CALL YOUR TRAVEL AGENT OR NEW YORK AIR IN BOSTON AT 569-8400. IN DETROIT AT 961-7272, IN NEWARK AT 623-0770, IN NEW ORLEANS AT 523-7835, IN NEW YORK CITY AT 718 565-1100, IN NASSAU/SUFFOLK AT 242-1000, IN WESTCHESTER AT 681-0001 , IN ORLANDO AT 295-6000, IN ROCHESTER AT 800 221-9300, IN TAMPA AT 885-2181 , IN WASH INGTON AT 588-2300. OR NATIONWIDE, 800 221-9300.


MrnLTBR SKBLTBR Continued from Page 45

~.~uch as 15-20-30 percent or higher of the lllihal investment fund. But the fees are

~Ways projected against the backdrop of :he Potential long-term gain, which makes em seem lower than they really are. R~member, as well, that the real value of 1 he Investment is individual; it varies with ~ch investor's tax bracket. The Real Estate ax Shelter Review estimates that a property appreciating at 15 percent a year with no Underlying mortgage will yield a little ~ver 10 percent to someone in a 50 percent racket. That's not much better than you ~ get in some short-term money market Uncts or 'Il'easury bonds.

~OOD PLACE TO INVEST?

~e

old rule in real estate continues to ~Ply. There are three things to look for lo a Property: "Location, location, and cation., orlienry A. Berliner, chairman of the Board C the Pennsylvania Avenue Development t'orporation and president of Second Na~onal Building and Loan, puts it in more Ill Odern terms: "Every real estate invest~nt ought to begin with a property's unique A.t et. Pennsylvania Avenue is a case in point. A.v one time, the north side of Pennsylvania A.venue between 13th Street and Constitution nuenue was pawnshops and liquor stores. t the street has one thing going for it that

''Historically, the most attractive investment areas around the city have been places where people have enhanced existing assets.' ' -Henry A. Berliner

it will always have. It is America's Main Street. The problem becomes how to capitalize on that asset, not how to ·create wealth from nothing. "Historically, the most attractive investment areas around the city have been places where people have enhanced existing assets. Thday we are doing it on Pennsylvania Avenue by adding parks, recreation, cultural activities and a retail infrastructure. That is going to make the Pennsylvania Avenue, Massachusetts Avenue, 13th Street triangle a prime area for mixed-use investmentoffices, apartment buildings, town houses, hotels, that sort of thing." As Berliner points out, this is the same pattern that took Georgetown from being a seedy, end-of-the-trolley-line neighborhood to the vital area it is today. Residents and investors capitalized on Georgetown's unique assets: the C&O Canal, Georgetown University, and the historic value attached to many of its buildings. In Old Thwn Alexandria, the asset that payed the biggest dividends was Colonial history. In Adams-Morgan, the unique asset is the vitality of its artist colony atmosphere, spiced with ethnic diversity in .its shops and restaurants. In Annapolis, it has always been the unique asset of the harbor. Asked where he sees the next possibilities emerging, Berliner points to the Anacostia waterfront. ·~gain, it's a unique asset. It's a waterway that spills into a harbor area. It has the Navy Yard and surrounding neighborhoods to provide the human factor, the

Lease a Piece of History 2007- 2009 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.

• An historic restoration • Distinctive office space

• • • • •

grand staircases fireplaces wood floors crown moldings high ceilings

-4713 sq. ft. -8417 sq. ft. -13,130 sq. ft. Convenient to:

Embassy Row- Metro- Hotels & Restaurants Parking available Inquiries:

Charlotte Ingram 457-0166

SPECIAL SECTION OF THE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S 57


_SH_ELT_E_RS--==-KE-=LT-=-ER_ ___

AT WATERGATE

people to make business development attractive. There is space for residential ap~· ment buildings, hotels and offices. It IS a highly usable space." Berliner adds a caveat about real estate investing. "From what I have seen of successful development " he says ''what makes ' and therefore ' a development work, what makes investment profitable, is people car· ing about what they invest in. If, as an investor, you are sensitive to your commu· nity you get a Jot more out of it the more of yourself you put into it. Responsible real estate investment means following your money with your heart." THE HISTORIC DIMENSION

RESTAURANT FRANCAIS ET LUNCHEON CLUB JEAN-LOUIS PALLADIN: CHEF PROPRIETAJRE LIMITE A 12 TABLES THE WATERGATE HOTEL, WASHINGTON RESERVATIONS (202) 298-4488.

Richard Warren One piece rayon crepe short sleeve navy chemise with detachable white collar and striped bow. Sizes 2-14.$210.

LADIES FASHIONS

The Pavilion at the Old Post Office 12th & Pennsylvania Ave. Washington, D . C.

898-1033 Langley Shopping Center 1380 Chain Bridge Rd . McLean VA 22101

356-5353 Formerly Town & Travel of McLean

58

SPECIAL SECfiON OF THE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

A new dimension to the local real estate investment picture and something the expe~ predict will be well protected under the ~e tax laws is investing in historic properties. "Historic properties" doesn't mean trr ing to buy a piece of Stephen Decatur ~ House. The tax laws look at any house thad is more than 30 years old as "historic," ~. provides a 15 percent tax credit on rehabJli· tation expenditures, a nice up-front advall; tage for investors with tax problems. If the property is more than 40 years old, the\ is a 20 percent credit; a 25 percent ere~! goes with a property that is "certified hiS·

''In historic properties, you have some built-in character that can help make it a good investment . . . . You have history... . '' -Brent Wilkes

t


---

:trac·

part·

!sa

state

·sue· takes what

car· san unu·

11ore

:real

your

Chron ·i ·de (kron'i-k'l}.n. IME·cronicle: Anglo-Fr. croniclel, I. Register of events in order of time.

FOR THE EVENTS OF YOUR TIME ...

CHRONICLES GEORGETOWN

state pertS

neW rtieS·

trY" tur's that

Iibanili~. van· rthe

·here ~edit hiS·

a professional unpacking service • Unpack All Boxes • Organize The Kitchen • Arrange Linen Closets with Labels • Unpack Garage • Turn On Utilities • Inventory and Place Furniture • Clean and Vacuum The Entire House

BEAUTIFUL & INTELLIGENT MAGAZINES OF THE WORLD 3207 "0" Street, N.W. • Washington, D.C. • 333-6049 (25 feet from corner of Wisconsin) Open daily 10 to 10 Sundays 10 to 6

''.. .the efficient way to move without opening a single box!''

I,

~

'nt. ''

Fashion Decorating for Spring at 20% to 50% Savings You' ll adore our affordable prices, complimentary decorating assistance and personalized service.

Bugged? Are your telephones Tapped? Are you

It's

Illegal

and we can Bedspreads Comforters Draperies Shades Miniblinds Wallcoverings Decorative pilloWs Furniture Accessories

n€ttl€ CR€€k SHOP

4400 Jenifer Street, N.W. In the Jenifer Mall, next to Lord & Taylor MONDAY-SATURDAY 10:00-6:00 THURSDAY 10:00-8:00

244-6200

Slop II.

Our team of engineers will electronically sweep your home or business and secure your privacy.

faoiECH

SURVEILLANCE CONTROL SYSTEMS

ON CALL 24 HOURS

(301) 656·1252


=SH=EC=-=J'E=-==-R-=SK=Et==-=l'E=R_ _ __

IF YOU DIDN'T MAKE THE LIST OF THE TEN BFST DRESSm MEN THIS YEAR...

toric" by an approved body in a historic . the property IS . on the "Us. area, or 1f · Register of Historic Properties." One _fo~; rnidable hitch to getting the tax credJth~S that the investor has to spend more than .~ original investment on renovating to get ~ · The usual below-the-line deductions ho · But like any real estate .investment, a historic property ought to be sound. eco· nomically, exclusive of tax considerations, At Bethesda Custom Tailors, each suit is hand / before investors rush in for tax br~aks. of cut, stitched and sewn to your exact measureAccording to Brent Wilkes, pres1de~t rY ments. You personally select fabric, color and Historic Properties Inc., a local advJso t styling from our extensive selection of imported frrrn specializing in this kind of investme~: and domestic fabrics in stock. Cost: from $450. "there are historic properties all over D. t that investors can consider. The IarJ;~. Custom-made shirts $32. growth areas are Dupont Circle, upper w Alteration services for men & women. necticut Avenue, Adams-Morgan, the Nen· Formal wear sales & rentals. Hampshire Avenue corridor, and the co vention center area." ·oo Wilkes says that the biggest co~centra~ in of pre-Civil War houses in Washmgton JS )(e Chinatown, but investors lookin~ to re \ a quick killing are too late. "Pnces t e is are already outpacing values; the area artificially inflated," he said. Jors All responsible investment c~unse ted warn that casual investors who are mteres ge 7836 Wisconsin Avenue • Phone: 656-2077 in historic properties really should eng~e Open Monday thru Saturday in careful study beforehand. As is the caiiY VISa and MasterCard accepted. with many areas of investing, the r~ is good deals never hit the street. "ThiSnlY no place for amateurs," says Wilkes. " 0eed ------------------------------~ sophisticated and qualified investors n

t /,(1 /

.. l: / ·.

WHY NOT GET READY FOR NEXT YEAR?

1

m:

BETHESDA

TAIL

UNIMAGINABLE SPRING SALE

35% OFF m__ .... ...... ---

·-~·111111

-

- --

------ •

1-

-- 1-

z c

IMAGINATION

CUSTOM WINDOW TREATMENTS • SHUTIERS • MINI BLINDS • SHADES • • • • •

AWNINGS WOVEN WOODS PLEATED

• • • •

MICRO BLINDS VERT BLINDS WOOD BLINDS SOFT LIGHTS

• • • •

ROMAN BALLOON PORCH VERISOL

FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATES • NO OBLIGATION

546-5432 SERVING DC • MD • VA

60

SPECIAL SECfiON OF THE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRJL 198S

• • • •

apply." . . wash· But for those who meet the cntena, are ington is not the only city where th~re re, opportunities. Philadelphia, BaltJJilOare Boston, Norfolk, and Savannah, Ga .• er· places where the demand for such Pwf)(eS ties is rising. And, in Washington, 1 d 1111 insists, there are still values t~ be fo itol in picked-over neighborhoods hke CaP Hill, if you know where to look. e 0111 "In historic properties, you have ~e it built-in character that can help ma bout a good investment. When you talk/hotel investing in refurbishing a grand ol you like the Hay-Adams or the Mayflower '·It-ill have history- but you also have a bU~ seC clientele who want to come back an what you did." . . tori' The basic thing to look for tn h~~ ••If areas is new construction, Wilkes s~ the it's happening-as it is happening 10area Dupont Circle area-you know the,, has peaked and it's time to move on·

THE NUMBER ONE RULE

to

For Washingtonians with a little e~tr:est· invest, the most accessible form of. 10 13ut ing remains the limited partnershJh·agreC Wilkes, Berliner, Prager and Hopewe ro(lt, on one thing: Given the potential for P there there are plenty of flimflam men out thall willing to promise a great deal more slliP• they are able to deliver. In any partne~te of the first thing to look for is not the ~ather, return or even the kind of propertY·al estate the general partner is the key. In re

I

,, t

in~

thi

I

llt(

inr

sta

illc

1

&e(

int, hin

no1

thiJ

nel

llti.

sa~

the C,

CJie ' for

ins, do,

&ul

tifn

lllo

he


oric J.S. for·

Experience the essence of European elegance and traditional British understatement in a beautiful Caribbean setting. A resort of 90 exquisite de-luxe air conditioned accommodations on 100 acres reflecting the same high standards of cuisine, quality and service as its famous sister hotel, London's St. James's Club. The Club's leisure and sporting facilities include complete watersports, private yacht club, five tennis courts, horseback riding on Texas bred quarter horses, elegant restaurants and a small European style gaming roorn.

it is

his :tit. 1

,Jd. t, a

eco· )OS,

1

,t of ;or'f ent,

.c.

gest

;on· ew :on·

. ,It

I) vttL~

For reservations or information contact your travel agent or First Resort Corporation on (212) 689-3048 or toll-free (800) 235-3505, Telex 422123 (via m ).

~~ P.O. Box 63, St. John's,Antigua,West Indies. ''""'1 he thing to remember is this. Sometimes, in a real estate investment, not . losing money is just as lllJ.portant making it.,

as

-H. Lynn Hopewell

invesr . th.irct tng, reputation is everything, and solid Or·Party advice can be well worth it. llror te~ this will involve consulting with a inr ess1onal on the prospectus; here, a well st~~llled opinion can be the only thing that lllo s between you and losing a lot of l.:ne"J•

&eo Ynn Hopewell recalls one client, a surin1011• Who was all ready to put $100,000 ,riel ''"' 1'1 'II.,, Sa land deal in Florida, "But I made not en? me the prospectus and prorni~e tbe ' thin to Sign anything until I'd read it. This !fell neltt\.had lawyers' opinions from here to Print ~ursday, but when you read the fme saYin' It turned out the lawyers were all to the f g something like, 'We don't know what ~t· C, t:.cts are, but if the facts are A, B, and sot ' Client I~ could be a good deal.' I told my :ree ~or h. 1r h~ bought in I'd cheerfully ar_ran_ge fit. ltlsur Is Wife to start collecting on hts life ere dow ance. A year later the whole deal went _, &u" n the drain and was crawling with IRS 1~"' JS look' JP• ''l' I?g to make a reputation . .of limes h~ thmg to remember is this. So~e­ lllon ' 1 ~ a real estate investment, not losmg he sae·y IS just as important as making it," ~.

A SPECIAL SECTION OF THE W,\SHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985 61


HEAL ESTATES THANS.Arul

Luxury Home Deals Skyrocket WASHINGTON

- - - - - - - - - - --

2929 Massachusetts Ave. NW New York Land Co. to Robert P. Kogod ..... $2,120,000 1677 31st St. NW (f.'fJ I. D. Milowe to RichardS. Beatty-$800. 3200 Woodland Dr. NW · J. E. Matthews to The Kingdom of swat~· land-$895,000 1700 Hoban Rd. NW G. H. Billings to Fawzi H. At-Sultan ..... $450,000 3001 44th St. NW (f.'fJ S.E. Seigel to Michael Minkoff-$459, 3908 Georgetown Ct. NW ..... Hillandale Dev. Corp. to Eva E. Koubek $340,000 3335 Reservoir Rd. NW ()()0 J. R. West to Deborah Szekely-$495, 5068 Sedgwick St. NW (f.'fJ R.S. Beatty to Mark W. Foster-$600, 4624 Verplanck PI. NW ...... A. B. Edgeworth Jr. to Theo H. Sche11 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 $335,000 2810 29th St. NW ()()0 M.T. Grady to John W. Lowe-$340, 2839 Allendale PI. NW """ A . G. Marcotte to L. Kirstein-$385,VJV 4732 Massachusetts Ave. NW ('f.'ft S. R. Peters to Eileen E Hayward- $325, 2860 Woodland Dr. NW .,. . True Davis to Perry 0. Barber Jr. $2,500,000 1212 35th St. NW ('f.'ft A . D. Simon to Howard Frank-$650, 2230 California St. NW sO L.D. Sawyer to Theo S. Sims-$315,2

Somehow, the atmosphere is more inviting, the conversation wittier and the parties all too soon over.

-------=V=IRG.:. :. : . :. :INIA..:..._-____.-1206 Perry William Dr., McLean 7,SoO W.A. Hasty Jr. to JaneS. Winans-$41 • 11319 Lapham Dr., Oakton . r...D. M. France to Vernon M. SchreJne $350,000 619 Potomac River Rd., McLean b...Langley Dev. Corp. to Richard D. Er $470,000

fourSeasoosHotB 2800 Pennsylvania Avenue, W Georgetown, Washington, DC 20007 Call our Catering Director at 342.{)444.

62 SPECIAL SECI10N OF THE WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

1306 Davidwood Dr., McLean (jfJ EV. Lilly II to Mehrdadm Malek-$540, 6304 Dunaway Ct., McLean 750 R. L. Nolting to William H. Zeitz-$63 3' 2008 Hunters Station, Vienna tJ{C" Country Developers Inc. to William W. Carten-$334,694 6701 WemberJy Way, McLean ....J. K. Totten to Douglas D. MadisO11 $310,000 10032 Scenic View Terr., Vienna .........


We're tuned in to you. ,rlfJ ,7 so

I

~c-

Smoothing the day's rough edges: Dave Foxx 10AM-2PM


Who's ~oing

Win to turn me on? anew 1985 car with used D.C. Instant Lonery tickets.

Instant tickets bring big cash prizes - $50 ,000 . . . $1 ,000 .. . $100 .. . But if you don 't win , send in 5 non-winn ing Instant Lottery tickets for the Second Chance Drawing on a new 1985 car! Now there's cash , and up to 12 cars in the Instant Lottery Car Sweepstakes It's a Capital Game!

HEAL ESTATES THANAirston Corp. of Va. to C. D. BishoP$370,057 6708 Cedar View Ct., Clifton U Bryant & Sons Dev. Corp. to D. S. Bowe -$358,600 ll15 Old Cedar Rd., McLean McLean Homes to Robert C. Wagner$420,000 204 River Bend Rd., Great Falls V.W. Banks to Elliott W. Amick Jr.$406,395 2005 Roundhouse Rd., Vienna 0 Country Developer's Inc. to Ronald F. Bose -$317,500 904 Vicar La., Alexandria E. S. Chickering to Peter E Yelverton ..... $364,000 218 Royal St., Alexandria kef Richard L. Sinnott to William S. BuS -$415,000

_

_______:_:_::MA:...:.:..:....:RY=--:.:..:.l.AN=--0______

6 Oaklyn Ct., Potomac clfJ Ian Homes to Frank M. Midgley-$575, fkY 9 Sotweed Ct., Potomac W. Miller Constr. Co. to Edward L. J{ru -$312,500 ll400 Hollow 'Itee La., Rockville M· Holly Oak Inc. to Peter Schissler-$310,000 7709 Charleston Dr., Bethesda ..... H. Kornegay to Philip G. Padgett Jr. $300,000 9(fJ , 10700 Laurel Leaf Pl., Potomac Woodrock Lp. to W.T. Loving II-$311, 7008 Loch Edin Ct., Potomac ..... U.S. Home Corp. to Michael E Kelleher $316,707 8804 Potomac Station Ln., Potomac J.P. Kollar to S. Punja-$675,000 7812 River Falls Dr., Potomac . ..... W. J. Thmlinson to Brian N. Ethendge $305,000 clfJ ll028 Stanmore Dr., Potomac E.R. Cusmano to Jean C. Racine-$425, ..... 2 Watergate Ct., Silver Spring GLP Dev. Co. to Easton Manderson $318,000 8204 Hackmore Dr., Potomac clfJ S.l. Bender to Richard H. Laird-$305, 4502 Boxwood Rd., Bethesda OOO R.B. Evans to C.L. Wilcox-$365, 7024 Endicott Ct., Bethesda tt· Saddlebrook Dev. Corp. to Robert T. Sha ner-$305,000 7506 Persimmon 'Itee Rd., Bethesda d ..... D.P. Connelly to Bernard A. Ramun $330,000 3910 Underwood St., Chevy Chase ()()0 M. 0. Garpink 'to E G. Miller-$350, 9713 Hall Rd., Potomac c1fJ P. G. Pappas to Nabil Abdel-Baki- $500• 10605 Willowbrook Dr., Potomac ..... Jerry Constr. Corp. to Robert E RYan ~ $750,000

°


er..r.-

oscO

1

\OuVe got class. We see it this way...

r.......

A radio station should reflect the personalities of its listeners. That's what Classy 95 is all about. Warm. Energetic. Lots of character coupled with integrity. Just like you.

You'll hear it this way... The music: not too hard ... not too soft. Fun in the morning with Baker & Burd. News updates to keep you informed of daily events. Dave Foxx smoothing the day's rough edges. John Dowling with an afternoon that keeps the tempo humming. And Walt Starling's traffic reports to ease the rush of the rush hours. Evenings mellow with Love Songs. So the week sounds good. Know why?

Were tuned in to you.

0


PALISADES WOODROCK ;K~

Out M(l().rlbur Blvd., tc Palisades entrance on right. Open daily 12-5.

Phone: 469-9050. From the mid 1360's.

Out M(l().r/bur Blvd., past Old AnKlers Inn tc \fbodrock on right. Open daily 11-5. Phone: 983-2015. From the high 320's.

I]MflED

The location is priceless! Whether you choose to settle deep within the dense woodlands of North Bethesda ... or nestle among the prestigious woodlands of Potomac, you'll discover the home of your dreams within one of our incredible totally distinct and distinguished communities .. . different names, different prices, different designs .. . but the same Leadership commitment to quality and innovation. Choose from a fine assortment of 4-5 bedroom custom estates offering the finest in gracious living and formal entertaining, both at Woodrock and the Palisades. Or choose from a fine assortment of luxury townhomes at the Towns at the Cloisters. ~ They're simply grand! Come see for yourself. G:r Sales by Lewis & Silverman. By The Leadership Corporation a member of The

Leadelship Group

/I

CLOISTERS Out Old Georgetown Rd., past Georgetown Square Shopping Center, right~!.~ 7Uckerman Lane tc the 7bwns allbe Clcisters. Open daily 11-5. Phone: 984路 'JJJ' From the lew $190's.


r

LEGANCE

By Which All Others Are Judged Built exclusively in McLean and Great Falls, Virginia. For information call Ken Murphy & Associates, Inc. (703) 448-1444

Randolph Williams, Inc. Homes For Elegant Living

,~Gli\IIQ .,., = ---


~ I~

Since 1975, Dossier' s Real Estate Property Section has helped move hundreds o f luxury properties throughout the world. Our readership provides the marketer with high income (average $108,000), high second home ownership (36% ), and the age group which has the highest expendable income. The Dossier will give you this excellent exposure for a very reasonable advertising investment. Call (202) 362-4040 for more information.

Washington's most prestigious address Those accustomed to gracious living are right at home in the luxurious Watergate apartments. Offering a stunning 3 bedroom apartment with views of both the city and the river. Mirrored entrance foyer, wood burning frreplace, study, separate formal dining room and all the executive extras. Undoubtedly one of the fmest apartments in the city's fme5t complex. Also offering a 3 bedroom apartment with one of the most spectacular river views in Washington. Award-winning in路 terior design higlilights a lavish bar - the absolute epitome of chic in-town living. Great Falls

GENTLEMAN'S ESTATE

$365,000

Situated on 9.S1 acres of privacy and serene country living, expansive views from elegant, spacious rooms, grand double circular staircase, dramatic step-down living room and formal dining room; graceful arched doorways. For details and appointment to see, please call:

THAI VO "service with integrity" Trilingual Realtof": Eng/ish-French-Vietnamese

Contact Watergate Real Estate Department WATERGATE MANAGEMENT CORPORATION 600 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W. Washington, OC 20037

McLean office: 703-790-1500 Wks/eves: 703-62().6479

(2D2) 298-4400

~ MenUI Lynch Realty

POTOMAC HUNT AREA "It's easy. It's eHective. It's conveniently located"

~ These are typical of the homes in the beautiful community of

Spring Meadows where you can enjoy bridle trails, a Swim and Tennis Club right in the community, and where traditional Colonial and ranch-style homes on 2 or more acres are priced from 5249,000. We are also offering large, luxurious homes in Potomac Manors, adjacent to our Potomac Falls community, from 5432,000. C:ill one of our Sales Associ:ltes for details.

"V'V. C.

A ND

A. N. :tv1:ILLER

REALTORS Potolllllc 9822 Falli Rd .

299.6000

Sumner 4701 Smgamore Rd. 229-4000

Spring Valley 4860 Mass . Ave. .W. 362-1300

"It's Quixseor'~ The computerize I professiont1

way to fill you:,

7


WXIIRY RfAL ESIATE

mtergate A City Within a City

SOMETIDNG WONDERFUL IS HAPPENING IN POTOMAC-''RIGGSWOOD'' Along the C & 0 Canal, minutes west of Potomac ViUage, is an elegant enclave of a few fine homes. This lovely wooded neighborhood on the palisades of the Potomac River is named "RIGGSWOOD", after the Admiral whose private estate it was for many Years. The developer of this quiet, sylvan community is carefully supervising the quality and design of the homes to be built here. "RIGGSWOOD", adjoining River Road, is on the wood's edge of the Potomac River, close to its charming ViUage. It is only minutes from shoppin&, superb public and private schools, the Parkway, Beltway and both airports. It is surrounded by lo~ely homes and estates whose residents enjoy country living within thir!Y minutes of The White House. In just a few years, such a home m such a neighborhood wiU no longer be available in The Capital of the World's beautiful suburb, Potomac.

ean 983-0200 r=-!-1~1.~~ The Crossroads

Realty,Ud.

We highly recommend this distinctive 1 bedroom, 11/2 bath apartment in Washington's premiere community. The spacious llving room has numerous windows and offers abundant llght and an extraordinary view of the dty. With an expansive balcony and garage parking, we know of nothing comparable in size, location and convenience for $159,000. For information on this and additional select apartments, please contact Susan Withington.

'fflt4.i!lgto/.1; Watergate Suite 209 2600 Virginia Avenue NW Washington, DC 20037

202/ 333-5372 I

10200 RiverRoad, Potomac. Md. (301)983-0200

~ 0 ur

res''

Palm Springs (Rancho Mirage) This exquisite 2 bedroom & den home located at the

famous Desert Island Country Club, is available for sale to enjoy this fall. Overlooing the 18th green, this apartment has over 2300 square feet of living space plus over-sized balconies. Designed by world famous James Callahan, it can be purchased completely furnished (except for artwork) at $395,000. Unfurnished at $325,000. For more details, please call owners representative at 202-966-4271.


The deWeldon Residence

2818 McGill Terrace N.W. Washington, D. C.

s 1,250,000.

Gncious Gc;orgian-style brick residence overlooks nearby Rock Creek Puk. Property fronts on tranquil street of exclusive Embassy section of nation's opitol. Seven bedrooms, 5 full and 2 half baths, zoned heating and air conditioning, almost Ill acre lot . rear yud fronting on Woodland Drive. Brochures available on request . For appointment oil Mrs. Matheson-(703) 687-5522 or Metro 471-1599

I======Malcolm Matheson, III========t Real Estate 888- 17th Street , N.W., Washington, D. C. 20006 (202) 296-4766

NORTH ARLINGTON

21 acre horse estate in Montpelier Hunt Country. Charming spacious home with spectacu lar Bl ue Ridge M t. views, ~e~ 8-stall barn with apartment, several sheds, pond, n~e frontage. $295,000. For brochures, information of this listing and many other Virginia horse properties, please contact:

~ 503 FAULCONER DRI~~I 路MCLEAN路 CHARLOTIESVILLE, VA (804) 295-1131 FAULCONER INC. FARM. ESTATE AND RESIDENTIAL BROKERS ~J-7"

$395,000

Tambien habla Espaiiol

Whatever your preference. . . Elegant, large family home on beautiful tree lined street in a most desirable location, marble entry, huge master suite, gracious family room with wet bar and a sunny reading room are but a few of the amenities of this 4 bedroom, 5 bath home. By appointment with Pam Baker 241-8499 COLDWeLL BAN~C!RO

COLDWELL BANKER ARLINGTON 524-2100

An elegant townhouse . .. or carefree condo A stately mansion . .. or modest home Urban living . .. or country estate Corporate retreat . .. or choice investment 1will find just the right property for you! To buy, sell, or invest-call me directly. I under路 stand the importance of your time and moneY路 Call now!

lOELLA MURRAY


LUXURY OCEANFRONT CONDOMINIUM RENTALS CALL 800/845-RSVP TOLL FREE RESORT SERVICES VACATION PROPERTIES 1105 48TH AVE . N., SUITE 205, MYRTLE BEACH, SC 803/449-7428


A magnificent solid Teak desk, with pull-out Partner's table, from Scandinavian Office Gallery . It's dependable. Hard working. The perfect business companion. This is the type of office furnishing that says who you are and where you are going. And it's just one of the looks you'll find at Scandinavian Office Gallery. Work with us and take advantage of all these benefits: • World's finest collections. Including many exclusive furnishings. With rapid delivery available. • 20 years of experience. You'll receive a level of service unequalled in the office furnishings field. • Knowledgeable Sales Consultants. We work with you on the total look of your office environment- from Executive seating to carpeting.

• Best prices. And we assure you of the finest value on everything we sell. Ask about our price guarantee. Visit Scandinavian Office Gallery today. It will be the beginning of a beautiful partnership. To receive further information, return this form to Scarxlinavian OffiCe Gallery, 11530 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20852 Name

Prone Company

WD-4

0

scandinavian office gallery Your successful office starts here.

WASHINGTON, DC 4473 Coorecticut Avenue, NW (202) 363-3291. McLEAN, VA Tyson's Corner Mall (703) 883-0919. ROCKVILLE, MD 11530 Rockville Pike (301) 231-9231. R>r your convenience, oor office furniture slx>wrooms are open Morx:lay through Saturday. Scandinavian Office Gallery is a division of Scarxlinavian Gallery.


SOCIAL SCENE

ALONG PARTY LINES

'Vistas From a Night in Old Vienna and a Visit With a l(ing

The Ed Feulners with the Hon. William Middendorf and his daughter Frances

Waltz l(ingdllm

I~deloy,:

lic0 .

10"

Sec. William J. Bennett and wife

OAS BALLROOM- It was just like Old Vienna, according to Austrian native Gertrude D~mecourt surveying the couples in white tails and gowns spinning to Strauss music in the crystal chandeliered OAS ballroom. The toast to the graceful waltz sponsored by the Committee for Western Civilization, an arm of the Intercollegiate Studies

Institute, drew high ranking Republicans and academics for champagne, tortes and dancing. The ebullient host, OAS Amb. William Middendorf, called it "wonderful, wonderful," but the waltz king was party organizer Robert Reilly with partner White House Public Liaison Dir. Faith Whittlesey, who danced to practically every number.

.

Asst. to the Pres. Faith Whittlesey and Robert Reilly

.

Defense Department of/ictal Robert L. Schuettmger

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S 73


....

:.~ ...--

j

-~----,rr

<Q

"'

..;

Luncheon Cochmn. Marlene Malek with Chmn. Jane Neal, designer Adolfo and Donna Marriott, chmn. Women's Board of Nat'/ Capital chapter of the American Heart Association

t

tl

It

A Valentine for Heart

Sl

"' WASHINGTON HILTON-"It's a sellout!" said Marlene Malek

who, with cochair Jane Neal, organized the most successful yet 路~ffair of the Heart" luncheon and fashion show. Over $80,000 was raised with the help of 1,800 guests and the new corporate sponsor program that brought donations from, among others, Riggs Bank, American Express and Marriott Corp. for the National Capital chapter of the American Heart Assoc. The cochairs and Women's Board Chmn. Donna Marriott donned red Adolfo knits in honor of the showing of his spring collection sponsored by Saks Fifth Avenue. "I've never seen so many women do so much without asking for recognition," said last year's chmn. Susan Lochs.

II

I J)if. Saks Gen. Mgr. Kert Rosenkoetter, Sue Block and Saks Regiona Harvey Rosenbloom

~ Adolfo and models in his "Giraffe" designs 74

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S

Sequined and embroidered organza jacket over a chiffon blouse and silk evening pants

Black and white checks mixed with patterned floral separates are the new look for spring

I


T&_ Bridge to China

~CATUR HOUSE-"Dalian is on the Ill eshold of enormous technological developShent," said Dalian Dep. Mayor Thng QiUn, The Chinese city on the Yellow Sea ~the second largest commercial port in e PRC-sent a delegation to Washington 0 fl\a ~ission to strike up industrial trade. O~t,t:"'mg meetings with House Speaker Tip ti e1U and Rep. Don Bonker, the delegae~n ~eld a reception to promote their proj' 'It路~Ith government and corporate bigwigs. Saj take 10 years to accomplish their goal," 'W: d ~lliot Richardson, Dalian's bridge to as~hington decision-makers. "They've set r01 e $100 million hard cash, and $1.3 billion r development."

7llng Qi-shun presents a Chinese scroll to Elliot Richardson

WASHINGTON'S FAVORITE

ITALIAN RESTAURANT ROMAN TORCH LOUNGE & SIDEWALK CAFE

~ 19th & M STS., N.W. 331-9444 Open Sunday Complimentary Dinner Parking Directly Across Street

8e

Ao:;s World 71-ade Pres. Frank Carlucci, writer Betty Chen, Alexander 71-owbridge of the Nat'/ oc. of Manufacturers and Mr. Jiang Chenzo Chenzong, counselor for the Chinese Embassy

I .........

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S 75


I

t bt Vice Pres. George Bush and King Fahd ~es bY J tween greeting 600 guests at the dinner g1ven Saudi King Fahd

Pres. and Mrs. Ronald Reagan greet King Fahd of Saudi Arabia for a state dinner at the White House.

Saudi Came and Conquered THE WHITE HOUSE-Dinners at 1600 Wicks left early in frustratio11, but 600 Pennsylvania Ave., the J.W. Marriott and others, including State Dept. Sec. George Vice Pres.' cottage filled the after hours of Shultz and Commerce Sec. Malcolm Baldfive busy days of successful talks between rige, were treated to caviar, veal, and Salad the Saudi Arabian King Fahd and the presi- Oasis served on gold lame tablecloths decodent. The ultra-luxurious Marriott fete rated with pink and white tulips. The visit's hosted by the Saudis drew the most atten- crowning touch came when Abdul Azziz, the tion, despite the king's tardiness, a two- King's 12-year-old son, presented $100,000 hour wait for the receiving line and some each to Children's Hospital and the Childisorganized seating plans. The Charles dren's Museum.

r

SHERATON GRAND-In a fitting start for Capitol Hill's latest luxury hotel, a red ribbon, stretched between two congressional staff directories held by hotel employees (left and right) Herman Monroe and Lori Cleveland, was ceremoniously snipped by (left to right) Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill with the assistance of John Kapiolates, pres. of the Sheraton Corporation, Leah Blum of the hotel's developing team, and Gen. Mgr. Josef Ebner at a reception for 500 to inaugurate the new Sheraton Grand Hotel. 76

WASHINGTO

DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

• of 11 NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART-A collectJO c~ a 200 photographs entitled "LIFE, The Second Decade " stru.Jle's familiar chord with everyone on hand to preview the rnaga? {>II' chronicle of our times. Priceless pies of Mahatma Gandtuests cille Ball and Marilyn Monroe drew the wistful attention o peP· AI Haig, US AIR's Ed Colodny, Patrick Monroe (left) an ellillg Mayor of Paris Monique Gamier-Leancon (right) at th~ oPcorP· reception sponsored by Time Inc. and United Thchnolog1es

l


~=================

~

. . · · Steve Palfv.il¢nts , entrance-making knits· · ··•···.' "' . color tlie new season ·:< .::~·-: !. :..~. ::,, . -arrt w~y you like. · ·, ·· ,· Strike a pose .::·.:; ·;.;.,... ;•:·:· ana.prepare·for · ·: ·:·,: · ~~unexpected. '··

•.

• '-

tl •

1·: .... '.:

• •

1

~

~--==

Cochmn. Dale Denton and Randall Roth, pres. and CEo of the Capitol Hill Hospital

~

\. .

. . ...---.. .

• -.. ::,;~~": -..::_ .•-~~": ~·-= :.:-=.~-:-:~---=...~ ... "'!.-..::.-...... ~ ~- - _. .;...-·

~

Oonbon Time

~ ~

-

Corner b1 i9tti :irld M Streets, N.W · Washington, DC 202/337-4800

'l'liE REGENT- Calorie watchers were noWhhere to be found at Capitol Hill Hospital's c ocolate and champagne fundraiser. "We ~ant. to provide a good community approach

~Billre~d~h."saidPres.RandaU,olli. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Ver 500 guests, including California Rep.

~nd Mrs. Robert Lagomarsino, turned out 0

support the hospital's effort to become

c;pafvlziatt~.

a first-rate neighborhood medical center.

Oriental Rug Masterpieces

GflaMziart~. Wt.SHINGTON O.Si&n Cmttr

Shar h lir on Raimo education chmn., Randall Rot • ces. and CEO of the Capitol Hill Hospital and ~h Ia ' H.allbertine, membership . cha~rman. .

7034 Wisconsin Avenue Bethesda (301) 654-8989 Open Daily 9:30- 6 Mon . and Thurs. evenings ti/9 Open Sunday from 1 til 5 EW JERSEY

HOUSTO

DALLAS

SAN ANTONIO

(202) 646-1230 (202) 348-3300 (713) 52().8998 (214) 559-3000 (SU) 824-9393

AUSTIN

NEW ORLEANS

(SU) 541-1558 (504) 522-UOO

L---------------------------------J~ WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL I98S

77


:.:

u

<

..J

"'

"'

..;

Jim Harjf and Naomi Judd with Susan Davis and Naomi's daughter Wynona

A Melting Pot for Chili

----

J.w.

Sarah Brady, Philip Morris Pres. Frank Resnik, Will Rogers Jr. and White House Press Sec. James Brady.

MARRIOTT-Bedecked in boots and black tie, a melting pot of Oklahomans, Texans and Washingtonians rallied for a hoe~ down dedicated to the appreciation of chili and White Hou~~ Pr;~ Sec. James Brady. The western evening, sponsored by ChJb-V and underwritten by Philip Morris U.S. A., was filled with ro~ tricks by Will Rogers Davis (no relation), music by the Gr~~yd award-winning Judds, and a help-yourself Lazy Susan of chill ~ beer at each table. Following speeches by event Cbmn. su as Davis and show stealer Oklahoma Gov. George Nigh, BradY w named the Will Rogers Chili Humanitarian of the year.

Robert McDaniel, Baili de Bail/age du Greater Washington, with guest Audrey Ber/inskY. Windows owner Carol Bloom

and

~~~b~e~C~b~a~ine~~G~a~ng~----------------~ â&#x20AC;˘0 11s

Waiter serves flower laden hors d'oeuvres tray to Karen McNeil, Food and Wine editor of USA Today 78

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S

WINDOWS RESTAURANT-The first joint meeting of Virginia and Washington members of the Confrerie de la Chaine, the world's oldest gourmet society, boasted a sumptuous nine-course meal featuring Chef Henry DiNardo's Maine Lobster, Goat Cheeze Calzone and Medallion of Bison.

The rave comments from the illustrl eW gourmands were a tribute to the brand ~011 restaurant in Rosslyn. "I really toast .11g, for doing this," so shortly after ope~oid Virginia Chapter Pres. Paul Chapman owner Carol Bloom.


~ ~===============

iOO I go from daytime to evening with cat like tread in our sassy linen cardigan by mary ann restivo temperatures will rise )t

---ttinB hoe· •ress

;sA roPe tillY'

and

~sjlll

was

0 klahoma Gov. and Emcee George Nigh.

fhef Henry DiNardo and sous chef Pasqua/ ngenito WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRI L I98S 79


~ll I

Joan Nathan, chef and owner of Glorious Food, Jean Claude Nedelec and Carol Cutler

Gregg Bissell and wife, Judge Jean Bissell

Les Dames d )Esco.ffier GLORIOUS CAFE-When Les Dames d'Escoffier, an organization of professional women in food and wine, threw their flrst fund-raising auction, they had Washingtonians bidding, and bidding big. Sotheby auctioneer Jean Wbitmer hawked an Israeli Embassy brunch to lawyer Elizabeth

Guhring, Paul Newman autographs to Nancy Gewirz, a ride on Ridgewell's Jeff Ellis' yacht to Thibaut de Saint Phaile, and other goodies- taking in a total of $32,000 for the Anne Crutcher Professional Fellowship. Pres. Carol Cutler awarded the grand prize trip to Paris to Dame Helene Bennett.

Food critic Phyllis Richmanpnd Helene Bennett, founder of Les Dames d'Escoffier

It's easier than you think to show your friends how special they really ore. Every one of our meals reflects your individuality and creativity.

I>

tb l' }:1

~

..

di ta

Cafe Mozart A warm and friendly atmosphere sets the tone for enjoying our Austrian and German delights. Try the Hasenpfeffer - large chunks of rabbit in a succulent brown sauce, and our Beef Goulash . Try to resist the Black Forest and hazelnut cakes after Viennese Schnetzel and Jager Schnetzel, (our two most popular dishes!)

Call for Our Entertainment and Concert Schedule. Open 7 Days. Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner 1331 H Street, NW, Washington, DC I 347-5732

80

WASHINGTON DoSSIER I APRIL 198S

With 22 years of competence and professionalism, the only thing we leave behind is pleasant memories for good friends to shore . Swan Caterersas graceful and elegant as the bird we represent . 1221 Conn. Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20036 393-7926


t,

1

fl:ggdwill for All pEPARTMENTAL AUDITORIUM-The Oth Goodwill Ball topped off a host of Pte-ball dinners about town and raised nearly ~.40,{)()() for that staple of Washington charites: Goodwill Industries. Desserts by RidgeWell's, dancing to the Redstone band and a Silent auction featuring a vacation in Acarbulco, kept the nearly 700 guests, including e Victor 'Iiepassos and Dr. and Mrs. James 110 l> Wers entertained. According to Goodwill res. David Becker, the funds raised will toward a program, sponsored by Mcd'0Uald's and Roy Rogers, to train the han,,~Pped for work in the fast-food industry. e want to make them taxpayers, not 1 ax receivers," said Becker.

to

~ee Heflin of Anton, Datsun, BMW presents Nissan Sentra key to prize winners Mr. and Mrs. ' 0 nk

McCulloch .WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRI L 1985

11


Postpone the signs of aging. Bio-Concentre Improve the environment your skin lives in and you improve your skin. This hypo-allergenic liquid containing an exclusive Bioactive complex of glycoproteins and mucopolysaccarids nourishes existing cells, fortifies inner cellular substances and enhances the living conditions for new cells. Applied before moisturizer or night treatment and able to amplify their effectiveness, Bio-Concentre helps skin repair its defenses and achieve a more youthful, energetic metabolic balance. Over time it delivers a restored vitality to skin and a softly resilient look and feel. Bio-Concentre - the great protector against the elements that line, age and damage your skin.

Ret. USMC Col. Wm . P. Oliver and wife Olga with Lt. Gen Dwayne Gray, chief of staff USMC

The Art of .. War CANNON BUILDING-The reception looked like a scene from a 1940s war movie -nearly everyone was in uniform for the opening of an exhibit of 75 WW II paintings commemorating the 40th anniversary of Iwo Jima. The show was the brainchild of Marine Commandant P. X. Kelley, who had curator Vera Mann and the Navy League's Mickey Hutter assemble the Pacific wartime art from collections held.by the Navy, Army, Coast Guard and Marine Corps.

A sst. Navy Sec. for Finance with Mrs. Robert H. Conn and Lt. Gen. B. F. Mickey 11'ainor

Stendhal PARIS Superior skincare with a French accent

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE

Wilma Hutter, Mrs. P. X. Kelley and Gen. John Vessey, chmn. of the Joint Chiefs of Sttiff


SOCIAL SCENE

lferb Hutner, Molly Le~ wife of the Malaysian Amb.; Julie Hutner and Amb. Sip Hon Lew

~se Celebre ~NNEDY

CENTER- Over a candle-lit

contrast to Carter's appointees, who raised

hn evening of "Cyrano," the fund-raising r-re路Sident's Advisory Comm. on the Arts fo a r the KenCen, toasted two new appointees nd talked of the private sector's influence 0 n the expanding scope of the center. In

resenting almost every state, "has raised a record $450,000 plus," said Committee Chrnn. Herb Hutner. Other loyal supporters on hand included Mrs. Forrest Mars, Jr. and

aInner in the Chinese Room followed by little more than they spent, this group, rep-

the Charles Camaliers.

Committee Rep. from Rhode Island Eileen Slocum and Princess Sonja Dragonetti

. . . special dresses for special moments

1513 Wisconsin Ave.

Ntar P Strm Georgetown Washington, D.C. 337-5742

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S 83


TV personality Maury Povich, Ball Chmn. Kathy Koons and her sister A nn Worch

Stephanie Bolick and BDM International v;ce Pres. George Newman

A Heartfolt Ball

---r

1.W. MARRIOTT-' ~bout a month ag~ wouldn't have bet I'd be here," said Fat~ fax Co. Board of Supervisors Cbmn. Herrity, who is just recovering froiD h~s third heart attack. Many of the 500 gu_~ at the Northern Virginia Council's AIJ1erl ed Heart Association baJJ had relatives affect with heart disease or were victims th.e~d selves. The annual event, which ra~ir路 $60,000 for Heart, helped make th~ e ginia chapter "No. 1 in fund raising 1n ~y United States," said ball Chmn. l{at f Koons. Virginia Rep . and Mrs. Frank ~ol the WiJJiam Brakefields and others d1n~y on shrimp bisque and steak followed dancing and a live auction.

Ja\

Gail DeGroff and Fairfax County Board of Supervisors Chmn . Jack Herrity

Rep. and Mrs. Frank Wolf 84

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 198S

Susan and Robert Doyle

J

Jayne Hofman and Michael McNally

I


~TheA!:re3sGame Continued from Page 29

,can ;ted eJil'"

sed Vir¡ the tbY oJf,

ned

,

"There are a lot of unsophisticated clients Who think that if you have big names they'll have influence on Capitol Hill... . Most Of these public relations firms handle problems dealing with legislation or regulatory Provisions. But that is not a total public relatiops service, as I see it." Gray, ever cool, is unperturbed by the slings and arrows: "I've always felt that it Was essential to have well-known people on the staff, to warehouse them if necessary Until you find out how they fit in,'' he remarked. "When I was at Hill & Knowlton, the chairman said, 'We don't want stars.' I thought then that's all I want, a galaxy of stars who have excellent reputations. They are magnets for new business~ but I don't hire them for that alone. They must be of a caliber that they'll attract business or I Wouidn 't hire them at all." On her part, Pettus resents allegations that she hired Carolyn Deaver because of her name value. Yet a Wall Street Journal article in early January reported that Mrs. Deaver "has become an almost overnight success as a public relations consultant, despite a previous lack of experience." The newspaper stated that among the accounts she brought in were the Republican National Committee and the Murdock Development Corp., which owns Washington's Hay-Adams liotel and has Watergate figure H. R. Haldeman as one of its chief executives. From behind her desk in her 15th Street Office, enlivened with various artists' interPretations of the Mona Lisa, Pettus explained, ''I hired Carolyn for a specific purpose, she is an art history J;llajor, knows Washington entertaining and has been exposed to Politics." Continuing, Pettus said, "I don't lobby and for me to have Carolyn, there's an Upside and a downside .. .. I've had people ~an me with illusions that I could get them Invited to state dinners. I have to tell them that I don't supply that service."

bY

Be as may,

Welcome

Spring Meet the Authors, IYina Graybill and Maxine Rapoport April 20, 11:30 am-3:00pm 3201 New Mexico Avenue NW 363-5800 April27, 11:30-3:00 pm 10323 Old Georgetown Road Wildwood Shopping Center, Bethesda 564-3100

' little

that it th"' doubt that while Ronald Reagan is in the ~hite House the Deaver name will exert ~nordinate pulling power. Still remembered 18 the lavish gala stage-managed by Mary flettus & Associates to celebrate the opening Of the refurbished Hay-Adams Hotel last Spring. The guest list, made up with the help of account executive Carolyn Deaver, read like a who's who of Washington and included a platoon of Cabinet secretaries and Senior White House aides. Among these were ~eese, Sen. Robert Dole and his wife, ~ansportation Secretary Elizabeth Dole, Upreme Court Justice Lewis Powell, Cali-

t&fH L~

PJ~

pot) .J6'5-M25

&oamuu, ~ M~ â&#x20AC;˘ WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985 85


Playing The Access Game fornia Sen. Pete Wilson, former Democratic National Committee chairman Charles T. Manatt and California Rep. Tony CoelhO, chairman of the House Democratic Cam· paign Committee, Navy Secretary John Lehman, and Selwa Roosevelt, the State Department's chief of protocol. Then there was the. grand opening of the Andrea Carrano shoe store arranged bY Pettus and Carolyn Deaver, the highlight of which was a formal dinner at the residence of the Italian ambassador. Guests included Deaver, Fred F. Fielding, counsel to the president, political commentator Tom Braden Washington socialites Buffy and Bill Cafritz. and a reporter from Women's Wear Daily, the fashion publication, who confessed, "When Carolyn Deaver calls, I go."

. ~or wftom tfte finest is a W'9'

of fife.

The u~t1ma t e m Europe~ perso~al luxury items and home accessories. A truly elegant collection of Italian lace and embroidered linens, fan tasy costume j ewelry from France fine leather goods ' ' engraved stationery and unique gift items.

'SIAAMARK

C()LLECTI()N WESTWOOD CENTER D

Shown above: Handmade Silver Flatware with Malachite and Vermeil

(off River Road)

5110 Ridgefield Road Bethesda, Maryland

654-8444

FABULOUI

ARUBA 4 Days/3 Nights/from S91.50 8 Days/7 Nights/from S201.00 INCRIDffiiE

BONAIRE

8 Days/7 Nights/from S 191.00 4 Days/3 Nights/from $70.00

~"12 J

0\U'

00

FANI'ASI1C

Single :\iglll

8 Days/7 Nights/from $227.00 4 Days/3 Nights/from $84 .00

CURACAO

R:ites are quoted per person, EP, double occupancy. Extra night and extended 8 chysn nights plan available. Island and hotels offer many c:xtra bonus features. ALM also serves key gateways in Central and South America as well as the major Caribbean nations .. " MAGNIFICENT 3" Vacation Packages brochure can be: obtained from your travel agent. ~

'???

-lllllliiii

86

WASHINGTON DoSSIER I APRIL 1985

80

A u t h o ' John Gunth" one< d• fined public relations as "unacknowledged advertising." So it was perhaps inevitable that in a social culture reared to perceive the fantasy images on TV as the real world, the public relations industry would groW beyond the wildest dreams of its practitionerS· Canzeri contends that modern PR is simply "an idea whose time has come.'' Others, however, attribute the growth to more practical reasons . Hannaford suggests that the Carter administration's regulatorY reforms and anti-business posture prompted members of the corporate community to enlist the services of public relations experts to push their causes in the inner circles of government and through the news media. Eventually, the constant encroachment of public relations into the area of public policY broadened its reach and expanded its visi· bility. Today, a thin line exists in Washington between public relations, lobbying and JaW firms that promote the ambitions of Fortune 500 corporations and foreign governmentS· Often, the diverse disciplines are merged under one roof. Gray and Co., althougb hardly typical, lists 28 registered lobbyists and seven lawyers among its 97 employeeS· In the vanguard of the new wave, GraY conceives PR and lobbying as being mutuallY compatible. With his flamboyant life style and talent for garnering prominent press coverage, he has rocked Washington's PF industry and made a fortune: his firm boasts an estimated 160 clients and his billings are pegged at more than $12 million. "We came in at a time when national issues were cascading," he explains. "PubliC relations was then almost exclusively in the hands of lawyers. I was convinced that Job· bying should be done by professional com· municators and that public relations should

c l

~

&

a


---

:ratic ~s T. ~lhO,

~am·

John 5tate

f the i bY ht of .ence uded , the ·aden fritz.

>ai/y, ;sed.

e de· dged table ;eive orJd,

5roW ners. R is

ne. •• h tO

gests ttorY .pted

y tO ions nner

lews nt of

olicY visi· gton JaW

·tune !ntS· rged >ugh

yists reeS· }raY

uaUY

style >ress pF

,asts

; are

onal JbJiC 1the

lob· :om·

ould

?e more engaged in advocacy, since the I~sues have their origin and potential solution in government." Rabin stressed, "In Washington, you sell counseling. The more you move into public affairs the higher the profits. Your comPetitors are law firms, you deal with impor~ant issues involving big dollars and your billlllgs are higher." The most sought-after PR firms, such as Gray and Co., may charge as much as $3{)() to $400 an hour for the services of the principal executive, plus a specified amount of staff work. The minimum corPorate fee levied by many PR firms is $5,000 ~month. Almost always, the cost is figured Ill advance and is largely dependent on the strategy devised and the manpower required. But since PR firms frequently deal in a~stractions, as in the promotion of good Wtll, it is sometimes difficult to tell whether the client is getting his money's worth. At Other times, especially when legislative or regulatory issues are at stake, the winners and losers are clearly defined. It was abundantly evident, for instance, that in 1980 the American 1tucking Association, represented by Bill & Knowlton, lost its fight against trucking deregulation. p ln?icative of the industry's growth, the Ublic Relations Society of America reported that membership in its metropolitan-area chapters has jumped from 504 to 724 mem~ers last year. Kamber noted that his opera~10ns leaped from three to 60 employees Ill less than five years, and Burson-Marsteller, ~hich has 45 staffers in Washington, doubled ~ size over the last 18 months and is expected 0 double again before the end of '86. t Anxious for a piece of the pie, the counTy's richest advertising agencies are buying ~Ontrol of some of the leading PR firms. &:Urson-Marsteller is now owned by Young &: ~ubicam advertising agency, and Hill I<nowlton by the J. Walter Thompson agency. t .l aking no risks against political uncerfiatnties and party changes, public relations t tr~s are increasingly trying to submerge hetr identification as Republican or Demo~atic and to present a bipartisan facade . ~ay, previously perceived as Republican 0 I'Iented, reported he has as many Democrats Working for him as Republicans, including ~ankiewicz and Hymel, two of his chief &:eutenants. At Wexler, Reynolds, Harrison ~chule, principal partner Wexler, is an ~cttve Democrat and Reynolds is a dedicated eagan Republican. Pe ~1 in all, these gentle persuaders on the fiPhery of power play hardball with sat~ 1 &. 0 Ves. Their courtship of Washington offiCialdom provides them with a kind of magic credit card with which they can draw on the serv· w Ices of those who make a difference, rnhe~her it is for drafting legislation, promOtmg regulatory reform, procuring govern&ent contracts or attracting prominent party fiUests. It's all done with drawing-room lrlesse and urbane gentility, and tends to ~reate the impression that it is another layer tn the government process. 'I'hen again, it might be just more PR . .A

WE'VE Gar THE WNG AND SHORT OF FASHIONABLE WOKS THIS SEASON. We make the difference between ok and extraordinary.

We're a Sebastian Artistic Center. © 1985 SEBASTIA INTERNATIONAL, INC., Woodland H1lls. CA . Artistk Center is a trademark of Sebastian lntemat1o nal .

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985 87


Introducing

BUFFAID BY ROBERT· McDANIEL AFTER SLIPPING PERILOUSLY CLOSE TO

extinction 100 years ago, the buffalo is back -and roaming into some of the Washington area's classiest restaurants and gourmet food stores. As everything from strip steaks to sirloin tips to juicy burgers, the symbol of the American plains is tempting sophisticated palates with its tender red meat and winning them over with its beef-like flavor and low cholesterol. Says Chef Jeffrey Bleaken of Chaucers restaurant in the Canterbury Hotel, "Guests enjoy it and return for more. And the plates come back to the kitchen clean." Not surprisingly, the flrst to serve up the wilderness game three years ago was Dominique's, which has introduced Washington to such other exotic novelties as rattlesnake meat. But dozens of other flne area restaurants have ridden herd to feature it in recent months, including: the Tivoli and the new Windows restaurant in Rosslyn, the Company Inkwell in Vienna, The Iron Skillet in Falls Church, Chalet de Ia Paix in Arlington, The Old Angler's Inn in Potomac and La Colline, Le Jardin, Jean Louis at the Watergate and Maison Blanche in Washington. Chef Klaus Helmin at the Tivoli calls it "a very good seller because it's lean and

Photography by John Whitman; damask table cloth from Jane Wilner, Maua Gal/erie; sterling fork in St. Mark pattern by Buccel/ati; buffalo head nickels from Coin of the Realm Inc. in Rockville.

tender and can be served equally well broiled or sauteed." Hotel restaurant chefs are equally enthusiastic. According to Paul L. Chapman of Food Tech International in Bethesda, the only East Coast distributor authorized by the National Buffalo Association, a few hotel orders are averaging $3,000 a month . His hotel clients to date? The Four Seasons, Hay-Adams, Hyatt Regency, 1Ysons Marriott, The Regent, Mayflower, the Sheraton Washington, Vista International and the Washington Hilton. Gourmands and health-food advocates alike are calling it the meat of the '80s. The difficulty is in getting people to take the frrst taste, say connoisseurs. Leaner and substantially lower in cholesterol than beef, it could conquer the craving for a thick, juicy steak with a close taste substitute that the USDA says has less cholesterol than either chicken or tuna. According to Diane B. Stoy, operations director of the LIPID Research Clinic at George Washington University Medical Center, buffalo meat is also higher in protein, vitamins and minerals than beef. Though its relative scarcity on the market makes it more expensive than beef, there is less waste in cooking because of the lower fat content. Supplier Chapman said chopped buffalo retails at about the price of lean groUnd beef-$2.79 per pound-and ribeyes run about 15 percent higher than the fmest cuts of beef. The biggest price difference-about 65 percent-is between tenderloin of buffalo and beef because buffalo have less tenderloin than cattle. While the February issue of Gourmet

magazine features a column that tou:s "beefalo," a specially bred hybrid of catt e and buffalo as a new food trend, Chap!Tiall says beefalo has a cholesterol level closer to beef's than buffalo's. . Local retail stores that carry buffalo 10; elude Some Place Special/Giant Gourme in McLean, Sutton Place Gourmet, oour; mand in Arlington, and all three Chees and Bottle Shops, at World Bank, Arling· ton and Woodbridge . f· Cooking tips from the experts: Since bU t falo meat is lower in fat, it requires less bell or less time to cook. As with all red meats. especially lean ones, it will toughen if over· cooked, so it is best served rare or medi~tnd Local chefs say it is also excellent sbc~­ thin and served with a red currant, mus room or marchand du vin sauce. . e None of this would have been poss1bl . a}S 30 years ago, when these lumbering ani~ 'S were still protected. Gradually the nauon ~ buffalo population has been brought ba~ from the mere 200 that were counted 1895 after American frontiersmen blithelY harvested hides in such massive quantities that the animal nearly became extinct. . 0 Today there are about 70,000 buffal~ ~ privately owned herds throughout the y~t 3 States, and Americans are fast acqUJnn8 taste for the beast all over again. If the nutritional information put out b; the USDA isn't convincing enough to gee you to try it, talk to some members of tll 8 Washington Redskins who were served buffalo dinner at Champions restaurant.~; fore their Nov. 25 football contest again the Buffalo Bills. I> The Redskins beat the Bills-41 to 14·


Serbian Crown For the only authentic Russian-Serbian dining experience in the Washington, DC area, visit Serbian Crown Restaurant. Combined with French cuisine, some of their elegant specialties include: Kulebiaka (salmon for two, baked in a pastry shell with lobster sauce}, caviar, Pate de Sole Valdirnir, real borscht and bliny, wild boar, suckling pig, buffalo, venison, and fresh wild goat. Just 20 minutes from Georgetown via Rt. 66 and the new 267 Toll Road to Rt. 7 West.

tS

Luncheon 11:30-2:30 Monday-Friday Dinner 5:30-11 pm Monday-Saturday 1141 Walker Road at Colvin Run Mill Great Falls, VA I 759-4150

et r·

•se g· f·

'S c~

ill IY

·es

bY

Metropolitan Washington's Premier French Restaurant "only minutes away to your hide-a-way ... ,

get

8111 Lee Highway Merrifield, Virginia

me·

(703) 560-3220

r:

(... ~

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985 89


EDUCATED PAlATE

The East Wind is owned and managed by Nguyen Khai, who says the mural in the backgrou~~ depicts a temple at Hue, the ancient Vietnamese capital. The restaurant's flatware is stamped WI a bamboo leaves logo. Chopsticks are available for more adventuresome diners.

90

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985


~~ CAROL CUTLER CRITIQUES: '

I

und vith

EAST WIND A Breeze of Exotic Vietnanuse Cuisine East Wind

! A:.

809 King St., Old Town, Alexandria

836-1515 'JYpe of Cuisine: Vietnamese. Quality of Cooking: Very good. Deft use of spices and herbs. Specialties: Cha Gio (deep-fried meat-filled rice-paper rolls), minced shrimp on crab claws, grilled lemon chicken, scallop saute. Decor: Soft pastel colors mixed with wood and bamboo furnishings create a tasteful, modern oriental atmosphere . Bamboo dividers separate the dining room into three distinct areas. There is also a separate room in back. Ambience: Calm reigns throughout, even when filled to capacity. Generous space between tables accommodates lively groups next to those who prefer quieter conversation. Service: Generally very polite and caring, although waiters often disappear for long periods and on occasion have difficulty understanding English. Dress Code: Anything from business dress to casual. Waiting: Usually no problem. There are chairs at the bar, if needed. Price: Moderate. Lunch and dinner priced the same. Dinner for two with wine, tip and tax, about $50. Wine List: Modest wine list at sensible prices: Jadot Macon Blanc, $16; Louis Latour Beaujolais, $13. Emphasis on beer-nine kinds from eight different countries. Avoid: Carelessly biting into the deep-fried Cha Gio rolls , which are usually still super hot inside. Also parties of more than six; food tends to be served tepid and less crisp to larger groups. Special Touches: Fresh floral table arrangements, each one different. Printed recipes for two popular dishes- Cha Gio and Grilled Lemon Chicken.

n old Vietnamese proverb says an east wind brings good fortune. Certainly some good luck blew this way in 1980, when this restaurant named after the zephyr opened in Alexandria. For despite the wealth of Vietnamese restaurants that have opened here in the past few years, this is the place to explore the intricacies of Vietnamese cuisine, that wonderful culinary blend of the exuberance of the Chinese with the refinement of the French. This is a restaurant of quiet style, and the good taste that prevails in its modern oriental decor is mirrored in the kitchen. For starters, try the famous Vietnamese appetizer Cha Gio, rice-paper wrapped rolls with a pork-and-crabmeat filling, plunged into the deep fryer and brought to the table steaming hot. What beguiles about these rolls is the alchemy of delicate seasoning, a trait that runs throughout the entire menu. Most meat and chicken dishes have been first marinated in a mysterious blending of herbs and spices, then grilled briefly and intensely, assuring a crisp outside and moist interior. Grilled lemon chicken is a star among the grilled dishes and one that can ostensibly be duplicated at home, since the recipe is available. But don't bet on it. Like too many other printed recipes, it is not 100 percent accurate, lacking some of the mysterious flavoring and the house sauce, ensuring your return for the real thing. One consistent failing in the East Wind kitchen is the heavy-handed use of catsup, especially intrusive in the fish dishes and dominates the otherwise superb stuffed squid. There are five desserts, plenty for the end of a multi-course meal: A choice of two flambeed fruits, a custard, or two flavors of ice cream. The ice cream is interesting, a rich vanilla beautifully flavored with hints of either suave lychee or brisk ginger and a nice finish to what is generally some very good eating.

A

Open: Lunch Monday through Friday, dinner every night. Credit Cards: All major cards. 1ransportation: King Street, Alexandria buses; I ~ blocks north of Washington Street. Reservations: Suggested. Extraordinary Very Good Good Acceptable

Critic's Last Word: Go East. WASHlNGTO

DOSSIER I APRIL 1985 91


I

~

OININ60Ul The following advertisers represent some of the finest restaurants in the Washington metropolitan area.

"We make the most extraordinary pasta"

,ho,...

American Harvest- Elegant regional American cuisine in a formal Georgia mansion setting. The Vista International Hotel at 1400 M St. NW. (429-1700)

Summer Cafe Dining

iI

lll'J IIUd11noM Hltlhw • y

Bennett's-Continental and American gourmet cuisine in the Jefferson Hotel. 1200 - 16th St. NW. (467-4849)

Reservations 667-5350 2653 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Washington, D. C.

Bernie's-Offers a mixture of American and Italian cuisines in The Linden Hill Hotel & Racquet Club. 5400 Pooks Hill Rd ., Bethesda, Md . (530.0300)

Steps from Woodley Park Metro Station

716-U U

Les §urvivants ·rne

Lunch

absolute /!nest.

Dinner

/or rhe

obsolurt /mest

609 Melvm Ave

Annapohs. Md

267-0999

Bistro Francais-Gourmet French fare, fine pastries. Open late. 3124 M Street, NW. (338-3830) Cafe Alan-Fine French dining in a contemporary setting, accented with a pastel colors and fresh flowers. 7141 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda (654-5055) Cafe at the Grand-Dine underneath the atrium skylight with a waterfall and gazebo, adding to the airy atmosphere. At the Sheraton Grand. 525 New Jersey Ave. NW. (628-2100) Cafe ltaliano-Seafood, veal and pasta in Northern and Southern Italian style. 3516 Connecticut Ave . NW.

Outdoor Patio Open for Dining 3201

(966-2172)

:--.:cw :v1n1u1

Carlton Room-Classic American cuisine in the Sheraton-Carlton Hotel. 923 - 16th St. NW. (638-2626)

LUNCH

M••• F11 11 30 2 30

Coeur de Lion-Continental cuisine in newly restored Henley Park Hotel. 926 Massachusetts Ave. NW. (638-5200)

DINNER Mon Sal 5 30 10 30 FRI & SAT Jc.an Cu<;im•r (Mrs Fogyytx~IC•n) MON & lUES

Comus Inn-Traditional American cuisine served in an authentic early American inn. At the junction of 1-95 and Rte . 109 in Comus, Md. (428-8593)

Kau .. K•;sman (SonySirc""')

WfD& THURS M.IIH> MliiN (ltWJ Puarty

Arlington, V i rgini•

Thev call it ,, "Finest Sout-h of New Yor~

~el

~

I(rupitt's

'%staurant

11 20 Connecticut Avenue • 33 1· 70°

IO I 0

Valet Parkmg at 6 p .m

Da Domlnico-Northern Italian gourmet cuisine. 1992 Chain Bridge Rd., 'TYsons Corner, Va. (790-9000) East Wind-Vietnamese cooking with subtle French and Chinese influence. 809 King St., Alexandria, Va. (836-1515) Evans Farm Inn-lraditional American cuisine. 1696 Chain Bridge Rd., McLean, Va. (356-8000) Fred's Place-Specializing in barbecued ribs and chicken. In the Crystal City Holiday Inn, 1489 Jefferson Davis Hwy., Arlington, Va. (92()..()772)

-=~-~

"'

GEORGE•s RIB HOUSE BEST RIBS IN TOWN 2514 Jefferson Davis Hwy. Alexandria, VA 14 (703) 548·5527 (703) 548·3

s

George's Rib House-lraditional American rib and beef cuisine. 2514 Jefferson Davis Hwy., Alexandria, Va. (548·S527)

·=

Glorious Cafe-Glorious Food presents a European style cafe for lunch and dinner. Georgetown Court, 3251 Prospect St., NW. (33Hl200)

Kaiserhof Austrian Cuisine

The Alibi Fine French Cuisine

Gusti's-One of the District's oldest Italian restaurants. 1837 M St. NW. (331-9444)

352-0059

591-6319

Hamburger Hamlet-American cuisine with an emphasis on hamburgers. 312S M St. in Georgetown. (96S-2037) 5225 Wisconsin Ave . NW. (244-2037)

Valet Parkurs • Mart>r Credit Cards Hmr!lred RcS<•n•atimrs Rc<"t>lllllll'rrded Opm Mt>uday tlrru Frrday {t>r Lrmclr arrd Dmm•r Saturday Dr111rcr Orrly

10418 Main Street Fairfax City, Virginia 92

rre

920-0772

Cafe Parisienne-Fine French fare with numerous luncheon specialties. Mazza Gallery. 5300 Wisconsin Ave., NW. (244-1110)

Continental Cuisine • Night Club

Locate or Crystal Oly Holiday Inn

Cafe Mozart- Viennese cuisine with a touch of German deli. 1331 H St. NW. (347-5732)

Cafe Promenade-American cuisine with a buffet in the Mayflower Hotel. 1127 Connecticut Ave. NW. (347-4000)

THE

Vietnamese Culinary Art in Historic Old Towne

Cafe LaFayette-Continental cuisine and entertainment in a quaint Old Town decor. 105 N. Alfred St., Alexandria, Va. (548-0076)

Avenue, l\:W urton Pbce Wa-,hmgton, D. C. 200 16 (202) 966-0500

r

lJ ll

WASHINGTON DOSSlER I APRIL 1985

J

Hemingway's- American cuisine specializing in seafood. In the Crown Plaza Holiday Inn, 1750 Rockville Pk., Rockville, Md. (468-1100) Henry Africa- Continental cuisine with recommended daily specials. 607 King St., Alexandria, Va. (549-4010) House of Hunan -First of the new Chinese restaurants specializing in Hunan and Szechuan cuisine. 1900 K St., NW. (293-9lll)

~~ _£'cJ/ippocamjJ£

(jJ

rJ • Outdoor C~fe • H~ppy Hour 4 30- 7 • p, ~no B~r B OO-M1dn1.ghl • L<~te 01nner Menu I0 OO-M1dn1gnt

7905

or folk Ave . Bethe sda. 986·0707

O M

I'\


DININO OUT llunan Gallery-Spicy Hunan cuisine. 3308 Wisconsin A.ve. NW. (362-6645)

""'

llunan Lion- Chinese cuisine served in an elegant a(~mosphere. 2070 Chain Bridge Rd ., "IYsons Corner, Va. 34-9828) Jacquellne's- Authentically French cuisine and decor, ~tractive and romantic ambience-since 1965. ' t990 St. NW. (785-8877)

~~an Inn-Japanese cuisine from grills to sushi. 1715 tsconsin Ave. NW. (337-3400) Jean Louis-Adventurous French cuisine with fiXed-price ~~us. In the Watergate Hotel, 2650 Virginia Ave. . (298-4488)

999

~~e and Mo's-Solid American cuisine with some frills. l1 Connecticut Ave. NW. (659-1211)

~oto

.Restaurant-Japanese sushi bar and cuisine. 27 Rtchmond Hwy., Alexandria, Va . (768-5274)

~~. ~iche-Country French dining. 7905 Norfolk Ave., ucthesda, Md. (986-0707)

~a Reserve- French and continental cuisine in the newly A.edecorated Embassy Row Hotel. 2015 Massachusetts ve. NW. (265-1600) ~lllppocampe-French

cafe cuisine. 7901 Norfolk

ve. Bethesda, Md. (656-4499)

~arket

lt"e

Inn - Live lobster and fresh seafood highlight

e menu . 200 E. St. SW. (554-2100)

~e~ Krupln's-1Taditional he-man cuisine and

a place e seen. U20 Connecticut Ave. NW. (331-7000)

~r.

K's Restaurant -Gourmet Chinese cuisine in a amorous setting. 2121 K St. NW. (331-8868)

Is it the skyline glistening on the Potomac? Or is it The View's elegantly romantic ruisine, served grandly in a starlight setting unmatched afl)'\\bere? Fmd out Atop the Key Bridge Marriott, Rosslyn. Pre-theatre specials, and Sunday brundt 10 to 2:30. Free parking. Reservations

524-6400.

~lcbo~as-Gourmet

American cuisine, seven days a N~k tn the Mayflower Hotel. 1127 Connecticut Ave., . (347-8100)

N

n°1lhandle Farm- A country inn with the flavor of (9~ thern France. 10710 Falls Rd ., Potomac, Md . ·8838)

3

~~Royal -American cuisine in The Old Town Holiday · 480 King St., Alexandria, Va. (549-6080) p 2:;" Place- French cuisine with live jazz on weekends. I Connecticut Ave. NW. (667-2701)

~e Peppenniii-American cuisine in The Bethesda HoliYInn . 8120 Wisconsin Ave., Bethesda, Md. (652-2000)

~~~to~s- Italian cuisine in intimate townhouse setting. ,

Connecticut Ave. NW. (667-5350)

~gley's-American

cuisine in a "saloon" setting. 1 New Mexico Ave. NW. (966-0500)

~:~ian Crown- Eastern European and Russian cuisine Va a touch of the gypsy. 1141 Walker Rd., Great Falls, . (759-4150)

~ ~ignature Room-Specializing in fme aged beef Cr JUmbo lobsters in a warm setting at the Sheraton and Hotel. 525 New Jersey Ave ., NW. (628-2100) s~Yl' on ~&bts- Fresh pasta is the specialty at this restaurant 2 7 ~ e 19th floor of the Hyatt Regency in Crystal City. Jefferson Davis Hwy, Arlington, Va . (486-1234)

~~Yerna Cretekou-Authentic Greek cuisine. 818 King

ll., Alexandria, Va. (548-8688)

lll~tio

Rlstorante-Gourmet Italian cuisine in a for-

't setting. 1915 K St. NW. (452-1915)

~~~bertakes-American

lt

neighborhood pub dining. Connecticut Ave. NW. (483-2266)

th:der Vic's-Newly renovated in a captain's cabin Op rn e, the restaurant has expanded its menu with u1ent seafood dishes . 16th and K Sts., NW. (347-7100)

~lgs Restaurant- Continental cuisine with a fabulous I( Dday brunch. In the Capital Hilton Hotel, 16th and

't streets NW. (393-1000) ahe VIew - Elegant continental dining overlooking

Our trained horticultural designers create the perfect setting for your special event. From a sprinkling of tiny lights in ficus trees in a candlelit room to lush, dramatic palms that accent the setting for your special event, plants provide the warmth and elegance you need to make your celebration the talk of the town . We have 20,000 square feet of greenhouse stocked with inventory, waiting for your next special function : • Parties • Conventions • Receptions • Meetings • Trade Shows • Weddings You've ordered the champagne and the entertainment ... Don't forget the plants!

BOTANICAL

DECORATORS 384-8877 Silver Spring Columbia

A.r~Pectacular view of the Potomac. 1401 Lee Hwy., 0 Ston, Va. (524-6400)

WASHINGTON DoSSIER I APRIL 1985

93


APRIL

FASHION mN~ 'I

Fashion Flash

ihe ambiance The perfect par:~uisine. tne fi~est of eleganc~. supeautifUI table settings silVer setvlce. bemore. Plus. you.r and linens. an~ of outstanding cnoice of a vanety locations.

The cater~r:f course. Sch\e\der s,

~e sat-37&1

oserved

Oietai'Y laWS o

Bloomlngdale's-April 1: Anne Klein II Collection with informal modeling at 'JYson's Comer from I to 4 p.m. DApril 6: Petite Fashion Show at Tyson's Comer at 11 a.m. and at White Flint at 1:30 p.m. Open to the public. 0April8: Anne Klein II COllection with informal modeling at White Flint I to 4 p.m. DApril 12: St. ltopez Collection with informal modeling at White Flint I to 4 p.m. OApril 13: St. Tropez Collection with informal modeling at Tyson's COmer I to 4 p.m. DApril 13: Informal modeling of men's Annani fashions at White Flint I to 4 p.m. DApril13: Informal modeling of men's Ungaro fashions at 1Yson's Comer I to 4 p.m. DApril 15 through 20: Dress week. Informal modeling of designs by Nipon Executive Dressing, St. Gillian, Argenti, Liz Claiborne, David Warren and others at Tyson's Corner and White Flint from I to 4 p.m. DApril20: Informal modeling of men's fashions by Perry Ellis at 1Yson's COmer and White Flint from I to 4 p.m.

fashion, beauty, health, home decorating ~d e;~ taining from 11 a.m . to 3 p. m. at White Fbnt, Church and Fair Oalcs stores. I. Magolo-lnformal modeling every Wednes~Y ~ Hemingways restaurant in the Crowne Plaza 0 ' Rockville. For reservations call 468-1100.

1

1

CeliDe-April 18: Preview of Madame Celine's Spring Collection with informal modeling from 12 to 4 pm. Fllzabeth Arden-April 24 and 25: 1tunk show of

Ricbilene evening and day fashions at Connecticut Avenue store from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. OApril 26 and 27: 1tunk show of Ricbilene evening and day fashions at Chevy Chase store from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Frankie Welch-April 18: Spring fashion show and luncheon for the Prince George's COunty Lawyers' Wives at I p.m. For information call 549..{)104. DApril 26: Spring fashion show and luncheon at the Washington Golf and COuntry Club. For information call Barbara Stoker at 525-4221. Lord&: Taylor-April 15 through 20: "The Land of

Country Pink," weeklong promotion highlighting

Perry,EIIis handknit cotton playing-card~ , dJ!lsJI•

Nelman-MarcUJ-Apri/ 1 through 6: Allan Goul fllon· national malce-up artist for Christian Dior, will de~ strate malce-up techniques. Monday 12 to 7 pm., 'J\1 y 11 through Friday 11 a.m. through 7 p.m., Sat~7()) a.m. through 6 p.m. For appointment call ~ rO' cosmetics. OApril 13: The "Bouquet of BeautY motion will feature make-up representatives frO 01 . major lines 12 to 5 pm. in the cosmetic departJ11C '

:,II

fl

Rose Williams-April 11: Fashion show at the gressional Country Club. For members only. CJ 00 se 14: Fashion show at Herb Gordon Mercedes open hriJ!I• for their new showroom, 3161 Auto Blvd., Silver 5P By invitation only. ,rt Slgoatures-April5 and 6: A trunk show of ~IJII Streets bandknit sweater collection will feature a "':,~ appearance by the designer with informal r,n""~ from I to 4 p.m. DApril 1.2 and 13: Evelll;'lif rill~ designer St. Vini will be on hand for the 111 modeling of his coUection from I to 4 p.m. 1 da1' SllebUy Laced-Informal modeling every Tbut5 Cafe de Port from 12:30 to 2:00 p. m. • sb01 Woodward &: Lothrop-April 20: Spring fashion ardeeJ for the Montgomery County Association of RetnoO~' Citizens at the Indian Springs Country Club at 1~718 For more information, call Joan Van Winter 3 Jlldef 0 April29: Fashions by Michael Allen and Fire Jsl rrofll will be modeled informally at Iverson Mall store II a. m. to 2 p. m.

°

Mr. K's Dine as the emperors dined Shark Fin Soup, Beef Mimosa, Peking Duck, Jade Lobster and Pork Royale. Its elegance surpassed only by its superb Chinese cuisine.

1121 K Stnet, NW WublDatoa, DC lOl-331-1168 94

WASHINGTON DOSSIER I APRIL 1985

Geometric patterned linen ensemble by Celine


1d

Donna Korman, Lorraine Krusel, Marian Moraan, Sandy Satterwhite and Deborah Theil of the

enter·

int, faJ}l

esdaY 81 a J-iotel,

Washington Dossier invite you to participate in our

1oth Anniversary Special Edition sweater ____.. ,uJdJ!IaJI: I delllon

,

I

1\1~

' daY II #971)1 ty'' p~ frolll rtrnent· ' con· :he

featurinB exclusive photos of the people and events that shaped the Washinaton Scene since 1975

t'

o.A se enb()ll r spriJlS· )ela"'~

Advertising Space Deadline: April 29} 1985 Camera-Ready Deadline: May 3} 1985

~iol

nod~ , ~

11111

illforJ!l lf5daY

al

bO~

tons ,j, Rel,rd

oan·

12 II '(11

38.4-4 del JslaDto"' ,ref

R.S.V.P 362-4040

_A


SOCIAL CALENJ!

APRIL

It)s Cheny Blossom Time Again

Performance of "The Bald Soprano." A one-act play by Ionesco followed by buffet. 3 A benefit for Source Theatre Company, Embassy

Founders' Day Celebration-30th An~· versary of Greater Southeast Commu!IIIY 20 Hospital Foundation- dinner, .awards ceremon~

of France Chancery, 4101 Reservoir Rd. NW -7 p. m.-black tie-by invitation-$!()() each - Chmn .: Gabrielle Hill and Lilly Rubin.

auction, raffle- Ramada Inn, Oxon Hill-6:3 p. m. - by reservation - patrons $50 eachFoundation Pres.: Barry A. Passett. 0 " Hooray for Hollywood" - Seventh NJ· nual Spring Auction benefit of Georgetown paY School - Capital Hilton Hotel- silent auction. 6:30 p. m. -dinner and Jive auction, 8:30 P· 111 j - by invi tation- $40 each - Chmn .: car Oppenheim . . O Third Annual American' Paralysis ASsociation Ball-Shoreham Hotel - reception at: ·p.m. foll owed by dinner and dancing-blaC tie - $150 each - Cochmn.: Sen. Robert poe1 and 'D"ansportation Sec. Elizabeth Dole. O Celebration of Duke University in Wasbd ington-Salute to outgoing Pres. Thrry Sanf~~ and welcome to Pres.-elect Chancellor H. J(et H. Brodie.-J. W. Marriott - reception 6:30 P·.111• followed by dinner, entertainment and danct~ - black tie- by invitation - $75 each-ChrnJI·· Mrs. Daniel W. Blaylock.

Opening 1985 National Cherry Blossom Festival-public lighting of the Japanese Lan7 tern-Tidal Basin-4 p.m.-welcoming reception honoring the festival princesses-J.W. Marriott Hotel-6:30 p.m.-open to the public$12 each-Chmn.: Mr. and Mrs. Peter Bonin. Congressional Reception for 1985 National Cherry Blossom Festival princesses-Caucus Room, Cannon Building-6:30 p.m.-by invitation only-Chmn. : Mrs. Jo Jorgenson.

9

Annual Dinner Dance benefit of The National Museum of Women in the 10 Third Departmental Auditorium, Constitu-

Arts1301 tion Ave. NW-7:30 p.m.-black tie-by invitation only-Chmn.: Mrs. Paul Laxalt. 01985 National Cherry Blossom Festival luncheon, fashion show and presentation of princesses-sponsored by The National Conference of State Societies-Shoreham Hotel- U:30 a.m. -by invitation only-$25 each-Chmn.: Mrs. Louise L. Parker.

The Fifth Annual Heart Ball-dinner dance benefit of The American Heart Association - J .W. Marriott Hotel-reception 7 p.m. followed by dinner-black tie-by invitation only-$250 each-Chrnn.: Mrs. John F. Potter. OA Gala Evening in honor of Father Gilbert V. Hartke celebrating 50 years at Catholic University-Shoreham Hotel-reception 6:30 p.m. followed by dinner-black tie-by reservation-$200 each - Chmn.: Mel Krupin. OFounders' Dinner-The Folger Shakespeare Library-black tie-by invitation only - Chmn.: Mrs. Caspar W. Weinberger. O"Pyramid of Stars" -dinner dance honor· ing corporate contributors of The Fairfax Sym· phony Orchestra-George Mason University Ballroom -black tie - 6:30 p.m.-$100 each.

12

1985 National Cherry Blossom Festival Parade- Constitution Ave. - noon13 sponsored by the Downtown Jaycees-Chmn. : Douglas Kenny. OThe 1985 National Cherry Blossom Festival Grand Ball with selection and crowning of queen-Shoreham Hotel-8:30 p.m.-black tie -by invitation-$35 each-Chmn.: Roy P. Wolfe. Annual Oatlands point-to-point races, Oatlands Plantation, Leesburg, Va. 14OTexas State Society Annual Meeting and Brunch-Capital Hilton Hotel-noon-by invitation only-Chmn.: Mrs . Martha Buchanan Lucero. ONSO Cookbook Sunday Supper-Dominique's Restaurant-sponsored by "FANS" benefit of the National Symphony Orchestrareception 7 p.m., dinner 8 p.m. - black tie or black and white attire-by invitation-$85 each -Chmn.: Evelyn Morello. 96

WASHf GTON DOSSIER I APRJL 1985

First Annual Rare Wine Auction b~n~f: 24 for The American Diabetes AssoctaU sl - Vista International Hotel- 7 p. m. - infor/11 0

Poised fora Heart Ball-from left, sitting, Heart Ball Chmn. Tanya Potter and Sondra Bender. From left, standing, NCA Pres. David L . Pearle, Stephen Harlan and NCA Chmn. Joel R. Cannon during a meeting at the Potter residence to plan the Fifth Annual Washington Heart Ball April 12 at the Washington Hilton Hotel.

1985 Women of the Year Awards dinner to benefit the YWCA of the National Capital Area- Sheraton Washington Hotel- reception 7:30 p.m. followed by dinner-black tie-by invitation only-$100 each-Cochmn.: Mrs. Barbara Kushner, Mrs. Barbara Pathe, Mrs. Jere Hathaway Wright. O Opening of the three-day Eighth Annual Needlecraft Exhibit and Sale sponsored by GFWC, Women's Club of Potomac-to benefit the club's benevolence program-St. Francis Episcopal Church, River and Counselman roads, Potomac -10 a.m. -admission $3.50-Cochmn.: Mrs. Gerhard Mueller and Mrs. Thiel Sullivan.

17

Annual Luncheon and Fashion Show, 19 Montgomery County Women's Guild for Crippled Children-Kenwood Country Clubnoon-by invitation-$25 each-Chmn.: Mrs. Virgil Gist. 0 30th Anniversary Corcoran Ball-annual dinner dance-sponsored by the trustees and Women's Committee of The Corcoran Gallery of Art-at The Corcoran Gallery of Art-reception 7 p.m., dinner 8:15 p. m.-blade tie-by invitation-$200 each-with a preview of the exhibition " Robert Henri: Painter"-Chmn.: Mrs. Robert D. Wallick. 0 1985 Bullis Gala benefit-7 p.m.-dinner with silent and live auctions at the schoolblack tie optional-$75 each-Chmn.: Susan Melton.

-by reservation- SIS each - Chmn .: MrS· Lawrence Seacrest. Preview Party, The 1985 Washington C~~ Show cocktail buffet benefit for Smttb 2 5 sonian Institution-Departmental Auditorium_.. by reservation- 6 to 8:30p . m. - Cochmn·=MfS· Parker T. Hart and Mrs. C. Michael Price.

·~ndy' s Attic" Preview Night-St. All;

26 drew's Episcopal School, 8935 Bradt?~

Dr., Bethesda-silent and Jive auction and dt~ -6:30 p.m. - by invitation-$40 each- . ochmn.: Mrs. George C. Denby and Mrs. WilltaJII Daisley. . OThe 1985 HOPE Ball Committee Meet~ -10:30 a.m .-for committee members-at 1'f. residence of Ball Vice chmn.: Mrs. Donald · Regan -Ball Chmn.: Mrs. David A. Lefeve.

The Third Annual Thrkey Roast-spOof sored by the Fairfax County Charnbe~ Commerce-honoring John F. Herrity - SprtnBS field Hilton Hotel-cocktails 7 p. m., dinner_.. p. m. -black tie- by invitation-$85 each Chamber Pres.: William Bestimt. nt OAnnual Angels' Auction at MaryrD 011 4 11 College to benefit the Marymount College fu c-6 p.m. -buffet, dancing, entertainment, allll tion-Cochmn.: Ellen Ely Daniels, Liz GannO' Kathy Lettieri and Marlene Malek.

27

"Catch a Wave": Annual Second Gen~ Benefit- dinner, entertainment, d~ct 29 - J. W. Marriott Hotel- reception 7 p. m., di:rs· tJ

8 p.m.-black tie-$150 each-Chmn.: 4 Frederic V. Malek, Mrs. Donald T. Regan all Mrs. Jonathan W. Sloat.

./ .~d

--------------------

Planning an event? Please call Maggie W1 ,.r at 652-7574 well in advance of publicatiOTI· t/11 regret that space limitations may p revent publication of every item.


.1eetit1S -at tbe

nald 'f. feve.

-spao路 nber of sprillS" inlier B eacll .....


Profile for David Adler

Washington Dossier August 1985  

Washington Dossier was the society magazine for the Nation's Capital from 1975-1991. David Adler, current CEO of BizBash (www.BizBash.com)...

Washington Dossier August 1985  

Washington Dossier was the society magazine for the Nation's Capital from 1975-1991. David Adler, current CEO of BizBash (www.BizBash.com)...

Advertisement