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SEPT 6-9, 2018 I HYATT REGENCY ORLANDO

PROGRAM BOOK E R A WE NDO A L R O

U=U

SILENCE=DEATH

THE UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS 2018usca.org #2018USCA


YES, WE MAKE MEDICINES WITH THE HIV COMMUNITY IN MIND. WE ALSO LISTEN TO WHAT’S ON THE MIND OF THE HIV COMMUNITY. At ViiV Healthcare, the voice of the HIV community informs the work we do to help improve the lives and outcomes for people living with HIV.

This ad is not intended to imply that the models pictured have HIV.

PROUD TO SUPPORT

SOLELY FOCUSED ON HIV Find out more at us.viivhealthcare.com and follow us

@ViiVUS


UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS USCA CONFERENCE PLANNING TEAM

The 2018 USCA Conference planning team looks forward to making your participation in USCA a comfortable and rewarding experience. If you have any questions, do not hesitate to contact the planning team in the Conference Operations Office, located in Barrel Spring 2 on Lobby Level of the Hyatt Regency Orlando.

GENERAL INFO 03 06 08 13

Welcome Letters Hotel Maps Sponsors General Info

PROGRAM FORMAT 14 23

Conference Format Program Partners

Tara Barnes-Darby Director of Conferences

Tara is your contact for all conference-related information and has overall responsibility for the conference. She is also responsible for handling scholarship hotel reservations.

CONFERENCE INFO 06 18 18

USCA Venue Floor Plan Exhibitor Floor Plan Exhibitor List

Alison J. McKeithen Conferences Manager

Alison is your contact for all conference related information, particularly questions about sessions. Alison is your contact for institutes, workshops, posters and affinity sessions. Alison can also address all questions related to continuing education. Aryah Lester

Constituent Advisory Panel, Coordinator

Aryah Lester is your contact for questions regarding the Constituent Advisory Panels and the mobile app. ShantA’ Gray

Conferences and Registration Coordinator

Shanta’ is your contact for conference registration and scholarship concerns. Shanta will be stationed at the “On-Site Solutions” booth at conference registration. GABRIELLA SPENCER

Conferences Program Associate

Gabriella is your contact for the Conferences Operations Office. She is able to receive and disseminate communications and assist in troubleshooting issues onsite. Safisha Mance-THOMAS Exhibits Coordinator

Safisha is your contact for the conference exhibit hall. She can be reached through the Exhibitor Registration booth on the Convention Level of the Hyatt Regency Orlando at the built-in registration counters.

THURSDAY 32 36

Sessions-At-A-Glance Sessions

FRIDAY 50 54

Sessions-At-A-Glance Sessions

SATURDAY 72 76

Sessions-At-A-Glance Sessions

SUNDAY 90 92

Sessions-At-A-Glance Sessions

SESIONES EN ESPAÑOL 98

Translated Sessions

POSTER SESSIONS 104

Poster Submissions

Information is up-to-date as of August 29, 2018. For current information or program changes please download our mobile app which can be accessed on iOS or Android stores using the search term: 2018 USCA

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Passionate Pharmacy Care Tailored Pharmacy Solutions Community Support & Advocacy For our patients, we are compassionate members of your healthcare team. For our partners, we are committed together in the care of those we serve. For our communities, we are proud advocates of wellness, equity, diversity.

AvitaPharmacy.com KnowHIV.me Getting Better, Together. 2


TO THE 22ND ANNUAL UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS

O

n behalf of NMAC and our national partners, welcome and thank you for attending this year’s United States Conference on AIDS. I hope this meeting will be remembered as the start for planning to end the HIV epidemic in America. Biomedical HIV prevention (U=U, PrEP, PEP, & TasP) has given us the tools we need, but do we have the political will and funding to make it happen? The End AIDS Coalition, working with a report developed by AIDS United, will bring a document outlining the community’s vision for ending the HIV epidemic in America. Please add your name to the list of leaders who are committed to working collaboratively to bring this dream to fruition. Our role - and it’s a big one - is to implement the programs on the ground. HIV prevention is moving to a medical model. Are you ready? When HIV care equals HIV prevention, is it time to combine our efforts? Last year’s meeting was a “Family Reunion.” This year we want to talk about activism. Our theme of “Fight Back, Fight HIV” is an homage to ACT-UP. We are moving into a critical moment and we need the activism of the early days. More and more of our rights and benefits are being taken away. We must always stand up to HIVphobia, racism, sexism, homophobia, and transphobia wherever it occurs. This next phase of our work will be a huge test of our leadership. Can we work with the administration to build a plan to end the HIV epidemic in America? There are no easy answers and I completely respect and understand that there will be different opinions. From NMAC’s perspective, there are few reasons to prolong an epidemic and not save so many lives. Our job is to fight for the end. NMAC wants to thank all of the 2018 sponsors: Gilead, ViiV Healthcare, Janssen, Merck, Walgreens, POZ, Avita Pharmacy, Human Rights Campaign, fhi360, The Elton John AIDS Foundation, Broadway Cares Equity Fights AIDS, Planned Parenthood, EMD Serono, the Florida Department of Health, and bioLytical Laboratories. Thanks to their support, we were able to give out a record 423 scholarships. Unfortunately, we also had a record number of rejections because we received over 1,300 requests for support. Thank you to the Orlando Host Committee. Stop by the Opening Reception on Thursday evening at the Hyatt Regency Orlando. It’s going to be an amazing event. Thank you to all the presenters, instructors, exhibitors, keynotes, volunteers, and conference partners. You volunteer thousands of hours to make this meeting happen. Finally, thank you to the NMAC staff. I know you are the leaders our movement needs as we continue on the journey to the end. We never take your attendance for granted and always strive to make USCA better. Remember to share your feedback and help us to continually improve the meeting. Yours in the struggle,

Paul Kawata Executive Director, NMAC RAL GENEFO IN

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ORLANDO, FL - SEPTember 6-9 UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS

WEDNESDAY

05

8:00 AM

9:00 am - 11:30 am

Social Media Lab

9:00 AM

10:00 AM

11:00 AM

Opening Plenary Luncheon

12:00 PM

1:00 PM

3:00 PM

4:00 PM

Fri..........8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Sat.........9:00 AM – 3:00 PM

5:00 PM Conference Operations Office

Sign language interpreters are available upon request. This service may be requested through the Conference Operations Office located in Barrell Spring 2 on Lobby Level of the Hyatt Regency Orlando.

REGISTRATION OPENS 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Social Media Lab / 1:30 pm - 6:00 pm

11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

EXHIBIT HALL / 10:30 am - 5:00 pm

Thurs.....7:30 AM – 5:00 PM

06 8:00 AM - 11:00 PM

Registration Hours

Wed....... 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM

SEPT

Institutes:

2:00 PM All attendees must register for the conference. Registration is located on the Lobby Level of the Hyatt Regency Orlando and is open during the following hours:

THURSDAY

REGISTRATION / 7:30 am - 5:00 pm

AGENDA

7:30 AM

SEPT

Session 1 Workshops: 1:45 PM - 3:45 PM

Session 2 Workshops: 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

6:00 PM

Affinity Session 7:00 PM

6:15 PM - 7:15 PM

Wed....... 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM Thurs.....8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Fri..........8:00 AM - 6:00 PM

8:00 PM

Sat.........8:00 AM - 6:00 PM

8:00 pm - 10:00 pm

Sun........9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

9:00 PM

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STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS 2018 UNITED

Opening Reception


USCA AGENDA SEPT

07

FRIDAY

ORLANDO, FL - SEPTember 6-9

SATURDAY

SEPT

08

SUNDAY

SEPT

09

7:30 AM 8:00 AM

Session 4 Workshops: 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Session 5 Workshops: 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM

9:00 am - 11:30 am

Social Media Lab

9:00 am - 11:30 am

11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

9:00 AM

9:00 AM - 11:00 PM 10:00 AM

11:00 AM

Closing Plenary Luncheon

12:00 PM

11:30 AM - 1:30 PM 1:00 PM

Social Media Lab / 1:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Poster Presentations

9:00 AM - 11:00 PM

Plenary Luncheon

EXHIBIT HALL / 10:30 am - 5:00 pm

Social Media Lab / 1:30 pm - 6:00 pm

EXHIBIT HALL / 10:30 am - 5:00 pm

11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

REGISTRATION / 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Social Media Lab

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Plenary Luncheon

Session 9 Workshops:

Session 6 Workshops:

REGISTRATION / 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

9:00 am - 11:30 am

Social Media Lab

Session 3 Workshops:

Poster Presentations Session 7 Workshops: 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

2:00 PM

3:00 PM

4:00 PM

Session 8 Workshops: 4:15 PM - 6:15 PM

5:00 PM

6:00 PM

Affinity Session

Affinity Session

6:30 pm - 7:30PM

6:30 PM - 7:30PM

7:00 PM

Film Screening 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

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HOTEL MAPS CONVENTION LEVEL

FLORIDA BALLROOM

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B

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E

D G

H I

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GREEN ROOMS

PLAZA INTERNATIONAL BALLROOM

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K M

CELEBRATION BREAKOUTROOMS 5 4

O P

ATLANTIC

PLANNING OFFICES

7

L

N

GULF

W

PEACOCK SPRING

ORLANDO BALLROOM

I

R

Q

REGISTRATION DESK

BLUE SPRING II

I

S

I

14 2

1

8 13

15

9 12 16

10 11

V T

CONVENTION LEVEL

REGENCY ROTUNDA

II

SILVER SPRING

REGENCY EXPRESS

LOBBY LEVEL

LOBBY LEVEL

OPEN TO WINDERMERE BALLROOM BELOW

21 20

OPEN TO REGENCY BALLROOM BELOW I BARREL SPRING

II

I CORAL SPRING

II

MANATEE SPRING

6

2018

UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS

I

II

I

PEACOCK SPRING

II ROCK SPRING

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23 24

22

18

31 17

30

32

25

29 33

26

Y

X

U

RAINBOW SPRING II

3

REGENCY BALLROOM

6

WINDERMERE BALLROOM

27

28 BAYHILL BREAKOUT ROOMS


SOCIAL MEDIA LAB

Don’t leave USCA without a plan for using social media!

If you’ve been wondering how do I... ...reach more clients and retain them? ...easily create simple educational images and graphics? ...use social media to save money on outreach? ...use Twitter and Snapchat to reach clients?

Visit Barrel Spring 1 to get 1-on-1 TA with a social media expert during USCA: Thurs, Fri, Sat: 9-11:30am and 1:30-6:00pm Sun: 9-11:30am

FACEBOOK.COM/HIVGOV @HIVGOV @HIVGOV


SPONSORS PRESENTING SPONSOR PRESENTING SPONSOR

PREMIERE SPONSORS

COLLABORATING SPONSORS

COLLEAGUE SPONSOR

FRIEND SPONSORS

8

2018

UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS

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A special thank you to our sponsors who have made significant contributions to the United States Conference on AIDS.


ad

POZ.COM

POZ.COM

EMPOWERING THE HIV COMMUNITY SINCE 1994


A next step for adults with HIV who have been undetectable* for at least six months. *Undetectable means keeping the amount of HIV in the blood at very low levels (less than 50 copies per mL).

What is JULUCA?

JULUCA is a prescription medicine that is used without other antiretroviral medicines to treat Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) infection in adults to replace their current anti-HIV-1 medicines when their healthcare provider determines that they meet certain requirements. HIV-1 is the virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). It is not known if JULUCA is safe and effective in children.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION Do not take JULUCA if you: • have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine that contains dolutegravir or rilpivirine. • are taking any of the following medicines: dofetilide; carbamazepine; oxcarbazepine; phenobarbital; phenytoin; rifampin; rifapentine; proton pump inhibitors (including esomeprazole, lansoprazole, omeprazole, pantoprazole sodium, rabeprazole); St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum); or more than 1 dose of the steroid medicine dexamethasone or dexamethasone sodium phosphate. What are the possible side effects of JULUCA? JULUCA can cause serious side effects, including: • Severe skin rash and allergic reactions. Call your healthcare provider right away if you develop a rash with JULUCA. Stop taking JULUCA and get medical help right away if you develop a rash with any of the following signs or symptoms: fever; generally ill feeling; tiredness; muscle or joint aches; blisters or sores in mouth; blisters or peeling of the skin; redness or swelling of the eyes; swelling of the mouth, face, lips or tongue; problems breathing. • Liver problems. People with a history of hepatitis B or C virus who have certain liver function test changes may have an increased risk of developing new or worsening changes in certain liver tests during treatment with JULUCA. Liver problems, including liver failure, have also happened in people without history of liver disease or other risk factors. Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check your liver function. Call your healthcare provider right away if you develop any of the following signs or symptoms of liver problems: your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow (jaundice); dark or “tea-colored” urine; light-colored stools (bowel movements); nausea or vomiting; loss of appetite; pain, aching, or tenderness on the right side of your stomach area. • Depression or mood changes. Tell your healthcare provider right away or get medical help if you have any of the following symptoms: feeling sad or hopeless; feeling anxious or restless; have thoughts of hurting yourself (suicide) or have tried to hurt yourself. • The most common side effects of JULUCA include: diarrhea and headache.

These are not all the possible side effects of JULUCA. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any new symptoms while taking JULUCA. Before you take JULUCA, tell your healthcare provider if you: • have ever had a severe skin rash or an allergic reaction to medicines that contain dolutegravir or rilpivirine. • have or have had liver problems, including hepatitis B or C infection. • have ever had a mental health problem. • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if JULUCA will harm your unborn baby. • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed if you take JULUCA. You should not breastfeed if you have HIV-1 because of the risk of passing HIV-1 to your baby. It is not known if JULUCA can pass to your baby in your breast milk. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Some medicines interact with JULUCA. Keep a list of your medicines and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine. • You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for a list of medicines that interact with JULUCA. • Do not start taking a new medicine without telling your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider can tell you if it is safe to take JULUCA with other medicines. Important Safety Information continued on next page. Please see Important Facts about JULUCA on the following page.

©2018 ViiV Healthcare group of companies or its licensor.

10

Printed in USA.

832817R0

June 2018


Rodney†

Undetectable since 2008

My doctor and I are proud of how far I’ve come. Now, I want to ask about staying undetectable with fewer medicines in my HIV pill. I started treating my HIV and reached an undetectable viral load. And whenever I become aware of other treatment options, I talk to my doctor. Here’s what I learned about JULUCA:

JULUCA is the only once-daily complete HIV-1 regimen that combines 2 medicines in just 1 pill.

Ask your doctor about JULUCA. Learn more at JULUCA.com

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION (cont’d) How to take JULUCA? • Take JULUCA 1 time a day exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. • Always take JULUCA with a meal. A protein drink alone does not replace a meal. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088. †

Real patient diagnosed with HIV-1. Individual compensated for his time by ViiV Healthcare.


IMPORTANT FACTS

This is only a brief summary of important information about JULUCA and does not replace talking to your healthcare provider about your condition and treatment.

(Jah-LOO-kah) POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF JULUCA

ABOUT JULUCA

JULUCA can cause serious side effects, including: • Severe skin rash and allergic reactions. Call your healthcare provider right away if you develop a rash with JULUCA. Stop taking JULUCA and get medical help right away if you develop a rash with any of the following signs or symptoms: fever; generally ill feeling; tiredness; muscle or joint aches; blisters or sores in mouth; blisters or peeling of the skin; redness or swelling of the eyes; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; problems breathing. • Liver problems. People with a history of hepatitis B or C virus who have certain liver function test changes may have an increased risk of developing new or worsening changes in certain liver tests during treatment with JULUCA. Liver problems, including liver failure, have also happened in people without history of liver disease or other risk factors. Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check your liver function. Call your healthcare provider right away if you develop any of the following signs or symptoms of liver problems: your skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow (jaundice); dark or “tea-colored” urine; light-colored stools (bowel movements); nausea or vomiting; loss of appetite; pain, aching, or tenderness on the right side of your stomach area. • Depression or mood changes. Tell your healthcare provider right away or get medical help if you have any of the following symptoms: feeling sad or hopeless; feeling anxious or restless; have thoughts of hurting yourself (suicide) or have tried to hurt yourself.

• JULUCA is a prescription medicine that is used without other antiretroviral medicines to treat Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) infection in adults to replace their current anti-HIV-1 medicines when their healthcare provider determines that they meet certain requirements. • HIV-1 is the virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). • It is not known if JULUCA is safe and effective in children.

HOW TO TAKE JULUCA • Take JULUCA 1 time a day exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. • Always take JULUCA with a meal. A protein drink alone does not replace a meal.

DO NOT TAKE JULUCA IF YOU • have ever had an allergic reaction to a medicine that contains dolutegravir or rilpivirine. • are taking any of the following medicines: dofetilide; carbamazepine; oxcarbazepine; phenobarbital; phenytoin; rifampin; rifapentine; proton pump inhibitors (including esomeprazole, lansoprazole, omeprazole, pantoprazole sodium, rabeprazole); St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum); or more than 1 dose of the steroid medicine dexamethasone or dexamethasone sodium phosphate.

The most common side effects of JULUCA include: diarrhea and headache.

BEFORE TAKING JULUCA

These are not all the possible side effects of JULUCA. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you have any new symptoms while taking JULUCA. You may report side effects to FDA at www.fda.gov/medwatch, or at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Tell your healthcare provider if you: • have ever had a severe skin rash or an allergic reaction to medicines that contain dolutegravir or rilpivirine. • have or have had liver problems, including hepatitis B or C infection. • have ever had a mental health problem. • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if JULUCA will harm your unborn baby. • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed if you take JULUCA. You should not breastfeed if you have HIV-1 because of the risk of passing HIV-1 to your baby. It is not known if JULUCA can pass to your baby in your breast milk. Talk with your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby.

GET MORE INFORMATION • This is only a brief summary of important information about JULUCA. Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist to learn more. • Go to JULUCA.com or call 1-877-844-8872, where you can also get FDA-approved labeling.

ViiV Healthcare Research Triangle Park, NC 27709

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take: • Keep a list that includes all prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements, and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist. • Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist about medicines that should not be taken with JULUCA. • Do not start taking a new medicine without telling your healthcare provider.

Trademark is owned by or licensed to the ViiV Healthcare group of companies. ©2017 ViiV Healthcare group of companies or its licensor. December 2017 JLC:2PIL ©2018 ViiV Healthcare group of companies or its licensor. Printed in USA. 832817R0 June 2018

12


GENERAL INFORMATION Affinity AffinitySessions Sessions

Evaluations Evaluations

RespiteLounge Lounge Respite

Affinity sessions are impromptu meetings of conference attendees who want to discuss a particular subject. To schedule an affinity session and receive a room assignment, visit the Conference Operations Office, located in Barrell Spring 2 on Lobby Level of the Hyatt Regency Orlando. Announcements for affinity sessions may be placed on the Affinity Session Board located near registration. The affinity session schedule is as follows:

Your feedback provides important information to help us improve USCA in the future. Please take a few minutes to share your thoughts and input by completing the conference evaluation forms. Information about completing evaluation forms will be available in all of the sessions and in the conference app.

The Respite Lounge will be staffed by volunteers from the Host Committee and on-call health providers. The location will be given out on site and posted by the registration desk at the Regency Rotunda on the Convention Level of the Hyatt Regency Orlando. The lounge will be open during the following days and times.

Exhibits Exhibits

Wednesday.....................4:00 PM - 7:00 PM Thursday – Saturday....... 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Sunday........................... 8:00 AM - 12 noon

Thursday:........................6:15 PM - 7:15 PM Friday:.............................6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Saturday:.........................6:30 PM - 7:30 PM Badges Badges

Conference attendees must wear their official conference badge to all educational sessions, plenary sessions, special events, and the exhibit hall. For your safety, do not wear your badge outside of the convention hotel. Security will not allow conference attendees to enter plenary sessions or the exhibit hall without a badge. A $10.00 fee will be assessed for replacement badges. ConferenceOperations OperationsOffice Office Conference

The Conference Operations Office is located in Barrel Spring 2 on the Lobby Level of the Hyatt Regency Orlando. Feel free to stop by with conference-related questions and concerns during the following hours. Wednesday: . . . . . . . 4:00 PM – 7:00 PM Thursday: . . . . . . . . . 8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Friday: . . . . . . . . . . . .8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

The exhibit hall is located in the Plaza International Ballroom, Convention Level. USCA conference partners, government agencies, community-based organizations, pharmaceutical companies and many others will showcase their exhibits, providing valuable information and giveaways. Complimentary desserts will be offered in the exhibit hall on select days. The exhibit hall will be open during the following hours: Thursday...................... 10:30 AM - 5:00 PM

PLWH PLWHLounge Lounge

The PLWH Lounge will be staffed by volunteers from the Host Committee. The lounge is located in the Manatee Spring 2, and will be open during the following days and times: Wednesday.....................4:00 PM - 7:00 PM Thursday – Saturday....... 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Sunday........................... 8:00 AM - 12 noon

Friday–Saturday........... 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM (closed during plenary sessions)

MedicalService ServiceInformation Information Medical

For any medical emergency, please call extension 55667 (within the Hyatt). Inform the hotel operator of the nature of the emergency and location. A specific response team of hotel managers will immediately respond. In non-emergency situations, the following is a list of nearby medical facilities: Dr. P. Phillips Hospital 9400 Turkey Lake Road (407) 351-8500 Select Specialty Hospital 5579 S Orange Avenue, Orlando, FL 32809 (407) 241-4800

Registration RegistrationHours Hours

All attendees must register for the conference. Registration is located on the Lobby Level of the Hyatt Regency Orlando and is open during the following hours: Wednesday:. . . . . . . .4:00 PM – 7:00 PM Thursday:. . . . . . . .. . 7:30 AM – 5:00 PM Friday:. . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM Saturday: . . . . . . . . . 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM SignLanguage LanguageInterpreters Interpreters Sign

Sign language interpreters are available upon request. This service may be requested through the Conference Operations Office located in Barrell Spring 2 on Lobby Level of the Hyatt Regency Orlando.

Saturday: . . . . . . . . . .8:00 AM – 6:00 PM Sunday: . . . . . . . . . . .9:00 AM – 2:00 PM ContinuingEducation EducationUnits Units Continuing

General continuing education units (CEUs) will be available for conference attendees. Additionally, USCA is a provider of Category I continuing education contact hours for certified health education specialists. To receive CEUs please visit the CEUs desk at on-site Registration desk located on the Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level.

Social Media Lab supported by HIV.gov

The Social Media Lab is your chance to get one-on-one technical assistance with a social media expert during USCA. The Lab is located on the Lobby Level of the Hyatt Regency Orlando in Barrel Spring 1.

Sesiones en Español Sign Language Interpreters

USCA ofrecerá sesiones en español. Las sesiones traducidas estarán identificadas con un ícono rojo en las sesiones en el esquema diario del programa.

Thursday – Saturday.....9:00 AM - 11:30 AM and 1:30 PM - 6:00 PM Sunday........................... 8:00 AM - 12 noon

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CONFERENCE FORmat Session Types

Pathways

Plenary Sessions

2 hours

Plenary sessions are formal, motivational presentations on a specific topic held in the host ballroom and usually feature a guest speaker(s) and a plated breakfast or lunch. Meals will be provided at each plenary.

Institutes

3 hours

Institutes are 3-hours sessions offering in-depth exploration and discussion of current HIV related issues, and are scheduled on Thursday, September 6, 8:00 am – 11:00 am

Aging Hosted by NMAC Capacity Building Hosted by NMAC CDC Pathway Hosted by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Ending the Epidemic Hosted by Housing Works Faith Hosted by Balm In Gilead Health Care Providers Hosted by Association of Nurses in AIDS Care Hepatitis Hosted by The AIDS Institute & NASTAD HHS SMAIF Pathway Hosted by U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Health Care Access Hosted by Robert Greenwald, Harvard University Trans Community Hosted by Trans members of the Constituent Advisory Panel HRSA Pathway Hosted by HRSA/ HAB Sex Work Hosted by Sex Workers Outreach Project

Workshops

2 hours

Workshops are in-depth, two hour presentations on topics directly relevant to one of more of the conference tracks.

South Hosted by Southern AIDS Coalition STDs Hosted by NCSD Structural Interventions Hosted by FAPP U=U Hosted by Prevention Access Campaign Youth Hosted by NMAC

Poster Presentations

30 min

Poster presentations are placard-type exhibits, which are often accompanied by handouts and/or other material relevant to one of the tracks. Posters are a great vehicle for abstracts that are data-driven and those that are displaying the results of a study. Posters will be displayed in the Regency Rotunda on the Convention Level of the Hyatt Regency Orlando.

14

2018

UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS

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The Elton John AIDS Foundation is proud to support the 2018 United States Conference on AIDS and our collective efforts to end AIDS in our lifetime by serving people in need no matter who they are, what they do, who they love, where they live, or what they believe.

Sir Elton John, Founder David Furnish, Chairman Scott P. Campbell, Executive Director


CONFERENCE FORMAT Tracks

Biomedical HIV Prevention Biomedical HIV prevention has expanded options to stop the spread of the virus. This new track will focus on PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis), PEP (Post Exposure Prophylaxis), Treatment as Prevention (TasP), and START (Strategic Timing of Anti-Retroviral Treatment). It will discuss the latest innovations, programs, and targets in order to scale up biomedical HIV prevention programs in your agency, city, or state.

Gay Men Gay men continue to have the highest rate of new infections and the largest number of people living with HIV in America. This track will focus on young gay men, particularly young gay men of color. Youth have the highest rates of new infections. What are the opportunity, challenges and innovations in HIV prevention, services, outreach, housing, treatment, and healthcare? Is your agency open to gay men who could be directors, clients, or board members?

Leadership What skills are needed to be an effective leader in the fight to end HIV? This skills building track focuses on leadership within CBOs, health centers, activist groups, and the government. Leaders are also getting old. When is it time to leave? How do you manage transition? How should our movement identify, nurture, and grow the next generation? What can our movement do to support existing leaders?

People Living with HIV This track will focus on what it means to live with HIV in America. PLWH are not a monolithic community and should not be treated like they are all the same. Stigma will be a major focus. This track will also cover aging, empowerment, self-determination, the criminal justice system, advocacy, and building a PLWH movement. The main focus will be for consumers; however, the conference also hopes to have a dialogue between providers and people living with the virus.

Public Policy This track will focus on city, county, state, and federal policies. It will examine policies that impact HIV prevention, healthcare, treatment, housing, research, and syringe exchange. It will look at federal programs like the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid expansion, HOPWA, and the Ryan White Care Act. What are the advocacy strategies to stop the criminalization of HIV transmission, increase state and federal appropriations, fund HIV research, prevention, and healthcare, and to end the epidemic?

Women This track is about cis & trans women. What are the latest advances in services for women living with HIV or at risk for HIV? What are the opportunities, challenges, and innovations in HIV prevention, treatment, housing, and healthcare? What are the effective trauma-informed care and HIV-related violence prevention programs? Is your agency open to cis and trans women directors, clients, or board members?

Opioid Epidemic Opioid Epidemic – The nation’s opioid epidemic is significantly intertwined with the increasing rates of HIV and viral hepatitis in our communities. This track will address prevention services for people injecting drugs and developing local plans to coordinate prevention, rehabilitation, and treatment services.

Trauma-Informed Care Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) is an organizational structure and treatment framework that involves understanding, recognizing, and responding to the effects of all types of trauma. TIC also emphasizes physical, psychological, and emotional safety for both consumers and providers, and helps survivors rebuild a sense of control and empowerment. HIV, racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, and xenophobia are all possible causes of trauma.

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EXHIBIT HALL Booth #

Company Name

702 502 615 213 316 805 201 612 712 814 717 701 C/D

2018 USCA Host Committee AAHIVM AID for AIDS Abbott Rapid Diagnostics AIDS Healthcare Foundation/ Lets340B AIDS United AIDSVu American Exchange API Wellness, Inc. APLA Health Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum Avita Pharmacy 113 & 115 bioLytical Laboratories 716 CAI 806 & 808 Capacity Building Assistance Provider Network (CPN) 714 CAPTC - California Prevention Training Center 411 Caution Wear Corp. 406 CDC 803 Chembio Diagnostic Systems, Inc. 110 & 112 Common Threads 506 & 508 CondomDispenser.org/Capital City AIDS Fund 217 CVS Specialty 515 EMD Serono 816 ETR Associates 511 FDA/ Office of Women’s Health 614 Feel Good, Inc. 210 FHI 360 700 Florida Department of Health 501 Gilead 401 Gilead HCV 603 Global Protection Corp. 215 GMHC 216 HHS Office of Minority Health Resource Center 617 Housing Works 514 Howard Brown Health 300 Human Rights Campaign Foundation 301 Janssen Infectious Diseases

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2018

UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS

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302

Janssen: Positively Fearless JSI Research and Training Institute, Inc. 412 & 414 Kaiser Family Foundation Greater Than AIDS 207 MERCK 510 Mom’s Meals NourishCare 212 Mylan Inc. 512 Napo Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 811 NASTAD 409 National Library of Medicine 500 NMAC 810 NYC CBA 307 & 309 OraSure Technologies, Inc. 407 OWH 707 & 709


214 203 117 311 701A/B 812 711 315 312 314 208 601 107 413 403

PharmBlue LLC Planned Parenthood Pride Media POZ Prevention Access Campaign U=U Primary Care Development Corporation PROCEED, Inc. Project INform R&S Northeast LLC Rare Patient Voice Ron Simmons Consulting, LLC Samaritan Ministry Say It With A Condom Southern AIDS Coalition RAL The AIDS Institute GENE O INF

513 504 303 405 610

The Black AIDS Institute The Change Project The Wall Las Memorias Project The Well Project TheBody 109 & 111 Theratechnologies 101 A/B Total Access Group 206 TPAN/ Positively Aware 102 & 104 Transgender Law Center 613 UCHAPS 713 & 715 University of California 408 & 410 Until There’s A Cure Foundation 313 Valley AIDS Council/ South Central AETC 607 ViiV Healthcare 101 C/D Walgreens

19


USCA SPONSOR

1000 Vermont Avenue, NW Suite 200 Washington, DC 20001

Staff Executive Office Paul Akio Kawata, Executive Director Kim Ferrell, Director of Operations

Finance and Administrative Division Bis Dhar, Director Ron Dorsey, Consultant

Conferences Tara Barnes-Darby, Director of Conferences Alison J. McKeithen, Conferences Manager Shanta’ Gray, Conferences and Registration Coordinator Safisha Mance-Thomas, Exhibits Manager Aryah Lester, Conference Coordinator Gabriella Spencer, Program Associate

Development Robert York, Development Director Diane Ferguson, Development Associate

Capacity Building Tamara J. Combs, Program Manager Robin Kelley, Evaluation Manager Munir Ahmed, Evaluation Specialist Genoa Rucker, Program Coordinator Dustin Baker-Holley, Program Coordinator Navneet Sehdev, Program Coordinator

Leadership Pipeline Linda H. Scruggs, Acting Director Charles Shazor Jr., Program Coordinator Marissa Miller, Program Coordinator

Treatment Moisés Agosto-Rosario, Treatment Director Matthew Rose, Policy and Advocacy Manager Sable K. Nelson, Policy Analyst

Secretary Therese Rodriguez, Asian Pacific Islander Coalition on HIV/AIDS, New York, NY

Treasurer Valerie Rochester, AIDS United, Washington, DC

Oscar De La O Bienestar Human Services Los Angeles, CA

Norm Nickens San Francisco Employees’ Retirement System San Francisco, CA

Evelyn Ullah Broward County, FL

Brenda Hunt Borderbelt AIDS Resource Team (BART) Lumberton, NC

Leonardo Ramon Ortega, MD, MPH Shalom Health Care Center, Inc. Indianapolis, IN

Monica Johnson HEROES - Helping Everyone Receive Ongoing Effective Support Columbia, LA

Mario Perez County of Los Angeles Department of Public Health Office of AIDS Programs & Policy Los Angeles, CA

Kelsey Louie, MSW, MBA Gay Men’s Health Crisis (GMHC) New York, NY

Rev. Ed Sanders Metropolitan Interdenominational Church Nashville, TN

Communications Chip Lewis, Communications Director Daniel Pino, Communications Strategist

Board of Directors Chair John W. Hill, Jr., Washington, DC Co-Chair Lance Toma, San Francisco Community Health Center, San Francisco, CA

Board Members

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2018

UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS

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Rodolfo R. Vega JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc. Boston, MA Nancy Wilson Honoree Altadena, CA


THE AIDS INSTITUTE SUPPORTS THE

USCA 2018 THEME FIGHT BACK! FIGHT HIV!

www.theaidsinstitute.org


USCA PROGRAM PARTNERS AIDS UNITED

Tel: (202) 408-4848 Fax: (202) 408-1818 www.aidsunited.org

1101 14th St, NW, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20005

AIDS United’s mission is to end the AIDS epidemic in the U.S. through strategic grant-making, capacity building, formative research and policy. AIDS United works to ensure access to life-saving HIV/AIDS care and prevention services and to advance sound HIV/AIDS-related policy for U.S. populations and communities most impacted by the epidemic. To date, our strategic grant-making initiatives have directly funded more than $104 million to local communities and have leveraged more than $117 million in additional investments for programs that include, but are not limited to HIV prevention, access to care, capacity building, harm reduction and advocacy. www.aidsunited.org. AMERICAN ACADEMY OF HIV MEDICINE

Tel: (202) 659-0699 Fax: (202) 659-0976 www.aahivm.org

1705 DeSales Street NW, Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036

The American Academy of HIV Medicine is an independent organization of AAHIVM HIV Specialists™ and other HIV clinicians dedicated to advancing excellence in HIV/AIDS care. Through advocacy and education, AAHIVM is committed to supporting all HIV care providers and to ensuring better care of those living with HIV. AAHIVM is the only U.S. medical organization providing its entire membership of MDs, DOs, NPs, PAs and Pharmacists the opportunity to credential as HIV Specialists™, HIV Experts™ or HIV Pharmacists™. ASSOCIATION OF NURSES IN AIDS CARE

Tel: (330) 670-0101 Fax: (330) 670-0109 www.nursesinaidscare.org

HIV/AIDS Nursing Certification Board 3538 Ridgewood Road Akron, Ohio 44333

The mission of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care is to promote the individual and collective professional development of nurses involved in the delivery of health care to persons infected or affected by HIV and AIDS. ANAC advances expertise and excellence in nurses engaged in any dimension of HIV disease and its comorbidities, and ensures that nursing expertise is recognized as a key component of inter-professional care models, and is incorporated in decisions affecting the HIV community. ANAC is the leading professional HIV nursing association educating, connecting and advocating for nurses concerned about HIV and HIV-related care. ANAC promotes a comprehensive, holistic and evidence-based approach to quality HIV care, and advocates for policies grounded in a human rights approach to health. THE BALM IN GILEAD

Tel: (804) 644-BALM (2256) Fax: (804) 560-1324 www.balmingilead.org

620 Moorefield Park Drive Suite 150 Richmond, VA 23236

The Balm In Gilead, Inc.™ is a not-for-profit, non-governmental organization whose mission is to improve the health status of people of the African Diaspora by building the capacity of faith communities to address life-threatening diseases, especially HIV/AIDS. Since 1989, The Balm In Gilead’s pioneering achievements have enabled thousands of churches to become leaders in preventing the transmission of HIV by providing comprehensive educational programs and offering compassionate support to encourage those infected to seek and maintain treatment. The Balm In Gilead spearheads a dynamic response to the HIV/AIDS crisis in the faith community through its international programs Healthy Churches 2020, The National Church Week of Prayer for the Healing of AIDS, Saving Future Generations, The National Brain Health Center for African Americans and various other capacity building and technical assistance projects. The Balm In Gilead is headquartered in Richmond, VA with offices in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. BLACK AIDS INSTITUTE

Tel: (213) 353-3610 Fax: (213) 989-0181 www.blackaids.org

1833 West 8th Street, #200 Los Angeles, CA 90057-4920

Founded in May of 1999, the Black AIDS Institute (BAI) is the only national HIV/AIDS think tank in the United States focused exclusively on Black people. BAI’s mission is to end the AIDS pandemic in Black communities by engaging and mobilizing institutions, leaders, and individuals in efforts to confront HIV/AIDS. BAI disseminates information, conducts training, offers technical assistance and capacity building, interprets and influences public and private sector HIV/AIDS policies, delivers prevention and linkage to care services, and provides advocacy mobilization from a uniquely and unapologetically Black point of view. Our motto is: “Our People, Our Problem, Our Solution.”

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PROGRAM PARTNERS BROADWAY CARES / EQUITY FIGHTS AIDS 165 West 46th Street, Suite 1300 New York, NY 10036

Tel: (212) 840-0770 Fax: (212) 840-0551 E-mail: info@bcefa.org www.broadwaycares.org

Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS is one of the nation’s leading industry-based, non-profit AIDS fundraising and grantmaking organizations. By drawing upon the talents, resources and generosity of the American theatre community, since 1988 BC/EFA has raised and distributed over $135 million for essential services for people with AIDS and other critical illnesses across the United States, awarding grants to over 400 AIDS and family service organizations nationwide. www.broadwaycares.org INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PROVIDERS OF AIDS CARE 1424 K Street, NW, Suite 200 Washington, DC 20005

Tel: (202) 408-4848, ext. 252 Fax: (202) 315-3651 www.iapac.org

IAPAC represents more than 17,000 clinicians and other healthcare professionals in over 100 countries who deliver both prevention and treatment services in multiple disease areas, including HIV, hepatitis, malaria, and tuberculosis. Its educational, research, technical assistance, and advocacy activities are conducted by a professionally diverse staff, and are guided by an international Board of Trustees composed of highly esteemed medical, public health, and advocacy professionals from across five continents. LIFEBEAT – MUSIC FIGHTS HIV 1515 Broadway, 16th Floor New York, NY 10036

Tel: (212) 459-2590 Toll-free: (800). AIDS.411 Fax: (212) 846-1472 www.lifebeat.org

Lifebeat is a nonprofit that uses the power of music and the music industry to help educate young people about HIV/ AIDS prevention. For more than seventeen years, Lifebeat has helped to mobilize the talents and resources of the music industry to raise awareness and funds, and to provide support to the HIV-positive community. M·A·C AIDS FUND

Tel: (212) 965-6300 Fax: (212) 372-6171 www.macaidsfund.org

130 Prince Street, 2nd Floor New York, NY 10012

The M·A·C AIDS Fund’s (MAF) mission is to serve people of all ages, all races and all sexes affected by HIV and AIDS. To partner with the bold, the visionary and the brave who confront the epidemic in countries and communities where people are most neglected, off the radar and at highest risk. Responsible, agile and alert, MAF funds innovative programs that deal directly with the most marginalized, stigmatized and under-heard victims. MAF celebrates humanity, life, creativity and individuality. Making a difference one VIVA GLAM lipstick at a time. THE NAMES PROJECT FOUNDATION Memorial Quilt 204 14th St NW Atlanta, GA 30318-5304

Tel: (404) 688-5500 Fax: (404) 688-5552 www.aidsquilt.org

Established in 1987, The NAMES Project Foundation, Inc. is the international non-governmental, 501(c)(3) organization that is the custodian of The AIDS Memorial Quilt and its associated document and media archive. The mission of The NAMES Project Foundation is to preserve, care for, and use the AIDS Memorial Quilt to foster healing, heighten awareness, and inspire action in the struggle against HIV and AIDS.

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2018

UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS

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PROGRAM PARTNERS NATIONAL AIDS HOUSING COALITION 727 15th Street NW, 11th Floor Washington, DC 20005-2168

Tel: (202) 347-0333 www.nationalaidshousing.org

The National AIDS Housing Coalition is a national nonprofit housing organization founded in 1994 in the belief that people with HIV/ AIDS have a fundamental right to decent, safe, affordable housing and supportive services, responsive and appropriate to their self-determined needs. NAHC works to end the HIV/ AIDS epidemic by ensuring that persons with HIV/AIDS have quality, affordable and appropriate housing Financed by member dues, foundation grants and individual donations, NAHC is governed by a diverse board of directors representing communities in 12 states and the District of Columbia, with vast personal and professional experience as AIDS housing developers, providers, residents and AIDS housing advocates. NAHC’s contributions to AIDS housing include training, educating and sharing experiences through work in coalitions, AIDS housing institutes, research summits and workshops at conferences across the country as well as on-going advocacy with policymakers in Congress, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Office of Management and Budget and other relevant agencies to ensure that government policies are responsive to the housing and service needs of people with HIV/AIDS, including those who are homeless or unstably housed. NASTAD

Tel: (202) 434-8090 Fax: (202) 434-8092 www.nastad.org

444 North Capitol Street, NW, Suite 339 Washington, DC 20001

NASTAD is a leading non-partisan non-profit association that represents public health officials who administer HIV and hepatitis programs in the U.S. and around the world. Our singular mission is to end the intersecting epidemics of HIV, viral hepatitis, and related conditions. We do this work by strengthening domestic and global governmental public health through advocacy, capacity building, and social justice. Each of NASTAD’s six programmatic teams—Health Care Access, Health Systems Integration, Policy & Legislative Affairs, Hepatitis, Health Equity & Prevention, and Global—interpret and influence policies, conduct trainings, offer technical assistance, and provide advocacy mobilization for U.S. health departments and ministries of health around the world to improve health outcomes for people living with HIV and hepatitis. THE AIDS INSTITUTE

Program and Administrative Office 17 Davis Boulevard, Suite 403 Tampa, FL 33606

National Policy Office 2000 S Street, NW Washington, DC 20009

FL

Tel: (813) 258-5929 / Fax: (813) 258-5939

DC

Tel: 202-835-8373 Fax: 202-835-8368 www.theaidsinstitute.org

The AIDS Institute is a national nonprofit and nonpartisan public policy organization with offices in Washington, DC, Tampa and Tallahassee, FL. Its mission is to promote action for social change through public policy, advocacy, research, and education and began as a grass roots community mobilization effort in 1985. In 1992, this advocacy network became incorporated as a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization. Over the years, The AIDS Institute has expanded its vision and scope to include an affiliation with the Division of Infectious Disease and International Medicine at the University of South Florida, College of Medicine.  The AIDS Institute remains focused on HIV/AIDS while incorporating other disease focuses including hepatitis and systems issues such as access to care, treatment, services, poverty, and human rights. The AIDS Institute achieves its mission and goals through collaborations, networks and programs that are targeted and focused, such as: • AIDS Alliance for Women, Infants, Children, Youth & Families • Florida HIV/AIDS Advocacy Network • I Am Essential Campaign • HepFlorida and HepInfoNow.org • Patient Advocacy Leaders Summit • National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day • Capacity Building Assistance Network • Florida Consortium for HIV/AIDS Research

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25


OUR PEOPLE, OUR PROBLEM, OUR SOLUTION

Dear Phill, On the wake of your retirement and after your 20 years of altruism, advocacy, trailblazing, and leadership as the CEO of the Black AIDS Institute, we, the BAI staff, are writing to express the honor it has been to work under your leadership and reaffirm our commitment to realize our shared vision of ending the AIDS epidemic in Black America. In the early 1990s, Black America had yet to mobilize against the epidemic, even though HIV/AIDS was devastating Black communities across the country. Rooted in the sentiment that moved Essex Hemphill to famously say, “if whales, snails, dogs, cats, Chrysler, and Nixon can be saved, the lives of Black men are precious and can be saved,” you realized the need for a national think tank dedicated to HIV/AIDS in Black America. Though those early days of BAI were hosted out of your repurposed home, the initial theory of change at the Institute was as visionary and impactful as ever: If Black America was going to rise to the challenge of ending AIDS, Black civil institutions—the media, elected officials, civil rights organizations, professional groups, fraternities and sororities and academia—would have to lead the way. From African American HIV University’s (AAHU) more than 15 years of training the countries leading HIV workforce, to the national network of Black Treatment Advocates Network (BTAN) chapters across the country, to conceptualizing a plan to institutionalize support for the HIV workforce through a certification program, under your leadership, BAI has helped to close racial and ethnic gaps in HIV scientific knowledge and access to services. You have punctuated to Black America, and the world, the importance of doing this work, and you have done so through leading by example. As the HIV epidemic continues to morph, BAI has continued to respond to new needs and we will not stop. You have set us up for such success, such as with BAI’S first-ever strategic partnership with one of the largest community health clinics in the country. Your voice has been one of leadership, reverence, wisdom, and community, and it will always echo as we continue to impact the health of Black people. As much as you have meant to the wider HIV-community, Phill, you have been especially impactful in the lives of us staff members. As you leave BAI, please know that you have created a uniquely and unapologetically Black space—that your investment has become a place where Black people lead on issues that pertain to our communities. You have ensured BAI is a place that strives to honor lived experiences, to center those most affected by health disparities, and to work in solidarity with those who dream of a future of equal health outcomes. You have created an organization primed to forge new relationships, try new tactics, and continue to fight for equity. We recognize the fight against AIDS in Black America is far from over. This is especially true in the South, home to nearly half of all new HIV diagnoses. Black people living with HIV are still markedly less likely to achieve viral suppression compared to white people living with HIV. Phill, you acted on Essex Hemphill’s words; and we also believe that the lives of Black people are worth saving. Though you are retiring, we are left with a mandate: not only must we save lives, but we must create conditions where all Black people, men, women, trans, cis, queer, straight, living with HIV, and not living with HIV, can thrive. There is no doubt that the next chapter in your life will be as inspiring and as meaningful as all the earlier ones. But at this important moment of transition—for the Institute, but also for our broader fight against AIDS in this country—we wanted to take a moment to thank and salute you, a once-in-ageneration leader who continues to galvanize us. The Staff Black AIDS Institute

1833 West Eighth Street #200 Los Angeles, California 90057-4920 213-353-3610 office, 213-353-9448 fax www.BlackAIDS.org, info@BlackAIDS.org

Executive Committee Grazell Howard, J.D. Charlotte, N.C. Chair

Vanessa Williams Los Angeles, Calif. First Vice Chair

Peter Brownlie Kansas City, Mo. Second Vice Chair

The Honorable Laura Hall Huntsville, Ala. Treasurer

Jesse Milan, Jr., Esq. Baltimore, Md. Chair Emeritus Secretary

Phill Wilson

Los Angeles, Calif. President and Chief Executive Officer

Board Members Donna Christensen, M.D.

Marlene McNeese

David Cook, M.D.

Washington, D.C.

Kym Johnson

Chicago, Ill.

Washington, D.C. Cornelius, N.C. Addison, Tex.

Houston, Tex.

Marc Meachem

David Munar Jussie Smollett Los Angeles, Calif.

Staff Phill Wilson

President and Chief Executive Officer


SESSIONS BY TRACKS & PATHWAYS Pathway: Aging Pathway: Aging

• •

• • •

• •

• • •

Pathway: CDCCDC Pathway:

A Conversation with the Reunion Project and NMAC’s HIV 50+ Strong and Healthy Aging, HIV, and Emotional Resilience: Skills to Improve Quality of Life

Employment Issues, Opportunities and Strategies for PLHIV over 50 Long-Term Survivor Initiative: GMHC’s Multipronged Approach to Aging & HIV

Long-Term Survivors: Research, Programs, & Advocacy for the 21st Century

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

Using HIV Surveillance Data: Where Do We Go from Here?

Pathway: Faith Pathway: ENDING THE EPIDEMIC

Trans & Poz after 50

• •

HIV & Mental Health: A Faith Response

Older Adults Dominate HIV Epidemic: Needs Defined by Multi-Site ROAH

Women of Color Aging Gracefully

50+ Strong & Healthy Mini-Grant Program: Grantees Projects

Faith Through Our Eyes

Master Class: A Historical Look at the Faith & HIV Movement

Trending: A Look at Cultural Trends of HIV and Faith among Youth

Pathway: Ending Pathway: Faiththe Epidemic

Prevention

Addressing Barriers to PrEP Uptake and Adherence among Transgender Women

• •

Centering Trans People and PrEP in the SF Bay Area Eliminating Barriers to PrEP Access

Ending the Epidemic with the Help of Peer Workers: Peer Worker Programs in HIV, HCV, and Harm Reduction Implementing U=U in Your Jurisdiction

Inclusion of Injection Drug Use and the Ongoing Opioid Epidemic in the ETE Process

Financially PrEPared: Maximizing PrEP Utilization in Underserved Populations

Women and PrEP: Challenges, Opportunities and Successes

Integrating “Sexual Safety” into the HIV Dialogue

2NP: A HIV/STI Prevention Intervention Targeting Young Black Gay Men

Methods of Engaging African American YMSM in Biomedical Research

Engagement of Latino MSM in HIV Clinical Trials

Getting in Bed Together: An Intimate Discussion about PrEP

Track: Gay MenMen Track: Gay

Lessons Learned from the Mississippi “Getting to Zero” Learning Collaborative

PrEP-aring Together: Community Mobilization’s Role in Expanding PrEP Access

PrEPLink: An Active PrEP Referral System in Miami-Dade County, FL The Feeling Out the Future: Understanding Advocacy and Drug Development

West Coast to East Coast: Rapid ART Protocol Implementation

Young Men Debating HIV: Care or Cure; Biomedical or Behavioral

Building

Reaching the Unreachable: Strategies for Reaching Transgender Populations

• • • • • • •

The New Era of HIV: Youth Navigation Program

2018

PrEParing the South: Learning from the Mississippi Experience

UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS

They2ze: A Mobile Health Resource for Transgender Spectrum Youth

The Triple Affect: Innovation, Prevention, and Treatment

Implicit Bias: The Road Towards Sustained Structural Racism

28

Using CDC Surveillance Data to Benefit PWH: An Overview

Models for Data to Care: Who, When, and How

Behind Closed Doors: Understanding the Culture of Sex in Church

Pathway: Capacity Building Pathway: Capacity

Community Engagement in Data to Care and HIV Surveillance

Never Alone: Addressing Isolation & Building Community Through Storytelling

Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Track: Biomedical HIV

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Black Gay Men in HIV Health and Research Policy Leadership, Where are We? Exploring Experiences of HIV Stigma and Spirituality by Older Black MSM Gay Youth: Breaking the Evolutionary Code of Risk and Pleasure Healthy Him: HIV Prevention BEYOND HIV Prevention HIV Education in Correctional Settings

How to Implement Viral Suppression Strategies with Homeless Young MSMOC How to Promote PrEP in the Latino Community

Improving the HIV Prevention Capacity of Community-Based Organizations It Starts with You: Envisioning Sex Education for Gay Youth

Survivor’s Gifts: Finding Your Story of Strength and Resilience Tech Please! A New Way to Engage and Retain Clients The Bros in Convo Initiative: We are the Community

We Count: Strategies for Effective SOGI Data Collection

You Down with GPP (Good Participatory Practice)? Engaging Young MSM In HIV Prevention


SESSIONS BY TRACKS & PATHWAYS Pathway: Health Care Access

Track: Leadership Track: Leadership

Health Care Rights and Discrimination in the Trump Era

Medicaid: Work Requirements, Time Limits, and Lock Outs, Oh My!

• •

Let’s Fight Back: The Affordable Care Act is Under Attack Race & Health Care: Fighting for Access and Equity

• •

Pathway: Health Care Providers Pathway: Health Care

• • • •

PROVIDERS

HIV Treatment in 2018 – What’s New & How to Communicate those Messages Opioid Use & Treatments: What We Can Do in 2018

Smoking & HIV – Helping Your Clients Understand the Risks and How to Stop

• • • •

Women & Wellness- Staying Healthy beyond UDVL

• •

Pathway: Hepatitis Pathway: Hepatitis

Eliminating HCV Among People Living with HIV

Meeting People Where They Are: Person-Centered Hepatitis Programming

Hepatitis Elimination as an Equity Issue

Syndemics of HIV, Hepatitis, and Overdose

• •

Pathway: HHSHHS SMAIFSMAIF Pathway:

Getting to HIV Equity by Creating Sustained Systems Changes

MSM of Color and HIV: Putting Biomedical Interventions into the MIx

• • •

• • •

Atrévete, Salte del Closet: Leadership Development in the Latins Communities Beyond MOU: A Look at Strategic Partnerships

Cultural Humility in Ever-Changing HIV Landscape: Strategies for Effective Leadership

Evaluating an HIV Leadership Program: Building Leaders of Color (BLOC) Leading Together - Strategic Partnerships to Advance the Fight Against AIDS Mentor, Lead, Succeed: Building Alliances Across Ages

Mentoring Future Grant Writers to Develop Applications that Win Funding

Preparing for the Next Generation of the Black HIV/AIDS Response Shallow Water: The Fate of Transgender Advocacy within HIV Treatment/Care

Supporting Supervisors to Manage Successfull Linkage to Care Programs

The Power of Fiscal Sponsorship: Supporting Small but Mighty Organizations Thriving in Times of Change: Exploring Sustainability and Competitive Advantage

Transforming Collaborative Systems: Creating New Conversations

Track: Opoid Epidemic Track: Opioid Epidemic

Listening Session: Updating National Plans for HIV & Hepatitis

The Consensus: Communication about HIV Treatment and Prevention The Opioid Crisis and Injection Related Infectious Diseases

A STEP Towards Harm Reduction: Facing Flint’s Opioid Epidemic

Connecting Data to Identify County-Level Need for Comprehensive Harm Reduction

Pathway: HRSA Pathway: HRSA

ARTAS for Managers: A Collaborative Capacity-Building Assistance Model

Data Utilization

Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) Responses to Substance Use Disorder and Housing Training and Technical Assistance Available for RWHAP CommunityBased Organizations and the HIV Community

Training and Technical Assistance for RWHAP Planning Councils and Recipients

Help for Multidisciplinary Care Teams: Managing PLWH Pain and Opioid Use Disorder

Improving Syringe Access Where You Live

Opioids, Hepatitis C, and Harm Reduction: An Overview of Prevention

• • •

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Breaking Silence, HIV, Opioids, And Harm Reduction in Tribal Communities

It Takes a Village: Multi-Sectoral Efforts to Create a Comprehensive Response

The Story of Syringe Vending Machines and Nevada’s Opioid Epidemic

Understanding the Opioid Epidemic and How Your Community Can Respond We Got You: Providing Harm Reduction Services in Mobile Settings

29


SESSIONS BY TRACKS & PATHWAYS Pathway: SexSex WorkWork Pathway:

Track: People Living With HIV

• •

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

Chemsex: HIV, Aging: A Revealing Dialogue on Risks and Interventions

Cultural Transformation for Integrating HIV/AIDS Care into Primary Care Employing a Sex Positive Approach to HIV Prevention and Care Fearlessly Living Your Best Life: How to Practice Daily Self-Care

Housing Services Impacting PLWHA Health Outcomes through Intersectionality

Increasing Retention in HIV-Care by Addressing Stigma among Mexican MSM

• •

Latidos (Heartbeat): Home Away from Home

• • • • • • •

30

Trans Communities: What We Want & Need

Survivor’s Gifts: Finding Your Story of Strength and Resilience

Pathway: STD PATHWAY STD

Telemedicine: Addressing HIV Stigma and Building Capacity for HIV Treatment

When the Falls Well: HIV in the Church

Condoms, STDs, and PrEP

The “Protective Health Effect” of Legal Intervention on HIV+ Patients

Leveraging STD Partnerships to End the Epidemic

Together, Our Voices, Make Us Stronger: Digital Storytelling Addresses Stigma

Pathway: Structural Interventions Pathway: Structural Interventions

The Power of Story: Crafting Inspirational Stories to Empower PLWH

Wellness Recovery Action Plan for Long Term Survivors

Ensuring Ryan White Funding Follows the Epidemic

To Colored Boys

SSS! Solving Southern Stigma

The COMPASS Points South: A Conversation with Community

Maximizing Empowerment and Minimizing Stigma in the Age of U=U

Being Alert, Taking Action, and Doing the Work: HIV & Public Policy

Inter-Generational Sisterhood and Storytelling among Black Women Living with HIV

Decriminalizing Sex Work: An Integral Step for Liberation AND Know Your Rights Training: The War on Drugs and Sex Workers

Pathway: South Pathway: South

HIV Communication: Reducing Stigma through Language

Track: Public Policy

Enabling Peer-Led Harm Reduction Models among Sex Workers

Enhancing the Role of HOPWA Providers in Ending the Epidemic

Federal HIV/Aging Policy Under Trump-Pence and the Republican Congress

Forging a Successful Path to HIV Criminalization Reform in California! HIV Exceptionalism and Implications for Acceptability of PrEP

Intersections and Divergences of Tribal, State, and Federal HIV Laws NC HIV is Not a Crime Project: A Case Study

• •

• • •

States in Play: Advocacy Priorities to Maintain HIV Insurance The Importance of the 340B Program to HIV Service Organizations

Using Data for Action: How to Reach Your Community, Policymakers, and Grantors with AIDSVu’s Data Visualizations and Tools Youth HIV Policy Advisor Program: A Model for HIV Advocacy

2018

HIV Criminalization Advocacy Beyond HIV Criminal Laws

Racism and Housing Policies: The IMpact on the HIV Epidemic

Building a Community-Led Research Agenda for Trans/Non-Binary People and HIV

Decolonizing Health Care for American Indian Transgender Women

Deemed Invisible: Transgender Men of Color within HIV Prevention and Care

The Midnight Stroll – Connecting Homeless Trans Persons to Housing Track: Trauma-Informed Care

Structural Segregation is Killing Us

UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS

Food is Medicine for People with HIV: Addressing Access Barriers through Nutrition Services

Pathway: Trans Community Pathway: TRANS COMMUNI

Race, the U=U Campaign, and HIV Criminal Law Reform

Addressing Employment Needs: Social, Economic, and Employment Disparities

Addressing Trauma in Newly Diagnosed HIV-Positive LGBTQ Millennials

De-Socializing Stigma

• •

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Be a Warrior not a Worrier: Leadership, Sustainability, & Renewal

Empowering Women Experiencing the Trauma Associated with IPV and HIV


SESSIONS BY TRACKS & PATHWAYS

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Forgotten Population: An Inside Scoop on Formerly Incarcerated Women

Healing Trauma Within LGBT Family Dynamics: An In-Depth Panel Discussion

Responding to Increased Anxiety among Immigrants through Legal Services

• •

Safe Consumption Spaces: An Essential Intervention to Fight the Opioid Crisis

Sexual Health History Taking for Transgender and Gender NonConforming Patients

Seeking Safety with Transitional Age Youth Living with HIV (YLWHA)

Trauma-Informed Care for the Soul: An Afro-Latinx Conversation

• •

Trauma-Informed HR Practices: Becoming Trauma-Informed Care Champions

Implementing U=U in Your Jurisdiction

Trauma-Informed Care for People Living with HIV: Strategies for Implementation

• • •

Building Community Power: A Women’s HIV/AIDS Advisory Board

Girl Talk: Developing Effective Support Groups for HIV-Positive Women Health Needs of HIV+ Women Who are Aging

HIV/AIDS and Domestic Violence: It’s Not Just Physical Anymore!!! Immigrant Latinas - Are They Really Included Among “Women of Color?” Let’s Talk About Sex: Breaking the Silence, Bridging the Gap

Mentoring, Modeling, & Messaging: Empowering HIV Positive Women to Community Leadership

National Implementation of Interventions for Transgender Women Living with HIV Reimagining Role Model Stories for the Trans Community

The Complexities of Lives and Care of Black Women with HIV

The Urgency for Intersectionality in HIV Prevention for Women

Transwomen, Vaginas, and Considerations for Sexual Risk, Testing, and Prevention

Women Living with HIV in Permanent Supportive Housing Programs

Women’s Institute: Leading with Intention, Through Resilience, Grace and Strength

Are We Shaming Those Who are Detectable?

The Third U is Universal Access: Achieving Racial and Gender Justice in U=U

Pathway: Youth Pathway: Youth

Unpacking U=U: The Message and the Movement

Inclusion and Justice: Creating Welcoming Services for LGBTQ Youth

Leadership Development for Youth Champions in the HIV Movement (Youth 18-25 only)

Addressing HIV Stigma in Older Women

Beyond Viral Suppression: Addressing Stigma, Mental Health, and Well-Being

US Women and PrEP Working Group (USWPWG)

• •

Track: Women Track: Women

Can We Deliver? HIV Research Among Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women

Orlando United: Community Response, Healing and Moving Forward from the Pulse Tragedy

Are U Part of the Revolution? Bringing U=U to Your Community

Moving Past Trauma with H.O.P.E. - An Innovative Model for CBA

Building an “HIV Toolbox” for Women Living with HIV

HIV Stigma: Why Trauma-Informed Care Matters

Pathway: U=UU=U Pathway:

Empowering this Generation of Youth to End the Epidemic

Mask Off: Raising Hell and Raising Our Voices

Ain’t I A Woman: Why Funding Gaps are Harmful!!!

RAL GENEFO IN

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7:00 am 7:30 am

Morning Worship Service

7:30 am 5:00 Pm

REGISTRATION

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level Institutes

8:00 am 11:00 am

Achieving a More Coordinated National HIV/ AIDS Response for American Indian/Alaska Natives Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 9 Addressing Stigma to End the HIV Epidemic Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom L

Listening Session for PLWHA and Advocates on Housing Needs Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 12 & 13

Addressing Workforce Need & Lighting the Road to Trans Liberation Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 8

Master Class: A Historical Look at the Faith & HIV Movement Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

Being Alert, Taking Action, and Doing the Work: HIV & Public Policy Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 7

Meaningful Input From Community: Dialogue with AIDS United on Policy, Grantmaking, and Capacity Building Priorities Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom M

Black Gay Men in HIV Health and Research Policy Leadership, Where are We? Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 1 & 2 Cultivating Advocates-Building Collaborations and Leveraging Resources Across Disease States Hyatt Regency Orlando, Orlando Ballroom N Culturally Sensitive Approaches to Address HIV in Asian Communities Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 3 & 4 HIV & Latinx: Our Legacies, Our Present, and Our Futures Supported by ViiV Healthcare Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom O Ka Hikina o Ka Lā - The Dawning of a New Day Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Silver Spring

10:30 am 5:00 pm 32

Leadership Development for Youth Champions in the HIV Movement (Youth 18-25 only) Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 11

Exhibit Hall Open

Our People, Our Problem, Our Solution-Ending HIV in Black America Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Bayhill 25 & 26 Saving Our Black Led Agencies and Cultivating New Leadership to End the HIV/AIDS Epidemic Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom P The COMPASS Points South: A Conversation with Community Spanish translation available ((es)) Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 5 Women’s Institute: leading with Intention through Reslience, Grace and Strength Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Blue Spring

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Plaza International Ballroom

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11:30 pm 1:30 pm

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE THURSDAY Luncheon Plenary

Opening Plenary: Activism and the Intersection of Movements Fighting for Social Justice Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Plenary Ballroom Session 1: Workshops

1:45 pm 3:45 pm

Be a Warrior not a Worrier: Leadership, Sustainability, & Renewal Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 12 & 13 Breaking Silence: HIV, Opioids, and Harm Reduction in Tribal Communities Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby level, Bayhill 25 & 26 Eliminating Barriers to PrEP Access Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom L Eliminating HCV Among People Living with HIV Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom N Enabling Peer-Led Harm Reduction Models Among Sex Workers Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 3 & 4 Faith through Our Eyes Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring Forging a Successful Path to HIV Criminalization Reform in California! Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 11 HIV Criminalization Advocacy Beyond HIV Criminal Laws Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom M Implicit Bias: The Road Towards Sustained Structural Racism Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 8 It Starts with You: Envisioning Sex Education for Gay Youth Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 9

The 2018 USCA HIV Cure Master Series Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom Q The Consensus: Communicating about HIV Treatment as Prevention Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 1 & 2 The Power of Fiscal Sponsorship: Supporting Small but Mighty Organizations Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 7 The Urgency for Intersectionality in HIV Prevention for Women Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 6 Using Data for Action: How to Reach Your Community, Policymakers, and Grantors with AIDSVu’s Data Visualizations and Tools Supported by Gilead Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom P Using CDC Surveillance Data to Benefit PWH: An Overview Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom O Wellness Recovery Action Plan for Long-Term Survivors Spanish translation available ((es)) Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 5 Women & Wellness - Staying Healthy Beyond UDVL Hyatt Regency Orlando Conference Level, Blue Spring 50+ Strong & Healthy Mini-Grant Program: Grantees Projects Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Manatee Spring 1

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4:00 pm 6:00 pm

Centering Trans People and PrEP in the SF Bay Area Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom L

Intersections and Divergences of Tribal, State, and Federal HIV Laws Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Bayhill 25 & 26

Cultural Humility in Ever-Changing HIV Landscape: Strategies for Effective Leadership Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 7

Meeting People Where They Are: PersonCentered Hepatitis Programming Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom N

Food Is Medicine for People with HIV: Addressing Access Barriers through Nutrition Services Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom M

Mentoring, Modeling & Messaging: Empowering HIV-Positive Women to Community Leadership Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 3 & 4

Healing Trauma Within LGBT Family Dynamics: An In-Depth Panel Discussion Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 12 & 13

Models for Data to Care: Who, When, and How Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom O

Health Needs of HIV+ Women Who are Aging Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 6

Smoking & HIV - Helping Your Clients Understand the Risk and How to Stop Hyatt Regency Orlando Conference Level, Blue Spring

Help for Multidisciplinary Care Teams: Managing PLWH’s Pain and Opioid Use Disorder Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 9

The Bros in Convo Initiative: We Are the Community Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 11

HIV Communication: Reducing Stigma through Language Spanish translation available ((es)) Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 5

The New ERA of HIV: Youth Navigation Program Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 8

HIV & Mental Health: A Faith Response Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring Implementing U=U in Your Jurisdiction Hyatt Regency Orllando Conventino Level, Regency Ballroom P

6:15 pm 7:15 pm

Affinity Sessions

8:00 pm 10:00 pm

OPENING RECEPTION FEATURING ONGINA

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The Opioid Crisis and Injection Related Infectious Diseases Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 1 & 2 Long-Term Survivors: Research, Programs, & Advocacy for the 21st Century Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Manatee Spring 1

Location: *Check Affinity Session board located near registration booths.

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Windemere Ballroom

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INSTITUTES

7:00 am - 7:45 am Early Risers

Morning Worship Service Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

8:00 am - 11:00 am Institutes

Being Alert, Taking Action, and Doing the Work: HIV & Public Policy Presented by the USCA Orlando Host Committee Moderator- Cathy Robinson Pickett, Founder and Executive Director of FriendsTogether, Florida Joey Wynn- Director of Wellness and Prevention Programs, Empower U Community Health Center, Miami, FL Dr. Philip Toal- Senior Vice-President, Aspire Health Partners, Orlando, FL Luigi Ferrer- Community Relations Manager, Pridelines- Miami’s LGBTQ Community Center, Miami, FL Kamaria Laffrey- Community Organizer, The Sero Project Florida, Winter Haven, FL Dr. David Forrest- Program Director of the IDEA Exchange syringe exchange program, University of Miami, Miami, Florida Location: Celebration 7, Convention Level Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

Public policy actions impact the field of HIV work and those living with HIV greatly. From decisions about the Affordable Care Act, to Immigration Policies, to HIV Criminalization and Syringe Access; shifts in these policies affect those impacted, directly. Throughout this interactive institute, we will go on a journey exploring different public policies and their intersections, while engaging in a community conversation about the work being done to move the needle forward. This institute will discuss issues that affect multiple states, while weaving in experiences and lessons learned from the State of Florida.

Black Gay Men in HIV Health and Research Policy Leadership, Where are We? Presenters: Craig Hutchinson, Black Gay Research Group Christopher Hutch-Ortiz, Black Gay Research Group Carl Baloney, AIDS United Charles Stephens, Counter Narrative Project Cornelius Baker, National Black Gay Men’s Advocacy Coalition Daniel Driffin, THRIVE SS Ernest Hopkins, National Black Gay Men’s Advocacy Coalition LaRon Nelson, Black Caucus, HIV Prevention Trials Network Leo Wilton, Black Caucus, HIV Prevention Trials Network Location: Celebration 1 and 2, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

This institute will provide an overview of current policy and funding activities

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associated with federal HIV activities and tie those efforts to the current HIV health status of Black gay/SGL/bisexual communities. The presentations by policy experts, and dialogue amongst session participants will begin the review and update of both the National Black Gay Men’s Coalition and the Black Gay Research Group’s Health Policy and Research Agendas on HIV in the U.S. The session will focus on targeted efforts to date in Southeast and urban communities to improve the health status of Black gay men, and their overall efficacy. The participant input will help to form recommendations from the Black SGL/Gay/Bisexual community to the updates to the US National HIV/AIDS Strategy and new Trump Administration efforts to create an End of the HIV Epidemic Initiative. Black gay men must ensure that both efforts reflect input from needs assessments of Black gay men, and improve deficits identified in current NHAS implementation through 2020.

Saving Our Black Led Agencies and Cultivating New Leadership to End the HIV/AIDS Epidemic Presenters: Ron Simmons Dr. Joyce Turner-Keller Dana Williams Cynthia Carey-Grant Leo Rennie Edward Jones Gabriel Maldonado Gloria Lockett Christopher Bates (Closing Speaker) Dazon Dixon (Speaker) Location: Regency Ballroom P, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

The African-American community is living in a time of disruption and innovation. As leaders in the community we have to always anticipate what is happening ahead of us. We cannot continue to live in the past and expect a different future. We need to stop, step and assess the resources we have in front of us right now to determine how we can eradicate the AIDS epidemic from our future. This can only happen with strong leadership and vision. It’s up to us to create economic opportunities for our agencies, develop a set of principles that provides guidance to our future leaders and focus on key elements that are essential to running successful and purposeful agencies. Cultivation of new leadership is essential to our survival and a true coming together as we look forward to ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

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INSTITUTES

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06

hearing from each of you listening to the following:

• What are barriers to accessing supportive housing services?

Leadership Development for Youth Champions in the HIV Movement (Youth 18-25 only)

• What housing initiatives work well in your area or in your experience? • What tools and resources are needed from NAHC to support you and your work?

Location: Celebration 11, Convention Level

The session will focus on leadership skills that can be applied according to youth interests, passions, personality, community needs and personal experience. The session will explore personal definitions of leadership, personal experience contributes to different leadership styles, Develop awareness of personal strengths and areas for growth

By the end of the session, NAHC hopes to understand more the challenges and opportunities facing people living with HIV/AIDS as it relates to housing. We hope to identify strategies to build local engagement and connect NAHC’s broader national work to local efforts.

Meaningful Input from Community: Dialogue with AIDS United on Policy, Grantmaking, and Capacity Building Priorities

Cultivating Advocates-Building Collaborations and Leveraging Resources Across Disease States Presenters: Michael Ruppal, The AIDS Institute, Tampa, FL Michelle Scavnicky, The AIDS Institute, Tampa, FL Anne Easter, The AIDS Institute, Cary, NC Joey Wynn, Florida HIV/AIDS Advocacy Network (FHAAN) Co-Chair Amye Leong, PALS Advisory Board/International Bone & Joint Advocate, Santa Barbara, CA Mike Cohen, PALS Advisory Board/ Former Executive Director, NAMI NH, Amherst, NH Location: Orlando Ballroom N, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

The Patient Advocacy Leaders Summit (PALS) initiative was developed in 2002 to bring together diverse patient advocacy leaders to improve advocacy capacity and identify ways to collaborate and unify the voices of many. The Institute will highlight PALS as a framework for how to effectively connect, educate, and empower advocates to build collaborations and leverage resources to improve health and healthcare. The Institute will demonstrate how PALS has improved the knowledge, effectiveness, and support of the patient advocacy leaders across disease states at the local, state, regional, national, and global levels.

The mission of PALS is to improve the lives of those affected by disease and chronic health conditions, by educating and mobilizing health advocacy leaders to work collaboratively in developing impactful policy and advocacy solutions focused on the prevention and elimination of disease and chronic health conditions.

Listening Session for PLWHA and Advocates on Housing Needs

Presenters: Adrian Neil, Jr., AIDS United, Washington, DC Paola Barahona, AIDS United, Washington, DC Venton Hill-Jones, AIDS United, Washington, DC Location: Orlando Ballroom M, Convention Level Level: Beginner

Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic organizations locally and nationally have worked with communities to develop strategies that break down systems of oppression, educate to decrease stigma, and advocate on behalf of those who are infected and affected by HIV/AIDS on the local, state, and federal levels. Considering the current political climate, organizations, along with communities, must work together even more to develop new and innovative strategies to get to a place where we have no new HIV infections. AIDS United’s institute will focus on working with conference participants, in a meaningful way, to identify strategies for collaboration and working together with organizations and communities to implement change across our three pillars (Capacity Building, Grantmaking, and Policy) in an intentional and culturally humble way.

Our People, Our Problem, Our SolutionEnding HIV in Black America Presenters: Maya Merriweather, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Lestian McNeal, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Fatima Hyacinthe, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Joshua Polk, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Maximillian Boykin, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Raniyah Copeland, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Saron Selassie, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Location: Bayhill 25 & 26, Lobby Level Level: Beginner

Presenters: Russell Bennett, National AIDS Housing Coalition, Washington, DC Christine Campbell, National AIDS Housing Coalition, Washington, DC Location: Celebration 12 & 13, Convention Level Level: Beginner

The National AIDS Housing Coalition invites advocates and people living with HIV/AIDS to share needs in local areas regarding access to supportive housing. During this three-hour listening session, we will share NAHC’s current policy and program work. We will spend the majority of the time

We owe much to the fierce leaders of the HIV movement that fought to realize the tools that we currently have that could virtually end the HIV epidemic. Yet the tools mean nothing if they aren’t accessible to the communities that need them most. We are at watershed moment. We have a group of legends passing the baton to the generation that will end HIV. In preparation for the new generation of HIV response in Black communities, the Black AIDS Institute has undergone significant

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transformation. BAI developed a joint venture to open a Clinic For Us, a series of Black Health Centers that provide comprehensive community health to Black folks in South LA. With CEO and President Phill Wilson’s retirement imminent, BAI is moving ahead full force in his legacy. This Institute will discuss how BAI is navigating their new era and what the new generation of advocacy brings to its programming, mission, recruitment, and ethos, while addressing the HIV epidemic from a uniquely and unapologetically Black lens.

The COMPASS Points South: A Conversation with Community Presenters: Neena K. Smith-Bankhead, Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA Samira Ali, University of Houston, Houston, Texas Susan Reif, Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research, Duke University, Chapel Hill, NC Mardrequs Harris, Southern AIDS Coalition, Birmingham, AL Location: Celebration 5, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

The evidence is clear: The South is falling behind. Closing the gap between the South and the rest of the United States is essential to the health of our people and the long-term success in ending the domestic HIV epidemic. During this interactive institute, we will explore the COMPASS Initiative, an unprecedented investment by Gilead Sciences to support the organizations working to end the HIV epidemic in the South. Specifically, this institute will include the following:

2. Identify and discuss creative, community-informed solutions in the South to address HIV-related stigma, organizational capacity, and mental health and wellness. 3. Explain new resources available to southern organizations, including capacity building assistance and grants available through the COMPASS Initiative.

Master Class: A Historical Look at the Faith & HIV Movement

This institute will hear from a few of the architects of the faith response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States.

Addressing Stigma to End the HIV Epidemic Presenters: Edwin Corbin-Gutierrez, Milanes Morejon, Kyle Taylor, Isaiah Webster, and Andrew Zapfel, NASTAD, Washington, DC Location: Orlando Ballroom L, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

Spanish translation available ((es))

1. Talk about the state of the South, including drivers of the epidemic and areas of unmet need in our communities.

INSTITUTES

As a leading organization that represents public health officials who administer HIV and hepatitis programs in the U.S. and around the world, NASTAD has worked for many years to address stigma that prevents optimal health care. In 2014, the organization released a toolkit for health departments and community stakeholders that focused on public health stigma and its impact on Black and Latino gay men. NASTAD is currently working on an update to its popular toolkit, and this institute will explore how HIV professionals can help to further reduce stigma of marginalized communities and generally around HIV and improve health outcomes across the Care Continuum.

Achieving a More Coordinated National HIV/AIDS Response for American Indian/ Alaska Natives Presenters: Hannabah Blue, JSI Research & Training, Inc., Denver, CO Savannah Gene, Albuquerque Area Indian Health Board, Albuquerque, NM Ayn Whyte, Albuquerque Area Indian Health Board, Albuquerque, NM Location: Celebration 9, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

This Institute will provide an opportunity to draft a coordinated national response to HIV/AIDS among American Indian/Alaska Native populations. Participants will engage in a focused discussion to create key actions and a strategic plan in collaboration with Indian Health Services, tribal agencies and urban Indian health organizations. This session will include concepts from the 2018 USCA pre-conference HIV Native Leadership Summit and will build on previous American Indian/Alaska Native-specific meetings. The Institute will focus on priority issues of high impact prevention, treatment as prevention, stigma, and increased access to treatment and care.

Presenters: Dr. Pernessa Seele Rev. Michael Schuenemeyer Ken South Bishop Yvette Flounder Rev. Edwin Sanders Rev. Debra Hickman Location: Rainbow Spring, Convention Level Level: Advanced

Faith has played a crucial role in the HIV movement. For three decades, faith and community leaders have raised their voices to address the burden of HIV/AIDS in pulpits and congregations internationally.

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HIV & Latinx: Our Legacies, Our Present, and ouR Futures supported by ViiV Healthcare Presenters: Hosted by Latinx CAP Location: Regency Ballroom O, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

The institute will bring together diverse groups of Latinxs from across the country to foster supportive relationships and build our capacity to advance HIV prevention and care work in Latinx communities. The Institute focuses on understanding the impact and legacy of HIV in Latinx communities.

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Culturally Sensitive Approaches to Address HIV in Asian Communities

Addressing Workforce Need & Lighting the Road to Trans Liberation

Presenter: Ben Cabangun, Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum, Oakland, CA

Presenters: Bamby Salcedo, TransLatin@ Coalition Ruby Corado, Casa Ruby Trudie Jackson, Navajo Nation Cecilia Chung, Transgender Law Center Jordan Blaza, TSC Kiara St. James, NYTAG

Location: Celebration 3 & 4, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

In majority of Asian communities, sexuality is a taboo subject not to be discussed. Stigma and shame remain the biggest barriers in preventing Asians from learning, talking, and getting tested for HIV. Shame and discomfort around the topic of sex and fear of disownment from families can silence a whole community. These are just some of the issues faced by Asian communities. This year the goal of the Asian Institute is to emphasize the importance of addressing stigma as it relates to HIV and how to initiate discussions around sexuality. There are two parts to this session: the first part provides an overview of national statistics for HIV as it relates to Asian communities; and the second part is a panel of speakers from organizations across the nation who will talk about culturally sensitive approaches to working with specific Asian communities.

Ka Hikina o Ka Lā - The Dawning of a New Day

Location: Celebration 8, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

Part 1:

Lack of employment is one of the issues that affect Trans & Gender NonConforming People.

Participants will understand how to address HIV prevention looking at broader social determinants and how these position Trans & GNC people to have higher incidents of HIV acquisition. Participants attending this session will be able to understand that for Trans & GNC people, having a job is critical in order to prevent the cycle of HIV infection and acquisition in Trans & GNC communities. Part 2: The goal of this workshop is to identify strategies and tools used in the past to utilize in today’s transgender movement. This session will explore the successes and failures in the HIV movement and the impact they have had on transgender communities. What can we learn as trans and gender non-conforming?

Presenters: Johnny Hebel, Federated States of Micronesia Department of Public Health, Pohnpei, FSM Keli’i Abordo, Hawaii Health & Harm Reduction Center, HIV Case Management Team Lead, Oahu, HI Cathy Kapua, Hawaii Health & Harm Reduction Services Kua’ana Project Program Manager, Waianae, HI Keiva Lei Cadena, Hawaii Health and Harm Reduction Center, Oahu, HI Kunane Dreier, Hawaii Health and Harm Reduction Center, Oahu, HI Kekoa Kealoha, Hawaii Island HIV/AIDS Foundation, Hawai`i, HI Carolyn Kuali`i, Kua`aina Associates, Berkeley, CA/Maui, HI Bianka Tasaka, Malama Pono Health Services, Kauai, HI

Women’s Institute: Leading with Intention Through Resilience, Grace, and Strength

Location: Location: Silver Spring, Convention Level Level: Beginner

Presenters: TBA

The Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Institute will provide insight into the unique world of Pacific Island communities and their diverse cultures. Through the lens of Pacific Island cultural values, the Institute will navigate the participants through the NH/PI perspectives on health and wellbeing. For the first time, The Dawning of a New Day will bring the voice of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders to the forefront of the National HIV arena at USCA.

Location: Blue Spring, Convention Level Level: Beginner

The Women’s Institute is a power-packed day discussion designed to energize and invigorate you - giving you new ideas and strategies to achieve and succeed in women programming and engagement in our HIV community.

This Institute offers a unique Ted-Talk dynamic nationally respected women speakers - discussing relevant issues to women leaders in our fight to end HIV in women. Please join us as we address the critical problems that impact our ability to obtain visibility as women, maintain relevance as women, and motivate and support us as women in this fight

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SESSION 1 WORKSHOPS

11:30 - 1:30 pm Plenary Luncheon

Opening Plenary: Activism and the Intersection of Movements Fighting for Social Justice Location: Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom Speakers: Alicia Garza, Co-Founder of #BlackLivesMatter Abigail Echo-Hawk, Director, Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle, WA Richard L. Zaldivar, Executive Director, The Wall-Las Memorias, Los Angeles, CA Naina Khanna, Executive Director, Positive Women’s Network – USA David Hogg, Activist and Survivor of Marjory Stoneman Douglas School Shooting, Parkland, FL Entertainment: Thelma Houston

Join us as we hear from social justice movement leaders and advocates for racial health equity. The speakers will share their thoughts on the need for activism in our communities to ultimately effect positive change. The themes of racism, gun violence, health access and equity are intersecting our lives more prominently day-by-day. Together, let’s determine a way forward.

Garza

Khanna

Hogg

Zaldivar

Echo-Hawk

Khanna

Houston

SESSION 1: 1:45 – 3:45 PM Session 1 Workshops

The 2018 USCA HIV CURE MASTER SERIES Presenters: Timothy Brown. Palms Spring, California Jeff Taylor. CARE Cure Research Martin Delaney Collaborative and The AmfAR Institute for HIV Cure Research, New York, New York Dr. Richard B. Jones. BELIEVE Cure Research Collaborative, New York, New York Karine Dube. University of North Carolina. National Martin Delaney Collaborative CAB, Chapel Hill North Carolina Danielle Campbell. DARE Cure Research Martin Delaney Collaborative. Los Angeles, California Richard Jefferys. Dare Cure Research Martin Delaney Collaborative. New York, New York Location: Regency Ballroom Q, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

How close are we to finding a cure HIV? Will all communities have access to the Cure? Finding a cure for HIV is critical in order to end the epidemic. The HIV Cure research agenda is investigating several approaches. Community engagement and involvement is necessary to make sure that there is diversity among clinical trial participants and also, input on the ethics and participation in cure research clinical trials. The goal of the HIV CURE Research Master Series is to provide the latest on the science and

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research searching for a cure. There will be discussion about community engagement, ethics, challenges and opportunities. There will be time for questions and answers. Joining the faculty is Timothy Brown, the only person cured from HIV infection. This session is open for USCA participants and Orlando’s local community.

50+ Strong & Healthy Mini-Grant Program: Grantees Projects Presenters: Lillibeth Gonzalez, Nancy Shearer, Teresa Sullivan, Michael G Smith Location: Manatee Spring 1, Lobby Level Pathway: Aging Level: Beginner

Grantees will present about their project logistics and implementation as well as lessons learned from the mini-grant program. This program awarded 12 mini-grants this year to help scholars develop ideas for working with the community of people living and aging with HIV in their towns and cities. The scholars also learned basic skills on how to apply for a grant, work on project reports, look for resources, develop community events, and mobilize their peers. The Mini-Grant Project gives grantees the opportunity to present about their projects at USCA.

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SESSION 1 WORKSHOPS

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Implicit Bias: The Road towards Sustained Structural Racism

Using CDC Surveillance Data to Benefit PWH: An Overview

Presenters: Milta Vega-Cardona, BPS, MSA, Consultant Core Trainer with the Peoples Institute for Survival and Beyond and Border Crossers, New York, NY

Presenters: Renata Ellington, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta GA Elizabeth DiNenno, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta GA

Location: Celebration 8, Convention Level Pathway: Capacity Building Level: Intermediate

Location: Regency Ballroom O, Convention Level Pathway: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Pathway Level: Beginner

This workshop is an interactive, didactive session using the work of Daniel Kahneman, Anthony Greenwald, and Mahzarin Banaji to accentuate racebased socialization in the United States. Participants will learn strategies to address racism individually and in their communities. In preparation participants should take the Implicit Association Test (IAT) at https:// implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/user/agg/blindspot/indexrk.htm.

This is the first of four sessions that will focus on the use of data to inform HIV prevention programs. Data sources used to support D2C will be discussed as well as the use of web-based tools that are available from CDC. Participants will discuss how these approaches fit, complement, or enhance existing approaches to identify persons with newly diagnosed HIV or individuals with HIV who have fallen out of care and to identify transmission networks. Since the session will present a broad overview of using surveillance and other data, the intended audience members are those who would like to learn more about the fundamental aspects of these approaches.

Using Data for Action: How to Reach Your Community, Policymakers, and Grantors with AIDSVu’s Data Visualizations and Tools

Faith through Our Eyes

Supported by Gilead Sciences

Presenters: Moderated by: Cary L. Goodman, The Balm In Gilead, Inc., Richmond, VA

Location: Regency Ballroom P, Convention Level Pathway: Faith Level: Beginner

Location: Rainbow Spring, Convention Level Pathway: Faith Level: Beginner

The U.S. has the most robust HIV surveillance system in the world. This data is invaluable in understanding and monitoring the HIV epidemic and informing our response, but data is only valuable if you use it.

AIDSVu is an interactive online mapping tool that transforms complex data sets into easy-to-understand maps that visualize the HIV epidemic across the United States. AIDSVu’s HIV service locators, city and state profile pages, and educational infographics provide users with additional highquality tools and resources to help advance awareness, advocate for critical issues, and develop programs and policies. Join us for an interactive workshop to hear first-hand examples of how researchers, community leaders, and educators use AIDSVu’s data, maps and other tools in their work, and learn easy and actionable steps to use AIDSVu to develop your own data-driven work.

Everyone has a story, and everyone’s story has value. We have the power to create and change our own narrative. Just the same, everyone has a faith experience - whether favorable or not. This interactive session will allow participants to reflect on their faith experience and share their story of the faith community’s impact on HIV.

Eliminating HCV Among People Living with HIV Presenters: Andrew Reynolds, Project Inform, San Francisco, CA Sonia Canzater, O’Neill Institute, Washington, DC Sainabou Katende, Texas Department of State Health Services, Austin, TX Alex Shirreffs, Philadelphia Department of Health, Philadelphia, PA Nirah Johnson, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY Moderator: Frank Hood, The AIDS Institute, Washington, DC and Alyssa Kitlas, NASTAD, Washington, DC

Women & Wellness- Staying Healthy beyond UDVL

Location: Orlando Ballroom N, Convention Level Pathway: Hepatitis Level: Beginner

Presenters: Carol Dawson Rose RN, PhD, FAAN Willie Roberts MSHA, BSN, RN Karen Gold RN BSN ACRN Location: Blue Spring, Conference Level Pathway: Healthcare Providers Level: Beginner

This session will explore wellness issues for women living with HIV, including routine health screenings, common health diagnoses with getting a little older, mental health concerns & strategies, strength based coping and nurturing your resiliency. This interactive session is facilitated by nurses who are members of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care.

In the United States, HIV and HCV co-infection continues to be a serious issue, with approximately 20 percent of people living with HIV co-infected with HCV. HCV infection increases the rate of liver disease progression, the leading cause of non HIV-related death among people co-infected with HIV and HCV. With the advent of direct acting antivirals (DAAs) that can cure HCV, we have an important opportunity to eliminate HCV among people living with HIV and dramatically improve their health outcomes. This session will provide an overview of HIV and HCV co-infection, highlight key policy recommendations for eliminating HCV among PLWHIV, and explore state and local elimination efforts.

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Location: Orlando Ballroom M, Convention Level Pathway: Structural Interventions Level: Beginner

The Consensus: Communicating about HIV Treatment as Prevention Presenters: Richard Wolitski, HHS/OHAIDP, Washington, DC Location: Celebration 1 & 2, Convention Level Pathway: HHS SMAIF Pathway Level: Advanced

Recent studies which found that nobody with a suppressed viral load transmitted HIV sexually are fundamentally changing HIV prevention. Although the science is clear, different messages have been communicated about how to use TasP as a personal risk reduction strategy. Effectively communicating about the effects of HIV treatment has the potential to reduce HIV stigma, improve health outcomes among people living with HIV, and prevent new infections. HHS agencies and offices have continued to work with community input on messages that will be shared and discussed. Following this workshop attendees will be able to: • Understand the federal process for finalizing the TasP core message • Recognize how HHS agencies have implemented TasP messages

• Recognize opportunities to integrate TasP messages into HIV prevention, care, and service programs.

Presenters: Alex Andrews, SWOP-USA, Orlando, FL Location: Celebration 3 & 4, Convention Level Pathway: Sex Work Level: Beginner

This workshop will discuss how SWOP developed a mini grant process and the lessons and successes of our grantees. SWOP-USA is the largest sex worker-led organization in the United States with chapters and affiliated organizations across the country. We assist grassroots organizers with capacity building, fundraising tools, and advocacy training. This year we provided numerous mini grants to our chapters and affiliate organizations in order to implement peer-to-peer harm reduction materials to sex workers and other vulnerable populations in their communities. These grants were used to purchase syringes, masks, safer sex supplies, and educational materials that were then distributed directly into the community. It is vital that direct services to sex workers, and others engaged in the street economy, be provided by competent and, whenever possible, peer providers. Our grassroots model is a growing success and one worth replicating on a larger scale.

HIV Criminalization Advocacy Beyond HIV Criminal Laws

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According to some estimates, 14 percent (or one in seven) of all people living with HIV in the US, and 20 percent (one in five) of Black Americans living with HIV will pass through a jail or prison every year. More than 30 states have laws that criminalize alleged HIV exposure, non-disclosure, or transmission. Many states also apply harsher penalties to sex workers and people who inject drugs on the basis of HIV status. While HIV criminal laws must be reformed to address the overrepresentation of PLHIV in the criminal legal system, it is also essential to consider broader drivers of incarceration for PLHIV, including the war on drugs and discrimination against people of color and LGBTQ people in housing, employment, and education. Mass incarceration and HIV are linked epidemics—advocacy efforts which seek to reform HIV criminal laws without attention to broader community-level factors impacting risk of incarceration for PLHIV are incomplete.

Be a Warrior not a worrier: Leadership, sustainability & renewal Presenters: Alejandro Aguilera, St. Paul-Ramsey County Public Health, Clinic 555, St. Paul, MN Location: Celebration 12 & 13, Convention Level Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Beginner

Enabling Peer-Led Harm Reduction Models Among Sex Workers

Presenters: Arpita Appannagari, Center for HIV Law and Policy, New York, NY Breanna Diaz, Human Rights Campaign, Washington, DC Robert Suttle, Sero Project, New York, NY Mandisa Moore-O’Neal, Moore-O’Neal Law Group and Louisiana Coalition on Criminalization and Health (LCCH), New Orleans, LA Nora Fuller, AIDS United, Washington, DC

SESSION 1 WORKSHOPS

According to SAMHSA, “trauma-informed care” realizes the widespread impact of trauma and understands potential and alternative paths for recovery. It recognizes signs of trauma not only in consumers but also in staff, organizational leaders and others involved in the system.  It responds by holistically integrating knowledge and practice concerning trauma.  Recently, trauma-informed care and leadership in the work place has gained more national prioritization with increasing concerns around the sustainability of advocates and leaders and the renewal of their efforts and energies.  Due to factors such as cultural barriers and stigma around seeking mental health services, it is essential to offer multiple pathways to healing and sustainability.  Trauma-informed yoga offers a different entry point for leaders, advocates and public health staff members who have themselves experienced trauma.  These workshop sessions will be hands-on explorations on the impact of trauma and the intersection of yoga.  Leadership self-care in action!

It Starts With You: Envisioning Sex Education for Gay Youth Presenters: Gabriel Martinez, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL Christina Bernhardt University of Central Florida Location: Celebration 9, Convention Level Track: Gay Men Level: Intermediate

Lack of sexual education in academic institutions may lead to an increased spread of sexually transmitted illnesses among adolescents, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that about one in five of all new HIV diagnoses

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occur between ages 13 and 24. This lack of education, coupled with social stigma and discrimination, is especially harmful for gay youth in America. This workshop will focus on the limitations of “conservative” sexual education that can impede American youth from making informed sexual decisions. Specifically, this workshop will discuss tools that can be used to help gay youth understand their sexuality. As gay youth are impacted by the intersectionality of various biases, the presenters will highlight the need for a progressive sexual education curriculum and community support for gay youth.

Eliminating Barriers to PrEP Access Presenters: Karina Gil, AltaMed Health Services Corporation, Los Angeles, CA Location: Orlando Ballroom L, Convention Level Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Intermediate

The Los Angeles County Division of HIV/STD Programs (DHSP) set a goal to increase the number of individuals accessing PrEP services. To achieve this, DHSP developed a scope of work with heavy concentration of PrEP navigation imbedded into non-medical and medical services. AltaMed Health Services Corporation, the largest Latino and multi-ethic HIV Provider in Southern California, piloted a same-day PrEP prescription initiative and robust PrEP recruitment and enrollment strategy to 1) increase number of individuals who receive PrEP prescription access and 2) reduce barriers related to adherence, insurance enrollment, etc.

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Forging a Successful Path to HIV Criminalization Reform in California! Presenters: Scott Schoettes, Lambda Legal, Chicago, IL Craig Pulsipher APLA Health Naina Khanna, Positive Women’s Network-USA Location: Celebration 11, Convention Level Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

Using California’s recent success modernizing HIV criminal laws as a case study, this workshop will explore effective messaging, strategy and coalition development to counter opposition and to build support to pass comprehensive HIV criminalization reform. The workshop will examine the political, institutional, and public opposition to Senate Bill 239 in California; describe formation of the coalition and identification of bill authors; outline effective messages; discuss selection of appropriate messengers and lobbying strategies; and explain how negative media attention shaped the coalition’s communications strategy. Workshop participants will learn how to survey their own states’ potential for modernizing HIV criminal laws and be empowered to develop strategies to meet their own unique challenges, including the importance and challenges to centering of people living with HIV in the processes.

Breaking Silence: HIV, Opioids, and Harm Reduction in Tribal Communities Presenters: Shervin Aazami, National Indian Health Board, Washington, DC Clinton Alexander White Earth Nation Robert Foley, National Indian Health Board

The Urgency for Intersectionality in HIV Prevention for Women Presenters: Michele Andrasik, HIV Vaccine Trials Network, Seattle, WA Kimberly Parker Texas Women’s University Danielle Campbell, Los Angeles Women’s HIV/AIDS Task Force Morenike Giwa-Onaiwu, AIDS Clinical Trials Group

Location: Bayhill 25 & 26, Lobby Level Track: Opioid Epidemic Level: Advanced

Location: Celebration 6, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Intermediate

Race, ethnicity, gender, geography, and other sociodemographic factors play a critical role in HIV incidence, treatment, and outcomes. Gender and race are strongly linked to health disparities along the HIV care continuum. However, HIV prevention and intervention for transgender and cisgender women has failed to focus on the multifaceted nature of health and wellbeing for women of color. Addressing current HIV disparities experienced by transgender and cisgender women requires a focus on intersectionality. This is particularly true for Black Women who suffer severe HIV incidence and treatment and outcomes disparities. Black women account for 61 percent of new diagnoses among US women in 2016 (CDC). They are less likely to be on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART), detrimental effects of late initiation and early discontinuation of ART are more severe, and they experience higher morbidity and mortality compared to their White counterparts. This workshop will present an intersectionality approach to HIV prevention for women.

American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) face stark disparities in both HIV diagnoses and opioid overdose deaths. In AI/AN communities, these two public health crises are uniquely intertwined by risk behaviors and the social determinants of health. This workshop will provide a brief overview of the HIV and opioid epidemics in Tribal communities, and discuss the role that social determinants of health (including poverty, inequities in healthcare access, exposure to crime, and historical trauma) have had in escalating these crises in Tribal communities. Participants will learn about the Tribal response to both epidemics, including a presentation of the specific policy and programmatic efforts undertaken by the White Earth Nation to create, implement and support a syringe service program. Participants will gain insight into the policy realities of expanding syringe service programs in Tribal communities, and learn about the complexities and nuances of implementing a syringe service program on a reservation.

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Wellness Recovery Action Plan for Long Term Survivors

The Power of Fiscal Sponsorship: Supporting Small but Mighty Organizations

Spanish translation available ((es)) Presenters: Tammy Kinney, Advantage, Winder, GA

Presenters: Paola Barahona, AIDS United, Washington, DC Zach Ford AIDS United Morey Riordan, Riordan Strategies

Location: Celebration 5, Convention Level Track: People Living with HIV Level: Intermediate

Location: Celebration 7 Track: Leadership Level: Intermediate

This workshop will teach you how to develop your own Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) to fit your concerns, issues for Long-Term Survivors. The topics of focus are: 1. Developing a Wellness Toolbox 2. Daily Maintenance Plan 3. Triggers 4. Early Warning Sign 5. When thing are breaking down 6. Crisis Planning 7. Post Crisis Planning to develop a Support System and to Identify what relaxation looks like.

This workshop will focus on fiscal sponsorship as an alternative to creating a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. A fiscal sponsor can help organizations establish themselves without having to balance the mission-driven work with the need to manage all administrative and financial responsibilities. However, the fiscal sponsor relationship is complex and can present certain challenges and confusion if it is not established via a thorough process. This session will explore best practices for selecting a fiscal sponsor, how to determine when it is time to establish an independent 501(c)(3), and how to work successfully.

SESSION 2: 4:00 – 6:00 PM Session 2 Workshops

Implementing U=U in Your Jurisdiction Coordinated by Housing Works Location: Regency Ballroom P, Convention Level Pathway: Ending the Epidemic Level: Intermediate

This workshop will focus on the core components involved in endorsing and implementing Undetectable equals Untransmittable (U=U). Participants will learn about the process undertaken by the health departments in New York state, Houston, and Washington, D.C. to introduce the concept of U=U, garner stakeholder input and ensure widespread community engagement in messaging development. This session will include interactive discussion about the challenges and successes of fostering key partnerships using a variety of implementation tools, including focus groups, an assessment survey and media campaigns. Participants can expect to leave this workshop with an in-depth understanding of the scientific and social implications of U=U, and equipped to use a range of strategies to bring this groundbreaking initiative to their communities in a structured and meaningful way.

Health Needs of HIV+ Women Who are Aging Antoinette Jones, SisterLove, Inc. Jenna Torres, Author, Spoken Word Artist, Community Advocate and Human Rights Supporter. Location: Celebration 6, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Intermediate

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Not enough studies follow people who have lived with HIV from birth, and thus doctors lack the necessary information to give those patients the holistic care they need, and patients who contracted the virus perinatally are losing their lives because of it. Most research studies on women aging with HIV are based around women who contracted the virus later in life and have been living with it for 20 years. Many of the studies target women who are in their mid-thirties and forties or older. We currently lack research studies for women who contracted the virus perinatally and have lived with it for 20 years. Thus, we need research that highlights the disparate health complications of aging with HIV after contracting it later in life and complications arising from living with HIV for one’s entire life. We need such studies to understand the brain functions, body mobility, bone development, and other issues that are likely different in people who have lived with the virus since birth. Learning objectives:

1. Understanding the critical need for research in young women living with HIV 2. Understanding differences for someone who was born with HIV versus an individual who contracted HIV at a later stage in their adult life.

3. Understanding the need for young folks who have HIV to participate in research studies that will benefit their health and also be a financial profit for their participation.

Long-term survivors: research, programs, & advocacy for the 21st century Presenters: Nina Martinez, Georgia HIV Justice Coalition, Atlanta, GA Waheedah Shabzz-El, Philadelphia, PA Matt Sharp, TPAN, Chicago, IL Jeff Berry, TPAN, Chicago, IL

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Location: Manatee Spring 1, Lobby Level Pathway: Aging Level: Intermediate

The Reunion Project’s goal is to bring long-term survivors (LTS) living with HIV together with their enduring allies who are witnesses to and acting to confront the HIV epidemic. Renowned HIV treatment activists and LTS implemented The Reunion Project with a town hall model, to reunite diverse survivor communities in jurisdictions nationally where mobilization had not yet begun. Most recently, in March 2018, a community-led, diverse coalition of survivoradvocates took a deeper dive into the survivor psychosocial and community landscape during The Reunion Project’s national roundtable forum. As people living with HIV and AIDS, our very survival has been an act of resistance and resilience. This session will revisit the national roundtable forum by identifying, revealing, sharing and embracing the techniques and nuances we attribute to being long-term survivors of the HIV and AIDS epidemic – both before and since the development of highly-active antiretroviral therapy.

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Smoking & HIV – Helping your clients understand the risks and how to stop Presenters: Jeff Kwong DNP, MPH, ANP, ACRN, FAANP Carole Treston RN MPH ACRN FAAN Karen Gold RN BSN ACRN Location: Blue Spring, Conference Level Pathway: Healthcare Providers Level: Beginner

PLWH and focus on risk reduction and smoking cessation strategies. Participants are encouraged to share their challenges, as we collectively identify strength-based approaches to healthier outcomes.

Meeting People Where they Are: PersonCentered Hepatitis Programming Presenters: Katie Burk, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA Mary Sylla, Centerforce, Oakland, CA David Abitbol, Hawai’i Health and Harm Reduction Center, Honolulu, HI Jill Wolf, Caring Ambassadors, Oregon Moderator: Alyssa Kitlas, NASTAD, Washington, DC and Frank Hood, The AIDS Institute, Washington DC

The New ERA of HIV: Youth Navigation Program Presenters: Peter Gamache, Turnaround Achievement Network, Tampa, FL Location: Celebration 8, Convention Level Pathway: Capacity Building Level: Intermediate

Community-based organizations delivering Youth HIV Navigation services are partnering with the National Library of Medicine® to build upon lessons learned and evidence-based practices to implement innovative ways of eradicating HIV in the youth population. This workshop will discuss topics related to lessons learned among CBOs delivering Youth HIV Navigation services and addressing numerous disparities among youth, a stage-based approach to Youth HIV Navigation information needs and resources across the HIV Care Continuum, and recommendations and next steps for developing knowledge, skills, awareness and the use of resources and tools for Youth HIV Navigation.

Models for Data to Care: Who, When and How

Location: Orlando Ballroom N, Convention Level Pathway: Hepatitis Level: Intermediate

People living with or most impacted by HCV need to be at the forefront of the work to address the epidemic. Stigma and discrimination continue to be a barrier to accessing prevention, testing, and cure so meeting people where they are and addressing their needs as a whole person in a nonjudgmental way will be critical to overcoming existing barriers. This session will explore person-centered hepatitis programs including peer-based prevention and linkage in corrections and community settings, wound care as an entry point to HCV testing and linkage, and integrating hepatitis programming into substance use treatment.

The Opioid Crisis and Injection Related Infectious Diseases

Presenters: Elizabeth DiNenno, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta GA

Presenter: Corinna Dan, HHS/OHAIDP, Washington, DC

Location: Regency Ballroom O, Convention Level Pathway: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Pathway Level: Intermediate

This is the second of four sessions that will focus on the use of data to inform HIV prevention programs. During this session, we will discuss different models for preparing a not-in-care (NIC) list, processes used to decide who is most at need of follow-up on that list, and the models for reaching those individuals, including models that use health department (HD) staff (e.g., DIS) and those involving other partners (CBOs) and providers. We will review health department-initiated models and provider models (and models that are a combination of the two), as well as discuss how CBOs collaborate with the health departments and interact with the data to identify people not in care. Participants in the session will also review laws, regulations or policies that may dictate how DIS and CBOs contribute to this effort.

Location: Celebration 1 & 2, Convention Level Pathway: HHS SMAIF Pathway Level: Advanced

Opioid and other substance use disorders are intertwined with HIV, viral hepatitis, and other injection-related infections and are often caused by the same social determinants of health. In contrast, our response to these health problems has typically focused on a single health issue that is determined by the funding instead of the client’s needs. This workshop will focus on the impact of opioid and other substance use disorders, emphasizing what is known among racial and ethnic minorities, gay and bisexual men, and transgender women. Emerging solutions and opportunities for bettering integrating information and services will be considered throughout the workshop.

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has a responsibility to address HIV, they have the same responsibility to respond to the mental health of persons infected and affected by HIV.

Food Is Medicine for People with HIV: Addressing Access Barriers through Nutrition Services

This session will provide faith-based tools and best practices for addressing HIV-related mental illness in faith-based communities.

Presenters: Karen Pearl, God’s Love We Deliver, New York, NY Matt Pieper, Open Hand, Atlanta, GA Mark Ryle, Project Open Hand, San Francisco, CA

Help for Multidisciplinary Care Teams: Managing PLWH’s Pain and Opioid Use Disorder

Location: Orlando Ballroom M, Convention Level Pathway: Structural Interventions Level: Intermediate

This workshop will discuss new research on the efficacy of food and nutrition services (FNS) for PWH, focusing on barriers unique to disproportionately affected communities of color and innovative engagement strategies using nutrition interventions as the gateway. Research on FNS for PWH will begin the workshop, including recently published studies from San Francisco and Boston and other studies in progress. We’ll introduce on-the-ground programs in Atlanta, Oakland and New York City that are achieving higher viral suppression, stronger client engagement and improved medication adherence. Finally, we will walk through policy strategies that have successfully incorporated the FNS model into healthcare delivery systems to capitalize on the results evident in the outcomes of the research presented.

The Bros in Convo Initiative: We Are The Community Presenter: Daniel Downer, The Bros in Convo Initiative, Orlando, FL Location: Celebration 11, Convention Level Track: Gay Men Level: Beginner

Presenters: Karen McKinnon, Northeast Caribbean AIDS Education and Training Center, New York, NY Daria Boccher-Lattimore Northeast Caribbean AIDS Education and Training Center Francine Cournos, Northeast Caribbean AIDS Education and Training Center Location: Celebration 9, Convention Level Track: Opioid Epidemic Level: Intermediate

It is estimated that as many as 115 people per day have died of opioid misuse. The excessive prescription of opioids has played a large role in fueling the current crisis of addiction and overdose. This is the backdrop against which PLWH are being treated for pain. Clinicians have been advised to prescribe opioids less often, for shorter durations, and with the lowest effective doses. Primary care HIV clinicians and care teams need to know how to provide effective pain management while preventing opioid addiction and overdose. The Northeast/Caribbean AIDS Education and Training Center has been bringing together stakeholders representing prescribers, multidisciplinary care team members, and clients to discuss best practices and create a toolkit. In this workshop, we will share our process; present a toolkit including clinical guides, resources, and infographics; and demonstrate through hands-on worksheets ways to customize the toolkit to reflect your own community’s needs.

This workshop will be a session The Bros in Convo Initiative uses to encourage individuals to identify the importance of their role in reducing the community viral load through advocacy, activism, innovation, and volunteerism. Attendees will interact with facilitators and fellow attendees using digital platforms, fishbowl conversations, evidence informed activities, and storytelling.

Cultural humility in ever-changing HIV landscape: Strategies for effective leadership

By the end of the workshop attendees will learn to identify their local challenges in YBMSM community engagement and mobilization and best practices to create inclusive and innovative programming to empower, engage, and mobilize YBMSM using existing resources.

Location: Celebration 7, Convention Level Track: Leadership Level: Intermediate

HIV & Mental Health: A Faith Response Presented by The Balm in Gilead Location: Rainbow Spring, Convention Level Pathway: Faith Level: Intermediate

Spirituality and religion are important factors to the well-being of persons who are affected by HIV. It helps to cope with stressors, such as stigma, discrimination, depression, post-traumatic stress syndrome, and other mental issues that go unnoticed and untreated. As the faith community

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Presenters: Kelly Stevens, AIDS United, Washington, DC Adrian Neil AIDS United

Over the past several years, cultural humility has been embraced across the field as an alternative to long-standing schools of thought on cultural competence. Much of its appeal lies in its emphasis on the fluidity of cultural identity and need for our understanding of cultures to be similarly flexible. But what does it actually mean to be a steward of cultural humility in this work? What does it mean to be a culturally humble leader? Through a series of facilitated dialogues and activities, this workshop aims to explore the rise of cultural humility as a concept, its application in the HIV field, and in particular, its relevance today. This session will explore ways cultural humility facilitates the building of strong, capable, and resilient leaders who are able to sustain the fight against HIV in the face of increasing transphobia, raciallycharged violence, and anti-immigrant sentiment.

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Location: Bayhill 25 & 26, Lobby Level Track: Public Policy Level: Advanced

Healing Trauma Within LGBT Family Dynamics: An In-Depth Panel Discussion

Federal programs and initiatives including Medicaid Expansion, the Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS Act, and the National HIV/ AIDS Strategy have had significant positive effects on HIV prevention and treatment outcomes. However, implementation of these programs and laws in Tribal communities have been fragmented, leading to inequities and differences in access to health and public health services. This workshop will provide an overview of the unique relationship between the federal government and Tribal Nations, how the U.S. public health system presents a fundamental challenge to HIV prevention in Tribal communities, the federal trust responsibility to provide healthcare and public health services to Tribal communities, and how the sovereign status of Tribal nations impacts the HIV policy and programmatic landscape. Participants will also learn about how Tribal HIV laws and policies interact with federal and state policies, and how differences in the landscapes can be mitigated to improve health outcomes.

Presenters: Naomi Busler, Someone Cares Inc. of Atlanta, Marietta, GA Tony Christon-Walker AIDS Alabama Larry Walker, THRIVE Support Services Location: Celebration 12 & 13, Convention Level Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Intermediate

For LGBT individuals, the concept of family can be a complicated and often troubling topic of conversation. Some find acceptance within an openminded family-of-origin, while others suffer intense trauma and even abuse within their birth families. Trauma can lead many LGBT people to seek out ‘chosen families’ within their communities to receive the familial safety and support that they did not originally receive. There is much behavioral health research supporting the effects of positive family dynamics in building resiliency against traumatic events, such as that experienced by many after the Pulse Shooting. Can these same models of family dynamics be applied to LGBT chosen families as well? If not, how do we encourage the healthcare retention of LGBT/HIV+ individuals that do not have an accepting birth family? Join us for an interactive panel discussion of behavioral health experts to lead discussion and activities exploring this topic.

Mentoring, Modeling & Messaging: Empowering HIV-Positive Women To Community Leadership

Centering Trans People and PrEP in the SF Bay Area

Presenters: Stephanie Antoine, Hyacinth AIDS Foundation, Newark, NJ Crystal Mitchell Iris House Anastasia Willis, Hyacinth AIDS Foundation Lynette Abdul’Waliyy, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center

Presenters: Sean Arayasirikul, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA Janet Halfin Erikka Palafox Janie Vinson Location: Orlando Ballroom L, Convention Level Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Beginner

Trans people are a population at high risk for HIV acquisition. Despite this fact, trans people have been largely ignored in the response to the HIV epidemic. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is the first biomedical intervention with promise for reducing HIV acquisition in populations at risk. PrEP projects to date have shown minimal uptake and low adherence to PrEP among trans people. The Stay Study is a PrEP access intervention aimed at providing tailored peer navigation and text message adherence support to increase uptake of and adherence to PrEP among trans adults. The Stay Study developed a social media campaign involving a diverse group of 12 trans and gender non-conforming social media influencers in the San Francisco Bay Area. This interactive workshop will describe the Stay Study intervention and detail the process of developing its innovative, critical campaign driven by trans and gender non-conforming social influencers.

Intersections and divergences of Tribal, State and Federal HIV Laws Presenters: Shervin Aazami, National Indian Health Board, Washington, DC Carolyn Angus-Hornbuckle National Indian Health Board Robert Foley, National Indian Health Board

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Location: Celebration 3 & 4, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Intermediate

This workshop will highlight three CDC-funded community-based organizations in Essex County (Newark), New Jersey that are implementing successful peer-based interventions and strategies to promote medication adherence and retention in care among HIV-positive cis and transgender women of color in the Newark community. Presenters will demonstrate how recruitment of HIV-positive women of color as advocates and mentors focusing on modeling strong leadership qualities and promoting positive messaging in social marketing campaigns has led to increased retention in care, decreased stigma, and a growing cadre of HIV-positive female community leaders.

HIV Communication: Reducing Stigma through Language Spanish translation available ((es)) Presenters: Vickie Lynn, USF, Lutz, FL Valerie Wojciechowicz CAN Community Health Venita Ray, Texans Living with HIV Network Location: Celebration 5, Convention Level Track: People Living with HIV Level: Intermediate

Researchers, clinicians, and other stakeholders unintentionally use terminology in verbal and written form that further stigmatizes people living with HIV (PLHIV). Although stigmatizing language surrounding

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HIV has been used for decades, a growing number of individuals in the community of PLHIV have expressed concerns over the unintentional stigma conveyed by certain terminology.   The aim of this interactive workshop is to explore the history of terminology used to describe HIV, detail how the use of stigmatizing language affects both internal (how we

feel about themselves) and external stigma (how others relate to us) and highlight the history and understanding of people first language.  This interactive session includes small group exercises and attendee feedback on the use of language.

8:00 – 10:00 PM Opening Reception

Opening Reception featuring Ongina Location: Hyatt Regency Orlando Convention Level, Windermere Ballroom

Thursday, September 6, dress in whatever makes you feel magnificent and head down to the Windermere Ballroom at 8PM.

Check in starts at 7:30 PM and you won’t want to be late! While you wait for the amazing festivities, you can enjoy the sounds of the University of Central Florida’s Jazz Band and we have more surprises in store! At 8:15 PM sharp you will be transported into a magical and mystifying world with a touch of Florida throughout. Come see talents you have never seen before, including our special guest performer, from RuPaul’s Drag Race Season One, Ongina!  Ongina, will hit the stage during the Opening Reception and it will lead into a party where you can dance the night away.  A meet and greet with Ongina will be available as well.

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Are you living with HIV, taking antiretrovirals, and experiencing decreased weight and energy? There’s more to gain.

SEROSTIM is a human growth hormone. In clinical trials, SEROSTIM improved symptoms of HIV-associated wasting after 12 weeks. The most common side effects occurring in more than 10% of patients included swelling of the hands or feet, and joint pain or stiffness. BRIEF SUMMARY OF IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION FOR CONSUMERS What is SEROSTIM (somatropin) for injection? SEROSTIM is an injectable prescription medicine used for the treatment of HIV-positive patients with wasting or cachexia to increase lean body mass and body weight, and improve physical endurance. Treatment with antiretroviral therapy at the same time is necessary. You should not take SEROSTIM if you have: É’$FULWLFDOLOOQHVVIURPVXUJHU\VHULRXVLQMXULHVRUDVHYHUH breathing problem É’&DQFHURUXQGHUJRLQJWUHDWPHQWIRUFDQFHU What should I tell my doctor before using SEROSTIM? É’,I\RXKDYHFDQFHURUKDGFDQFHULQWKHSDVW É’,I\RXKDYHGLDEHWHVDUHDWULVNIRUJHWWLQJGLDEHWHVRUKDYH blood sugar levels that are higher than normal. New cases of type 2 diabetes have been reported in patients taking SEROSTIM. É’,I\RXDUHDOOHUJLFWRJURZWKKRUPRQHEHQ]\ODOFRKROVXFURVH phosphoric acid or sodium hydroxide.

É’(\HSUREOHPVFDXVHGE\GLDEHWHV É’$OOHUJLHVWRJURZWKKRUPRQHRURWKHULQJUHGLHQWVLQ SEROSTIM vials É’,I\RXDUHWDNLQJDQ\RWKHUPHGLFLQHV ERWKSUHVFULSWLRQRURYHU the counter), vitamins, or supplements because these medicines may affect each other. Your doctor may need to adjust the dose of SEROSTIM or other medicines you are taking. É’,I\RXDUHQXUVLQJSUHJQDQWRUSODQWREHFRPHSUHJQDQW,WLVQRW known if SEROSTIM passes into your breast milk or could harm your unborn baby.

What are the most common side effects of SEROSTIM reported in clinical trials in patients treated for HIV-associated wasting or cachexia? É’%UHDVWHQODUJHPHQWLQPHQ É’6ZHOOLQJHVSHFLDOO\LQWKHKDQGVRUIHHWRUDURXQGWKHH\HV É’1DXVHD É’%RQHPXVFOHDQGMRLQWSDLQRUVWLIIQHVV É’([WUHPHWLUHGQHVV É’7LQJOLQJQXPEQHVVDQGSDLQLQWKHILQJHUVWKXPERUZULVW É’8QXVXDOVNLQVHQVDWLRQV Other less common but serious side effects of SEROSTIM are: É’+LJKEORRGVXJDU K\SHUJO\FHPLDGLDEHWHV ZKLFKFDQLQFOXGH É’6HULRXVDOOHUJLFUHDFWLRQVWKDWUHTXLUHLPPHGLDWHPHGLFDO symptoms of increased thirst and urination, tiredness, or attention trouble concentrating É’3DLQDQGWHQGHUQHVVLQWKHDEGRPHQ É’+HDGDFKHVFKDQJHVLQYLVLRQQDXVHDRUYRPLWLQJZKLFKUHTXLUHVLPPHGLDWHPHGLFDODWWHQWLRQ These are not all of the possible side effects. Let your doctor know about any side effects you experience. Your doctor may prescribe a pain reliever or may decrease your dose of SEROSTIM to help manage some side effects. You are encouraged to report side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. How should you administer SEROSTIM? Patients and caregivers should be trained by a healthcare professional on how to mix and inject SEROSTIM prior to use. Never share SEROSTIM with another person, even if the needle is changed. Injection sites can include arms, legs, abdomen and should be changed GDLO\$YRLGLQMHFWLQJSEROSTIM in areas that are sore or bruised.

For complete information, visit www.serostim.com and talk to your healthcare provider. ASK YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER ABOUT SEROSTIM FOR HIV-ASSOCIATED WASTING. WITH TREATMENT, PEOPLE CAN GAIN WEIGHT AND LEAN BODY MASS, AND EXPERIENCE INCREASED ENERGY. Connect with us for tips on healthy living with HIV and to learn more about SEROSTIM. Facebook.com/Serostim

Serostim Official Channel

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Positivelytold.com


SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE FRIDAY 7:00 am 7:45 am

Morning Worship Service

8:30 am 5:00 Pm

REGISTRATION

9:00 Am 11:30 Am

Social Media Lab

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07

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level

Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Barrel Spring 1 Session 3: Workshops

9:00 am 11:00 am

Community Engagement in Data to Care and HIV Surveillance Activities Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom O Ensuring Ryan White Funding Follows the Epidemic Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom L Decriminalizing Sex Work: An Integral Step for Liberation Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Silver Spring Forgotten Population: An Inside Scoop on Formerly Incarcerated Women Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Bayhill 25 & 26 Getting to HIV Equity by Creating Sustained Systems Changes Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 1 & 2 Girl Talk: Developing Effective Support Groups for HIV-Positive Women Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 7 Integrating “Sexual Safety” into the HIV Dialogue Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 11 Mentor, Lead, Succeed: Building Alliances Across Ages Supported by ViiV Healthcare Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom P Obstacles to Undetectable: Case Studies from the Rural Deep South Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 12 & 13

Opioids, Hepatitis C, and Harm Reduction: An Overview of Prevention Spanish translation available ((es)) Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 5 Opioid Use & Treatments: What We Can do in 2018 Hyatt Regency Orlando Convention Level, Blue Spring Preparing for The Next Generation of The Black HIV/AIDS Response Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 3 & 4 PrEParing the South: Learning from the Mississippi Experience Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 8 Racism and Housing Policies: The Impact on the HIV Epidemic Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom M The Complexities of Lives and Care of Black Women with HIV Hyatt Regncy Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 6 Trans & Poz after 50 Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Manatee Spring 1 Syndemics of HIV, Hepatitis, and Overdose Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom N Trending: A Look at Cultural Trends of HIV and Faith among Youth and Young Adults Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring You Down with GPP (Good Participatory Practive)? Engaging young MSM in HIV prevention Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 9

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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE FRIDAY

SEPT

07

10:00 am 5:00 pm 11:30 am 1:30 pm

Exhibit Hall Open

Location: Plaza International Ballroom, Convention Level Luncheon Plenary

Together Ahead: Accelerating Progress to End HIV through Inclusion Presented by Gilead Sciences Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Plenary Ballroom

1:30 pm 2:00 pm

POSTER PRESENTATIONS

1:30 Pm 6:00 Pm

Social Media Lab

2:00 pm 4:00 pm

Location: Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Rotunda

Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Barrel Spring 1 Session 4: Workshops

Addressing Employment Needs: Social, Economic and Employment Disparities Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom M

HIV/AIDS and Domestic Violence: It’s Not Just Physical Anymore!!! Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 6

ARTAS for Managers: A Collaborative CapacityBuilding Assistance Model Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 7

HIV Stigma; Why Trauma-Informed Care Matters Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 12 & 13

Behind Closed Doors: Understanding the Culture of Sex in Church Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring Fearlessly Living Your Best Life: How to Practice Daily Self-Care Supported by Janssen Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Silver Spring Exploring Experiences of HIV Stigma and Spirituality by Older Black MSM Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Bayhill 25 & 26 Gilead COMPASS Initiative™: A Conversation with the Coordinating Centers Supported by Gilead Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom P Hepatitis Elimination as an Equity Issue Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom N

HIV Treatment in 2018 - What’s New & How to Communicate Those Messages Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Blue Spring MSM of Color and HIV: Putting Biomedical Interventions into the Mix Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 1 & 2 Older Adults Dominate HIV Epidemic: Needs Defined by Multi-Site ROAH Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Manatee Spring 1 Reaching the Unreachable: Strategies for Reaching Transgender Populations Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 8 The Importance of the 340B Program to HIV Service Organizations Spanish translation available ((es)) Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 5

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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE FRIDAY The Power of Story: Crafting Inspirational Stories to Empower PLWH Supported by ViiV Healthcare Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 3 & 4 The Triple Affect: Innovation, Prevention and Treatment Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom L

SEPT

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Together, Our Voices Make Us Stronger: Digital Storytelling Addresses Stigma Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 11 Understanding the Opioid Epidemic and How Your Community Can Respond Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 9 Using HIV Surveillance Data: Where Do We Go from Here? Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom O

Session 5: Workshops

4:15 pm 6:15 pm

Ain’t I A Woman: Why Funding Gaps are Harmful!!! Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 6

Maximizing Empowerment and Minimizing Stigma in the Age of U=U Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 1 & 2

Can We Deliver? HIV Research among Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom N

Mentoring Future Grant Writers to Develop Applications that Win Funding Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 8

Connecting Data to Identify County-Level Need for Comprehensive Harm Reduction Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 7

Methods of Engaging African American YMSM in Biomedical Research Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom L

A Conversation with the Reunion Project and NMAC’s HIV 50+ Strong and Healthy Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Manatee Spring 1

Reimagining Role Model Stories for the Trans Community Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Blue Spring

Financially PrEPared: Maximizing PrEP Utilization in Underserved Populations Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom M

Supporting Supervisors to Manage Successful Linkage to Care Programs Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom O

Employing a Sex Positive Approach to HIV Prevention and Care Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Bayhill 25 & 26

Trauma-Informed Care for People Living with HIV: Strategies for Implementation Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 12 & 13

Engagement of Latino MSM in HIV Clinical Trials Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

Trauma-Informed Care for the Soul: An Afro-Latinx Conversation Spanish translation available ((es)) Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 5

Enhancing the Role of HOPWA Providers in Ending the Epidemic Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 9 Listening Session: Updating National Plans for HIV & Hepatitis Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom Q

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We Count: Strategies for Effective SOGI Data Collection Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Silver Spring Youth HIV Policy Advisor Program: A Model for HIV Advocacy Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 11


SEPT

07

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE FRIDAY

6:30 pm 7:30 pm

Affinity Sessions

7:00 pm 8:30 pm

DOCUMENTARY SCREENING: WHEN THE BEAT DROPS

Location: *Check Affinity Session board located near registration booths.

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom

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SEPT

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FRIDAY

SESSION 3 WORKSHOPS

7:00 am - 7:45 am Early Risers

Morning Worship Service Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

9:00 am - 11:00 am Session 3: Workshops

Mentor, Lead, Succeed: Building Alliances Across Ages

Trans & Poz after 50 Presenters: Cecilia Chung, Oakland, CA Teo Drake, Greenfield, MA

Supported by ViiV Healthcare Location: Regency Ballroom P, Convention Level Track: Leadership Level: Advanced

Location: Manatee Spring 1, Lobby Level Pathway: Aging Level: Intermediate

ViiV Healthcare’s Positive Action is proud to present a session designed for youth and their adult allies looking to support youth into leadership roles. Youth are the faces and doers of the future. As veteran leaders age, youth will take over – but are we ready? If you are a leader - are you able to focus your energy in identifying, cultivating, and nurturing your organization’s next leader? If you are a future leader - do you spend or have enough time gleaning best practices and institutional knowledge or learning the skills necessary to assume a leadership position in your organization? During this session, attendees will hear from youth and adults working together as mentors and mentees to create spaces and opportunities for youth-adult alliance building and the development of the next generation of leaders. Attendees will have the opportunity to engage in breakout sessions to connect with their peers, consider best practices for mentoring young people, or being mentored into leadership roles and develop organizational sustainability.

Decriminalizing Sex Work: An Integral Step for Liberation Presenters: Alex Andrews, SWOP-USA, Orlando, FL Christa Daring, SWOP-USA, Baltimore, MD Location: Silver Spring, Pathway: Sex Worker Level: Beginner

Decriminalization of sex work has long been the forefront demand of the sex workers’ rights movement. Decriminalized systems such as New Zealand have seen a dramatic drop in HIV and other STIs as criminal penalties for sex work have been removed. However, there are many other societal oppressions that contribute to violence and stigma against those in the sex trade. In this presentation we will discuss why decriminalization of sex work is a necessary step towards liberation of our communities, but that it is only one of many steps we must take as an intersectional movement.

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STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS 2018 UNITED

Individuals who are living with HIV, over 50, and transgender have unique challenges that deserve to be expertly discussed and validated by the entire community of PLWH. This presentation will address advocating selfdetermination for all people, grounded in legal expertise and committed to racial justice, to keep transgender and gender nonconforming people alive, thriving, and fighting for liberation.

Trending: A Look at Cultural Trends of HIV and Faith among Youth and Young Adults Presenters: Cary L. Goodman, The Balm In Gilead, Inc., Richmond, VA Shyla Kali Campbell, University of Alabama at Birmingham/Alabama Department of Public Health, Birmingham, AL Location: Rainbow Spring, Convention Level Pathway: Faith Level: Intermediate

With the rise of social media, youth and young adults have access to trends that impact their daily lives. As such, the church has been a very influential source of information about sex and sexuality over the years. In this workshop, attendees will review current trends that impact youth and current HIV-related trends impacting youth and young adults. The session will also explore data and information on healthy relationships among youth and young adults. In an interactive way, this workshop will identify tools to strengthen the capacity of faith communities to address HIV among youth and young adults.

FRI


FRIDAY

SESSION 3 WORKSHOPS

SEPT

07

Location: Orlando Ballroom L, Convention Level Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

The Complexities of Lives and Care of Black Women with HIV

In order to ensure people living with HIV have the care, treatment and support needed to be virally suppressed and begin to end HIV, it is imperative that the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program be maintained and funding be distributed to those areas most affected and in need. The AIDS Institute examined how current funding is distributed by analyzing all formula and competitive grant awards based by state and case counts. Using this analysis, this session will engage experts on the provisions in the law that guide how the funding is distributed, and potential administrative changes to funding distributions, including the award of supplemental funding. Additionally, proposed legislative formula changes contained in the Administration’s FY19 budget will be discussed. Subject matter experts from the field will provide perspectives on how best Ryan White funding should be distributed to areas most in need to achieve the goal of ending the epidemic.

Presenters: Janet Kitchen Helena Kwakwa Location: Celebration 6, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Intermediate

The majority of women with HIV are Black, and mortality rates are highest for Black women (BW) than for any non-Black male race/ethnicity. Clinical and reproductive health needs of BW are similar to those of other women, yet differ in material ways. BW are at higher risk than other women for heart disease, hypertension, kidney failure and most cancers. Birth outcomes are worse for BW even after controlling for education and socioeconomic status. These outcomes are worse with age, and worse still with HIV, yet clinical and reproductive health needs of BW are seldom discussed within the context of the lives of BW. We propose to review current data on health outcomes of BW, discussing the complex social, economic, and genetic and life factors intersecting to cause observed outcomes. We will then review some potential solutions that may be incorporated into the general and reproductive healthcare of BW.

Community Engagement in Data to Care and HIV Surveillance Activities

PrEParing the South: Learning from the Mississippi Experience

This is the third of four sessions that will focus on the use of data to inform HIV prevention programs. During this session, health department (HD) representatives will share their experiences engaging their local communities around the methods used to identify and interact with persons who are identified for intervention with D2C and or cluster investigations. HD representatives will describe the processes for engaging with the community (e.g., CBOs, medical providers, and stakeholders), lessons learned, and challenges experienced with the implementation of Data to Care (D2C) and use of surveillance data. This session will also discuss how HD and CBO staff carry out re-engagement to care activities, and the challenges associated with relinking individuals to care.

Presenters: TBD Location: Regency Ballroom O, Convention Level Pathway: CDC Pathway Level: Intermediate

Presenters: Mazdak Mazarei, Primary Care Development Corporation, Westlake Village, CA Melanie Graham, New York Department of Health, New York, NY Robin T. Kelley, NMAC, Washington, DC Location: Celebration 8, Convention Level Pathway: Capacity Building Level: Advanced

The introduction of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) into the HIV prevention toolkit has been justifiably heralded as a game changer in the effort to get new HIV infections in the United States down to zero. While the evidence supporting the effectiveness of PrEP is impressive, many jurisdictions continue to struggle with how to strategically use limited resources to increase access and use of PrEP for the people who need it the most. During this session, participants will hear about lessons learned from the Mississippi PrEP Institute, a convening of the local health department, community-based organizations, and health care organizations throughout the state to work collectively to develop a jurisdiction-wide plan to increase access to PrEP in Mississippi. By the end, participants will have identified opportunities for partnership and strategies for successful implementation of the PrEP continuum of care within their own jurisdictions.

Ensuring Ryan White Funding Follows the Epidemic Presenters: Carl Schmid, The AIDS Institute, Washington, DC Stephanie Hengst, The AIDS Institute, Washington, DC Carolyn McAllaster, Southern, HIV/AIDS Strategy Initiative, Durham, NC

Opioid Use & Treatments: What we can do in 2018 Presenters: Carole Treston RN MPH ACRN FAAN Carol Dawson-Rose RN, PhD, FAAN Melanie Crass PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP Location: Blue Spring, Conference Level Pathway: Health Care Providers Level: Intermediate

Why are Women at risk? What communities are most affected? What are Medication Assisted Therapies(MAT)? What barriers exist to MAT? Come explore these issues with ANAC member Pharmacist and Nurses to identify and respond to what is happening in your community.

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What is BIKTARVY®? BIKTARVY is a complete, 1-pill, once-a-day prescription medicine used to treat HIV-1 in adults. It can either be used in people who have never taken HIV-1 medicines before, or people who are replacing their current HIV-1 medicines and whose healthcare provider determines they meet certain requirements. BIKTARVY does not cure HIV-1 or AIDS. HIV-1 is the virus that causes AIDS.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION What is the most important information I should know about BIKTARVY? BIKTARVY may cause serious side effects: } Worsening of hepatitis B (HBV) infection. If you have both HIV-1 and HBV and stop taking BIKTARVY, your HBV may suddenly get worse. Do not stop taking BIKTARVY without first talking to your healthcare provider, as they will need to monitor your health.

Who should not take BIKTARVY? Do not take BIKTARVY if you take: } dofetilide

Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat. } Severe liver problems, which in rare cases can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, or stomach-area pain. The most common side effects of BIKTARVY in clinical studies were diarrhea (6%), nausea (5%), and headache (5%). Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effects that bother you or don’t go away.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking BIKTARVY? } All your health problems. Be sure to tell your healthcare provider if you have or have had any kidney or liver problems, including hepatitis virus infection.

Serious side effects of BIKTARVY may also include:

} All the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, antacids, laxatives, vitamins, and herbal supplements. BIKTARVY and other medicines may affect each other. Keep a list of all your medicines and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist, and ask if it is safe to take BIKTARVY with all of your other medicines.

} Changes in your immune system. Your immune system may get stronger and begin to fight infections. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any new symptoms after you start taking BIKTARVY.

} If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if BIKTARVY can harm your unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider if you become pregnant while taking BIKTARVY.

} Kidney problems, including kidney failure. Your healthcare provider should do blood and urine tests to check your kidneys. If you develop new or worse kidney problems, they may tell you to stop taking BIKTARVY.

} If you are breastfeeding (nursing) or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed. HIV-1 can be passed to the baby in breast milk.

} rifampin } any other medicines to treat HIV-1

What are the other possible side effects of BIKTARVY?

} Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis), which is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Ask your healthcare provider if BIKTARVY is right for you.

Please see Brief Summary of Patient Information with important warnings on the following pages.


Get HIV support by downloading a free app at MyDailyCharge.com

KEEP SHINING.

Because HIV doesn’t change who you are. BIKTARVY is a 1-pill, once-a-day complete HIV-1 treatment for adults who are either new to treatment or whose healthcare provider determines they can replace their current HIV-1 medicines with BIKTARVY.

BIKTARVY does not cure HIV-1 or AIDS. BIKTARVY.COM


Do not take BIKTARVY if you also take a medicine that contains: } dofetilide

Brief Summary of Patient Information about BIKTARVY®

} rifampin

BIKTARVY (bik-TAR-vee) (bictegravir, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide) tablets

Before taking BIKTARVY, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you:

Important: Ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist about medicines that should not be taken with BIKTARVY. For more information, see “What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking BIKTARVY?”

What is the most important information I should know about BIKTARVY? BIKTARVY can cause serious side effects, including: } Worsening of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. If you have an HBV infection and take BIKTARVY, your HBV may get worse (flare-up) if you stop taking BIKTARVY. A “flare-up” is when your HBV infection suddenly returns in a worse way than before. • Do not run out of BIKTARVY. Refill your prescription or talk to your healthcare provider before your BIKTARVY is all gone. • Do not stop taking BIKTARVY without first talking to your healthcare provider. If you stop taking BIKTARVY, your healthcare provider will need to check your health often and do blood tests regularly for several months to check your HBV infection. Tell your healthcare provider about any new or unusual symptoms you may have after you stop taking BIKTARVY. For more information about side effects, see “What are the possible side effects of BIKTARVY?”

What is BIKTARVY? BIKTARVY is a prescription medicine that is used without other anti-HIV-1 medicines to treat Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) in adults: } who have not received anti-HIV-1 medicines in the past, or } to replace their current anti-HIV-1 medicines for people whose healthcare provider determines that they meet certain requirements. HIV-1 is the virus that causes AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). BIKTARVY contains the prescription medicines bictegravir, emtricitabine, and tenofovir alafenamide. It is not known if BIKTARVY is safe and effective in children under 18 years of age.

What should I tell my healthcare provider before taking BIKTARVY?

} have liver problems, including hepatitis B virus infection } have kidney problems } are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if BIKTARVY can harm your unborn baby. Tell your healthcare provider if you become pregnant during treatment with BIKTARVY. Pregnancy Registry: There is a pregnancy registry for women who take antiviral medicines during pregnancy. The purpose of this registry is to collect information about the health of you and your baby. Talk with your healthcare provider about how you can take part in this registry. } are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed if you take BIKTARVY. • You should not breastfeed if you have HIV-1 because of the risk of passing HIV-1 to your baby. • At least one of the medicines in BIKTARVY can pass to your baby in your breast milk. It is not known if the other medicines in BIKTARVY can pass into your breast milk. Talk with your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, antacids, laxatives, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Some medicines may interact with BIKTARVY. Keep a list of your medicines and show it to your healthcare provider and pharmacist when you get a new medicine. } You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for a list of medicines that interact with BIKTARVY. } Do not start a new medicine without telling your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider can tell you if it is safe to take BIKTARVY with other medicines.


How should I take BIKTARVY? } Take BIKTARVY exactly as your healthcare provider tells you to take it. BIKTARVY is taken by itself (not with other HIV-1 medicines) to treat HIV-1 infection. } Take BIKTARVY 1 time each day with or without food. } Do not change your dose or stop taking BIKTARVY without first talking with your healthcare provider. Stay under a healthcare provider’s care during treatment with BIKTARVY. } If you take antacids that contain aluminum, magnesium, or calcium, take BIKTARVY on an empty stomach 2 hours before you take these antacids. } If you take supplements that contain iron or calcium, take these supplements with food at the same time that you take BIKTARVY. } Do not miss a dose of BIKTARVY. } If you take too much BIKTARVY, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away. } When your BIKTARVY supply starts to run low, get more from your healthcare provider or pharmacy. This is very important because the amount of virus in your blood may increase if the medicine is stopped for even a short time. The virus may develop resistance to BIKTARVY and become harder to treat.

What are the possible side effects of BIKTARVY? BIKTARVY may cause serious side effects, including: } See “What is the most important information I should know about BIKTARVY?” } Changes in your immune system (Immune Reconstitution Syndrome) can happen when you start taking HIV-1 medicines. Your immune system may get stronger and begin to fight infections that have been hidden in your body for a long time. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you start having any new symptoms after starting your HIV-1 medicine. } New or worse kidney problems, including kidney failure. Your healthcare provider should do blood and urine tests to check your kidneys when starting and during treatment with BIKTARVY. Your healthcare provider may tell you to stop taking BIKTARVY if you develop new or worse kidney problems.

What are the possible side effects of BIKTARVY? (continued) } Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis). Too much lactic acid is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat. } Severe liver problems. In rare cases, severe liver problems can happen that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turns yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, lightcolored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, or stomach-area pain. The most common side effects of BIKTARVY are diarrhea (6%), nausea (5%), and headache (5%). These are not all the possible side effects of BIKTARVY. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

General information about the safe and effective use of BIKTARVY. Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Patient Information leaflet. Do not use BIKTARVY for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give BIKTARVY to other people, even if they have the same symptoms you have. It may harm them. This Brief Summary summarizes the most important information about BIKTARVY. If you would like more information, talk with your healthcare provider. You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for information about BIKTARVY that is written for health professionals. For more information, call 1-800-445-3235 or go to www.BIKTARVY.com. Keep BIKTARVY and all medicines out of reach of children. Issued: February 2018 BIKTARVY, the BIKTARVY Logo, DAILY CHARGE, the DAILY CHARGE Logo, KEEP SHINING, LOVE WHAT’S INSIDE, GILEAD, and the GILEAD Logo are trademarks of Gilead Sciences, Inc., or its related companies. © 2018 Gilead Sciences, Inc. All rights reserved. BVYC0087 07/18

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Syndemics of HIV, Hepatitis, and Overdose Presenters: CDC, Atlanta, GA Sue Cantrell, LENOWISCO, Wise County, VA Wayne Smith, Samaritan Ministry, Knoxville, TN Lee Storrow, NC AIDS Action Network, Raleigh, NC Shana Geary, Florida Department of Health, Tallahassee, FL Moderator: Frank Hood, The AIDS Institute Washington, DC and Alyssa Kitlas, NASTAD, Washington, DC Location: Orlando Ballroom N, Convention Level Pathway: Hepatitis Level: Intermediate

The opioid crisis in the United States is a public health emergency with drug overdose being the leading cause of death among people under 50. Increases in injection drug use are driving rates of HBV, HCV, and HIV to increase exponentially, with new HCV cases increasing 3.5-fold between 2010 and 2016. In order to address these intertwined epidemics, communities are working to expand access to syringe services programs (SSPs), substance use treatment, including medication assisted treatment, hepatitis and HIV testing, and overdose prevention. This session will explore the syndemics of HIV, viral hepatitis, and the opioid crisis, and how health departments, community based organizations, and communities are working to respond.

Presenters: For list of presenters please refer to the 2018 USCA mobile app Location: Celebration 1 & 2, Convention Level Pathway: HHS SMAIF Pathway Level: Intermediate

Today, people living with HIV can live about as long as their peers and have essentially no risk of transmitting the virus sexually if they achieve and maintain an undetectable viral load. Disparities in access to PrEP, new HIV infections and diagnoses, retention in care, viral suppression, and death rates remain.

These include: (1) improving HIV screening, prevention, and care within the Indian Health Service, (2) improving the ability of community health centers to conduct routine HIV screening and provide high-quality HIV care, (3) developing data sharing agreements, and (4) programs for Black and Latino gay and bisexual men.

Racism and Housing Policies: The Impact on the HIV Epidemic Presenters: Lauren Banks Killelea, National AIDS Housing Coalition, Washington, DC

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To address racial and health disparities in our nation, we must first learn the history. In this workshop we will look at the history of housing policies and how they deliberately perpetuated systemic racism and health disparities. We will explore the impact of racial discriminatory housing policies (including “red lining” and “quality of life” regulations) and how decades later, these laws are tied to the current HIV epidemic and availability of affordable housing. We will learn about solutions, including the Fair Housing Act, the HOPWA program, and other programs that support people living with HIV and prevent homelessness. Finally, we will look at what is on the horizon-- housing for aging persons living with HIV, increased housing costs, and how housing is a key solution to ending the HIV epidemic.

Obstacles to Undetectable: Case Studies from the Rural Deep South Presenters: Monica Johnson, Valencia Robinson, HEROES, Columbia, LA Location: Celebration 12-13, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

Louisiana, Mississippi, and Georgia will present case study on the differences in services provided in rural vs urban.

At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: Data from the Centers from Disease Control and Prevention indicate that the Deep South had the highest HIV diagnosis rate and the highest number of individuals diagnosed with HIV in 2014. The Deep South also had the highest death rates with HIV as an underlying cause of any US region. While funding and media reports paint a picture of a monolithic epidemic here, there are actually two epidemics here—urban and rural.

Getting to HIV Equity by Creating Sustained Systems Changes

The Secretary’s Minority AIDS Initiative Fund (SMAIF) supports local, state, and federal programs that have tested ways to change existing care systems to benefit people of color. In this session we will share: • Strategies to create systems change in your own community • SMAIF program models that can improve efficiency and effectiveness.

Location: Orlando Ballroom M, Convention Level Pathway: Structural Interventions Level: Intermediate

15% of people living with HIV/AIDS in the Deep South live in rural areas; mortality in these rural areas is 1.5 times higher than seen in urban areas of the region. This workshop will use case studies and interactive discussion to identify and explore unique barriers to health in rural areas and will help participants understand the urgent need for rural-specific solutions.

Integrating “Sexual Safety” into the HIV Dialogue Presenters: Bennett Reagan, APLA Health, Los Angeles, CA Miguel Chion, APLA Health, Los Angeles, CA Ted Duncan Location: Celebration 11, Convention Level Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Beginner

“Sexual safety” is an approach to sexual choices and decisions, and a promotion of self-efficacy, individuality, and sex-positivity. This workshop will present the concept of “sexual safety” as an alternative focal point of prevention messaging and interventions. Participants will be asked to provide examples of the prevention messaging and language they

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currently employ, and will explore the possible negative effects of simply using “safe sex” as a goal for people living with HIV (PLWH) and individuals at risk. Participants will be introduced to “sexual safety” as it is used in Sin Buscar Excusas/No Excuses (SBE), and will be given the opportunity to brainstorm how “sexual safety” can be used in their own practice and messaging.

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recidivism. This workshop will assist community providers better serve this population.

Girl Talk: Developing Effective Support Groups for Women Living with HIV Presenters: Veronica Karp, Iris House, New York, NY Ingrid Floyd, Iris House, New York, NY

You Down with GPP (Good Participatory Practice)? Engaging young MSM in HIV Prevention

Location: Celebration 7, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Beginner

Presenters: Clare Collins, Microbicide Trials Network, Pittsburgh, PA Russell Campbell, Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, Seattle, WA Jonathan Lucas, FHI 360 Jessica Salzwedel, AVAC Location: Celebration 9, Lobby Level Track: Gay Men Level: Beginner

Good Participatory Practice (GPP), a set of comprehensive guidelines on engagement for biomedical HIV prevention trials, has provided a roadmap for developing meaningful and intentional partnerships with community stakeholders. Yet, GPP concepts have been adopted to a much lesser extent in advocacy among young gay men of color in the U.S., where the necessity for thoughtful and sustained engagement is immense. This workshop will engage attendees in a discussion about the benefits of applying a GPP framework to HIV prevention programming and the training of emerging leaders in gay communities of color.  Panelists versed in GPP will provide examples of how the GPP framework informs advocacy with young Black and Latino gay men, and how it can be used to create future partnerships.  Attendees will also have an opportunity to apply GPP concepts hands-on through a small group exercise and report-back process.

In the past decade, many interventions and medical advancements have been developed that have significantly improved the health outcomes of Women Living with HIV (WLWH). However, despite the progress made, we have yet to overcome two most pressing barriers to care: stigma and isolation. WLWH face a series of unique challenges that cause them to acutely experience the effects of stigma and isolation. In an effort to combat these barriers, Iris House, a non-profit organization in Harlem, NY, has collaborated with ViiV Healthcare to launch a national virtual support group (VSG) for cis and trans WLWH. In this interactive workshop, participants will learn about: the process of developing and implementing the VSG; the impact that participation in the VSG has had on members’ rates of engagement in care, viral load suppression, and feelings of isolation; and how they can successfully develop effective support groups for WLWH at their own agencies.

Opioids, Hepatitis C, and Harm Reduction: An Overview of Prevention Spanish translation available ((es)) Presenters: Andrew Reynolds, Project Inform, San Francisco, CA Location: Celebration 5, Convention Level Track: Opioid Epidemic Level: Beginner

Forgotten Population: An Inside Scoop on Formerly Incarcerated Women Presenters: Roni Minter, Sistas Healing Old Wounds, Inc., Albany, NY Paulene Toussaint, Sistas Healing Old Wounds, Inc., Albany, NY Location: Bayhill 25 & 26, Lobby Level Track: Trauma-Informed Care Level: Intermediate

Most women leaving correctional facilities need assistance and support as they re-enter their respective communities. However, many of the support services are either male modeled services or very generic services that do not meet the needs of formerly incarcerated women. These programs are negligent in addressing PTSD and separation anxiety issues women experience as a result of their experiences while incarcerated. Many service providers are unaware of the Pseudo Family units women forge while incarcerated. Thus, upon release, in respect to gender identity and gender roles, most if not all programs fail to address and/or honor the experiences these women have had while incarcerated. These barriers create situations where formerly incarcerated women are at high risk for contracting sexually transmitted diseases or viruses along with a high probability of

This presentation will provide an overview of the syndemic relationship between opioids, injection drug use, and hepatitis C. We will discuss the various risks associated with opioid use, including overdose and HIV and HCV transmission, while also providing an update on the epidemiology of hepatitis C in the United States. From there, we will review various strategies for HCV prevention among people who inject drugs (PWID) and strategies to engage and support people in HCV treatment, concluding with a review of reinfection prevention.

Preparing for The Next Generation of The Black HIV/AIDS Response Presenters: Raniyah Copeland, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Aunsha Hall-Everett, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Location: Celebration 3 & 4, Convention Level Track: Leadership Level: Intermediate

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On National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, Black AIDS Institute’s CEO and Founder, Phill Wilson, announced his retirement. Wilson has been one of the most influential leaders in the efforts to end HIV in Black communities and his retirement hallmarks BAI’s trajectory to prepare for the next generation of HIV/AIDS response in Black communities. During this workshop, BAI will discuss the following: Strategic planning process and the succession planning thus far, including the adoption of Holocracy - a self-management

practice for running purpose-driven, responsive organizations; Breaking out of patriarchal organizational systems that have been counter-productive in Black organizations, and moving into an organizational culture that is reflective of the expertise and talents among BAI staff; and Reflective processing to review progress made, including successes, challenges and lessons learned, while also brainstorming how our collective leadership will continue to lead the efforts to end HIV in Black America.

11:30 am - 1:30 pm Plenary Luncheon

Together Ahead: Accelerating Progress to End HIV through Inclusion Location: Plenary Ballroom, Convention Level Sponsored by Gilead Presenters: TBA

Declining rates of new HIV infections and advances in HIV prevention and treatment are offering new hope for ending the epidemic. However, progress has not been even across key affected populations. The transgender community, for example, continues to have one of the highest burdens of HIV infection compared with other hard-hit communities. To truly end the epidemic, we must acknowledge the challenges that remain and continue to seek out solutions that will address the needs of the communities hardest hit by HIV. Please join us for a plenary discussion exploring the transgender journey, and how new paradigms and approaches to addressing the burden of HIV may help accelerate progress toward ending the epidemic.

10:00 am - 1:30 pm Exhibitions

Exhibit Hall Open Hyatt Regency Orlando, Plaza International Ballroom, Convention Level

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm Presentations

Poster Presenations Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Rotunda

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violence. This session will dive into the types of intimate partner violence, potential reasons behind them and ways to ensure that organizations and providers have safe and culturally appropriate spaces.

Fearlessly Living Your Best Life: How to Practice Daily Self-Care Workshop sponsored by Positively Fearless, brought to you by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson Presenter: Yolo Akili Robinson is the Executive Director and Founder of BEAM. Yolo began his career in public health supporting Black communities as an HIV/AIDS counselor. Feeling strongly about the need for more feminist work with men, Yolo co-founded Sweet Tea: Southern Queer Men’s Collective, a collective

Using HIV Surveillance Data: Where Do We Go from Here? Presenters: For list of presenters please refer to the 2018 USCA mobile app Location: Regency Ballroom O, Convention Level Pathway: CDC Pathway Level: Intermediate

of gay and queer men who came together to address sexism and misogyny in

LGBT communities. Alongside Robinson’s counseling and training work, he has written for numerous publications on wellness, including the Atlanta Journal Constitution, Ebony, The Huffington Post, Cassius and Everyday Feminism Location: Silver Spring, Convention Level Level: Beginner

In the whirlwind of our busy lives, self-care can feel like the last thing we have time for. When we’re so focused on helping others, we can forget about prioritizing our own well-being. But to be our best selves – in our work and our lives – self-care is an absolute MUST.

So what is self-care and why is it so important? Self-care is any intentional act – large or small – that recharges our personal batteries and promotes holistic health – mind, body and spirit. Self-care calls for self-reflection, selfacceptance and a daily commitment to living freely, boldly and fearlessly. When we take time to practice self-care we nourish ourselves and in turn, we are better equipped to help nourish the community.

This is the fourth and final session of the CDC Pathway focusing on the use of data to inform HIV prevention programs. Data to care (D2C) and cluster investigations are relatively new public health interventions, now funded under CDC’s flagship HIV surveillance and prevention health department program. This peer-to-peer discussion will focus on what health departments need as they prepare to conduct these interventions. What do we need to do to have the largest public health impact? Presenters will address the “feedback loop” from program data to improve surveillance data; how well the D2C and cluster investigations improve our outreach to priority populations, like MSM of color and transgender persons; the potential of these activities on populations most in need of assistance and resources (e.g., homeless, persons using drugs, other high-risk groups), and what D2C or cluster investigation programs will look like in five years.

In this workshop, self-care guru, Yolo Akili Robinson from BEAM, will teach participants how to incorporate self-care into their daily routines. Yolo will show attendees how to practice intentional self-care and illustrate how the journey toward emotional healing can better their personal advocacy efforts or their organization’s work.

Reaching the Unreachable: Strategies for Reaching Transgender Populations

HIV/ AIDS and Domestic Violence: It’s Not Just Physical Anymore!!!

Location: Celebration 8, Convention Level Pathway: Capacity Building Level: Beginner

Presenters: Marissa Miller, NMAC, Washington, DC Aryah Lester, NMAC, Washington, DC

This interactive workshop will demonstrate how to offer culturally responsible and effective community mobilization and outreach strategies for the transgender populations.

Presenters: Dr. Demisha Burns, Policy and Advocacy Manager at WORLD Carla Wright, Outreach and Linkage Team Leader Location: Celebration 6, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Intermediate

Objectives:

Although Domestic Violence (DV) or Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is no longer just a female or male, cis or trans issue, it is an issue nonetheless that should not be overlooked. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), HIV-positive women in the United States experience IPV at rates that are higher than for the general population. Across a number of studies, the rate of IPV among HIV-positive women (55%) was double the national rate, and the rates of childhood sexual abuse (39%) and childhood physical abuse (42%) were more than double the national rate. They also found that Women in relationships with violence have four times the risk for contracting STIs, including HIV, than women in relationships without

• To empower community agents to learn how to effectively mobilize transgender of color populations for care services • To ensure agency infrastructure supports safe and affirming entry of transgender patients into HIV services • How to provide a safe space during outreach and mobilization for the transgender of color populations

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Location: Blue Spring, Convention Level Pathway: Healthcare Providers Level: Intermediate

The Power of Story: Crafting Inspirational Stories to Empower PLWH

Rapid start, Two drug regimens, long acting agents. Is U=U the new TasP? What happened to HIV vaccines & microbicides? Let’s get updated on what this really means for your clients and how the messages and access are-or- are not translating to all communities. Bring your questions and experiences to share with the group. Discussions facilitated by ANAC nurse practitioner, nurse and pharmacist.

Supported by ViiV Healthcare Panel Moderator: Marc Meachem (Head of External Affairs, ViiV Healthcare North America) Panelists: Devin Q. (Peer Ambassador) Dekota J. (Peer Ambassador) Masonia T. (Peer Ambassador) Cynthia R. (Peer Ambassador) Matt M. (Snow Companies)

Gilead COMPASS Initiative™: A Conversation with the Coordinating Centers

Location: Celebration 3-4, Convention Level Track: People Living with HIV Level: Beginner

Presented by Gilead Sciences

Throughout history, storytelling has been a key that opens doors of enlightenment and motivates people to action. Stories connect us with - and help us learn - from each other. Good stories can be powerful tools in the fight against stigma…or in the struggle to inspire one another to advocate for themselves and for their health needs. What makes a good story? How do you put one together? How do you use stories to promote health and wellbeing to those that feel uninspired? This workshop will feature a panel of HIV+ peer ambassadors discussing how they created and shared their stories across the US. You’ll also participate in an interactive writing workshop to begin creating your story, whether it is about your journey living with HIV or as an advocate in the fight to end HIV. Join us and see how your story is unique, powerful, and can inspire others.

Behind Closed Doors: Understanding the Culture of Sex in Church Presented by The Balm in Gilead Location: Rainbow Spring, Convention Level Pathway: Faith Level: Intermediate

Conversations of sex and sexuality in many churches is silent. While there are some congregations that address healthy sexuality openly and directly, many churches send the message that sex and sexuality are not topics that are generally open for discussion. Many feel it’s too awkward, have their own personal struggles, or it hits too close to home. Many faith leaders tend to avoid the topic of sex and sexuality all together. The challenge is: saying nothing still sends a message. As a result, usually there will be taboo or shameful undertones around the topic of sexuality in the church. This session will give a comprehensive look at the culture of sex in church sharing data, historical information, and controversial cases.

HIV Treatment in 2018- What’s New & How to Communicate those Messages Presenters: Jeff Kwong DNP, MPH, ANP, ACRN, FAANP Melanie Crass PharmD, BCPS, AAHIVP Carole Treston RN MPH ACRN FAAN

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Speakers: Gilead COMPASS Initiative™ Coordinating Centers Neena K. Smith, Bankhead, Emory University Rollins School of Public Health Samira Ali, University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work Nic Carlisle, Southern AIDS Coalition Location: Regency Ballroom P, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

Through the Gilead COMPASS Initiative™, we are working to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the Southern United States by partnering with local communities and supporting evidence-based solutions to meet the needs of people living with and impacted by HIV/AIDS. Join the COMPASS Coordinating Centers for a discussion on how we are listening, learning and leveraging our collective impact to improve access to and quality of health care services for people living with HIV in the South, increase local leadership and advocacy in the South, and change public perception of HIV/AIDS in the South.

Hepatitis Elimination as an Equity Issue Presenters: Corinna Dan, HHS, Washington, DC Elton Naswood, Office of Minority Health Resource Center, Washington, DC Rhea Racho, Hep B Foundation, New York, NY Luis Mares, Latino Commission on AIDS, New York, NY Robert Greenwald, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation, Cambridge, MA Moderator: Alyssa Kitlas, NASTAD, Washington, DC and Frank Hood, The AIDS Institute, Washington, DC Location: Orlando Ballroom N, Convention Level Pathway: Hepatitis Level: Beginner

Hepatitis disproportionately impacts a number of communities in the United States. Incidence rates for American Indian/Alaskan Natives remain high relative to other groups. People of Asian and Pacific Islander descent make up less than five percent of the US population, but account for over 50 percent of people living with HBV. Hispanics are 60 percent more likely to die from viral hepatitis than whites. And, within five years, over 65 percent of people who inject drugs will become infected with HCV, but Medicaid and private insurance continue to impose restrictions that block the people most in need from getting access to a cure. Eliminating hepatitis will not be possible unless we explore it through the lens of equity. This session will discuss the importance of and provide examples of engaging communities most impacted by hepatitis and putting them at the forefront of our work.

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MSM of Color and HIV: Putting Biomedical Interventions into the Mix Presenters: TBD Location: Celebration 1 & 2, Convention Level Pathway: HHS SMAIF Pathway Level: Advanced

Nationally, there are signs of improvement in HIV infections and viral suppression among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM). These gains are less in some cases than those in other groups, and among MSM, the racial/ethnic and younger men are not benefiting as much. The key to preventing HIV infections and improving viral suppression among MSM is increasing use of biomedical interventions. This workshop will present information about increasing the use of PreP to reduce the risk of HIV acquisition and Treatment as Prevention (TasP) to increase viral suppression and prevent transmission among MSM of color. The workshop includes discussions about strategies for implementing these interventions in a range of programs, problem solving, and the need for ongoing monitoring and evaluation to assess progress and ongoing program improvement.

Addressing Employment Needs: Social, Economic and Employment Disparities Presenters: Brett Andrews, PRC, San Francisco, CA Liza Conyers, Penn State University, University Park, PA Mark Misrok, National Working Positive Coalition, New York, NY April Watkins, GMHC, New York, NY Location: Orlando Ballroom M, Convention Level Pathway: Structural Interventions Level: Beginner

Social and economic disparities that undermine HIV care and prevention interventions are at play in the unemployment, underemployment, and/ or lack of quality employment among communities most impacted by HIV in 2018. This community forum on HIV and employment will be a platform to share and expand understanding of the employment needs and desires of people living with or at greater risk for HIV, and a range of strategies to address them in the context of HIV care and prevention. Interactive discussion will focus on service delivery best practices, HIV and employment research findings, and federal, state, local and agency level employment-related policy issues with implications for the health and well-being of people living with or at greater risk for HIV.

ARTAS for Managers: A Collaborative Capacity-Building Assistance Model Presenters: Arman Lorz, JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc., Denver, CO Ba Laris, ETR, Long Beach, CA Sarahjane Rath, PROCEED Melanie Graham, New York Department of Health, New York, NY Location: Celebration 7, Convention Level Track: Leadership Level: Advanced

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In the efforts of getting to zero, community-based organizations, health departments, and healthcare organizations seek training to implement effective strategies that help clients living with HIV link into care. Key to this is supporting organizational leadership in effective ways to integrate these strategies into their services and implement them successfully. Using data collected over three years of delivering national trainings on the Anti-Retroviral Treatment and Access to Services (ARTAS) strategy, the presenters identified key information regarding the strategy’s effective implementation. This quantitative data has been the foundation of an online training course for managers of prevention programs, addressing the common barriers and concerns and developing a best practices online training tool. During this workshop, the presenters will focus on describing the collaborative efforts delivering capacity-building assistance and highlighting successes and challenges of ARTAS implementation to managers, specifically in supporting their coordinators in their linking role with newly HIV-diagnosed clients.

The Triple Affect: Innovation, Prevention and Treatment Presenters: Barbara Kubilus, Borinquen Health Care Center, Inc., Miami, FL Location: Orlando Ballroom L, Convention Level Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Intermediate

This session will provide a replicable framework within a Community Health Center setting. This approach to HIV prevention includes Routine HIV Testing, Identification of High Risk Negatives and Rapid Access treatment. By using an innovative methodology via the Electronic Medical Record (EMR), HIV testing is integrated into the clinic flow and is another test added to the battery of tests conducted during every new and annual patient visit. Algorithms are implemented within the EMR that determine eligible patients and automates the processes; alerts are sent to Comprehensive Risk Counseling and Services (CRCS) for patients identified as “High-Risk” and an alert is sent to a Patient Navigator for PrEP assessment/linkage for those identified positive for an STD. Rapid Access Treatment is offered to newly diagnosed (and lost to care); these individuals receive a primary care visit, 30-day supply of medication, and linkage to supportive services within the same day of diagnosis.

Understanding the Opioid Epidemic and How Your Community Can Respond Presenters: Bruce Taylor, Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, VA Location: Celebration 9, Convention Level Track: Opioid Epidemic Level: Beginner

This interactive workshop is focusing on the complex factors that have contributed to the rise of opioid use and dependences in our communities and how communities respond to lessen the severe impact on its citizens. The workshop examines social norms, stigma, racism, trauma, policy and social determinants of health as contributors to the epidemic.  The myths and misunderstandings of addiction will be briefly discussed as well.  The second part of the workshop focuses on a community response to the epidemic. Effective collaborative efforts between governmental, civic,

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medical and business partners are essential elements in this response as well as the voices of those persons using drugs. Strategies in how to get all players to the table to minimize the impact of opioids on the community will be the concluding discussion.

Together, Our Voices Make Us Stronger: Digital Storytelling Addresses Stigma Presenters: Jessica Holli, John Snow, Inc., San Francisco, CA Erin Norvell, Digital Edge Communications

who are aging, is nonexistent. With advanced medication treatment, aging populations are living longer with HIV. It is essential to understand the lived experiences of older Black MSM living with HIV as it pertains to the critical socio-cultural constructs and intersections of HIV stigma, aging, and spirituality. This workshop will provide vital information on these intersections. The interactive workshop will also provide practice and research implications for helping professionals working with older Black MSM living with HIV effectively.

Older Adults Dominate HIV Epidemic: Needs Defined by Multi-Site ROAH

Location: Celebration 11, Convention Level Track: People Living with HIV Level: Intermediate

HIV stigma continues to be a major barrier to accessing testing, care, and treatment in many areas of the United States (U.S.). In observance of World AIDS Day 2017, HIV.gov partnered with Snapchat’s news production team to air a nationwide, public Snapchat Story which featured the voices of individuals living with HIV in communities throughout the U.S. Through their own voices, participants shared their experiences with testing, treatment, viral suppression, stigma, support, and the power of positive thinking. In this workshop, HIV.gov will walk through how creating a digital storytelling campaign that showcases voices from the community can address stigma in communities throughout the U.S.

HIV Stigma: Why Trauma Informed Care Matters.

Presenter: Mark Brennan-Ing, Brookdale Center for Healthy Aging, Hunter College, CUNY, New York, NY Location: Manatee Spring 1, Lobby Level Pathway: Aging Level: Intermediate

The last two decades have seen the inexorable annual increase in the number of adults age 50 and older living with HIV. This massive shift in age is accompanied by parallel changes in the needs of these older adults as HIV treating clinicians are spending most of their time managing nonHIV conditions. The multi-site ROAH 2.0 (Research on Older Adults with HIV) initiative is focused on defining and prioritizing the emergent needs of this aging population. ROAH will provide ASOs, CBOs and health care providers with data driven direction for programming.

The Importance of the 340B Program to HIV Service Organizations

Presenters: Robert Pompa, Lehigh Valley Health Networks AIDS Activities Office, Allentown, PA

Spanish translation available ((es))

Location: Celebration 12 & 13, Convention Level Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Beginner

HIV stigma will be the foil to “ending HIV” in our lifetime. HIV stigma continues to impact HIV/AIDS in regards to all aspects of the National HIV Strategy and the HIV treatment cascade: Prevent Test, Link, and Treat (and Retention). This workshop will discuss how stigma is enacted within the MSM community through thought, word, and deed, as well as policies and procedures that stigmatize PLHIV in delivery of care. The presentation will also explore the trauma responses as a result of HIV stigma for PLHIV. Through definition and demonstration this workshop will make the case for Trauma Informed Care as the foundation for all agencies serving PLHIV.“

Exploring Experiences of HIV Stigma and Spirituality by Older Black MSM Presenters: Warren Miller, Howard University, Washington, DC Location: Bayhill 25 & 26, Lobby Level Track: Gay Men Level: Intermediate

Presenters: William McColl, AIDS United, Washington, DC Carl Baloney, AIDS United, Washington, DC Drew Gibson, AIDS United, Washington, DC Location: Celebration 5, Convention Level Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

In a budgetary landscape where the Ryan White Program is consistently flat-funded and recipients are operating on razor thin margins, the savings generated from the 340B Drug Pricing Program have been invaluable for HIV service organizations. The 340B Program, which both lowers drug costs for patients, including people living with HIV, and provides additional resources for HIV service organizations at no cost to the U.S. taxpayer, has enabled HIV service organizations to offer vital services to people living with HIV. However, in the past year there has been considerable interest from members of Congress, the Trump administration, and the pharmaceutical industry to fundamentally alter the 340B Program against the wishes of the healthcare providers who use it. In this workshop, AIDS United will look at the ways in which the 340B Program benefits HIV service organizations and examine what can be done to ensure the program’s continued success going forward.

Research on HIV stigma and spirituality with Black men who have sex with men (MSM) living with HIV is minimal. Moreover, research with this group,

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4:15 pm - 6:15 Pm Session 5: Workshops

Location: Regency Ballroom O, Convention Level Track: Leadership Level: Beginner

A Conversation with the Reunion Project and NMAC’s HIV 50+ Strong and Healthy Workshop leaders: Jeff Berry, TPAN, Chicago, IL Moisés Agosto-Rosario, NMAC Gregg Cassin, San Francisco, CA

Location: Manatee Spring 1, Lobby Level

This interactive session will include short update presentations, Q and A, discussion and feedback regarding NMAC’s 50+ Stronger and Healthy program and The Reunion Project, two of the largest sustained national programs specifically for people with HIV/AIDS over 50 years old and HIV/AIDS long-term survivors. A facilitated interactive discussion to honor our survivor experience will be led by The Reunion Project’s Gregg Cassin. Attendees welcome to stay for a social and networking hour with refreshments at the end of the session. 

Listening Session: Updating National Plans for HIV & Hepatitis

Many agencies are implementing linkage to care programs for individuals who are newly diagnosed with HIV. Managers and supervisors of these programs are tasked with supporting their programs and staff to ensure clients are linked to medical care as quickly as possible. Often, these organizational leaders do not have the specific program content knowledge to proactively enhance the success of these public health strategies such as ARTAS. In an effort to address these barriers identified by training participants, members of the Capacity Building Assistance Provider Network (CPN) collaboratively developed a blended-learning series to support managers and supervisors who oversee linkage to care programs. During the first implementation cycle, over 140 providers registered for the course and evaluation data show that 94 percent found the course useful or very useful. Presenters will introduce key elements and provide an overview of the ARTAS strategy focusing on roles and responsibilities that relate to supervisors.

Presenters: Kaye Hayes, Acting Director, HHS Office of HIV/AIDS and Infectious Disease Policy Nathan Fecik, Public Health Analyst, HHS Office of HIV/AIDS and Infectious Disease Policy Corinna Dan, Viral Hepatitis Advisor, HHS Office of HIV/AIDS and Infectious Disease Policy

Presenters: Bretia Gordon, Medical Advocacy and Outreach, Montgomery, AL Alftan Dyson, Medical Advocacy and Outreach, Montgomery, AL

Location: Regency Ballroom Q, Convention Level Pathway: HHS SMAIF Level: Beginner

Location: Orlando Ballroom M, Convention Level Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Intermediate

Financially PrEPared: Maximizing PrEP Utilization in Underserved Populations

USCA participants are encouraged to attend this session to share ideas and experiences to help inform the update of the current National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) and the National Viral Hepatitis Action Plan (NVHAP) which both expire in 2020. Scientific advances, the evolution of the health care system, emerging strategies for effective prevention and improved health outcomes, and ongoing and emerging challenges such as the opioid crisis have created imperatives and opportunities to renew and extend these plans which are designed to move us, as a nation together, toward the goal of ending both diseases as public health threats in the United States.

Community feedback has been one of the greatest strengths in making the NHAS and the NVHAP successful national plans. Join community leaders, frontline workers, individuals living with and at risk for infection, and other members from the community for a listening session with HHS staff.

Supporting Supervisors to Manage Successful Linkage to Care Programs Presenters: Ba Laris, ETR, Long Beach, CA Sarahjane Rath, PROCEED Arman Lorz, JSI Melanie Graham, New York Department of Health, New York, NY

Although highly effective in preventing HIV, PrEP is not reaching most Americans who could benefit from its utilization. Data released by the CDC recently revealed that about 1.1 million people in the United States are at substantial risk for HIV and should be offered PrEP. One potential barrier preventing the uptake of PrEP is cost.  Out-of-pocket expenses can vary for individuals depending on insurance coverage. Furthermore, many individuals interested in PrEP are uninsured. PrEP clinics may be able to use several funding streams to decrease cost associated with providing care and contribute financial support to individuals requiring assistance with out-ofpocket expenses.  In this workshop, we will discuss how to establish a PrEP clinic, identify viable sources of funding to sustain the clinic, and expand reach to underinsured or uninsured clients. We will also discuss how the use of telemedicine for PrEP can increase access for rural communities. 

Can We Deliver? HIV Research among Pregnant and Breastfeeding Women Presenters: Clare Collins, Microbicide Trials Network, Pittsburgh, PA Katherine Bunge, Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC Dazon Diallo Dixon, SisterLove, Inc. Kristen Sullivan, University of North Carolina, Center for Bioethics

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Location: Orlando Ballroom N, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Beginner

Major successes have been made in preventing perinatal transmission of HIV and yet, substantial knowledge gaps continue to exist in HIV clinical research among pregnant and breastfeeding women. A conventional ethical framework has led to the exclusion of this population from major PrEP trials, and required that women who become pregnant while participating in research discontinue the use of study products.  This framework hinders our knowledge of HIV prevention and treatment options for pregnant and breastfeeding women. This session will address the need for safe and effective options to prevent and treat HIV during all stages of women’s lives, including when they are pregnant and breastfeeding – a time of substantial vulnerability to HIV. Session presenters will summarize HIV studies underway that include pregnant and breastfeeding women, and engage attendees in an interactive discussion about fair access to involvement in research and the interconnected interests of maternal and fetal health.

Presenters: Erin Nortrup, AIDS United, Washington DC, DC Erin Falvey, Christie’s Place Martha Robles, Christie’s Place Jay Blount, Christie’s Place

This workshop will review a gender-responsive, trauma-informed model of care to improve health outcomes for people living with HIV. Presenters will highlight the importance of organizational transformation in fully implementing traumainformed care and the critical role of peers in this process.

Presenters: Eric Paulk, Georgia Equality, Atlanta, GA Daniel Driffin, Thrive SS Alphonso Mills, Positive Impact Location: Celebration 11, Convention Level Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

In April 2015, Georgia Equality started the Youth HIV Policy Advisors Program (YHPA) because “all laws and policies related to HIV should be informed by the experiences of people living with HIV.” YHPA trains young people living with HIV (HIV+) in Metro Atlanta in policy advocacy and provides them resources to educate state, city, and county-level policymakers to make better decisions related to HIV prevention and treatment. Youth must be under 30-years-old, HIV+ and willing to discuss their status publicly with officials and the media and reside in Metro Atlanta to qualify for this program. In the program, youth create a policy agenda and present it to elected officials and community leaders at our World AIDS Day Luncheon. Youth also are matched with elected officials and serve as “Special Advisors on Youth HIV” while they complete an HIV-related project in an elected official’s district. This interactive workshop will help advocates plan, implement, and facilitate similar programs in their communities. 

Maximizing Empowerment and Minimizing Stigma in the Age of U=U Presenters: Erika Roca, APLA Health, Los Angeles, CA Thomas Donohoe, UCLA

Reimagining Role Model Stories for the Trans Community Presenters: Esha Dholia, San Francisco Community Health Center (formerly API Wellness Center), San Francisco, CA Nate Cedilla Jenna Rapues Location: Blue Spring, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Beginner

This hands-on creative writing workshop will share strategies and tools to adapt client stories from Community PROMISE for the trans community. Participants will leave the workshop with a strong understanding of how to adapt these stories to reflect the norms and experiences of the communities they’re working with, and how to use these stories to meaningfully engage clients in person through outreach and via social media. The workshop will be facilitated by staff from San Francisco Community Health Center (SFCHC), an agency with expertise in developing programs for trans folks that reflects communityidentified needs.

Methods of Engaging African American YMSM in Biomedical Research

Location: Celebration 1 & 2, Convention Level Track: People Living with HIV Level: Intermediate

Presenters: Joyell Arscott, Duke University, Owings Mills, MD

In this interactive workshop, APLA-Shared ActionHD will review the science supporting U=U and will use an intersectional approach to explore personal and environmental factors that impact viral suppression. We will also explore STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS 2018 UNITED

Trauma-Informed Care for People Living with HIV: Strategies for Implementation

Location: Celebration 12 & 13, Convention Level Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Beginner

Youth HIV Policy Advisor Program: A Model for HIV Advocacy

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the impact unachievable viral suppression has on people living with HIV (PLWH), HIV providers and the HIV community. The group will collectively review cases, share experiences, and review success stories---as well as potential challenges---of U=U strategies to not just identify challenges but find the best course of action to address those challenges. We will then review behavioral and organizational leverage points and intermediaries that can reinforce success, refine U=U messaging, and offer empowering solutions for people living with HIV, their organizations, and their providers.

Location: Orlando Ballroom L, Convention Level Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Intermediate

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Young African-American men who have sex with men (YMSM), age 18-24, have the highest rates of HIV for their age group, but also have the lowest rates of PrEP use. Recruitment of African-American YMSM into HIV biomedical research studies is challenging, causing them to be underrepresented in HIV prevention research. This underrepresentation has been linked to: African-Americans’ community stigma regarding HIV and same-sex behaviors, and the collective memory of research conducted in the African-American community (e.g., Tuskegee). In addition to using proven recruitment strategies, researchers also need to be familiar with newer methods of engaging African-American YMSM in biomedical research. This workshop will describe the pros and cons of using social media and community engagement to identify and recruit young AfricanAmerican YMSM into a PrEP study in two different states.

Connecting Data to Identify CountyLevel Need for Comprehensive Harm Reduction

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which can be felt as soon as they are asked about their demographic information in a non-affirming way. In this interactive workshop, you will learn about field-tested strategies to improve retention in care through effective collection of patient sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) data, and leave the session with a plan to implement these tips to make your own organization more welcoming so that young gay, bisexual and transgender men of color will know that they count.

Enhancing the Role of HOPWA Providers in Ending the Epidemic Presenters: Raquel Silverio, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Queens, NY Eleonora Jimenez-Levi Rasheed Ford, Project Hospitality Location: Celebration 9, Convention Level Track: Public Policy Level: Beginner

Presenters: Lauren Yerkes, Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, VA Bruce Taylor Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, VA Karen Diepstra Anne Rhodes   Location: Celebration 7, Convention Level Track: Opioid Epidemic Level: Intermediate

In response to the statewide opioid epidemic, Virginia passed legislation (HB 2317) enabling comprehensive harm reduction (CHR), including syringe services, in select Virginia counties determined to be at increased risk of HIV and Hepatitis C outbreaks among persons who inject drugs. In order to prioritize counties for CHR eligibility, Virginia developed an eligibility assessment tool that provides each county with a score based upon 13 relevant indicators (e.g., opioid overdose fatalities). This workshop will present Virginia’s experience with CHR implementation, the eligibility tool methodology, and the methodologic adaptations to the tool that occurred to incorporate lessons learned from public health practice. Workshop attendees will participate in an activity to rank counties for CHR using two different methodologies and will gain a deeper understanding of the challenges to and strategies for successful CHR implementation.

In 2015, New York State released the Ending the Epidemic (ETE) Blueprint to end AIDS by 2020. In order to reduce the number of new infections to 750 or less, a large number of persons with HIV (PWH) must achieve and maintain viral suppression. HIV housing providers are strategically positioned to support ETE efforts by addressing consumer barriers to care and treatment through the delivery of housing services. The workshop will feature the collaborative work between the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s (DOHMH) and Project Hospitality during the “Getting to 90 initiative,” a viral suppression program designed to enhance the role of HIV housing providers in improving viral suppression outcomes for PWH who receive subsidized housing assistance. The interactive session will also include a facilitator-led group activity to help providers assess internal and external resources to maximize viral suppression in their existing housing services model.

Engagement of Latino MSM in HIV Clinical Trials Presenters: Russell Campbell, Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination, Seattle, WA Jose Bauermeister, University of Pennsylvania Omar Martinez, Temple University School of Social Work Location: Rainbow Spring, Convention Level Track: Gay Men Level: Beginner

We Count: Strategies for Effective SOGI Data Collection Presenters: Mazdak Mazarei, Primary Care Development Corporation, Westlake Village, CA JaDawn Wright, Pacific AIDS Education & Training Center Location: Silver Spring, Convention Level Track: Gay Men Level: Intermediate

While young gay, bisexual and transgender men of color continue to be disproportionally impacted by HIV, they are too often not accessing the care they need to stay healthy and reduce new infections. One important barrier to retention in care for these men is a lack of culturally competent services,

The Legacy Project is a national initiative housed within the Office of HIV/AIDS Network Coordination. The Legacy Project’s mission is to build trust and collaboration between historically underrepresented communities most impacted by the domestic HIV epidemic, researchers, and research institutions; enhance cultural competence; and initiate scientific investigation to increase clinical research participation. This interactive workshop will highlight the efforts of the Legacy Project, Latinx organizations, and researchers to jointly develop culturally specific and relevant resources and tools to increase recruitment and retention of Latino MSM in HIV Clinical Trials.

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SESSION 5 WORKSHOPS

Trauma-Informed Care for the Soul: An Afro-Latinx Conversation

Employing a Sex Positive Approach to HIV Prevention and Care

Spanish translation available ((es))

Presenters: Vaty Poitevien, Housing Works, Brooklyn, NY Andrew Greene, Housing Works, Brooklyn, NY Elizabeth Koke, Housing Works, Brooklyn, NY

Presenters: Shawn-Patrick Torres, Latino Commission on AIDS, New York, NY Location: Celebration 5, Convention Level Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Beginner

Trauma, defined as experiences that produce enduring pain and distress, impacts all people differently; instigating a variety of responses to traumatic life incidents. Studies show that the relationship between religion and trauma has been linked to a variety of poor health outcomes including HIV infection in vulnerable communities and initiating crystal meth injection drug use amongst marginalized women, including sex workers. During this workshop, participants will deconstruct and discuss the religion-trauma relationship, and be able to re-imagine how trauma informed care, which has been used across a range of practice settings, has the potential to improve health outcomes of Black and Latinx LGBT folks.

Location: Bayhill 25 & 26, Lobby Level Track: People Living with HIV Level: Intermediate

Sex-positive medical and psychosocial services are a critical component of effective prevention and care with persons with and at risk of HIV infection. In this workshop, participants will learn about how to implement the groundbreaking Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U) message in clinical and other service settings by embracing a frank, sex-positive approach designed to affirm sexuality and promote healthy sexual lives while undoing the harm caused by years of negative messaging and intrusive behavioral approaches that have left many HIV positive and atrisk persons in fear and with less than fulfilling sexual lives.

Ain’t I A Woman: Why Funding Gaps are Harmful!!!

Mentoring Future Grant Writers to Develop Applications that Win Funding

Presenters: Dr. Demisha Burns, Policy and Advocacy Manager at WORLD Carla Wright, Outreach and Linkage Team Leader

Presenters: Stephen Fallon, PhD, Skills4, Ft Lauderdale, FL Theodore Noel, The Guiding Right

Location: Celebration 6, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Intermediate

Location: Celebration 8, Convention Level Track: Leadership Level: Intermediate

Your CEO either writes the grant applications for your agency, or hires outside grant writers. Who is going to keep your program or agency funded when the CEO retires? How will your proposals continue to adapt to changing needs of your local population? Agencies must groom younger staff by giving them a role practicing in the grant writing process. This highly interactive workshop includes hands-on activities to help early and mid-level staff develop grant applications that will win scarce funding. The facilitators will reveal tricks of the trade to help you score points to win grant funding. Participants will get to review and discuss samples from actual grant narratives, learning to identify the strengths and shortcomings in each. Another activity will demonstrate how to break a grant project into pieces that can be split amongst team members and coordinated in order to meet grant due dates.

With the recent announcement of a $1.2 billion pledged to launch the MenStar Coalition, one might ask, what about the women. When comments regarding funding for women’s programs, are made that include verbiage similar to, ‘If we support men’s programs, then hopefully funding will trickle down to women’, one may start to wonder. Concerned individuals can’t help but ask whether or not people understand that women are just as important and funding for women’s programs, specifically for Black and Latina women are needed now more than ever. We will take a transparent look at funding for both men and women’s programs, along with increased diagnoses among Black women, specifically in San Francisco. We will discuss the current state of funding for women’s programs, including Title X and how it specifically impacts Black and Latina Women. We will begin developing workgroups to start identifying opportunities to access funding for women’s programs.

6:30 PM – 7:30 PM Affinity Sessions Location: Check Affinity Session board located near registration booths

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SESSION 5 WORKSHOPS

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7:00 PM - 8:30 PM Documentary Screening

DOCUMENTARY SCREENING: WHEN THE BEAT DROPS Featuring Director Jamal Sims Location: Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom

Drop into the electric and subversive underground dance scene known as “bucking.” As voguing exploded out of the ballroom scene of NYC, bucking was boldly pioneered in the clubs of the Deep South as a new form of self- expression. This film presents a fresh glimpse into the magnetic artistry and flair behind this emerging dance culture.

In his feature debut, famed choreographer and filmmaker Jamal Sims, who has worked with the likes of Madonna, Jennifer Lopez, and RuPaul’s Drag Race, illuminates the warm-hearted and fierce queer black performers who make up one of the leading “bucking” groups in the city of Atlanta. As they train for their biggest competition yet, they face the risk of losing their jobs and family to compete at the top levels of this dance scene. Jamal Sims calls dance a “super power,” and with this film he crafts a vision of the power of dance to bring movement to new heights and elevate the queer community.

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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE SATURDAY 7:00 am 7:45 am

Morning Worship Service

8:30 am 5:00 Pm

REGISTRATION

9:00 Am 11:30 Am

Social Media Lab

9:00 am 11:00 am

08

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level

Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Barrel Spring 1 Session 6: Workshops

Women of Color Aging Gracefully Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Manatee Spring 1 Decolonizing Health Care for American Indian Transgender Women Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 8 Data Utilization Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Blue Spring

National Implementation of Interventions for Transgender Women Living with HIV Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom M Orlando United: Community Response, Healing, and Moving Forward from the Pulse Tragedy Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 7

Ensuring Federal Funding for Domestic HIV Programs Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 12 & 13

Race, the U=U Campaign, and HIV Criminal Law Reform Spanish translation available ((es)) Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 5

Gay Youth: Breaking the Evolutionary Code of Risk and Pleasure Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom N

Shallow Water: The Fate of Transgender Advocacy within HIV Treatment/Care Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Silver Spring

Let’s Fight Back: The Affordable Care Act is Under Attack Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 3 & 4

Telemedicine: Addressing HIV Stigma and Building Capacity for HIV Treatment Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 9

Immigrant Latinas - Are They Really Included among “Women of Color?” Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 6

Thriving in Times of Change: Exploring Sustainability and Competitive Advantage Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom O

It Takes a Village: Multi-Sectoral Efforts to Create a Comprehensive Response Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom P

To Colored Boys Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

Mask Off: Raising Hell and Raising Our Voices Supported by ViiV Healthcare Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 10 Moving Past Trauma with H.O.P.E. - An Innovative Model for CBA Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Bayhill 25 & 26

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Unpacking U=U: The Message and The Movement Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 1 & 2 Women and PrEP: Challenges, Opportunities, and Successes Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 11 Young Men Debating HIV: Care or Cure; Biomedical or Behavioral Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom L


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10:00 am 5:00 pm 11:30 am 1:30 pm

SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE SATURDAY Exhibit Hall Open

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Plaza International Ballroom, Convention Level Luncheon Plenary

Trauma-Informed Care. Aging with HIV and the Trauma of Surviving Lunch provided Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Plenary Ballroom

1:30 pm 2:00 pm

Poster Presentations

1:30 pm 6:00 pm

Social Media Lab

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Rotunda

Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Barrel Spring 1 Session 7: Workshops

2:00 pm 4:00 pm

Aging, HIV, and Emotional Resilience: Skills to Improve Quality of Life Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Manatee Spring 1

Housing Services Impacting PLWHA Health Outcomes through Intersectionality Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom L

Trans-NIH HIV/AIDS Research Program: Mission and Future Directions Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom Q

How to Promote PrEP in the Latino Community Spanish translation available ((es)) Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 5

Addressing HIV Stigma in Older Women Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 9

Lessons Learned from the Mississippi “Getting to Zero” Learning Collaborative Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 7

Are We Shaming Those Who Are Detectable? Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 1 & 2 A STEP Towards Harm Reduction: Facing Flint’s Opioid Epidemic Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Bayhill 25 & 26 Building a Community-Led Research Agenda for Trans/Non-Binary People and HIV Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 8 Ending the Epidemic with the Help of Peer Workers: Peer Worker Programs in HIV, HCV, and Harm Reduction Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 11 Get the Gig - Youth Professional Toolkit - Bio’s, Resumes, & Headshots Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom N

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Race & Health Care: Fighting for Access and Equity Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 3 & 4 States in Play: Advocacy Priorities to Maintain HIV Insurance Protections Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Silver Spring Survivor’s Gifts: Finding Your Story of Strength and Resilience Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom M Training and Technical Assistance for RWHAP Planning Councils and Recipients Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Blue Spring Trans Communities: What We Want & Need Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE SATURDAY Transforming Collaborative Systems: Creating New Conversations Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 12 & 13

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Women of Color Aging Gracefully Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Manatee Spring 1

Trauma-Informed HR Practices: Becoming Trauma-Informed Care Champions Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom O

4:15 pm 6:15 pm

Session 8: Workshops

Are U Part of the Revolution? Bringing U=U to Your Community Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 1 & 2 Building an “HIV Toolbox� for Women Living with HIV Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 12 & 13 Chemsex: HIV, Aging: A Revealing Dialogue on Risks and Interventions Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom O Condoms, STDs, and PrEP Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom L Employment Issues, Opportunities, and Strategies for PLHIV over 50 Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Manatee Spring 1 Empowering this Generation of Youth to End the Epidemic Supported by ViiV Healthcare Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom N Exploring South Asian Sexual Health Relational Domains in the US Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 6 Federal HIV/Aging Policy under Trump-Pence and the Republican Congress Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 9 Getting in Bed Together: An Intimate Discussion about PrEP Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Silver Spring Health Care Rights and Discrimination in the Trump Era Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 3 & 4

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HIV Education in Correctional Settings? Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Bayhill 25 & 26 Inclusion of Injection Drug Use and the Ongoing Opioid Epidemic in the ETE Process Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 11 Never Alone: Addressing Isolation & Building Community Through Storytelling Supported by Gilead Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom P Safe Consumption Spaces: An Essential Intervention to Fight the Opioid Crisis Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom M Sexual Health History Taking for Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Patients Spanish translation available ((es)) Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 5 The Midnight Stroll - Connecting Homeless Trans Persons to Housing Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 8 The Time is Now! Together or Never! Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 7 Training and Technical Assistance Available for RWHAP Community Based Organizations and the HIV Community Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Blue Spring When the Walls Fell: HIV in the Church Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring


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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE SATURDAY

6:30 pm 7:30 pm

Affinity Sessions

7:00 pm 8:00 pm

Special Performance by the Kinsey Sicks!

Check Affinity Session board located near registration booths.

Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom

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SATURDAY

SESSION 6 WORKSHOPS

7:00 am - 7:45 am Early Risers

Morning Worship Service Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

9:00 am - 11:00 am Session 6: Workshops Maria Mejia, Fort Lauderdale, FL Kevin Maloney, Fort Lauderdale, FL Bruce Richman, Brooklyn, NY Jennifer Vaughan, San Francisco, CA Mariah Wilberg, St. Paul, MN

Immigrant Latinas – Are they really included among “Women of Color?” Presenter: Nathaly Rubio-Torio, LMSW, Voces Latinas, Jackson Heights, NY

Location: Celebration 1 & 2, Convention Level Pathway: U=U Level: Beginner

Location: Celebration 6, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Intermediate

The term “women of color” does not always include immigrant Latinas. Campaigns that target women of color do not speak to the needs, circumstances, realities and cultural norms that often impede on decision making of a Latina. Realities such as sex trafficking, survival sex, domestic violence, and traumas around border crossing and history of child sexual abuse are not captured in campaigns targeting women of color. The session will examine these realities and demonstrate how culture plays a tremendous role in Latinas decision making about getting on Pep/Prep, using condoms, leaving abusive relationships, etc. The session will demonstrate how Voces Latinas is currently working on a Prep campaign that includes these realities. It will emphasize the need to include cultural realities if we want to be inclusive of immigrant Latinas in campaigns targeting women of color. Learning Objectives:

1) To understand how culture must be considered and included among “women of color”

2) To understand how realities of immigrant Latinas interfere with her risk for HIV/STI’s

3) Steps to ensure inclusivity of immigrant Latinas in campaigns targeting “women of color”

Unpacking U=U: The Message and the Movement Presenters: Roscoe Boyd, New York, NY Dee Connor, Denver, CO Brady Dale Morris, Nashville, TN Alicia Diggs, Greensboro, NC Stacy Jennings, Columbia, SC Bryan Jones - Cleveland, OH Michael Kharfen. Washington, DC Alleen King, Shreveport, LA Arianna Lint, Fort Lauderdale, FL

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In early 2016, people living with HIV organized with allies and researchers to communicate a life-changing but widely unknown and radical fact: a person living with HIV who has an undetectable viral load and is taking medication as prescribed cannot transmit HIV to sexual partners. In other words, Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U). The U=U campaign began in the U.S. as a struggle for truth rooted in the principle that all people living with HIV have a right to accurate and meaningful information about their sexual and reproductive health. It grew into a community-driven global movement accepted by the international scientific and medical community, and reaching every key affected population in nearly 100 countries – and growing.

In this workshop, you’ll hear the inside story of how it started from some of the founders of the movement, and you’ll gain tools and strategies to communicate this game-changing message in meaningful ways in your communication, clinical, and advocacy work.

Orlando United: Community Response, Healing and Moving Forward from the Pulse Tragedy Presented by the USCA Orlando Host Committee Speakers: Felipe Sousa- Rodriguez, Manager of Collaborative Partnerships, Office of the Mayor, Orlando, Florida Joél Morales, Orlando United Assistance Center, Orlando, Florida Jennifer Foster, Co-Founder, The One Orlando Alliance, Orlando, Florida Nikole Parker, One Pulse Foundation, Orlando, Florida Marco Quiroga, Contigo Fund, Orlando, Florida Ricardo Negron- Almodovar, Latino Justice &Pulse Survivor, Orlando, Florida Location: Celebration 7, Convention Level Track: Trauma Informed Care Level: Intermediate

On June 12, 2016, Orlando experienced one of the worst mass shootings in American history, taking place at Pulse Nightclub. Forty- nine lives were taken

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SATURDAY

and over 50 people were injured, many of whom identified as LGBTQ+, Latinx, and/or Black/African-American. Countless individuals in Central Florida, the nation, and the world were impacted by the immense tragedy.

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Data Utilization

In the two years since the mass shooting, the community in Orlando has grown and is actively working to heal and rebuild, while continuing to face challenges. This workshop will be a panel discussion that tells the story of Orlando’s Resilience and how the community came together to work on healing and rebuilding after Pulse.

Decolonizing Health Care for American Indian Transgender Women Presenter: Trudie Jackson, University of New Mexico Location: Celebration 8, Convention Level Pathway: Trans Level: Beginner

American Indian Transgender women encounter numerous barriers in receiving adequate health care addressing transgender care and treatment by health care providers that may not be familiar or trained in transgender health.

There is a serious scarcity of literature on Two Spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (2SLGBT) health specifically on American Indians. Similar to the limited research on 2SLGBT populations, there is an even greater shortage of research on American Indian transgender individuals. This presentation will fill the gap and move toward decolonizing and improving their health care through challenging and exposing the colonial practices that have reproduced the existing conditions of oppression, injustice, and marginalization that American Indian transgender individuals encounter. This presentation also explores American Indian transgender resiliencies and shares the voices of American Indian transgender individuals centering their ideas, perspectives, and insights of culturally appropriate services and care for their healthcare must be developed to be congruent with their cultural values and norms, consistent with their meaning of well-being, and must be grounded in their cultural perspective.

Presenters: Michael Costa, Abt Associates, Cambridge, MA Leanne Savolal, RWHAP Part A, Detroit, MI Supriya Rao, RWHAP Part A, San Jose, CA Jennifer Flannagan, NASTAD, Washington, DC Monique Richards, HRSA/HAB/DMHAP, Rockville, MD Location: Blue Spring, Convention Level Pathway: HRSA Pathway Level: Intermediate

This workshop will focus on data utilization at the local, state, and federal level to improve health outcomes for persons living with HIV. The workshop will feature three presentations: that will discuss 1) lessons learned and successful strategies in implementing Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) Part A Data Driven Data- to- Care approaches by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA) Care Continuum Learning Collaborative ; 2) a state perspective on ways to identify disparities and inform service delivery models/approaches and resource allocation; and 3) how HRSA is using RWHAP client –level data to target interventions and address health inequities across the United States.

Women and PrEP: Challenges, Opportunities, and Successes Coordinated by Housing Works Location: Regency Celebration 11, Convention Level Pathway: Ending the Epidemic Level: Intermediate

Women are particularly vulnerable to HIV due to a mix of social, behavioral and biological factors. Women of color, particularly Black women, have been disproportionately affected by HIV. This workshop will discuss the challenges of implementing a PrEP program for women, discuss opportunities to identify barriers, and celebrate successes.

To Colored Boys

Women of Color Aging Gracefully

Presenter: Marcus D. McPherson, Crystal Springs, MS

Presenters: Anna E Fowlkes, Baltimore, MD Lepena Reid, Tampa, FL Patricia (PAT) Kelly, Orangeburg, SC Lynda Faye Wilson, New Haven, CT

Location: Rainbow Spring, Convention Level Pathway: South Level: Beginner

Location: Manatee Spring 1, Lobby Level Pathway: Aging Level: Beginner

As women of color age, they have considerable concerns about navigating the system as seniors plus women living with HIV. This workshop will bring attention to the different journeys taken by four women of color living with HIV and aging gracefully. There is wisdom in numbers and with a combined total of 267 years of life experiences and 99 years living with HIV, the presenters have much to share. This workshop’s goal is to encourage positive outcomes by recognizing our personal experiences and challenges, placing our attention on resiliency, self-worth, personal strengths and coping strategies. We may be aging but we refuse to be invisible.

Using a play on the literary piece by Hassan Beyah, “To Colored Boys” will explore the challenges faced by young gay, bisexual, queer, and same gender-loving men of African descent as they grow into adulthood in the South. This workshop will bring to light the issues faced by young Black gay, bisexual, queer, and SGL men as they navigate in a world that is oftentimes against them and conclude with an open dialogue of what we can do as a community to be more open and welcoming in a time of division and hatred.

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SATURDAY

SESSION 6 WORKSHOPS

Telemedicine: Addressing HIV Stigma and Building Capacity for HIV Treatment

Moving Past Trauma with H.O.P.E. An Innovative Model for CBA.

Presenters: Aisha Wilkes, CDC, Atlanta, GA Michael Shankle, HealthHIV Reetu Grewal, University of Florida Jacksonville Health

Presenters: Gabriela Betancourt, Latino Commission on AIDS, New York, NY Bolivar Nieto Latino Commission on AIDS Location: Bayhill 25 & 26, Lobby Level Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Beginner

Location: Celebration 9, Convention Level Track: People Living with HIV Level: Advanced

In 2017, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention made funds available for PS17-1710, Telemedicine to Improve HIV Care among Minority Persons Living with HIV in Urban Areas. This three-year demonstration project supports a collaborative effort between University of Florida, Jacksonville (UF) and HealthHIV to assess the feasibility of providing HIV care via telemedicine to enhance retention in HIV care, specifically for racial and ethnic minorities. Telemedicine is an important resource for increasing access to HIV specialty care and reducing the stigma associated with seeking HIV treatment. This workshop will discuss a telemedicine model where physicians provide care to patients remotely using videoconferencing at designated local clinics and communitybased organizations or other convenient locations (e.g., patient’s home using computer or smart device). We will discuss the development of this demonstration project, history of telemedicine at UF, and capacity building assistance required to launch the UF HIV telemedicine program.

National Implementation of Interventions for Transgender Women Living with HIV

2. Ford, J. (1999). Organizational change as shifting conversations, Journal of Organization Change Management, 12, 480-500.

Spanish translation available ((es)) Presenters: Kate Boulton, Center for HIV Law and Policy, New York, NY Eric Paulk, Georgia Equality Ace Brooks, Friends for Life

Location: Orlando Ballroom M, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Intermediate

This workshop will explore national implementation of evidence-informed interventions for transgender women living with HIV, through HRSA’s Evidence-Informed Interventions Coordinating Center for Technical Assistance (E2i CCTA), part of a new initiative entitled Using EvidenceInformed Interventions to Improve Health Outcomes among People Living with HIV (PLWH). Through the E2i CCTA, The Fenway Institute and AIDS United (TFI/AU) aim to improve HIV outcomes (viral suppression, treatment adherence, retention in care) by conducting rapid and sustainable implementation of effective and culturally-tailored interventions for transgender women, specifically Healthy Divas (Alabama, California, New Jersey) and Transgender Women Engagement and Entry to Care Project (TWEET; Louisiana, Michigan, Puerto Rico).

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1. Anderson, D. L. (2017). Organization development: The process of leading organizational change (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications.

Race, the U=U Campaign, and HIV Criminal Law Reform

Presenters: Alex Keuroghlian, The Fenway Institute/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Venton Hill-Jones, AIDS United, Washington, DC Sean Cahill Massah Massaquoi

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This interactive workshop presents the H.O.P.E. strategic capacity-building assistance (CBA) model to help organizations get out and move forward from a “crisis loop.” HOPE (Holistic, Operations, Program, Evaluate), conceptualized by the Latino Commission on AIDS (the Commission), is an innovative, home-grown four-step model that views organizations from a social-construction perspective, and employs organizational development and management (ODM) approaches and interventions to help community-based organizations (CBOs) define/diagnose the roots of the crisis loop; and to plan for action, implementation, and evaluation. H.O.P.E. leads organizations to “shift conversations” that perpetuate the crisis loop to support change, sustainability, and efficacy of their high-impact HIV prevention, sexual and reproductive health, and supportive services for priority populations.

Location: Celebration 5, Convention Level Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

This workshop will explore the relationship between advancements in HIV treatment and prevention and HIV criminal law reform. The workshop will cover recent guidance on Undetectable=Untransmittable (U=U) as it relates to efforts to modernize HIV criminal laws, i.e., laws that target PLHIV for prosecution and imprisonment for activities that are otherwise legal (e.g., consensual sex) or only a minor crime for someone who has not tested positive (e.g., spitting). The Consensus Statement on HIV “Treatment as Prevention” in Criminal Law Reform aims to support advocates who want to identify the most effective way to incorporate U=U into their work and avoid putting marginalized communities at additional risk of criminalization. The workshop will address how criminal reforms that rely on U=U so that only PLHIV who are virally suppressed are protected will leave behind people of color, LGBT people, sex workers, and others who are disproportionately harmed by the criminal legal system.

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engagement tool. Join two Debate Teams as they demonstrate the value and importance of understanding the critical issues in HIV.

It Takes a Village: Multi-Sectoral Efforts to Create a Comprehensive Response Presenter: Laura Pegram, NASTAD, Washington, DC

Ensuring Federal Funding for Domestic HIV Programs

Location: Regency Ballroom P, Convention Level Track: Opioid Epidemic Level: Beginner

This panel will highlight the importance of creating multi-sectoral work groups and collaborative efforts to create comprehensive responses to the intersecting crises of drug use, hepatitis, and HIV. This panel will consist of several presentations about current and ongoing multi-sectoral and crossdepartmental efforts from different organizations and perspectives. These efforts bring together governmental public health, safety, communitybased groups, directly-affected community members, and policymakers in an effort to address the complex and interconnected nature of the current drug use crisis, particularly in relation to infectious disease.

Thriving in Times of Change: Exploring Sustainability and Competitive Advantage Presenters: Liesl Lu, JSI Research and Training Institute, Inc., Boston, MA Juli Powers, JSI Research and Training Institute, Inc., Boston, MA

Presenters: Nick Armstrong, The AIDS Institute, Washington, DC Carl Schmid, The AIDS Institute, Washington, DC Kevin Fisher, AVAC Location: Celebration 12 & 13, Convention Level Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

This workshop will focus on the federal funding needed for domestic HIV programs in order to make progress in reaching the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy. Recent and current federal appropriations and budget cycles will be discussed, including proposed budget cuts by the Trump Administration and what the HIV community did, and continues to do, to defeat them. Speakers will describe potential impacts of proposed budget cuts, and the need for additional funding to reduce the number of new HIV infections and increase treatment and improve viral suppression, particularly amidst of the growing opioid epidemic. Finally, opportunities for community engagement in advocacy activities will be discussed.

Let’s Fight Back : The Affordable Care Act is Under Attack

Location: Regency Ballroom O, Convention Level Track: Leadership Level: Beginner

This skills-building workshop is intended to teach community-based organization (CBO) staff the fundamentals of strategy development to help position themselves for success. CBOs need to understand their niche, while also adapting to national and local policy changes and funders’ priorities. In this workshop, presenters will describe how an organization can “know itself” by understanding its mission, vision, and current business model, and how staff can build on their strengths to identify their competitive advantage. This workshop is intended for staff in all roles and levels. No prior experience is required.

Young Men Debating HIV: Care or Cure; Biomedical or Behavioral Presenters: Marsha Martin, Global Network of Black People working in HIV, Washington, DC Location: Orlando Ballroom L, Convention Level Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Beginner

The HIV response has changed considerably over the past decade. HIV testing is more widely accessible and routine. HIV clinical care is less complicated and more easily managed by the persons living with HIV and their HIV care providers. HIV prevention has matured to include personal choice. Yet, many young African-American gay and bisexual men are outside of the HIV discussion, do not know their HIV sero-status, have not taken the HIV test, nor are they fully aware of how things have changed for the better. This workshop will introduce the use of the Debate Club as an educational community

Presenters: Jaron Benjamin, Housing Works, New York, NY Ramon Gardenhire, AIDS Foundation Chica go, Chicago, IL Robert Greenwa ld, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School, Cambri dge, MA Naina Khanna, Positive Women’s Network – USA, Oakland, CA Location: Celebration 3 & 4. Convention Level Pathway: Health Care Access Level: Intermediate

This workshop will provide an overview of recent efforts by the Trump Administration and Congress to undermine the Affordable Care Act and other important health reforms. It will describe how these efforts threaten access to high-quality and affordable health care for people living with HIV. Join us for a discussion about new Trump proposals that include work requirements, drug screening and restricting prescription drug access. Learn more about efforts to challenge this Administration and Congress and how to participate in grassroots advocacy to protect and promote the health, rights and dignity of people living with HIV!

Shallow Water: The Fate of Transgender Advocacy within HIV Treatment/Care Presenters: Socorro Moreland, #brotherhood, #hch510, APEB, Oakland, CA Achim Howard, DC Transmens Rising Location: Silver Spring, Convention Center Track: Leadership Level: Intermediate

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To empower Transgender people of color (TPOC) to find their voice within HIV prevention and care programming in hopes to de-stigmatize the negativity and myths around the syndemics associated with transgender people of color communities.

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the end of the workshop, participants should be able to identify their own stories as powerful mechanisms that can effect change and will leave with knowledge on how to share their stories.

Gay Youth: Breaking the Evolutionary Code of Risk and Pleasure

Mask Off: Raising Hell and Raising Our Voices Supported by ViiV Healthcare

Presenters: Stephen Fallon, PhD, Skills4, Ft Lauderdale, FL Juan Oves, Florida International University

Presenters: Louie A. Ortiz-Fonseca, Advocates for Youth, Washington DC Tiffany Marrero, Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Location: Orlando Ballroom N, Convention Level Track: Gay Men Level: Intermediate

Location: Celebration 10, Convention Level Pathway: Youth Level: Intermediate

New HIV rates are declining overall, but rising among gay / bisexual youth, especially youth of color. This highly interactive workshop will look at risk and pleasure through role play activities, anecdotes, and songs or spoken word jams. Then we’ll harvest the common phrases we used and unpack them to identify key drivers of risk behaviors that few understood in a factual way. This isn’t just about youthful hormones, but the deeper driving forces of primal survival scripts. You’ll learn how Mother Nature’s invisible hand pushes people towards risk with specific, even addictive, neurochemicals. Only by understanding these can we change behaviors. Come prepared to be astonished, and to have a whole new framework for understanding and impacting yourself and your YMSM clients.

Why is storytelling important to social justice movements? One answer is that we exist in a society hell-bent on silencing our voices and experiences. This interactive workshop highlights the power of storytelling as a tool for shifting culture and challenging HIV stigma. Through the lens of #MyStoryOUTLoud, a digital storytelling campaign that focuses on uplifting the narratives of LGBTQ youth of color, Participants will be given tools on how to develop and share their stories through various methods and across different social media platforms. By

10:00 am - 5:00 pm Exhibitions

Exhibit Hall Open Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Plaza International Ballroom

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11:30 am - 1:30 pm Plenary Lucheon

Saturday Plenary: Trauma Informed Care. Aging with HIV and the Trauma of Surviving Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Plenary Ballroom Presenters Eric Dube, ViiV North America Barbara Poma, CEO and Executive Director onePULSE Foundation, Orlando, FL Dr. Michele Andrasik, Director of Social-Behavioral Sciences and Community Engagement, HVTN Core, Seattle, WA Ron Stall, Director of the Center for LGBT Health Research, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA L’Orangelis Thomas Negrón, Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), Puerto Rico Ben Schatz, Member, Kinsey Sicks, Los Angeles Phill Wilson, The Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA

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Entertainment: Orlando Gay Men’s Chorus Wilson

Poma Thomas Negrón The goal of this plenary is to make the case for trauma informed care for those living with HIV and, trauma informed prevention for the populations at high risk of infection. We will reach our goal by focusing on HIV long-term survivors over 50 years old who are facing aging having gone through heavy grief, isolation, and post-traumatic stress disorder. There are many types of trauma associated to people of color that need to be identified and dealt with if we are to be successful in HIV care and biomedical prevention among communities of color.

1:30 pm - 2:00 pm Presentations

Poster Presenations Hyatt Regency Orlando Convention Level, Regency Rotunda

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm Session 7: Workshops

Race & Health Care: Fighting for Access and Equity

require a racial justice lens. Through centering our communities in this work, we can address the implications racism and similar structures have on our lives and wellbeing.

Presenters: Maximillian Boykin, Black AIDS Institute (BAI), Atlanta, GA Edwin Corbin-Gutierrez, National Alliance of State & Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD), Washington, DC Maryanne Tomazic, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School (CHLPI), Cambridge, MA

Trans-NIH HIV/AIDS Research Program: Mission and Future Directions

Location: Celebration 3 & 4, Convention Level Pathway: Health Care Access Level: Beginner

Presenter: Dr. Maureen Goodenow, the Director of the Office of AIDS Research (OAR)

Health care access inequities are too often a manifestation of institutionalized racism in the United States. Communities of color suffer worse health outcomes than their white counterparts and will continue to be disproportionately impacted by the Administration’s health care policies. In this session, panelists will discuss ways current and proposed policies are undermining health insurance access and coverage, and how these disparities have impacted communities of color’s access to essential HIV services, like PrEP, routine screening, and linkage to care. We will include highlights from innovative models that can begin to address these challenges, and focus on how these solutions and our own advocacy

Location: Regency Ballroom Q, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

Dr. Maureen Goodenow, the Director of the Office of AIDS Research (OAR), will provide an overview of the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) HIV/ AIDS research program, its priorities, and future directions followed by a listening session with other NIH officials. OAR oversees and coordinates the largest investment in HIV/AIDS research globally (3.0 Billion in FY 2017). The OAR implements the trans-NIH HIV/AIDS research agenda across the 27 NIH Institutes and Centers (ICs) that receive HIV/AIDS research funding. OAR works with the ICs, scientists within and outside NIH, community

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stakeholders, and people with HIV to establish the research priorities that will have the greatest impact toward reducing HIV incidence, improving the lives of individuals impacted by HIV/AIDS, and making progress towards a vaccine and cure.

Get the Gig- Youth Professional Toolkit Bios, Resumes, & Headshots Presenters:For list of presenters please refer to the 2018 USCA mobile app Location: Orlando Ballroom N, Convention Level Pathway: Youth Level: Beginner

Aging, HIV, and Emotional Resilience: Skills to Improve Quality of Life

Youth ages 18-25, are you having difficulty writing a professional resume or bio? If so, grab your laptop or flash drive and join us in this hands on training clinic. The Clinic team will provide you with new tools for career readiness to get your resume or bio right! We will have professional resume editors offering their support and guidance by reviewing your resume. You can also win a chance to get a professional headshot as well! Please come with a laptop. (Youth Only 18-25)

Presenter: David Fawcett PhD, LCSW Location: Manatee Spring 1, Lobby Level Pathway: Aging Level: Advanced

This workshop explores resources and skills that build resilience for the unique complications of aging and living with HIV. Stigma and isolation continue to impact both health outcomes and quality of life among those over age 50 who are newly-diagnosed, as well as among aging long-term survivors who may also be managing PTSD or other expressions of trauma resulting from years of challenges and loss. This workshop focuses on adaptive coping strategies that promote resilience in this population for such critical factors as self-worth, selfcompassion and social connection, and will provide tools for confronting both internal and external stigma. Practical skills to cope with age-specific conditions such as neurocognitive disorders, poly-pharmacy, shifting roles between caregiver and care-receiver, and medical complications will be discussed. Workshop participants will be encouraged to share their own tools and strategies in this interactive workshop.

Space is limited to 30 youth.

Are We Shaming Those Who Are Detectable? Presenters: Mark S. King, My Fabulous Disease, Baltimore, MD Charles Stephens, The Counter Narrative Project, Atlanta, GA Location: Celebration 1 & 2, Convention Level Pathway: U=U Level: Intermediate

Ending the Epidemic with the Help of Peer Workers: Peer Worker Programs in HIV, HCV, and Harm Reduction Coordinated by Housing Works Presenters: Cecilia Chung, Oakland, CA Teo Drake, Greenfield, MA Location: Celebration 11, Convention Level Pathway: Ending the Epidemic Level: Intermediate

Forward thinking health departments have, for many years, recognized the important role that peer workers can play in improving health outcomes for people living with HIV. Development of a certified HIV peer workforce was highlighted as an objective in a number of jurisdictional plans to End the Epidemic. This workshop will provide an overview of the steps taken by health departments across the United States to develop peer programs (and certification programs) in HIV, HCV and Harm Reduction. Participants will learn how these health departments engaged with community partners to: define peer worker competencies; develop a formal code of ethics; determine requirements for certification; prepare a certification test; partner with academic organizations; and offer a catalogue of trainings. The importance of a Review Board comprised of peer workers to make the final determination regarding certification will be discussed. The results of a survey of certified peer workers will be presented.

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How do we herald U=U without alienating those who are not undetectable – and how can we respect and support them? This workshop (inspired in part by King’s POZ Magazine essay, “The Truth About the 7,000”) will examine contemporary AIDS deaths and barriers to drug adherence, discuss how to create non-judgmental space for people who are not undetectable, and draw upon participants’ experience to discuss best practices in response. Attendees are encouraged to come open minded, solution oriented, and willing to work in breakout groups to address specific aspects of these issues.

Health Care Rights and Discrimination in the Trump Era Presenters: Kevin Costello, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA Scott Schoettes, Lambda Legal, Chicago, IL Leonardo Cuello, National Health Law Program, Washington, DC Luc Athayde-Rizzaro, National Center for Transgender Equality, Washington, DC Location: Celebration 3 & 4, Convention Level Pathway: Health Care Access Level: Intermediate

In the past year, we have seen health care policy at both the federal and state level endure a volatile regression, with many previously won advancements now in jeopardy. This panel will focus on how advocates are continuing the health care fight for the HIV, HCV and LGBTQ communities in two important arenas: Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act. We will identify some of the worst examples of how discriminatory health care policies affect vulnerable, chronically ill populations, who are often forgotten when lawmakers in

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Washington write their policies. This workshop will also identify bad actor health insurance practices in both Medicaid and private health insurance and discuss successful litigation efforts as well as the ongoing challenges we face in the Trump era. Join us and learn how to hold the public and private insurance industries accountable to the HIV community!

Training and Technical Assistance for RWHAP Planning Councils and Recipients Presenters: Mira Levinson, John Snow, Inc (JSI), Boston, MA Julie Hook, John Snow Inc (JSI), Boston, MA Clemens Steinbock, National Quality Center (NQC), New York, NY

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impact the Ryan White system of care and jeopardize access to affordable, comprehensive health care. We will also consider state actions that may mitigate the potential harms of these changes, and the role of stakeholders in shaping these important policies. We will then discuss strategies for attendees to navigate these changes in their own work, protect the populations they serve, facilitate access to care for their clients, and engage with state decision-makers to influence policy.

Housing Services Impacting PLWHA Health Outcomes through Intersectionality Presenters: Erika Alfaro, APLA Health, Los Angeles, CA Vanessa Jacuinde, APLA Health, Los Angeles, CA

Location: Blue Spring, Convention Level Pathway: HRSA Pathway Level: Intermediate

This workshop will present several training and technical assistance (TA) opportunities offered to Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) Planning Councils/Bodies and RWHAP recipients through the HRSA HIV/AIDS Bureau. The Community HIV/AIDS TA and Training (CHATT) project will talk about building the capacity of Planning Councils/Bodies across the country to meet legislative requirements, strengthen consumer engagement and increase the involvement of community providers in HIV service delivery. The Integrated HIV/ AIDS Planning Center will describe technical assistance opportunities available to those entities involved in Integrated Planning. The Implementation Center for Quality Improvement will talk about the training and TA available to RWHAP recipients around quality improvement. The workshop will also highlight capacity building tools and materials that are useful training and TA resources.

Trans Communities: What We Want & Need Presenters: Ms. Tori Cooper Prevention Specialist, Atlanta, GA Ms. Tiffany Starr Miss Black Trans International, Atlanta, GA

Location: Orlando Ballroom L, Convention Level Track: People Living with HIV Level: Intermediate

This workshop will showcase how Housing Specialists working with young men who have sex with men (YMSM) can contribute to achieve better health outcomes (i.e. viral suppression) through the intersectionality between housing and HIV services. During the workshop, the presenters will show how barriers to housing and HIV services overlap presenting a golden opportunity for intervention leveraging resources. Using a multidisciplinary approach, Housing Specialists can play an important role not only achieving housing stability but contributing to better health outcomes. The presenters will share an assessment tool used in APLAShared Action’s Housing Specialist Certification Training and provide an opportunity for participants to use the tool to identify areas of professional development. The workshop will discuss three (3) month follow-up data of certified Housing Specialists and recommendations for future professional development that will enhance their skills to address housing stability and improved health outcomes.

Addressing HIV Stigma in Older Women

Location: Rainbow Spring, Convention Level Pathway: South Level: Beginner

Attendees will receive background information on the trans community. Information will focus on the Black/African-American trans community. The discussion will include definitions, overviews, data, and stories from lived experience.

States in Play: Advocacy Priorities to Maintain HIV Insurance Protections Presenters: Dori Molozanov, NASTAD, Washington, DC Amy Killelea NASTAD, Washington, DC

Presenters: Kimberly Molnar, The AIDS Institute, Tampa, FL Michelle Scavnicky, The AIDS Institute, Tampa, FL Location: Celebration 9, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Intermediate

The presenters will explore various common social barriers that affect older women. Topics to be covered include: ageism, stigma, discrimination, limited knowledge about HIV/AIDS, misconceptions, and underestimation of risk. During this presentation, special emphasis will be placed on addressing HIV stigma and additional issues faced by women of color.

Trauma-Informed HR Practices: Becoming Trauma-Informed Care Champions

Location: Silver Spring, Convention Level Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

This workshop will discuss private market reforms on the federal level and the implications for access to health care for people living with chronic illnesses such as HIV and hepatitis C. Specifically, we will focus on recently finalized or proposed administrative and regulatory actions that may

Presenter: Rhonda Harris, Gay Men’s Health Crisis, New York, NY Location: Regency Ballroom O, Convention Level Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Intermediate

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It is well documented that traumatic experiences, including histories of childhood sexual and physical abuse, are far more prevalent among PLWHA than in the general U.S. population. This workshop will describe GMHC’s efforts to successfully integrate trauma-informed processes, protocols, and practices into the agency’s culture. GMHC will describe its work to build trauma-informed care literacy among staff and build institutional capacity to recognize and mitigate the effects of trauma on clients and staff. Tools, templates, strategies will be shared along with what worked, what didn’t, and the lessons that were learned to ensure that this trauma-informed care model can be successfully replicated in other workplace environments.

Presenters: Robin Atwood, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX Jennifer Greenberg, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX Karol Kaye Harris, Location: Celebration 12 & 13, Convention Level Track: Leadership Level: Beginner

Addressing the HIV epidemic is complex and multifaceted, requiring leaders to challenge conventional thinking and processes. This session will explore how a collaboration between The University of Texas at Austin Health Innovation and Evaluation Team, the Texas Department of State Health Services HIV/STD Program, and statewide partners has changed the conversation and approach to finding solutions. Building on research from neuroscience, systems thinking, appreciative inquiry and relational coordination, the research team works with both the state staff and local leadership to construct a multifaceted, multi-level approach to changing conversations, shifting systems and building leadership capacity at the state and local levels. The goal is to improve coordination and collaboration across systems impacting HIV prevention and care across the state. Through unconventional approaches, the team created space and catalysts for leadership development, shared conversations, perspective taking, and enhanced interaction and collaboration at numerous levels.

How to Promote PrEP in the Latino Community. Spanish translation available ((es)) Presenters: Yesenia Kimberly Palacios, FLAS, Inc., Houston, TX Eddie Gonzalez FLAS, Inc.

The program FLASNovelas provides culturally competent PrEP, substance abuse and HIV prevention messages through social media to Latino gay men and Latina women. The messages are inculcated through prevention messages in a new transformed concept that is already part of the culture. These episodes are created and produced based on real life stories shared by participants willing to share their dark experiences to shine light on issues faced by many Latinos. Each personal experience shared was transformed into a novela (soap opera) to teach the Latino community about these current issues such as betrayal, drug use, HIV, domestic violence and PrEP. This novela series grows off of the foundation used in various stories which will educate the community. The hardships that individuals face daily are projected through this form of art so that the community can relate and share this experience in hopes of creating a better future for themselves.

Lessons Learned from the Mississippi “Getting to Zero” Learning Collaborative Presenters: Sarah Blust, Primary Care Development Corporation, New York, NY Mazdak Mazarei Primary Care Development Corporation- CA Office Brandon Harrison, Primary Care Development Corporation Location: Celebration 7, Convention Level Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Intermediate

A STEP Towards Harm Reduction: Facing Flint’s Opioid Epidemic Presenter: Yashica Ellis, Wellness Services, Inc., Flint, MI Location: Bayhill 25 & 26, Lobby Level Track: Opioid Epidemic Level: Intermediate

Syringe exchange programs have always been met with resistance due to the fact that they challenge drug-related stigma while prioritizing the human rights and dignity of people who use drugs. This workshop will focus on creating safe access points in your community that do not focus directly on total abstinence, but instead focus on engagement and empowering the individual where they are with an undertone of addressing conditions of drug use along with the drug use itself. Wellness Services STEP program involves Naloxone/Narcan distribution, free HIV/HCV testing, free access to syringes and other harm reduction supplies. STEP emphasizes building rapport and trust first while engaging readiness for testing STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS 2018 UNITED

and treatment. This has led to an increase in HIV/HCV testing and treatment services for Flint’s IDU (injection drug user) population and helped to reduce the number of HIV/HCV cases related to injection drug use.

Location: Celebration 5, Convention Level Track: Gay Men Level: Beginner

Transforming Collaborative Systems: Creating New Conversations

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Treatment for HIV has improved greatly over the years, but Mississippi still has one of the highest rates of infection in the country. According to a recent study released by Emory University, four out of 10 gay or bisexual men in Jackson have HIV.  This rate is the highest in the nation.  Fortunately, with the availability of PrEP (Pre-exposure Prophylaxis) for people at risk for HIV infection and effective antiretroviral medication for people living with HIV, it is possible to turn these statistics around.  Primary care providers have a crucial role to play in making sure their patients get access to these life-saving medications.  In partnership with Mississippi Primary Health Care Association (MPHCA), Primary Care Development Center (PCDC) invited five MS health centers to participate in a six-month learning collaborative, focused on the core components of HIV prevention.  Through this learning collaborative, health centers received free training, technical assistance and peer-to-peer learning opportunities.

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Survivor’s Gifts: Finding Your Story of Strength and Resilience

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Building a Community-Led Research Agenda for Trans/Non-Binary People and HIV

Presenters: AIDS United Location: Orlando Ballroom M, Convention Level Track: People Living with HIV Level: Intermediate

The authors will: 1) Share their experiences of living with survivor’s gifts as aging Black, Latino, and white gay HIV+ men who endured the suffering and deaths of many of our brothers to AIDS; 2) Encourage survivors aging with HIV to claim and reclaim gifts given by their loved ones lost to AIDS; and 3) urge these long-time survivors to consider how far we have come with the help and spirit of biomedical advances and current support systems that have taken us beyond where we and those who died once only hoped would someday be possible. Applying these gifts can help us live longer, change our attitudes, and be proactive to grow stronger, work harder and advocate from a strength-based platform. Above all, these gifts have the capability to help support ourselves and people of all generations affected by HIV through embracing how far we have come, and not through our guilt or deficits.

Presenters: Jordan Olsen, Transgender Strategy Center, Los Angeles, CA JD Davids, Transgender Strategy Center, New York, NY Kiara St. James, New York Transgender Advocacy Group, New York, NY Reagan Wiklund, Boston, MA Location: Celebration 8, Conference Level Pathway: Trans Community Level: Intermediate

This is an exciting time in health research about transgender people who are disproportionately affected by HIV. After years of struggle, funding for and interest in research exploring the health of transgender communities has started to rise. Research is a key foundation of policies and programs that can help close health gaps and improve access to care for transgender people. At the same time, there are political attacks fueled by ignorance and fear that target the transgender communities in the U.S. Transgender people across the globe remain vulnerable to violence, marginalization, and exploitation. This workshop will explore and analyze how trans and gender non-conforming people (TGNC) can affect the research agenda to ensure it reflects and supports community needs.

4:15 pm - 6:15 pm Session 8: Workshops

Empowering This Generation of Youth to End the Epidemic

Health Care Rights and Discrimination in the Trump Era

Supported by ViiV Healthcare

Presenters: Kevin Costello, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA Scott Schoettes, Lambda Legal, Chicago, IL Leonardo Cuello, National Health Law Program, Washington, DC Luc Athayde-Rizzaro, National Center for Transgender Equality, Washington, DC

Presenters: Richard Hutchinson, Deidre Coleman, Brothers United, Indianapolis, IN Terrell Parker, Brothers United, Indianapolis, IN Location: Orlando Ballroom N, Convention Level Track: Youth Level: Beginner

Brothers United Inc. and Thrive S.S. are two innovative organizations working to improve HIV prevention and treatment for underserved communities. Both organizations share the philosophy that youth (both living with HIV and those highly vulnerable) must have a meaningful seat at the table in order to end the HIV epidemic within the next generation. Thrive SS and Brothers United have both experienced success working to build youth leadership and to increase meaningful involvement of youth in addressing current prevention challenges and improving access to care for youth.

Location: Celebration 3 & 4, Convention Level Pathway: Health Care Access Level: Intermediate

In the past year, we have seen health care policy at both the federal and state level endure a volatile regression, with many previously won advancements now in jeopardy. This panel will focus on how advocates are continuing the health care fight for the HIV, HCV and LGBTQ communities in two important arenas: Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act. We will identify some of the worst examples of how discriminatory health care policies affect vulnerable, chronically ill populations, who are often forgotten when lawmakers in Washington write their policies. This workshop will also identify bad actor health insurance practices in both Medicaid and private health insurance and discuss successful litigation efforts as well as the ongoing challenges we face in the Trump era. Join us and learn how to hold the public and private insurance industries accountable to the HIV community!

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The Time is Now! Together or Never!

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Safe Consumption Spaces: An Essential Intervention to Fight the Opioid Crisis

Presented by the USCA Orlando Host Committee

Presenters: Zachary Ford, AIDS United, Washington, DC Nora Fuller, AIDS United, Washington, DC Andrew Reynolds, Project Inform, San Francisco, CA

Moderator: Nicole Elinoff, Florida Department of Health- Orange county, Orlando, Florida Speakers: Dr. Andrea Dunn, Founder, Let’s Beehive!, Inc., Orlando, Florida Angie Buckley, Director, PrePare Program, Aspire Health Partner, Orlando, Florida Stephen Addona, Hope and Help Center of Central Florida, Inc., Orlando, Florida Willie Nixon, Florida Department of Health, Tallahassee, Florida Mark Anthony Delgado, QLatinx, Orlando, Florida Ashley Figueroa, Bliss Cares, Orlando, Florida John Curry, BTAN Melbourne, Melbourne, FL

Location: Orlando Ballroom M, Convention Level Track: Trauma Informed Care Level: Intermediate

Location: Celebration 7, Convention Level Track: Trauma Informed Care Level: Intermediate

According to the CDC’s 2016 HIV Surveillance Report, the Orlando Metropolitan Area (Orlando- Kissimmee- Sanford) was ranked fifth in the country for number of new HIV transmissions. The community has a lot of work ahead of them, but through collaborative efforts and advancements in technology, we are building the tools to succeed. This panel will discuss the merger of Central Florida’s HIV Planning Bodies, the State of Florida’s Four Key Components to address the HIV epidemic, and will have representatives from several local initiatives sharing the work they do in the community. Through collaboration, combined planning, and an integrated system of care, Central Florida will move the needle on the HIV Epidemic in the area.

Safe consumption spaces have operated in numerous countries around the world for decades, with a body of research proving they are effective models for prevention and care. As the opioid crisis continues to intensify across the United States, HIV and harm reduction advocates are working to bring these models to cities around the country. This workshop will provide an overview of safe consumption spaces, present findings from interviews with drug users and organizations working to open these spaces, discuss the concerns of people who use drugs around legal sanction and governmental regulation, the challenges and lessons learned from the international community, and how funders can strategically support organizations advocating for the legalization of safe consumption spaces without compromising the importance of keeping drug users in positions of leadership and decision-making.

Employment Issues, Opportunities, and Strategies for PLHIV over 50 Presenters: Mark Misrok, National Working Positive Coalition, New York, NY Vanessa Johnson, Ribbon Consulting Group, Washington, DC April Watkins, GMHC, New York, NY

Never Alone: Addressing Isolation & Building Community through Storytelling

Location: Manatee Spring 1, Lobby Level Pathway: Aging Level: Beginner

Presented by Gilead Sciences Host: HIV: The Long View Coalition Location: Regency Ballroom P, Convention Level Level: Intermediate

While HIV can now be a long-term, manageable chronic disease for many, this can present a unique set of challenges for those living and aging with the virus. Many people living with HIV describe feelings of loneliness and isolation, which is why it is so important to know how to find a community of support. In this session, we’ll share stories from three long-term HIV survivors about overcoming obstacles, facing fears and creating communities as part of a new video series called Never Alone. These stories aim to remind people that, regardless of who they are, where they live, or what their HIV journeys have been, they are not alone. There is a whole community of people who understand, accept, and are there for them. After screening the videos, we will open the session for a discussion about breaking down barriers and reducing isolation. Materials will be available to help develop storytelling programing for your communities.

Our working lives have often been greatly impacted by many factors for people living and aging with HIV. Participation in the workforce may be a lifeline, feel like a threat, or seem unavailable. We may still want and need to work to benefit our economic circumstances, for social inclusion and many other reasons. Presenters from the National Working Positive Coalition who are 50+ join to discuss challenges and opportunities, and share strategies for working and getting assistance with employment for aging workers and job seekers. Bring your questions, your lessons learned and your strategies for success. We’re here, we’re HIV+, we’re 50+ and are not ready to lie down yet!

Inclusion of Injection Drug Use and the Ongoing Opioid Epidemic in the ETE Process Coordinated by Housing Works Location: Celebration 11, Convention Level Pathway: Ending the Epidemic Level: Intermediate

This Pathway session will discuss how jurisdictions who have developed

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or are in the process of developing Ending the Epidemics plans, have looked to address the ongoing opioid epidemic and the specific needs of individuals who inject drugs. Moderated by the Act Now: End AIDS Coalition, this session will contain brief presentations from specific jurisdictions with plans and include ample time for discussions on a variety of topics, including: • The need to include individuals who inject drugs and programs who serve this population in your ending the epidemic process • How jurisdictions have included issues related to injection drug use in their existing Ending the Epidemics plan • What are best practices to engage this population?

• How can an Ending the Epidemics plan help a jurisdiction respond to the opioid epidemic and work with other partners in the state?

Have you ever wondered what resources are available to your agency around new business models for Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) communitybased organizations? What leadership building opportunities are available for People of Color Living with HIV (PLWH)? Have you ever looked for a tool or TA to enroll and engage PLWH in health care coverage, or attempted to increase the health literacy of a RWHAP care and treatment system for your clients? This workshop examines three HRSA HIV/AIDS Bureau funded projects that offer training and technical assistance opportunities for RWHAP recipients. The workshop will also highlight capacity building tools and materials that are useful training and TA resources.

It’s a radical fact: A person living with HIV who has an undetectable viral load and is taking their medication as prescribed cannot transmit HIV sexually. In other words, Undetectable = Untransmittable (U=U). The NIH Office of AIDS Research calls U=U a “game changer.” So, why are

In this workshop, we’ll review the groundswell of evidence that confirms U=U. You’ll learn and share advocacy strategies, social marketing campaigns, and communications skills. You’ll practice role plays to communicate the message in clear, meaningful, and accurate ways that reflect the realities of people living with HIV and their partners. You’ll develop action plans to share the revolutionary U=U message, dismantling HIV stigma and bringing hope to people with HIV.

The Midnight Stroll – Connecting Homeless Trans Persons to Housing

Location: Celebration 8, Conference Level Pathway: Trans Community Level: Intermediate

Location: Blue Spring, Convention Level Pathway: HRSA Pathway Level: Beginner

Location: Celebration 1 & 2, Conference Level Pathway: U = U Level: Intermediate

thousands of people with HIV in the U.S. and millions worldwide still in the dark? Who is hearing the message and who is still being left behind? How can we unlearn decades of fear and build confidence to share this lifechanging news?

Jazzmun Crayton, APAIT Los Angeles Transgender Advisory Council City of Los Angeles

Presenters: Liesl Lu, John Snow, Inc. (JSI), Boston, MA Linda Scruggs, NMAC, Washington, DC Denise Anderson and Avital Havusha, Primary Care Development Corporation (PCDC), New York, NY

Presenters: Roscoe Boyd, NY, NY Dee Connor, Denver, CO Stacy Jennings, SC Maria Mejia, Fort Lauderdale, FL Bruce Richman, NY, NY Katie Willingham, Alabama

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Presenters: Maria Roman, CAP

Training and Technical Assistance Available for RWHAP Community-Based Organizations and the HIV Community

Are U Part of the Revolution? Bringing U=U to Your Community

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Trans individuals face unique challenges when attempting to access housing. One in five transgender individuals experience housing discrimination. Among homelessness trans individuals experience higher levels of HIV, STIs, and substance misuse; APAIT along with the TAC “Transgender Advisory Counsel of the City Of Los Angeles created The Midnight Stroll, in an attempt to connect trans individuals with direct service access. This unique program is composed of staff, volunteers, and community stakeholders who walk the Santa Monica Boulevard (known to be a hub for both survival sex work and homelessness) to reach and connect with services at a local offsite hub where patient navigators aim to provide temporary housing, as well as HIV testing, showers, laundry, and more during the hours of 11PM and 6AM. This workshop will explore and analyze how trans and gender non-conforming people (TGNC) can affect the research agenda to ensure it reflects and supports community needs.

Exploring South Asian Sexual Health Relational Domains in the US Presenters: Becca Keo-Meier Samira Ali, PhD and Becca Keo-Meier, MSW University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work Location: Celebration 6, Convention Level Track: Level: Intermediate

As one of the fastest growing populations in the US, South Asians make up one of the largest Asian ethnic groups in the country. Despite the group’s rapid growth, the extent of sexual health knowledge and practice among South Asians remain sparse. Given that sexual health is a central aspect of human development, young adulthood is a pivotal time in which physiological and socio-cultural factors interplay to bring upon sexual exploration and sexual identity development that have far reaching effects on well-being. Given the absence of knowledge regarding South Asian

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sexual health, it is important to consider culturally relevant sexual health dimensions that have the potential to influence this community’s overall wellness. Informed by a mixed methods pilot study in a Southern US state, the South Asian Sexual Health (SASH) Project team will discuss expanding community based training and education to achieve sexual justice among South Asian communities. Learning Objectives​(3): Participants will 1. Become familiar with research on relationship dynamics including dating, partnerships, and gender-based violence among South Asian communities 2. Identify sexual health service gaps among South Asian communities 3. Develop strategies to advance culturally responsive, sex positive, and holistic sexual health programming among South Asian communities

Presenter: Neil Rana, NCSD, Washington, DC

Whether we combine messages promoting both condoms and PrEP continues to be a challenging question for HIV and STD prevention. Hoping to find an answer, NCSD convened focus groups that sought to solicit the opinions of black MSM on PrEP and their thoughts on condoms. The results show that while PrEP has been instrumental in preventing new HIV infections, STDs are often left out of the picture. Audience members will gain a better understanding of the need to stress routine STD screening for those on PrEP, and how to better produce culturally relevant condom messaging for MSM prescribed PrEP.

Location: Rainbow Spring Pathway: South Level: Intermediate

This workshop will give alternative methods of approaching the church to have meaningful conversations about HIV and how the church can help end the epidemic.

Federal HIV/Aging Policy Under TrumpPence and the Republican Congress Presenters: Aaron Tax, SAGE, Washington, DC Sean Cahill The Fenway Institute Location: Celebration 9, Convention Level Track: Public Policy Level: Intermediate

While we made progress in ending the epidemic under the Obama Administration, most notably with the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and the Affordable Care Act, the Trump Administration has undermined much of this progress. The President sacked PACHA, undermines the ACA, tries to cut domestic and global HIV/STI funding, and promotes religion as a license to

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HIV Education in correctional settings?

Location: Bayhill 25 & 26, Lobby Level Track: Gay Men Level: Intermediate

Location: Orlando Ballroom L, Convention Level Pathway: STD Level: Beginner

Presenter: Tony D. Christon-Walker, AIDS Alabama, Birmingham, AL

discriminate. Trump has rolled back sexual orientation and gender identity data collection on aging and disability surveys. Regardless of who holds power, the percentage of older adults living with HIV continues to rise: 70 percent in New York City, 60 percent in San Francisco, and more than 50 percent nationally. What is the federal government doing to address this issue? What more should it be doing? Are there success stories at the state/ local level that we can emulate? And what more can we do as advocates, particularly with the Older Americans Act up for reauthorization in 2019?

Presenters: Andrea Medeiros, Center for Health Justice, Los Angeles, CA Siddharth Raich, Center for Health Justice, Los Angeles, CA

Condoms, STDs, and PrEP

When the Walls Fell: HIV in the Church

SESSION 8 WORKSHOPS

YMSM of color who have a history of incarceration are difficult to access and serve and are at the highest risk for HIV in Los Angeles County. The program addresses social determinants of health by providing education on topics focused on HIV/STI prevention, treatment, harm-reduction, life skills and by connecting YMSM of color to information on resources tailored to assist youth development, leadership, and overall health and wellness.

Getting in Bed Together: An Intimate Discussion about PrEP Presenters: Ashlee Wimberly, Washington AIDS Partnership, Washington, DC Ken Pettigrew HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD and TB Administration District of Columbia Department of Health (DOH), Washington, DC Location: Silver Spring, Convention Level Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Intermediate

Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) has the potential to be a game changer when combined with other strategies such as risk reduction, increased access to support services, and condom use. However, national PrEP utilization analyses indicate that African-Americans are accessing PrEP at disproportionately low rates. Washington, DC has developed and implemented specific awareness campaigns for different focus populations, including MSM of color, transgender women, and heterosexual African American women. While there is great benefit to looking at these groups individually, an important, complementary approach is to examine how the community as a whole can respond to and benefit from PrEP. This workshop will amplify voices from the community in a discussion about the need for mobilization around strategies to increase conversations about sexual health and the uptake of PrEP.

Chemsex: HIV, Aging: A Revealing Dialogue on Risks and Interventions Presenters: David Fawcett, S FL Center for Counseling and Therapy, Inc., Wilton Manors, FL Mark King MyFabulousDisease.com

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Location: Regency Ballroom O, Convention Level Track: People Living with HIV Level: Intermediate

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Transgender individuals are historically marginalized and underserved in healthcare settings; this continues to impact all aspects of wellness including access to comprehensive HIV prevention services. The ability to take a nuanced, affirming, and trauma-informed sexual health history is an essential for getting accurate data and mitigating health disparities. Taking a comprehensive sexual history and creating an affirming environment for transgender and gender non-conforming (TGNC) patients will help to facilitate access to and increase retention in HIV prevention and care services. This workshop will equip participants with terminology and trauma informed care techniques to take a comprehensive sexual health history for TGNC patients.

“Chemsex,” the use of stimulants and other drugs combined with highrisk sexual behavior, has reached crisis proportions among older people living with HIV/AIDS, including increasing numbers of Black and Latino MSM. This workshop, led by an addiction specialist and an HIV-positive recovering addict, explores this phenomenon in both clinical and deeply personal terms. Stigma, shame, isolation, and issues related to aging itself attract many gay and trans men living with HIV/AIDS to chemsex. all of which numb emotional pain, reduce inhibitions, and increase highrisk sexual behavior. This workshop is a conversation between clinician and author David Fawcett (Lust, Men, and Meth), addressing physical and clinical issues created by chemsex; and recovering addict and HIV blogger Mark S. King (My Fabulous Disease), who will share the attraction and effects of chemsex and his own recovery process. This conversational format explores chemsex risks, effects, and interventions an aging population of PLWHA.

Building an “HIV Toolbox” for Women Living with HIV Presenters: Krista Martel, The Well Project Maria Mejia, The Well Project Tiommi Luckett, The Well Project

Sexual Health History Taking for Transgender and Gender NonConforming Patients

Location: Celebration 12 & 13, Convention Level Track: Women Level: Beginner

In a climate of ever-decreasing funding and resources, this session will describe how HIV advocates can optimize their work by utilizing existing resources. We will provide an overview on how to build an “HIV toolbox” to support attendees across their wide range of needs, including information, community support, and advocacy, for their personal and professional endeavors. The session will provide participants with an overview of The Well Project’s free, online resources (including a library of fact sheets, slide sets, webinars, blogs, and community partners) and an understanding of the importance of leveraging existing resources to build leadership and community. There will be a Q&A session.

Spanish translation available ((es)) Presenters: Dustin Wagner, Denver PTC, Denver, CO Teddy Tinnell Denver PTC, Denver, CO Location: Celebration 5, Convention Level Track: Trauma-informed Care Level: Beginner

6:30 PM – 7:30 PM Affinity Sessions Location: Check Affinity Session board located near registration booths

7:00 PM – 8:00 PM Special Performance by the Kinsey Sicks! For 24 years, America’s Favorite Dragapella® Beautyshop Quartet has served up a feast of music and comedy to audiences at performing arts centers, music venues, and comedy festivals in every kind of town you can imagine! Their award-winning a cappella singing, sharp satire, and over-the-top drag have earned The Kinsey Sicks a diverse and devoted following.

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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE SUNDAY 7:00 am 7:45 am

Morning Worship Service

9:00 Am 11:30 Am

Social Media Lab

9:00 am 11:00 am

Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Barrel Spring 1 Session 9: Workshops

Addressing Trauma in Newly Diagnosed HIVPositive LGBTQ Millennials Spanish translation available ((es)) Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 5

Deemed Invisible: Transgender Men of Color within HIV Prevention and Care Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 8 Healthy Him: HIV Prevention BEYOND HIV Prevention Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 11 Improving Syringe Access Where You Live Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Silver Spring Inclusion and Justice: Creating Welcoming Services for LGBTQ Youth Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom N Inter-Generational Sisterhood and Storytelling among Black Women Living with HIV Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring Know Your Rights Training: The War on Drugs and Sex Workers Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Regency Ballroom O

Latidos (Heartbeat): Home Away from Home Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 12 & 13 Leveraging STD Partnerships for Ending the Epidemic Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom L Long-Term Survivor Initiative: GMHC’s Multipronged Approach to Aging & HIV Hyatt Regency Orlando Lobby Level, Manatee Spring 1 Medicaid: Work Requirements, Time Limits, and Lock Outs, Oh My! Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 3 & 4 The Feeling Out the Future: Understanding Advocacy and Drug Development Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Orlando Ballroom M Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) Responses to Substance Use Disorder and Housing Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Blue Spring The Third U is Universal Access: Achieving Racial and Gender Justice in U=U Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 1 & 2 They2ze: A Mobile Health Resource for Transgender Spectrum Youth Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 9 US Women and PrEP Working Group (USGWPWG) Supported by ViiV Healthcare Hyatt Regency Orlando, Lobby Level, Bayhill 25 & 26

Closing Plenary Brekafast

Opioid Crisis - Fighting for Our Lives and Our Communities Lunch provided. Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Plenary Ballroom

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Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

Beyond Viral Suppression: Addressing Stigma, Mental Health, and Well-Being Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Celebration 7

11:30 am 1:30 pm

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ANAC is proud to be a program partner of NMAC at USCA 2018

Nurses:

nursesinaidscare.org anac@anacnet.org 800.260.6780 or 330.670.0101 11230 Cleveland Ave NW #986 Uniontown, OH 44685

1101 14th Street NW, Suite #300 Washington, DC 20005


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SESSION 9 WORKSHOPS

7:00 am - 7:45 am Early Risers

Morning Worship Service Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Rainbow Spring

9:00 am - 11:00 am Session 9: Workshops

Improving Syringe Access Where You Live Presenters: Hansel Tookes, MD, MPH, University of Miami IDEA Syringe Exchange Program David Forrest, PhD, University of Miami IDEA Syringe Exchange Program Kasha Bornstein, MS, University of Miami IDEA Syringe Exchange Program Location: Silver Spring, Convention Level Track: Opioid Crisis Level: Beginner

The Third U is Universal Access: Achieving Racial and Gender Justice in U=U Presenters: Daniel Driffin, Thrive SS, Atlanta, GA Naina Khanna, Positive Women’s Network-USA, Oakland, CA Location: Celebration 1 & 2, Convention Level Pathway: U=U Level: Intermediate

On World AIDS Day 2016, the first syringe exchange program in Florida was established in Miami Dade County. The IDEA SEP came into existence as a result of seven years of research, grassroots activism, and legislative advocacy, overcoming significant hurdles in a challenging and highly polarized political landscape to legalize syringe exchange. This presentation will focus on the research projects that facilitated the passage of the 2016 Infectious Disease Elimination Act, as well as the ongoing organizing and advocacy to broaden syringe access in the state. Presenters will describe and share this methodology with the goal of empowering others to broaden syringe access in their locales drawing on the experience of passing the 2016 IDEA law.

People of color, especially Black and Latinx folks, are disproportionately impacted by the US HIV epidemic. U=U holds great promise to advance rights and dignity for people living with HIV. However, structural barriers, especially racism and other forms of stigma and discrimination, have presented tremendous obstacles to ensuring that everyone living with HIV has equitable access to quality healthcare and treatment. In this workshop, we will discuss why it’s imperative to develop greater focus on racial and gender justice in U=U discourse and present strategies that are working to engage communities of color. Presenters will facilitate a solution-oriented dialogue with participants.

Know Your Rights Training: The War on Drugs and Sex Workers

Leveraging STD Partnerships for Ending the Epidemic

Presenter: Alex Andrews 

Presenters: Taryn Couture, NCSD, Washington, DC

Location: Regency Ballroom O, Convention Level Pathway: Sex Work  Level: Beginner 

An interactive workshop that explores how to more safely interact with police and law enforcement. This will include how police use seemingly innocuous items such as condoms and cell phones to profile and arrest those that they suspect of being involve in the street economy. Knowing how to assert your rights is vital to surviving in an increasingly hostile culture.

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Location: Orlando Ballroom L, Convention Level Pathway: STD Level: Beginner

Preventing STDs is directly related to the effort to prevent new HIV infections. However, STD and HIV programs do not always collaborate. As populations overlap, and resources for both programs become more stretched, programs can identify creative ways of sharing resources and reaching key populations. In this session, participants will hear state examples of how HIV and STD programs have leveraged partnerships to help each other achieve the goal of preventing new STD and HIV infections. This will be a panel discussion with examples from three states about how the STD program worked with the HIV program to reach a shared vision. We will take audience questions and engage them on successes and overcoming barriers. PowerPoints will be used.

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[1] Taken from www.hhs.gov/opioids. Downloaded May 16, 2018

US Women and PrEP Working Group (USWPWG)

[2] Health Resources and Services Administration. RWHAP Annual ClientLevel Data Report 2016. http://hab.hrsa.gov/data/data-reports. Published Nov. ‘17. Accessed 5/30/18

Supported by ViiV Healthcare Presenters: Dazon Dixon Diallo and Danielle Campbell Location: Bayhill 25 & 26, Lobby Level Level: Beginner

Introductory session to the USWPWG for all current and future members. During this session, presenters will provide updates on biomedical prevention modalities for women and facilitate a discussion on 2019 goals and outcomes for the group.

Inter-Generational Sisterhood and Storytelling among Black Women Living with HIV Presenters: Masonia Traylor, Atlanta, GA, Lady BurgAndy, Atlanta, GA Tiffany Marrero, Deerfield Beach, FL Gina Brown, Southern AIDS Coalition, New Orleans, LA Marcia Ellis, CFAR, Alexandria, VA Location: Rainbow Spring, Convention Level Pathway: South Level: Beginner

Long-Term Survivor Initiative: GMHC’s Multipronged Approach to Aging & HIV Presenters: Nina Martinez, Georgic HIV Justice Coalition, Atlanta, GA Waheedah Shabzz-El, Philadelphia, PA Matt Sharp, TPAN, Chicago, IL Jeff Berry, TPAN, Chicago, IL Location: Manatee Spring 1, Lobby Level Pathway: Aging Level: Intermediate

GMHC is one of the nation’s leading providers of care, policy advocacy, and research on long-term survivors (LTS) and HIV & Aging. The agency has recently redoubled its efforts to understand and address the needs of this often-forgotten population. GMHC’s multipronged approach includes strategic fund development, service delivery, policy advocacy, and researchinformed technical assistance. This framework can be replicated by AIDS Service Organizations (ASOs) around the country to best meet the growing needs of this community.

Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) Responses to Substance Use Disorder and Housing Presenters: April Fields, HRSA/HAB/DSHAP, Rockville MD Paul Harkin, HIV Services Manager, Glide, San Francisco, CA Amy Griffin, HRSA/HAB/DSHAP, Rockville, MD

Black women are the most impacted by the HIV epidemic and account for 60 percent of all women living with HIV due to factors like racism, discrimination, and gender inequality. Because HIV impacts Black women of all ages, there is a need for sisterhood and solidarity in our personal journeys and in the HIV movement that is inclusive of all ages. This workshop will feature a series of revealing conversations about the lived experiences of Black women living with HIV that will include young women who acquired HIV from birth, later acquisition and long-time survivors. Please join us for rich storytelling from the unique perspectives across the spectrum of intergenerational leadership and sisterhood. Panelists will share about the unspoken generational divide in the HIV movement, ways to meaningfully bridge that divide and ideas about how to engage with generations behind us until there’s a cure.

Inclusion and Justice: Creating Welcoming Services for LGBTQ Youth Supported by ViiV Healthcare Presenters: Lisa Carver, Pridelines, Miami, FL Tori Cooper, Positive Impact, Atlanta, GA Richard A. Hutchinson, The H.I.V. Project, Atlanta, GA Lillian Rivera, Hetrick Martin Institute, New York, NY Location: Celebration Ballroom N, Convention Level Pathway: Youth Level: Intermediate

Location: Blue Spring, Convention Level Pathway: HRSA Pathway Level: Beginner

On average 116 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose [1]. Additionally, among Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) clients exposed to HIV through injection drugs, those who identified as experiencing temporary or unstable housing achieved viral suppression at much lower percentages (78.9%, 72.5% respectively) than other RWHAP clients (84.9%) [2]. The programs at the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) play a critical role in providing care and treatment to those most affected. In this workshop, staff from HRSA’s HIV/AIDS Bureau (HAB) will discuss the impact of this crisis, the effect of substance use on people living with HIV (PLWH), and innovative strategies used to leverage syringe services programs (SSP) and housing services to aide PLWH.

LGBTQ youth are not one population. There are many considerations that are important in creating HIV and other health programs that affirm each young person who is served. Whether you want to expand your services to include LGBTQ youth, better understand the diversity of LGBTQ youth, start a program from scratch, or get some fresh ideas on how to address challenges you are experiencing, this workshop will have something for you. A panel of experienced program planners will provide practical guidance for creating spaces and services that are inclusive below the surface. They will share their perspective and expertise in areas such as affirming diversity within LGBTQ youth populations, addressing sexism, racism, homophobia and transphobia between LGBTQ youth, hiring the right staff, and how to involve youth in creating and leading programs.

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Healthy Him: HIV Prevention BEYOND HIV Prevention

Deemed Invisible: Transgender Men of Color within HIV Prevention and Care

Presenters: Donta Morrison, APLA Health, Los Angeles, CA Anthony Singleton APLA Health, Los Angeles, CA Tyreik Gaffney-Smith, APLA Health, Los Angeles, CA

Presenters: Socorro Moreland Achim Howard Tyree Williams

Location: Celebration 11, Convention Level Track: Gay Men Level: Intermediate

Location: Celebration 8, Convention Level Pathway: Transgender Level: Intermediate

Healthy Him is an umbrella that covers the CDC and SAMHSA funded youth programs for young men of color 18 - 29 at APLA Health in Los Angeles, CA. Understanding that HIV prevention for young men of color (especially those who are gay or bisexual) encompasses more than just conversations about sexual health, Healthy Him provides out-the-box ways to meet those needs. By hosting workshops and classes that discuss mental, spiritual and physical health, participants are given information that strengthens their decision-making skills and betters their lives. This workshop will expound upon how two separate funding opportunities integrated into one holistic program and launched a well-received media campaign that bridged the gap between YMSM and YMSW of color 18-29. Its success strengthened APLA’s efforts relating to HIV testing, prevention, LTC, and PrEP and PEP acquisition for young men of color 18-29. 

This session is an in-depth conversation with TMOC working within their own communities and sharing their experiences and best practices to those interested in engaging TMOC around HIV prevention, care and holistic health care services.

Addressing Trauma in Newly Diagnosed HIV-Positive LGBTQ Millennials

The Feeling Out the Future: Understanding Advocacy and Drug Development

Spanish translation available ((es)) Presenters: Dylan Brooks, Compass Community Center, Lake Worth, FL Lorezno Lowe, Compass Community Center, Lake Worth, FL

Presenters: Danielle Campbell, ATAC, Los Angeles, CA Kevin Fisher, AVAC, New York, NY

Location: Celebration 5, Convention Level Track: Trauma-Informed Care Level: Intermediate

Location: Orlando Ballroom M, Convention Level Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Intermediate

Founded in 2001, ATAC is a national coalition of AIDS activists—many living with HIV - working together to end the AIDS epidemic by advancing research on HIV. The session, tentatively titled: “Are we there yet? HIV Research activism in 2018 and beyond,” will provide an opportunity for USCA attendees to learn about the current HIV treatment, prevention, and cure pipeline and to discuss the critical importance of research activism. This session will also be a chance for ATAC to share its advocacy goals and hear feedback on those plans from USCA attendees. It will include an interactive component, including discussion on the following topics: 1. Introduction to ATAC

Transgender Men of Color (TMOC) are disproportionately affected by HIV. However, they’re left out of conversations and opportunities associated with the greater transgender community which creates a divide amongst TMOC and Transgender women of color (TWOC). Opportunities to participate/work within Research, Treatment, PrEP and PEP is a rarity and almost an opportunity never offered to TMOC, creating obstacles around gaining adequate data and creating meaningful and appropriate services for this specific population.

2. The Treatment and Prevention Pipeline of the pharmaceutical companies that are involved in the HIV space

Accounting for 22 percent of new diagnoses in 2015, the 13-24 year old age range is a fast-growing demographic for new HIV diagnosis. This workshop is aimed toward providing more support to the millennial population in regards to newly experienced trauma related to being diagnosed HIV-positive and the long term effects. In a time when everything is so fast paced, there might not always be time to slow down and actually work through the steps with your clients. By developing cross-system collaborations, your agency will be able to better serve all the needs of each client, meeting them where they are. We want to share what has worked for us at Compass Community Center and help you develop a Continuum of Care that works for you and your respective agencies.

3. “Are we there yet?” – An interactive discussion of the importance of research advocacy in 2018 and beyond, ATAC strategies, and ways to get involved

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Latidos (Heartbeat): Home Away from Home Presenters: Jose Aguilar, Miracle Of Love Inc., Orlando, FL Lester Burgos, Miracle Of Love Inc., Orlando, FL

This workshop goes over the first monolingual support network in the Central Florida community and will describe how Latidos Orlando/ Kissimmee, created a family for individuals living with HIV, individuals who are immigrants and are monolingual. This workshop will be an interactive discussion that facilitates the understanding of the many challenges and intersections involved in being an immigrant who is gay, latino, and also a person living with HIV in the United States. Topics discussed will include the successes, challenges, and ways to incorporate a similar program in your community. This workshop will be facilitated bilingually as this will help recreate the tone that is had in a Latidos Orlando/Kissimmee meeting.

Medicaid: Work Requirements, Time Limits, and Lock Outs, Oh My!

Location: Celebration 3 & 4, Convention Level Pathway: Health Care Access Level: Beginner

To many people living with HIV, the Medicaid program plays a vital role in ensuring access to medically necessary care and treatment. Despite the success advocates enjoyed in defending Medicaid from congressional action, the Administration is continuing to erect new barriers to Medicaid coverage. Through Medicaid waivers, the federal government is allowing states for the first time to implement restrictive and punitive policies that make it harder to get and keep Medicaid coverage. In this workshop, we will discuss Medicaid waivers generally, examine the current landscape with respect to proposed and approved waivers, and give concrete examples of advocacy you can engage in to push back against this disturbing new trend.

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They2ze: A Mobile Health Resource for Transgender Spectrum Youth Presenters: Emma Schlamm, YTH, Oakland, CA Bhuprendra Sheoran, YTH, Oakland, CA Cara Silva, YTH, San Francisco, CA

Location: Celebration 12 & 13, Convention Level Track: People Living with HIV Level: Beginner

Presenters: Phil Waters, Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation of Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA Kathie Hiers, AIDS Alabama, Birmingham, AL Nic Carlisle, Southern AIDS Coalition, Birmingham, AL

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Location: Celebration 9, Convention Level Track: Biomedical HIV Prevention Level: Intermediate

they2ze is a mobile application (app) intended to reduce health disparities among transgender spectrum identifying youth (TSY) and their providers by increasing the availability, access, and use of critical HIV and health resources. Originally funded as a 2017 pilot project for the San Francisco Bay Area, additional funding has been secured to scale they2ze throughout the remaining counties in California. Current expansion includes the additional integration of a digital PrEP access and navigation adherence tool. This presentation will cover an overview of TSY health access, with an emphasis on YTH’s youth-centered health design approach in collaboration with our they2ze community advisory board. Both TSY and health provider user data will be included to review app satisfaction, number of resources, continuing education links accessed, and the use of the app’s regional expansion. Mobile interventions like they2ze will be presented as a feasible and acceptable tool to help TSY access sexual health and life services.

Beyond Viral Suppression: Addressing Stigma, Mental Health and Well-Being Presenters: Krista Martel, The Well Project Vickie Lynn, MPH, The Well Project Gina Brown, MSW, The Well Project Location: Celebration 7, Convention Level Track: Women

While the HIV care continuum has become the predominant framework for assessing progress in HIV treatment and prevention, viral suppression should not be the only outcome of interest when it comes to women living with HIV (WLHIV). This session will look at the importance of a holistic approach to defining health and quality of life—including mental health, stigma, and isolation, substance use, and self-care—for WLHIV. To support the session, The Well Project will include results from its 2016 User Survey, which documented the experiences of 136 WLHIV. The session will also include practical tips and personal stories from WLHIV.

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11:30 am - 1:30 pm Closing Plenary

OPIOID CRISIS – FIGHTING FOR OUR LIVES AND OUR COMMUNITIES Hyatt Regency Orlando, Convention Level, Plenary Ballroom Presenters: Deon Haywood, Women with a Vision, New Orleans, LA Robert Suarez, Peer Network Of New York & VOCAL-NY, New York, NY Monique Tula, Harm Reduction Coalition, New York, NY Jesse Milan, AIDS United, Washington, DC Megan McLemore, Human Rights Watch, Washington DC Greg Millet, amfAR, Washington, DC

Haywood

Suarez

Tula

Early on, when injection drug use was a primary route of HIV transmission, Larry Kramer wrote about AIDS, “Unless we fight for our lives, we shall die.” Today, as people living with HIV gain access to treatments that allow us to live long, healthy lives, we are struck by the toll of opioid overdoses on ourselves and our communities - 116 people die every day in Milan McLemore Millet the U.S. from drug overdose. And, as the opioid crisis worsens, it threatens the progress made in reducing infectious disease transmission through injection drugs. HIV advocates suffered drug crises before, especially in our communities of color, and were among the earliest proponents of evidence-based strategies to address drug-related harm. Experts in America’s opioid epidemic and its intersections with HIV, STDs, and hepatitis will provide insight into the current landscape of the opioid crisis and offer tools for fighting it both collectively and at home.

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Achieving Health Equity to End the Epidemics OUR MISSION is to end the intersecting epidemics of HIV, viral hepatitis, and related conditions by strengthening domestic and global governmental public health through advocacy, capacity building, and social justice.

OUR VISION is a world free of HIV and viral hepatitis

Learn more at www.NASTAD.org


Sesiones para la interpretaciOn en espanol 6 de septiembre Talleres (Institutes): De 8:00 a 11:00 AM

Sesión 1: De 1:45 a 3:45 PM

SESIÓN 1: De 1:45 a 3:45 PM

Talleres (Institutes): De 8:00 a 11:00 AM

Plan de Acción para la Recuperación del Bienestar en Sobrevivientes de Largo Plazo

COMPASS apunta al Sur: Una Conversación con la Comunidad

Expositores: Tammy Kinney, Advantage, Winder, GA

Expositores: Venita Ray, Southern AIDS Coalition (Coalición Sureña contra el SIDA), Birmingham, AL Neena K. Smith-Bankhead, Universidad Emory, Escuela de Salud Pública Rollins, Atlanta, GA Samira Ali, Universidad de Houston, Houston, Texas Susan Reif, Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research (Centro de Investigación de Políticas Sanitarias y Desigualdades en Salud), Universidad Duke, Chapel Hill, NC Mardrequs Harris, Southern AIDS Coalition (Coalición Sureña contra el SIDA), Birmingham, AL Lugar: Celebración 5, Nivel de convenciones Nivel: Intermedio

Las pruebas son claras: El Sur está quedando rezagado. Acortar la brecha entre el Sur y el resto de los Estados Unidos es esencial para la salud de nuestro pueblo y para el éxito de largo plazo en acabar con la epidemia nacional de VIH. Durante este taller interactivo, exploraremos la Iniciativa COMPASS, una inversión sin precedentes de Gilead Sciences para apoyar a las organizaciones que trabajan para poner fin a la epidemia de VIH en el Sur. Específicamente, este taller incluirá lo siguiente: 1. Se conversará acerca del estado del Sur, con inclusión de los factores determinantes de la epidemia y las áreas con necesidades insatisfechas en nuestras comunidades. 2. Se identificarán y discutirán soluciones para el Sur que sean creativas, con conocimiento de la comunidad, para tratar el estigma en relación al VIH, la capacidad organizacional y la salud e integridad mental. 3. Se explicarán los nuevos recursos disponibles para las organizaciones del sur, incluida la asistencia para desarrollo de capacidad y las subvenciones disponibles a través de la Iniciativa COMPASS.

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Lugar: Celebración 5, Nivel de convenciones Área temática: Personas que viven con VIH Nivel: Intermedio

Este taller enseñará cómo desarrollar su propio Plan de Acción para la Recuperación del Bienestar (“Wellness Recovery Action Plan” o WRAP) para responder a las inquietudes y problemáticas de los Sobrevivientes de Largo Plazo. Los temas objetivo son: 1. Desarrollar una caja de herramientas de bienestar. 2. Plan de mantenimiento diario. 3. Disparadores. 4. Señal de advertencia temprana. 5. Cuando las cosas se desmoronan. 6. Planificación de crisis. 7. Planificación post crisis. También se intentará desarrollar un Sistema de Apoyo e Identificar formas de relajación. Sesión 2: De 4:00 a 6:00 PM

SESIÓN 2: De 4:00 a 6:00 PM Comunicación en torno al VIH: Reducir el Estigma a través del Lenguaje Expositores: Vickie Lynn, USF, Lutz, FL Valerie Wojciechowicz CAN Community Health (Salud Comunitaria CAN) Venita Ray, Texans Living with HIV Network (Red de Texanos que Viven con VIH) Lugar: Celebración 5, Nivel de convenciones Área temática: Personas que viven con VIH Nivel: Intermedio

Los investigadores, médicos u otros colaboradores sin querer utilizan terminología oral y escrita que estigmatiza aún más a las personas que viven con VIH (PLHIV, por sus siglas en inglés). Si bien se ha utilizado lenguaje estigmatizador en torno al VIH durante décadas, un creciente número de personas de la comunidad PLHIV ha manifestado preocupación acerca del estigma involuntario transmitido por cierta terminología. El propósito de este taller interactivo es explorar la historia de la terminología utilizada para describir al VIH, detallar cómo el uso de lenguaje estigmatizador afecta tanto al estigma interno (como nos sentimos acerca de nosotros mismos) como al estigma externo (cómo se relacionan con nosotros los demás) y destacar la historia y entendimiento del lenguaje de la persona en primer lugar (“people first language”). Esta sesión interactiva incluye ejercicios en grupos pequeños y feedback de los asistentes sobre el uso del lenguaje.

ESP


Sesiones para la interpretaciOn en espanol estadounidense, ha permitido a las organizaciones de servicios contra el VIH ofrecer servicios vitales para las personas con VIH. Sin embargo, el año pasado ha habido un interés considerable por parte del Congreso, la Administración Trump y la industria farmacéutica de modificar sustancialmente el Programa 340B contra los deseos de los proveedores de atención médica que lo utilizan. En este taller, AIDS United analizará las maneras en que el Programa 340B beneficia a las organizaciones de servicios contra el VIH y examinará qué puede hacerse para asegurar el éxito continuo e ininterrumpido del programa.

7 de Septiembre Sesión 3: De 9:00 a 11:00 AM

Sesión 3: De 9:00 a 11:00 AM Opioides, Hepatitis C y Reducción del Riesgo: Perspectiva General sobre Prevención Expositores: Andrew Reynolds, Project Inform, San Francisco, CA Lugar: Celebración 5, Nivel de convenciones Área temática: Epidemia de opioides Nivel: Inicial

Sesión 5: De 4:15 a 6:15 PM

Sesión 5: De 4:15 a 6:15 PM

Esta presentación resumirá de la relación sindémica (de epidemia sinérgica) entre los opioides, el consumo de drogas inyectables y la hepatitis C. Discutiremos los diversos riesgos relacionados con el consumo de opioides, (sobredosis, transmisión del VIH y del VHC), y a su vez proporcionaremos información actualizada sobre la epidemiología de la hepatitis C en los Estados Unidos. A partir de allí, analizaremos distintas estrategias para la prevención del VHC entre las personas que se inyectan drogas (PWID, por sus siglas en inglés), y estrategias para atraer y apoyar a individuos para el tratamiento del VHC, concluyendo con una perspectiva general de la prevención de reinfecciones. Sesión 4: De 2:00 a 4:00 PM

Sesión 4: De 2:00 a 4:00 PM La Importancia del Programa 340B para las Organizaciones de Servicios contra el VIH Expositores: William McColl, AIDS United, Washington, DC Carl Baloney, AIDS United, Washington, DC Drew Gibson, AIDS United, Washington, DC

Atención Informada de Traumas para el Alma: Una Conversación Afro-Latinx Expositores: Shawn-Patrick Torres, Latino Commission on AIDS (Comisión Latina sobre el SIDA), Nueva York, NY Lugar: Celebración 5, Nivel de convenciones Área temática: Atención informada de traumas Nivel: Inicial

Los traumas, definidos como experiencias que producen dolor y sufrimiento duradero, afectan a todas las personas de una manera diferente; provocando una variedad de respuestas a incidentes traumáticos. Los estudios muestran que la relación entre religión y trauma, ha sido vinculada a una variedad de resultados desfavorables de salud, tales como infección por VIH en comunidades vulnerables e iniciación de consumo de drogas inyectables como metanfetamina cristal entre mujeres marginalizadas, incluidas trabajadoras sexuales. Durante este taller, los participantes deconstruirán y debatirán acerca de la relación entre religión y trauma, y podrán volver a imaginar como la atención informada de traumas, que ha sido utilizada a lo largo de un rango de entornos prácticos, tiene el potencial de mejorar los resultados de salud de las personas LGBT negras y latinxs.

Lugar: Celebración 5, Nivel de convenciones Área temática: Política pública Nivel: Intermedio

En un escenario presupuestario donde el Programa Ryan White se financia siempre con fondos fijos y los beneficiarios operan con márgenes ínfimos, los ahorros generados por el Programa sobre Precios de Medicamentos 340B (“340B Drug Pricing Program”) han sido inestimables para las organizaciones de servicios contra el VIH. El Programa 340B, que reduce los costos de los medicamentos para los pacientes, incluidas las personas que viven con VIH, y proporciona recursos adicionales para las organizaciones de servicios contra el VIH sin costos para el contribuyente

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Sesiones para la interpretaciOn en espanol Sesión 7: 7: De a 4:00 PM PM Sesión De2:00 2:00 a 4:00

8 de septiembre Sesión 6: 9:00 a 11:00 AM Sesión 6:DeDe 9:00 a 11:00 AM

Cómo Promover PrEP en la Comunidad Latina.

Raza, la Campaña Indetectable=Intransmisible (Undetectable = Untransmittable o U=U]), y la Reforma de las Leyes Penales sobre el VIH Expositores: Kate Boulton, Center for HIV Law and Policy (Centro de Leyes y Políticas sobre el VIH), Nueva York, NY Eric Paulk, Georgia Equality (Igualdad en Georgia) Ace Brooks, Friends for Life (Amigos para Toda la Vida) Lugar: Celebración 5, Nivel de convenciones Área temática: Política pública Nivel: Intermedio

Este taller explorará la relación entre los avances en el tratamiento y la prevención del VIH y la reforma de las leyes penales sobre el VIH. El taller abordará la orientación reciente sobre Indetectable=Intransmisible en relación con los esfuerzos de modernizar las leyes penales sobre el VIH; es decir, las leyes que apuntan a procesar y enviar a prisión a personas que viven con VIH por actividades que en otras circunstancias son legales (p.ej.: sexo consensuado) o solo un delito menor para alguien sin una prueba con resultado positivo (p.ej.: escupir). La Declaración de Consenso sobre “Tratamiento de VIH como Prevención” en la Reforma de las Leyes Penales apunta a apoyar a los defensores que desean identificar la manera más efectiva de incorporar I=I en su trabajo y evitar poner a las comunidades marginadas en riesgo adicional de penalización. El taller abordará de qué manera las reformas penales que se amparan en I=I de modo que solo las personas con VIH viralmente suprimidas están protegidas dejarán de lado a personas de color, personas LGBT, trabajadoras sexuales y otras personas desproporcionalmente perjudicadas por el sistema jurídico penal.

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Expositores: Yesenia Kimberly Palacios, FLAS, Inc., Houston, TX Eddie Gonzalez, FLAS, Inc. Lugar: Celebración 5, Nivel de convenciones Área temática: Hombres gay Nivel: Inicial

El programa FLASNovelas proporciona mensajes culturalmente competentes sobre PrEP, abuso de sustancias y prevención del VIH a través de los medios sociales para hombres gay latinos y mujeres latinas. Estos mensajes son inculcados a través de mensajes de prevención en un nuevo concepto transformado que ya es parte de la cultura. La creación y producción de estos episodios se basa en historias de la vida real que comparten los participantes que están dispuestos a transmitir sus experiencias oscuras para echar luz sobre las problemáticas enfrentadas por muchos latinos. Cada experiencia personal compartida fue transformada en una novela para enseñar a la comunidad latina acerca de problemáticas actuales tales como la traición, el consumo de drogas, el VIH, la violencia doméstica y PrEP. Esta serie se desarrolla sobre bases utilizadas en varias historias que educarán a la comunidad. Las adversidades que las personas enfrentan diariamente se proyectan a través de esta forma de arte de manera que la comunidad pueda sentirse identificada y compartir esta experiencia con la esperanza de crear un futuro mejor para ellos mismos.

ESP


Sesiones para la interpretaciOn en espanol Sesión 8: 4:15 a 6:15 PM PM Sesión 8:DeDe 4:15 a 6:15

9 de Septiembre Sesión 9: De 9:00 a 11:00 AM Sesión 9: De 9:00 a 11:00 AM

Obtención de Información de Salud Sexual en la Realización del Historial Médico en Pacientes Transgénero y Pacientes que Difieren con los Estereotipos de Género

Enfrentar el Trauma en Personas de la Generación del Milenio LGBTQ Recientemente Diagnosticadas con VIH Positivo Expositores: Dylan Brooks, Compass Community Center (Centro Comunitario Compass) Lake Worth, FL Lorezno Lowe, Compass Community Center (Centro Comunitario Compass), Lake Worth, FL

Expositores: Dustin Wagner, Denver PTC, Denver, CO Teddy Tinnell Denver PTC, Denver, CO Lugar: Celebración 5, Nivel de convenciones Área temática: Atención informada de traumas Nivel: Inicial

Históricamente, los individuos transgénero son marginados y desatendidos en los ámbitos sanitarios; esto continúa impactando en todos los aspectos del bienestar, incluido el acceso a servicios integrales de prevención del VIH. La capacidad de obtener información detallada de salud sexual para el historial médico del paciente, que lo valide, y que incluya los traumas informados por el paciente, es esencial para obtener información precisa y mitigar las disparidades de salud. Obtener información sexual completa y crear un entorno de validación de los pacientes transgénero y a los pacientes que no se ajustan a los estereotipos de género (“gender non-conforming “ o TGNC) ayudará a facilitar el acceso e incrementar la retención en servicios de prevención y atención del VIH. Este taller dotará a los participantes de terminología y técnicas de atención informada de traumas que ayude a obtener toda la información de salud sexual necesaria para confeccionar un historial médico completo en relación a pacientes que difieren con los estereotipos de género (TGNC).

Lugar: Celebración 5, Nivel de convenciones Área temática: Atención informada de traumas Nivel: Intermedio

Representando el 22% de los nuevos diagnósticos en 2015, el rango de 13-24 años de edad es un grupo demográfico de rápido crecimiento en lo que respecta a nuevos diagnósticos de VIH. Este taller apunta a proporcionar más apoyo a la población del milenio respecto del trauma recientemente padecido al ser diagnosticado con VIH positivo y los efectos a largo plazo. En tiempos en que todo transcurre a ritmos tan rápidos, no siempre habrá tiempo para bajar el ritmo y trabajar eficazmente con los clientes. Al desarrollar colaboraciones entre sistemas, su agencia podrá atender mejor todas las necesidades de cada cliente, llegando a donde ellos se encuentran. Queremos compartir lo que nos ha dado buenos resultados en Compass Community Center y ayudarlos a desarrollar un Continuo de Asistencia que les funcione a ustedes y a sus respectivas agencias.

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“Stigma is like the air. You don’t see it, but you feel it.” HIV stigma hurts the well-being and mental health of people living with HIV, and even prevents some from getting medical treatment. /ActAgainstAIDS

When we support people living with HIV, we make it easier for them to live healthy lives. Learn how at cdc.gov/together

/ActAgainstAIDS

@TalkHIV


POSTER SESSIONS

September 7 & 8 1:30 -2:00 PM Poster Sessions are located on the Convention Level, Regency Rotunda

Biomedical HIV Prevention Addressing Barriers to PrEP Uptake and Adherence among Transgender Women Finn Schubert, Family Health Centers at NYU Langone, Brooklyn, NY Jeanne Carey Family Health Centers at NYU Langone, Brooklyn, NY Jennifer Orellana, Family Health Centers at NYU Langone, Brooklyn, NY   PrEP-aring Together: Community Mobilization’s Role in Expanding PrEP Access Elias Gonzalez, City of El Paso, HIV Prevention Program, El Paso, TX

PrEPLink: An Active PrEP Referral System in Miami-Dade County, FL Sarah Kenneally, Florida Department of Health - Miami-Dade County, Miami, FL Susanne Doblecki-Lewis, Florida Department of Health - Miami-Dade County, Miami, FL West Coast to East Coast: Rapid ART protocol implementation Ashleigh Garcia, Allies for Health + Wellbeing, Pittsburgh, PA Mallory McCormick Coordinated Care Pharmacy

Women Building Community Power: A Women’s HIV/AIDS Advisory Board Amanda Phi, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Queens, NY Davida Farhat NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Transwomen, Vaginas, and Considerations for Sexual Risk, Testing, and Prevention Erin Wilson, SFDPH, San Francisco, CA Caitlin Turner SFDPH Jess Lin, SFDPH Willi McFarland, SFDPH

Women Living with HIV in Permanent Supportive Housing Programs Deidra Bibbs, AIDS Foundation of Chicago, Chicago, IL Amanda Peters AIDS Foundation of Chicago Let’s Talk About Sex: Breaking the Silence, Bridging the Gap Dr. Demisha Burns, Women Organized to Respond To Life-Threatening Diseases (WORLD), Oakland, CA

Gay Men 2NP: A HIV/STI Prevention Intervention Targeting Young Black Gay Men. Ron Simmons, Ron Simmons Consulting, Washington, DC

Improving the HIV Prevention Capacity of Community-Based Organizations Amanda Doreson, CDC, Atlanta, GA

How to Implement Viral Suppression Strategies with Homeless Young MSMOC Nike Blue, AIDS Foundation Houston, Inc., Houston, TX

Tech Please! A New Way to Engage and Retain Clients Reynaldo Cordova, MSW, Howard Brown Health, Chicago, IL Kristin Keglovitz Baker Howard Brown Health, Chicago, IL George Greene, Northwestern University - Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing, Chicago, IL

Leadership Atrévete, Salte del Closet: Leadership Development in the Latinx Communities Armando Garcia, Chicago House and Social Service Agency, Chicago, IL Karlo Manzo-Arroyo Chicago House and Social Service Agency, Chicago, IL Alfredo Flores, Chicago House and Social Service Agency, Chicago, IL

Evaluating an HIV Leadership Program: Building Leaders of Color (BLOC) Lorin Boyce, ICF, Atlanta, GA Linda Scruggs NMAC, Washington, DC Gingi Pica, ICF, Atlanta, GA Charles Shazor, NMAC, Washington, DC

Beyond MOU: a Look at Strategic Partnerships Zeena Hazuri, Latino Commission on AIDS, New York, NY

Leading Together-Strategic Partnerships to Advance the Fight Against AIDS Kelsey Louie, Gay Men’s Health Crisis, New York, NY

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POSTER SESSIONS

September 7 & 8 1:30 -2:00 PM Poster Sessions are located on the Convention Level, Regency Rotunda

Opioid Epidemic The Story of Syringe Vending Machines and Nevada’s Opioid Epidemic Jessica Johnson, Southern Nevada Health District, Las Vegas, NV Chelsi Cheetom, Trac-B Exchange

We Got You: Providing Harm Reduction Services in Mobile Settings Mary Brewster, Harlem United, New York, NY Elizabeth Furth, Harlem United, New York, NY Anthony Lafontant, Harlem United, New York, NY

People Living With HIV Cultural Transformation for Integrating HIV/AIDS Care into Primary Care David Bradley, Florida Department of Health Osceola County, Kissimee, FL Increasing Retention in HIV-Care by Addressing Stigma among Mexican MSM Roman Buenrostro, AIDS Foundation of Chicago, Chicago, IL Gilberto Soberanis AIDS Foundation of Chicago, Chicago, IL Jessica Torres, AIDS Foundation of Chicago, Chicago, IL Bridget Magner, Erie Family Health Center

The “Protective Health Effect” of Legal Intervention on HIV+ Patients Guillaume Bagal, Whitman-Walker Health, Washington, DC Erin Loubier Whitman-Walker Health, Washington, DC

Public Policy HIV Exceptionalism and Implications for Acceptability of PrEP Shan-Estelle Brown, Rollins College, Winter Park, FL

Structural Segregation is Killing Us Teresa Springer, Wellness Services Inc., Flint, MI

NC HIV is Not a Crime Project: A Case Study Lee Storrow, NC AIDS Action Network, Raleigh, NC Carolyn McAllaster, Duke Law Jeffery Edwards-Knight, Mecklenburg County Health Dept.

Trauma-Informed Care De-Socializing Stigma Lestian McNeal, Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA Joshua Polk Black AIDS Institute, Los Angeles, CA

Responding to Increased Anxiety among Immigrants through Legal Services Kamilla Sjodin, Gay Men’s Health Crisis, New York, NY

Empowering Women Experiencing the Trauma Associated with IPV and HIV Richelle Joe, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL Nevin Heard

Seeking Safety with Transitional Age Youth Living with HIV (YLWHA) Adam Leonard, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA Carol Dawson-Rose University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, CA Brian Lasofsky, University of California, San Francisco, School of Nursing, San Francisco, CA Eva Kersey, Larkin Street Youth Services

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On behalf of the Board, Staff, and Constituent Advisory Panels of NMAC

Thank You To The

2018 uSCa hoST CommiTTee

for their hard work and dedication to making this year’s conference the best yet.

uniTeD STaTeS ConFeRenCe on aiDS


Show up. Speak out.

AIDS ����

SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND The 23rd International AIDS Conference

| July 6-10, 2020

LEARN HOW:

https://youtu.be/9BJXcAD�6Sc


SEPT 5-8, 2019 - MARRIOTT MARQUIS WDC

UNITED STATES CONFERENCE ON AIDS #2019USCA WWW.2019USCA.ORG


What is SYMTUZA™ Used For?

SYMTUZA™ is a prescription medicine that is used without other antiretroviral medicines to treat Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) infection in adults who: � have not received anti-HIV-1 medicines in the past, or � when their healthcare provider determines that they meet certain requirements. HIV-1 is the virus that causes AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). It is not known if SYMTUZA™ is safe and effective in children under 18 years of age.

What is the most important information I should know about SYMTUZA™?

SYMTUZA™ can cause serious side effects including: � Worsening of hepatitis B virus infection. Your healthcare provider will test you for HBV before starting treatment with SYMTUZA™. If you have hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and take SYMTUZA™, your HBV may get worse (flare-up) if you stop taking SYMTUZA™. ° Do not stop taking SYMTUZA™ without first talking to your healthcare provider ° Do not run out of SYMTUZA™. Refill your prescription or talk to your healthcare provider before your SYMTUZA™ is all gone. ° If you stop taking SYMTUZA™, your healthcare provider will need to check your health often and do blood tests regularly for several months to check your HBV infection or give you a medicine to treat your HBV infection. Tell your healthcare provider about any new or unusual symptoms you may have after you stop taking SYMTUZA™. � Change in liver enzymes. People with a history of hepatitis B or C virus infection or who have certain liver enzyme changes may have an increased risk of developing new or worsening liver problems during treatment with SYMTUZA™. Liver problems can also happen during treatment with SYMTUZA™ in people without a history of liver disease. Your healthcare provider may need to do tests to check your liver enzymes before and during treatment with SYMTUZA™. • Severe liver problems. In rare cases, severe liver problems can happen that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: skin or the white part of your eyes turn yellow, dark “tea-colored” urine, light-colored stools, loss of appetite for several days or longer, nausea, vomiting, or stomach-area pain. SYMTUZA™ may cause severe or life-threatening skin reactions or rashes. Sometimes these skin reactions and skin rashes can become severe and require treatment in a hospital. Call your healthcare provider right away if you develop a rash. Stop taking SYMTUZA™ and call your healthcare provider right away if you develop any skin changes with symptoms below: � Fever � Blisters or skin lesions � Tiredness � Mouth sores or ulcers � Muscle or joint pain � Red or inflamed eyes, like “pink eye” (conjunctivitis) Who should not take SYMTUZA™? � Do not take SYMTUZA™ with any of the following medicines: alfuzosin, carbamazepine, cisapride, colchicine (if you have liver or kidney problems), dronedarone, elbasvir and grazoprevir, ergot-containing medicines (such as: dihydroergotamine, ergotamine tartrate, methylergonovine), lovastatin or a product that contains lovastatin, lurasidone, oral midazolam (when taken by mouth), phenobarbital, phenytoin, pimozide, ranolazine, rifampin, St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) or a product that contains St. John’s wort, sildenafil when used for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), simvastatin or a product that contains simvastatin, or triazolam. � Serious problems can happen if you take any of these medicines with SYMTUZA™. Before taking SYMTUZA™ , tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: � have liver problems (including hepatitis B or hepatitis C) � have kidney problems � are allergic to sulfa (sulfonamide) � have diabetes � have hemophilia � are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant. ° It is not known if SYMTUZA™ will harm your unborn baby. ° SYMTUZA™ should not be used during pregnancy because you may not have enough SYMTUZA™ in your body during pregnancy. ° Tell your healthcare provider if you become pregnant while taking SYMTUZA™. Your healthcare provider will prescribe different medicines if you become pregnant while taking SYMTUZA™. ° Pregnancy Registry: There is a pregnancy registry for those who take antiretroviral medicines during pregnancy. The purpose of the registry is to collect information about the health of you and your baby. Talk to your healthcare provider about how you can take part in this registry. � are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed if you take SYMTUZA™. ° You should not breastfeed if you have HIV-1 because of the risk of passing HIV to your baby.


° One of the medicines in SYMTUZA™ called emtricitabine can pass into your breast milk. It is not known if the other medicines in SYMTUZA™ can pass into your breast milk. ° Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Some medicines interact with SYMTUZA™. Keep a list of your medicines to show your healthcare provider and pharmacist. � You can ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist for a list of medicines that interact with SYMTUZA™. � Do not start taking a new medicine without telling your healthcare provider. Your healthcare provider can tell you if it is safe to take SYMTUZA™ with other medicines. How should I take SYMTUZA™? � Take SYMTUZA™ exactly as your healthcare provider tells you. � Do not change your dose or stop taking SYMTUZA™ without talking to your healthcare provider. � Take SYMTUZA™ 1 time a day with food. � If you have difficulty swallowing, the tablet may be split using a tablet cutter. After splitting the tablet, the entire dose (both halves) should then be taken right away. � Do not miss a dose of SYMTUZA™. � When your SYMTUZA™ supply starts to run low, get more from your healthcare provider or pharmacy. This is very important because the amount of virus in your blood may increase if the medicine is stopped for even a short time. The virus may develop resistance to SYMTUZA™ and become harder to treat. � If you take too much SYMTUZA™, call your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away.

The most common side effects of SYMTUZA™ include: ° diarrhea ° rash ° nausea ° fatigue

° headache ° stomach problems ° gas

These are not all of the possible side effects of SYMTUZA™. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What important facts I should know? � This information is not complete. How to get more information: ° Talk to your healthcare provider or pharmacist ° Visit www.SYMTUZA.com to read over the FDA-approved product labeling and patient information ° Call to report side effects either to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or to Janssen Products, LP at 1-800-JANSSEN (1-800-526-7736) © Janssen Therapeutics, Division of Janssen Products, LP 2018 07/18 cp-60850v1

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What are the possible side effects of SYMTUZA™? SYMTUZA™ may cause serious side effects including: � See “What is the most important information I should know about SYMTUZA™?” � Changes in your immune system (Immune Reconstitution Syndrome) can happen when you start taking HIV-1 medicines. Your immune system may get stronger and begin to fight infections that have been hidden in your body for a long time. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you start having new symptoms after starting your HIV-1 medicine. � New or worse kidney problems, including kidney failure. Your healthcare provider should do blood and urine tests to check your kidneys before you start and while you are taking SYMTUZA™. Your healthcare provider may tell you to stop taking SYMTUZA™ if you develop new or worse kidney problems. � Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis). Too much lactic acid is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat. � Diabetes and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). Some people who take protease inhibitors including SYMTUZA™ can get high blood sugar, develop diabetes, or your diabetes can get worse. Tell your healthcare provider if you notice an increase in thirst or if you start urinating more often while taking SYMTUZA™. � Changes in body fat can happen in people taking HIV-1 medications. The changes may include an increased amount of fat in the upper back and neck (“buffalo hump”), breast, and around the middle of your body (trunk). Loss of fat from the legs, arms, and face may also happen. The exact cause and long-term health effects of these conditions are not known. � Increased bleeding for hemophiliacs. Some people with hemophilia have increased bleeding with protease inhibitors.


SYMTUZA™ is a prescription medicine that is used without other antiretroviral medicines to treat Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) infection in adults who: • have not received anti-HIV-1 medicines in the past, or • when their healthcare provider determines that they meet certain requirements. HIV-1 is the virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION WHAT IS THE MOST IMPORTANT INFORMATION I SHOULD KNOW ABOUT SYMTUZA™? SYMTUZA™ can cause serious side effects including: • Worsening of hepatitis B virus infection. Your healthcare provider will test you for hepatitis B virus (HBV) before starting treatment with SYMTUZA™. If you have HBV infection and take SYMTUZA™, your HBV may get worse (flare-up) if you stop taking SYMTUZA™. o Do not stop taking SYMTUZA™ without first talking to your healthcare provider. o Do not run out of SYMTUZA™. Refill your prescription or talk to your healthcare provider before your SYMTUZA™ is all gone. o If you stop taking SYMTUZA™, your healthcare provider will need to check your health often and do blood tests regularly for several months to check your HBV infection or give you a medicine to treat your HBV infection. Tell your healthcare provider about any new or unusual symptoms you may have after you stop taking SYMTUZA™. � Change in liver enzymes. People with a history of hepatitis B or C virus infection or who have certain liver enzyme changes may have an increased risk of developing new or worsening liver problems during treatment with SYMTUZA™. Liver problems can also happen during treatment with SYMTUZA™ in people without a history of liver disease. Your healthcare provider may need to do tests to check your liver enzymes before and during treatment with SYMTUZA™. � Severe liver problems. In rare cases, severe liver problems can happen that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: o Skin or the white part of your o Nausea eyes turn yellow o Vomiting o Dark “tea-colored” urine o Stomach area pain o Light-colored stools o Loss of appetite for several days or longer SYMTUZA™ may cause severe or life-threatening skin reactions or rashes which may sometime require treatment in a hospital. Call your healthcare provider right away if you develop a rash. Stop taking SYMTUZA™ and call your healthcare provider right away if you develop any skin changes with symptoms below: � Fever � Blisters or skin lesions � Tiredness � Mouth sores or ulcers � Muscle or joint pain � Red or inflamed eyes, like “pink eye” (conjunctivitis) Who should not take SYMTUZA™? � Do not take SYMTUZA™ with any of the following medicines: alfuzosin, carbamazepine, cisapride, colchicine (if you have liver or kidney problems), dronedarone, elbasvir and grazoprevir, ergot-containing medicines (such as: dihydroergotamine, ergotamine tartrate, methylergonovine), lovastatin or a product that contains lovastatin, lurasidone, oral midazolam (when taken by mouth), phenobarbital,

DON’T RISK RESISTANCE. TAKE THE KNOW YOUR RISK QUIZ—visit SYMTUZA.com/Quiz

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WHAT IS SYMTUZA™?

phenytoin, pimozide, ranolazine, rifampin, St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) or a product that contains St. John’s wort, sildenafil when used for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), simvastatin or a product that contains simvastatin, or triazolam. � Serious problems can happen if you take any of these medicines with SYMTUZA™. Before taking SYMTUZA™, tell your healthcare provider about all of your medical conditions, including if you: � have liver problems (including hepatitis B or hepatitis C), have kidney problems, are allergic to sulfa (sulfonamide), have diabetes, have hemophilia, or have any other medical condition. � are pregnant (if you become pregnant while taking SYMTUZA™), or plan to become pregnant. It is unknown if SYMTUZA™ will harm your unborn baby. o SYMTUZA™ should not be used during pregnancy. � are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. Do not breastfeed if you take SYMTUZA™. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Some medicines interact with SYMTUZA™. Keep a list of your medicines to show your healthcare provider and pharmacist. Do not start taking a new medicine without telling your healthcare provider. HOW SHOULD I TAKE SYMTUZA™? � Take SYMTUZA™ 1 time a day with food. WHAT ARE THE POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF SYMTUZA™? SYMTUZA™ may cause serious side effects including: � See “What is the most important information I should know about SYMTUZA™?” • Immune system changes can happen in people who start HIV medications. • New or worse kidney problems, including kidney failure. o Your healthcare provider should do blood and urine tests to check your kidneys before you start and while you are taking SYMTUZA™. • Too much lactic acid in your blood (lactic acidosis). o Too much lactic acid is a serious but rare medical emergency that can lead to death. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you get these symptoms: weakness or being more tired than usual, unusual muscle pain, being short of breath or fast breathing, stomach pain with nausea and vomiting, cold or blue hands and feet, feel dizzy or lightheaded, or a fast or abnormal heartbeat. • Diabetes and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). Some people who take protease inhibitors including SYMTUZA™ can get high blood sugar, develop diabetes, or your diabetes can get worse. Tell your healthcare provider if you notice an increase in thirst or if you start urinating more often while taking SYMTUZA™. • Changes in body fat can happen in people taking HIV-1 medications. • Increased bleeding can occur in people with hemophilia who are taking SYMTUZA™. The most common side effects of SYMTUZA™ are: Diarrhea, rash, nausea, fatigue, headache, stomach problems, and gas. These are not all of the possible side effects of SYMTUZA™. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit http://www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects to Janssen Products, LP at 1-800-JANSSEN (1-800-526-7736). Please see full Product Information, including Boxed Warning for SYMTUZA™. © Janssen Therapeutics, Division of Janssen Products, LP 2018 07/18 cp-60850v1


VISIT THE SYMTUZA™ EXPERIENCE AT BOOTH #301

STAY YOU

NEW HIV TREATMENT

BE RESILIENT

Your resilience matters. So does your HIV treatment. It’s important to take your HIV medication every day, because missing even a few doses may lead to drug resistance and may cause it to stop working. SYMTUZA™ is a treatment with a high barrier to drug resistance to help you keep fighting HIV with just one pill a day. Ask your doctor about

Please see the accompanying Important Safety Information and Brief Summary, including Boxed Warning for SYMTUZA™ on following page.


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2018 USCA Program Book  

This is the impact report for the 2018 United States Conference on AIDS held in Orlando,FL Sept 6 - 9th, 2018.

2018 USCA Program Book  

This is the impact report for the 2018 United States Conference on AIDS held in Orlando,FL Sept 6 - 9th, 2018.