Page 1

Contents Executive Summary

1

Introduction

2

Site Option Appraisal

Site Overview Summary Site A Site B Site C Site D Site E

3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Design Proposal

Reuse and Recycle Floating Structure Site Plan Schedule of Accomodation Diagrams Elevations Sections Security Solution Off Site Construction Off Grid Solutions

10 11 14 15 16 17 19 21 22 23

Cost Plan

27

Statement of Viability Appendices

28

30 30 33 36 36 37

Practice Ethos CVs Projects Sheets Risk Register Project Timeline Outline Brief

ESOarch.


Executive Summary Brockholes aims not to attract bird watchers but aims more at being a place for families to experience and be educated about nature. Our goal is to educate visitors on nature but also teach them about their impact on it. Our water sports centre will focus on canoeing and open water swimming as the primary activities, with the option to expand into others such as zorbing. It will include storage for all the equipment, toilets and changing areas with warm showers as well as an area for educational use. We propose a floating structure created from many recycled and reclaimed materials including timber, newspaper and plastics. With the community taking an active role in donating, raising awareness for the building before it is built. This approach is more environmentally friendly and cheaper. The building will be constructed off site and will be off grid, removing the high cost of connecting to services which will be very destructive to the nature reserve. It will employ passive statagies to provide light, heat, ventilation and water. These include natural light, compost toilets, wood burning stove, rain water collection and reed bed filtration.

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Introduction We were approached by a manager at Brockholes nature reserve to design a centre for recreation in the reserve. The project was requested by Brockholes, a local nature reseve and bird haven. The idea of a water sport centre had been envisioned by the nature reserve since the aquiring of the site in order to raise revenue for the reserve. The client wanted a place where small groups and clubs could use and store items for use in the pool. The main financial benefactors for this project will be Sport England and charitable donations from the community. With this in mind the local community should be acknowledged in the design process so to final outcome has part of the communities identity. To assemble this feasibility document we undertook desktop studies, meeting with the client, site appraisal, precedent research to put forward a viable design solution.

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Nook Pool Identified for recreational use

Ribbleton Pool

Car Park

No.1 Pit Visitor Centre M6

River Ribble

The Site Brockholes Nature Reserve In the 90’s Brockholes was a major quarry extraction site and has been contested for ownership by the Lancashire wildlife trust since 1992. In 2006 The Lancashire wildlife trust was given a month to raise £50,000 to buy the Brockholes site and protect it from being developed on. With a combination of generous donations from Wildlife trust members and investment from the Northwest Regional Development Agency, Brockholes was aquired by the trust. A RIBA competition was launched for a visitors centre to the nature reserve in 2007 and in the summer of 2008 the winner was announced as Adam Kahn Architects. In 2011 Brockholes opened to the public and has hosted 200,000 visitors to date. Brockholes is a symbol of conservation and continues to improve and reintroduce a series of bird species back into Lancashire. Community spirit is also key to Brockholes with over 200 committed volunteers who have contributed 15,212 hours to the maintenance and operation of the reserve. The volunteers are essential and Brockholes still recruit anyone interested in wildlife conservation. Since its first year the centre has been visited my many local schools and has education facilities to teach children which include a classroom, dipping pool and a series of trails through the reserve.

Brockholes Nature Reserve is located in the County Council division of Preston East, under the ward Ribbleton as identified by the purple border. The site is located on the east side of th M6 just outside of Preston. The pool identified as the prime location for the water sports facility is the Ribbleton pool which is just above the Number 1 pit. There are no existing structures located around this area. The nearest buildings are located in the car park and the visitor centre. The sites original use was a quarry (sand and gravel) this caused the creation of many of the sites pools and is a reflection of the areas ground condions. Ribbleton pool and Nook pool were identified for recreation purposes from the start of the design of the nature reserve project. Ribbleton pool has steep sides around most of its edge and a natural bank on one side which the local canoe club currently use to launch there boats. The pool is 3m deep with a bed of silt. The pool has been deemed safe for open water swimming and has also been advised that it would only make a good pool for learning. The primary task is to design a building that has a minimal impact on the environment and blends in with the landscape.

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B A

C

E

D

visitor centre site options

Site Option Appraisal Site A

Site B

Site C

Site D

-Located to the west of Ribbleton Pool -Located between Nook Pool and Ribbleton Pool

-Located on the water of Ribbleton Pool

-Located between Ribbleton Pool and -Located beside the carpark No.1 Pit

Pros -Shelter from wind -Natural bank provides easy access into water -Good distance from conservation pool -No cost for aquiring site

Pros -Shelter from wind -Natural bank provides easy access into water -Good distance from conservation pool -No cost for aquiring site

Pros Pros -No disruptive groundworks -Visible from motorway -Cheaper alternative to pile foundations -No cost for aquiring site -Easiest access into water -Good distance from conservation pool -No cost for aquiring site -More secure on the water -Very flexible, expanded/removed

Pros -Easy to connect to services -Good vehicle access -Good distance from conservation pool -No cost for aquiring site

Cons -Shaded in the evening -No access to services -Remote location, no security -Needs improved vehicle access

Cons -Shaded in the evening -No access to services -Remote location, no security -Needs improved vehicle access

Cons -Exposed to sun,rain and wind -More difficult to access services -Needs improved vehicle access

Cons -Long distance from Ribbleton pool -Difficult transportation of equipment -Children exposed to cold

Cons -No protection from sun,rain or wind -No access to services -Steep banks make access difficult into water -Very close to conservation pool -Remote location, no security -Needs improved vehicle access

Site E

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Site conditions and constraints: Site A is the least exposed. There is a row of trees lining the southwest border of the site which reduces the noise pollution from the motorway as well as an embankment providing some shelter from the prevailing south westerly winds. However this also shades the site from the evening sun. Currently site A is off-grid. It has no access to gas, electricity, mains water or sewerage. The closest source is at the car park which is 0.8km away. Site A is located to the west of the southernmost pool selected for recreational use with easy access into the water via the natural bank. Large consideration must be given to the impact of the structure on the local wildlife during both construction and funtional use of the building once completed. To reduce the environmental impact during construction and operating from the site it needs to be as far from the conservation pool as possible.

Site A

visitor centre site A pedestrian access vehicle access

Site security has been raised as an issue and with the remote location at the edge of the site paired with previous vandalism incidents in this area, secure storage and fire protection are important as well as security during the construction period. Therefore the construction process on site will need to be kept to a minimum to reduce the risk of damage or theft.

Accessibility: Building on Site A will be visible from Brockholes carpark but the small scale of the building combined with its distance from the entrance to Brockholes calls for some type of sign posting in order for the building to be easily found by the users. There is a track running parallel to the motorway to the south west of the site which can be used for vehicle access but needs to be improved and widened for construction traffic and the delivery of equipment/materials. If improved the track could be used by mini buses for the school classes. However when in use the public will be able to park at Brockholes main car park and walk to the water sports centre, a distance of 1.5km. This will also give them an experience of the nature reserve.

Site ownership: The site in question is already owned by Brockholes so there will be no cost for aquiring the site. The surrounding area is a nature reserve run by the body proposing the development. This is not to say that the nature reserve aspects of the area are to be disregarded, conservation and minimal ecological impact are vital. As a sports centre many other organisations would be interested in making use of the proposed facilities. The pool is already used by local scouts groups.

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Site conditions and constraints: Site B is lined by reeds. There are no trees or surrounding buildings so the site will be exposed directly to the sun, rain and wind but the reeds should buffer this slightly. Currently site B is off-grid. It has no access to gas, electricity, mains water or sewerage. The closest source is at the car park. Site B is located on the land between Ribbleton Pool and Nook Pool. Ribbleton Pool has been identified for recreational use, Nook pool is already in recreational use for fishing and the building may impair views across the reserve and disturb the fishers. The site area is a very thin strip of land sandwiched between both pools which could cause difficulty with launching boats. It is also treacherous ground which would prove hard to get materials on and off site but also cause issues with foundations and excavating the soil.

Site B

visitor centre site B

They have experienced problems with arsen close to our site in the past so security during construction is an issue. Therefore the construction process on site will need to be kept to a minimum to reduce the risk of damage or theft.

Accessibility: Building on Site B will be visible from Brockholes carpark and from the motorway which could attract more visitors. There is a track running parallel to the motorway to the south west of the site which can be used for vehicle access during construction. Since its positioned between pools the ground is waterlogged. If improved the track from the south could be used by mini buses for the school classes then walk to the building.

Site ownership: The site in question is already owned by Brockholes so there will be no cost for aquiring the site.

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Site conditions and constraints: Site C would propose a floating structure on the body of water in Ribbleton Pool. This location is very exposed to the elements. The building will have no protection from the sun, rain and wind. Currently site C is off-grid. It has no access to gas, electricity, mains water or sewerage. The closest source is at the car park which is 0.6km away. Floating on the water of Ribbleton pool rather than being situated on the land could make connecting to services more complicated.

Site C

visitor centre site C pedestrian access vehicle access

Being on the water, Site C would have the best access into the water. Large consideration must be given to the impact of the structure on the local wildlife during both construction and funtional use of the building once completed. A floating structure will mean there is no disruptive groundworks taking place. It can also be cheaper than the neccessary pile foundations on land. A floating structure will make no permanent mark on the landscape of the nature reserve and is very flexible.It can be removed/extended at any point. Site security has been raised as an issue in this area of the Brockholes reserve. The distance from the main facilities means there is no surveillance and there have been previous vandalism incidents in this area, secure storage and fire protection are important as well as security during the construction period. A floating structure could be constructed completely off site. Further more, located in the pool of water, the building could be isolated by use of a drawbridge similar to the visitor village.

Accessibility: Building on Site C will be visible from Brockholes carpark and the motorway. Access to the floating structure will require a bridge most likely to the land of site A because of its distance from No.1 Pit but its good access via the track running parallel to the motorway to the south west of the site which can be used for vehicle access but needs to be improved and widened for vehicles. If improved the track could be used by mini buses for the school classes. However when in use the public will be able to park at Brockholes main car park and walk to the water sports centre, a distance of 1.6km. This will also give them an experience of the nature reserve.

Site ownership: The site in question is already owned by Brockholes so there will be no cost for aquiring the site. The surrounding area is a nature reserve run by the body proposing the development. This is not to say that the nature reserve aspects of the area are to be disregarded, conservation and minimal ecological impact are vital. As a sports centre many other organisations would be interested in making use of the proposed facilities. The pool is already used by local scouts groups.

7


Site conditions and constraints: Site D is very exposed. There are no trees or surrounding buildings so the site will have no protection from the sun, rain and wind. Currently site D is off-grid. It has no access to gas, electricity, mains water or sewerage. The closest source is at the car park which is 0.5km away.

Site D

visitor centre site D pedestrian access vehicle access

Site D is located on the land seperating Ribbleton Pool and No. 1 Pit. While Ribbleton Pool has been identified for recreational use, No. 1 Pit is the largest conservation pool at Brockholes. The slope into Ribbleton Pool is uniform and steep making it difficult to launch boats whereas the edge to No.1 Pit has been changed to form a gradual slope into the water to create shallow, underwater ledges and peninsulas where birds can roost and feed, safe from predators. The close proximty to the conservation pool is a concern. The building needs to have as little impact on the environment as possible. To reduce the environmental impact during construction and operating from the site it needs to be as far from the conservation pool as possible. The site is very remote and there will be no-one to ensure site security when Brockholes is not open, between 5pm and 10am. They have experienced problems with arsen close to our site in the past so security during construction is an issue. Therefore the construction process on site will need to be kept to a minimum to reduce the risk of damage or theft.

Accessibility: Building on Site D will be visible from Brockholes carpark and from the motorway which could attract more visitors. There is a track running parallel to the motorway to the south west of the site which can be used for vehicle access during construction. The position of the site between the pools will be more problematic than site A. If improved the track could be used by mini buses for the school classes. However when in use the public will be able to park at Brockholes main car park and walk to the water sports centre, a distance of 1.4km. This will also give them an experience of the nature reserve.

Site ownership: The site in question is already owned by Brockholes so there will be no cost for aquiring the site.

8


Site conditions and constraints: Site E is located in the car park of the current Brockholes facility, close to the visitor centre. There is the option to have the entire facility at this location or to split the facilities, having storage beside the Ribbleton pool, at one of the sites previously mentioned, and the showers in the car park where it will be less expensive to connect to power and water supply due to the small distance. However if chosen to have the whole facility at site E there will be issues surrounding the transportation of equipment (kayaks) to and from the pool. This could create a high level of disturbance to the animals at the nature reserve. Classes of small children would be unable to carry the kayaks the 1.5km to Ribbleton pool. Furthermore children returning from the pool could be at risk of becoming ill as a result of being exposed to the cold for a long period after leaving the water. Being located beside the carpark means that Site E would be easy to connect to mains supply electricity and Brockholes current water system which is also located in the carpark.

Site E

visitor centre site E pedestrian access vehicle access

Site security has been raised as an issue and having the facility based in the car park would be easier to keep an eye on compared to the remote location of Ribbleton Pool. There is serveillance of the visitor centre. The close proximity to the visitor centre will also mean a greater connection between the two facilities.

Accessibility: Building on Site E will be visible from Brockholes carpark and the visitor centre. There is easy access to the site by both vehicle and pedestrians so there will be no need to improve any roads.

Site ownership: The site in question is already owned by Brockholes so there will be no cost for aquiring the site. The surrounding area is a nature reserve run by the body proposing the development. Therefore conservation and minimal ecological impact are vital. As a sports centre many other organisations would be interested in making use of the proposed facilities. The pool is already used by local scouts groups.

9


With the opportunity to generate more interest in the nature reserve, the watersports centre intends to actively involve participation with the community in the building and construction rather than creating an object to be viewed by the public and not interacted with. The community will actively donate various materials which the building will be made of. Some of the materials donated will be timber, plastic bottles and newpapers to raise the awareness of waste production to the local community and schools.

Reuse and Recycle

Brockholes is a prime example of reuse of the manmade. It took a quarry and turned it into a nature reserve. So we took this principle and applied it to our proposal.

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Our design is a lightweight timber structure supported by a floating platform on the water of Ribbleton Pool. The floating foundation is made of a timber frame and recycled plastic bottles, a cheaper and less destructive alternative to pile foundations. A floating structure is also more secure and makes it much easier to access the water. The surrounding platform forms a walkway around the building while also providing extra stability to the structure.

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12


13


Site Plan

N

The existing track is narrow and not suitable for heavy vehicles which would be neccessary to deliver the building to site as well as school buses therefore it will need to be improved. For the public we propose to share the existing car park at Brockholes. This will encourage a sense of community. Users of the water sports facility will be more likely to use the visitors centre and explore the reserve. The water sports centre will use a soak away system to remove the waste water from the shower. This will feed into a reed bed filtration system on the opposite side of the access road.

reed bed existing car park visitor centre water sports centre pedestrian access vehicle access

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Schedule of accomodation Classroom/Kayak Storage WC WC Additional Storage Male Showers Female Showers Male Changing Room Female Changing Room Total

57sqm 3sqm 3sqm 4sqm 3sqm 3sqm 11sqm 11sqm 98sqm

Platform Total

44sqm 139sqm

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16


West Elevation

scale 1:50

17


South Elevation

scale 1:50

18


A

Section AA A

scale 1:50

19


B

Section BB B

scale 1:50

20


Security

Day

In order to address the issue of security we drew inspiration from the most secure structures - the castle. The feature that we are looking to replicate in the water sports centre is that of access restriction. We look to apply this by placing the building off the bank of the pool. Restricting the access to the building though a single removable access point. This is achieved through a retractable “draw bridge� contraption. We propose the solution depicted on the left. The bridge itself is constructed from two separate halves, one hollow and one solid. The hollow is designed to accommodate the solid during the retracted state. The telescopic action is controlled by a pair of pulley systems on the shore which would be lockable to restrict access to non-water sports center employees

Night

21


Having the majority of construction taking place off site also reduces the noise levels in the reserve, as well as the amount of time that these noises would occur for. Thus drastically reducing the impact on the wildlife as loud noises for extended periods may disrupt many creatures and possibly even cause them so re-locate.

Off Site Construction

The majority of the buildings construction can be completed off site and brought to location by vans or small lorries. This allows for minimal impact on the surrounding ecosystems and wildlife habitats by reduction of requirement of large machinery in the nature reserve.

Benefits + No lasting damage to the environment + No disturbing groundworks + No noisy construction traffic + MInimal impact on the wildlife + Minimal time on site no need for site security

The elevation of the building above the ground by the use of a floating structure not only improves water access, building security and reduce foundation cost, but also helps to preserve the local wildlife through minimized ecological impact and disturbance of existing habitats.

22


Lighting: The building is well lit by the large skylight windows. The gaps between the exterior wall cladding solution also provides additional light. The ability to open the exterior walls provides a level of transparency as well as total exposure to the light conditions outside. This eliminates the need of electrical lighting, although battery powered LED lights could be an option if some of the classes or activities would take place during darker periods of the day. Compost toilets: A composting toilet is a dry toilet that uses aerobic processes to treat the excreta. Most composting toilet solutions do not use any water. The systems range from rather large grounded structures to simple and small solutions that can be used on boats, camper vans and inside off grid buildings.

Off Grid Solutions

The only materials needed to maintain a working compost toilet are: sawdust, coconut coir or peat moss. The smaller compost toilets have a special compartment that can be removed in order to empty the contents. The composted matter then can be used as a fertiliser. An example of a small compost toilet used on boats. >

We have chosen to provide off grid energy, heating and sanitary solutions as an alternative to more conventional means. By doing this we are reducing the environmental impact and avoiding the large costs associated with utility connections. Heating, for space and water - wood burning stove Lighting - natural light, large skylights battery powered LED lights Waste Water - soak away and reed bed treatment system Water system - rain water collection Toilets - compost toilets

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The main room and the showers are heated by a wood burning stove. The chimney pipe of the wood stove goes straight through the water tank. This would heat the water to a comfortable temperature.

Section CC Rainwater is collected from the roof to fill the water tank for the showers.

A filter is used to improve the quality of the water.

Two extra water tanks are provided in the toilets for the sinks. Composting toilets are used to eliminate the need for sewage connections.

Section DD Used water is disposed by redirecting it to a reed bed on the shore.

Heating:

Water system:

The multifunctional space of the building is heated by a wood The building collects rain water into 3 tanks located inside the burning stove that doubles as a hot water solution for the building (1 large one for the showers and 2 smaller ones for the showers. hand washing basins in the toilets). Before reaching the tanks the rain water goes through water filters. These filters are both The stove itself can use a variety of different ecological fuels economical and easy to replace. such as: traditional wood logs, smokeless heatlogs (that are made from the waste products of environmentally friendly saw The tanks themselves are located near the roof of the building mills) and wood briquettes. so that gravity could be used to force the water down the showers and taps. The chimney pipe of the stove runs directly through the rain water collection tank to heat the water to a comfortable temperature for the showers.

C

Waste water:

D

A reed bed sewage treatment system would be used to treat the grey water from the building. This is a natural, cost effective and sustainable water purification system that is already in use in the Brockholes Visitor Centre. Due to the nature of the system an electrical water pumping system might be needed, but due to the fact that this would be the only electrical device for the building, solar or battery power could be used.

D

C

24


25


26


Cost Plan Stage One

(pending)

27


Statement of Viability (awaiting cost plan)

28


29

Appendices


ESOarch. Curriculum Vitae

Alexander Lawrie Macbeth DOB 29.12.1992

We are a young group of designers who believe that every project has to be unique and designed especially for the client. We tackle every project as an opportunity to expand our knowledge and create something new and one of a kind.

2011-2014

University of Central Lancashire ARCHITECTURE BSc (Hons)

We do not follow any architectural dogmas and we always aim to outperform the competition. Our aim is to maintain highs standards at every stage of the design process. Each of us has a specific interest in architecture and together we can respond to any architectural problems or issues. We believe that every little detail contributes to the final outcome of the design and we do not take any short-cuts. As a group we tend to think out of the box and search for interesting and unique solutions.

2009-2011

Alsager Sixth Form

2004-2009

Alsager High School

We believe that buildings have to have a powerful idea that would integrate the exterior and the functional spaces of the building. Our objective is to condense the essential information and features of the building’s context to provide a responsive and functional design that does not feel anachronistic or intrusive. We are passionate about architecture that is elegant at any scale. Through careful analysis and response we are able to create authentic spaces and top quality architectural structures.

ESOarch.

CVs

Practice Ethos

Education and Qualifications

Background As a confident introvert I am a valuble addition to any work force. Whilst working well in groups, both as a vocal mediator or as an equal peer, I am also able to create high standards of work rapidly in isolation. My time studying at the University of Central Lancashire in particular has helped me hone these skills as well as encouraging me to develop many other vital attributes, in particular self, and peer criticism, as well as time management. Again, skills which translate perfectly into any modern working environment.

Work Experience

Software Abilities

Hulme Upright Manning

Auto-CAD - up to 2013 Rhinoceros - up to Rhino 5 Office (all programs) - all editions Indesign - up to CS6 Photoshop - up to CS6 Premier pro - up to CS6 Revit - up to 2013 Sketchup - up to version 8 3DS Max - up to 2012

Hulme Upright Manning is a regional practice, working here gave me sense of the workload and turnaround time of projects in a smaller practice. This experience was extremely valuable.

Broadway Malyan

Broadway Malyan is an international scale practice. My time there opened my eyes to the team based workload of a larger scale project. Seeing the network of work flow between different departments was extremely interesting to experience.

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ESOarch.

ESOarch.

Curriculum Vitae

Curriculum Vitae

Darius Narmontas

Kate Nicholson

DOB 16.01.1992

Education and Qualifications 2011-2014

University of Central Lancashire ARCHITECTURE BSc (Hons)

2009-2011

Kaunas “Santara Gymnasium A LEVELS Maths Physics Literature History English Art

DOB 11.01.1993

Background

Education and Qualifications

As an architecture student I have to work and do research independently to justify my architectural projects and proposals. I have always been very interested in any form of research or activity that would help me expand my understanding of any given subject. I do whatever it takes to finish a concept idea or anything I might be working on as often I think that everything can always be improved or reinvented. I think that in depth research is essential in any discipline as lack of understanding can greatly limit the outcome of any activity.

2011-2014

University of Central Lancashire ARCHITECTURE BSc (Hons)

I am currently in the third year studying for my degree in Architecture at the University of Central Lancashire, Preston.

2009-2011

Alleyne’s Sixth Form A LEVELS Art A* Maths A History B AS LEVEL Physics C Awarded Wedgewood Prize for Excellence in Art

The subject of Architecture has provided me with the opportunity to combine my interests in both the arts and sciences; challenging me to solve problems creatively.

2006-2009

Alleyne’s High School GCSEs 6 A*s, 3 As, B including Maths and English Awarded Prizes for Excellence in Graphics and French

During my studies I have collaborated with various students who are studying different courses such as: graphics design (live-work unit for an artist project), fine art (helped a student with digital image manipulation), event management (I contributed photos and general advice for a charity event at the University of Edinburgh) and applied physics (ecliptic room project for the Museum of Weather design project) to name a few. I feel very proud that I could help others by contributing my work and at the same time gain new ideas and receive knowledge about different subjects.

Employment History 3 September 2011 – April 2012 Floor staff member, The Assembly 32 Lune street, Preston PR1 2NN 14 June 2012 - 14 September 2012 Team member, Benugo, Natural History Museum Cromwell Road London SW7 5BD t

Employment History 2009-2013

Costa Barista Moto Services, Stafford North

Background

I have enjoyed great academic success throughout school and sixth form and I have truly engaged with the subject over my first two years studying architecture. The projects I have undertaken over the past three years have enabled me to design for both the urban and agrarian environment. At the end of 2012 our year took part in an urban design project to regenerate Preston Docklands. This huge project required a high level of communication and organisation to ensure every member of the year worked together as an effective team. I was named leader of the production of the final document. At the end of my second year I put forward an entry for RIBAs nationwide competition, Forgotten Spaces Preston. My project was shortlisted as one of the top 22 entries. I have also spent time in Architectural practices, being exposed to the office environment.

Work Experience Wood Goldstraw & Yorath, Stoke-on-Trent Summer 2008, Summer 2010 Kilburn Nightingale Architects, London Summer 2012

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ESOarch.

ESOarch.

Curriculum Vitae

Curriculum Vitae

Benjamin Powell

Tomasz Trześniowski

DOB 14.05.1993

Education and Qualifications

Background

Education and Qualifications 2011-2014

University of Central Lancashire ARCHITECTURE BSc (Hons)

2009-2011

Mikolaj Rej 7th Private High School Krakow A levels: Maths Literature English History of Art

In 2nd year I was part of a project to regenerate Preston docks. During this project lead the design of the food and drink sector and l also designed the plaza. I was a memeber of the model team and we created a four metre long model of the docklands and also contributed to the production of the final document.

2009 - 2011

“Elipsa” Architecture Drawing School Krakow

In 3rd year I looked at the problems surrounding death and people preconceptions around it. My project delves into the depths of human psyche and explore what we consider moral or ethical and how we can start to solve current issues. Through my research I aim to provide a solution to organ donation, burial space, food shortage, soil degredation and the issues around assisted suicide.

Employment History

2011-2014

University of Central Lancashire ARCHITECTURE BSc (Hons)

I am a currently an architecture student studying at the Univerity of Central Lancashire in Preston.

2009-2011

Loreto College A LEVELS 3D Design Maths Physics AS LEVEL Art & Design

Architecture combines my interests in art, science and psychology into a single creative subject which allows be to constantly stretch the boundaries of imagination and theory.

2004-2009

Loreto RC High School, Chorlton GCSEs

A B D C

Work Experience Central Learning Centre, Trinity High School The central learning centre provides all the I.T support and needs for Trinity High School. During my time there I gained extensive knowledge of software and hardware issues and inner workings.

DOB

I am very critical and reflective of myself and my work which drives me to come out with the work diligently on every project I am part of. I am regulary commended for my high level of critical thinking and ability to scrutinise an idea or project.

Background Since the beginning of architecture course I was strongly interested in urbanism and devlopment of ubran area. Most recently, my focus has been on african urbanism and nomadic tribes. I believe that by aplying socio-cultural anthropology in architecture practice, we can better understand problem and came up with better solutions. My interest in People can be seen in my photography, that i describe as cultural documentry. In my photos i am trying to document culture of people in urban context during they every day life, avoiding pathos i blend into crowd and i try to understand problems of those people not just look for nice pictures.

Freelance Photographer Photos for: “Nowoczesne technologie w przemyśle” - New technology in industry magazine

Software Abilities AutoCAD Rhinoceros Indesign Photoshop Revit Sketchup 3DS Max Maya

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ESOarch.

Project Sheets

Alex Macbeth Project Title: Civic Centre Location: Docklands, Preston, England.

Project Details In this project we were looking at the development of the currently unused Preston docks. Once a hive of activity we were looking to reintroduce the life of the area and revive its vibrance. The aspect of this planning development towards which I was focused was the civic centre/town hall building. The main features the client wanted this structure to represent where: a gateway to the rest of the development area ,as well as a monumental focus point of the surrounding landscape. As well as these dominant town planning characteristics the building needed to embody, it was also important that the building facade maintain a continuous literal transparency in order to portray a connection between the public and the council members. The notion of power over the public is reintroduced through the upper floors looming over the central, park area of the development.

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ESOarch.

ESOarch.

Darius Narmontas Project Title: Digital Soil Location: Holy Island, Anglesey, Wales.

Kate Nicholson Project Title: Acension Location: Ribblehead Viaduct, North Yorkshire.

Project Details

Project Details

This is a work in progress studio project.

I was drawn at once to the scale and magnitude of the viaduct. Although the landscape dwarfs the viaduct, the viaduct still towers over a person.

The work draws symbolism from Dante Alighieri’s “Inferno” and writings by Joris-Karl Huysmans. The aim is to create a new form of architectural detailing and symbolic representation by exploring fractal and generative algorithms and use them in combination with digital fabrication methods. The generated data will be fed into digital machines that will print and manipulate the buildings acording to the required specifications. The machines themselves are inspired by Franz Kafka’s torture machine from “The Penile Colony”. The finished site will take the form of an industrial estate that will produce everything needed to expand and grow.

This project involved designing a museum of weather. Weather can be described as a series of different atmospheres. And these atmospheres provoke different reactions. I was drawn to three aspects following our visit to site. Exposure. Scale. Texture. They have continued to have a strong presence throughout the project. I chose to focus on the wind and the rain as these were the two weather features which dominate the region. Inside the arch is an exhibition of weather, that which we as humans can control and create, combined with the unpredictability of the weather. It is a journey through the layers of the sky. A wall of water falls from a suspended room, a cloud, and at the very top the incredible view across the landscape can be taken in. It is a design which responds to the context of the site. A sensitive structure which fits elegantly inside one of the viaducts 24 arches but does not touch this historic monument. At any point it can be disassembled and the landscape will not have been marked.

34


ESOarch.

ESOarch.

Benjamin Powell Project Title: Reclaiming the Rural Location: Sawley, Lancashire, England.

Tomasz Trześniowski Project Title: Reclaiming the Rural Location: Sawley, Lancashire, England.

Project Details

Project Details

The social and economic sustainability of Englands rural dwellings has been brought into focus because of the booming property market preceding the globa financial crisis in 2008 and the worsening state of the UK’s economy and employment figures since the crash.

The aim of my project is to break free from the traditional stereotypes linked to housing developments and focus on the community aspects and not the pure functionality of architectural devices. The objective is to reevaluate the importance and use of common spaces and shared facilities in order to create a stronger sense of community and cut the price of living

Many young people on low incomes were rendered unable to afford to the appropriate housing so they were drawn to the big cities where higher wages were attainabe and with a wider range of housing to rent or sold. The rural housing became the property of retired, farmers and wealthy generating a big shift in demographics. Affordable housing is a major modern day issue. The project was aimed at providing affordable housing for a younger demographic in a rural environment, while also providing a feasible solution to the difficult context of the site. This project involved designing sixteen housing accomodations for the demographics I outlined would live in Sawley. The concept was developed around creating housing and a community that the residents could be proud of and interact with, but also dealing with the severe flooding on site in a natural manner. Defined by the boundary of a busy road, all elements of the site help deal with flooding. The road is also the pathway and a sustainable urban drainage system, the courtyard has excavated holes which fill and act as ponds.The houses are designed to be a modular construction which can be put up, taken down or extended and reduced in size. The main timber structure acts as shelving on the inside and sits snugly inside a concrete shell which protects the main building from the water. All four different layouts centre around the idea of having a small element of nature inside, giving them their own personalised space.

35


Project Name

Project No.

Client

Date Page 1 of 1

Potential Risk

Risk Register

Ref

Probability

Consequence

Rank

Owner/

Recommended

Date By

Actions/ Comment

Risk Description Expensive supply of hot ‡•‹‰ǦŠ‡”‡ƒ”‡‘•‡”˜‹…‡•‘•‹–‡

3

water and energy to our building    

͵





All waste have

to be disposed Construction - Location of the site on nature reserve area

off site, and we 2

need to take

3

care that we don’t do any harm to nature

External - Act of vandalism reported on site Client - Too low budget we might not met Client - Sustainability brief we might not met Design - Due to risk of vandalism, building have to be fireproof and secured

1

2

Failure to fulfill the brief

3

1

Failure to fulfill the brief

1

trying to design as cheap as possible

2 abortive work,

External - Seasonal flooding

2

Project Timetable

Risk Register

21 OCT

28 OCT

4 NOV

11 NOV

18 NOV

25 NOV

2 DEC

Brief

Research

Concept design Cost planning Sustainable strategies Final design

3D model

Visualisations

delays, extra costs,

Construction - Expensive foundations may strain budget Design - Providing emergency exits for floating building

2

3

misallocation of fundings failure to meet requirements

we need to look for 2

other, cheaper solutions

1

Booklet production Presentation production

36


ESOarch. Brockholes Water Sports Centre The primary outcome we are looking to produce in this project is water sports centre in Brockholes nature reserve. The purpose of this Building would be to accommodate the storage and changing facilities required by water sports enthusiasts undertaking a variety of activities, whilst also being adaptable to community use/public hire, as well as scheduled educational training sessions. However, the main requirement of the building is to be profitable. The nature reserve relies on internal funding to maintain its function; this extension to the site will need to help generate income for the preservation and continued operation of the reserve. On top of fund generation this project is also intended to encourage people who would otherwise not, to visit the site, to experience the area and to connect with the nature it contains.

Project aims - Generate interest in Brockholes by younger people - Educate people on nature and their impact on the environment - Create a wider community base with the reserve - Connect people with the outdoors - Provide education facilities to primary schools and clubs

The Site -Located on the east side of the M6 just outside of Preston -Previously it was the location of a major quarry -The pool identified as the prime location for the water sports facility is the Ribbleton pool which is just above the Number 1 pit. Ribbleton pool was identified for recreational purposes from the start of the design of the nature reserve project. The pool has steep sides around most of its edge and a natural bank on one side which the local canoe club currently use to launch their boats. The pool is 3m deep with a bed of silt. The pool has been deemed safe for open water swimming and has also been advised that it would only make a good pool for learning. The primary task is to design a building that has a minimal impact on the environment and blends in with the landscape. There were three sites identified around the Ribbleton pool by the client and we have identified two further site options. The easiest access is along the trail to the west of Ribbleton pool. It is also the side with the best access into the water with the wide, natural bank. Site D is in close proximity to Number 1 pit and would cause the most disruption to the wild life. Site B is between Nook and Ribbleton pools. The narrow strip of land would cause difficulty in launching boats and accomodating the other facilities required.

B A

C

D

E

visitor centre site options

37


Requirements

Spatial Requirements

Cost

-Male and Female changing facilities with capacity for 20 girls and 20 boys -Storage for minimum of 20 boats owned by Brockholes -Additional storage for local group and scouts -Storage for kit -Meeting room, large enough for a class -Hot water and flushing toilets -VERY SECURE -Low maintenance with respect to managing and cleaning -Heating is not essential -Must look like a natural lake and feel part of the nature reserve - One story to blend into environment - DDA compliant

The spaces all have to adhere to Sport Englands guidelines.

The Maximum cost of the project must remain below £140 000. This figure is likely to fall as it is currently a maximum estimate of the total funding the reserve is looking to receive. sport England have offered a sum of £70 000 towards the realization of the project and separate organisations are looking to match this figure, however this is as of yet unconfirmed. For this reason it is recommended to work within a suggested lower budget within the region of £110 000.

- Each single sex changing block should be approximately 10.5 x 3.5m - Storage areas should be approximately 6 x2.5m - Classrooms should be approximately 10.5 x 3.5m -The building must be fully accessible

Services - Currently, there is no mains services on site. - The closest mains is by the car park to the visitors centre about 1.1km away from the site - Alternative solutions to power, water and drainage will have to be pursued as there wont be the funding to bring the services in

The cost of the building has to be taken into account when considering sustainable technologies. The most straight forward solution would be to introduce passive design elements and clever design features.

Users

Activities

Design Team

-Schools groups of 20 to use the facilities -Public access -Other external groups or bodies Scout groups Ribble Valley Canoe club

Primary (1-3 year plan) - Kayaking - Open swimming

Ben Powell Tomasz Trzesniowski Kate Nicholson Alex Macbeth Darius Narmontas

Flexibiltiy to expand Brockholes are interested in the opportunity to expand on the activities that take place in the reserve. The design needs to be able to change in the future to meet needs.

Secondary (3-5 year plan) - Zorbing - Experienced canoeing (River Ribble)

38

Brockholes Group Project  
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