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danielorbach Industrial Designer


danielorbach Industrial Designer

experience

daniel.i.orbach@gmail.com 847-363-3241 danielorbach.com

Chamberlain Group Winter 2012 :: Elmhurst, Il

skills

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Chamberlain Group Summer 2011 :: Elmhurst, Il Responsible for blue sky concept development based upon incorporating new technologies into existing products. Additionally, worked on U/I design, design research, and strategy for assorted projects.

Camp Ramah Summer 2009,2010 :: Conover, WI Worked in the shop and taught campers how to use various woodworking tools. Lived in a cabin with campers and worked with them on a daily basis.

education

University of Cincinnati :: Cincinnati, OH College of Design, Art, Architecture, and Planning B.S Industrial Design, expected graduation 2014 GPA: 3.86/4.0

activites

interests

recognition

Alias Studiotools, Solidworks, Rhinoceros, Keyshot2, Adobe cs5, Microsoft Office, Rudimentary html & css, Model Making, mig welding, Interface mock-ups, Rapid Ideation, Fluent in Hebrew

University Honors Society, Tutoring at Hughes High School, uc nightwalk, Principal Clarinet: ucso, Chabad of uc, Bearcats for Israel

Typography & type design, playing clarinet, collecting and listening to vinyl records, close up magic, solving Rubik’s Cubes and other puzzles, pixar concept art, figure drawing, design blogs.

Palmer Scholarship Cincinnatus Scholar Deans List Illinois State Scholar AP Scholar With Honor

2010, 2011 all terms all terms 2009 2009

Highland Park Highschool :: Highland Park, IL Graduated June 2009 GPA: 4.10/4.0 [weighted]

If you need references, just ask.


A low-tech prosthetic to take you higher and farther Prosthetics are getting more and more high-tech. What about a low-tech solution for both rock climbing and hiking?


let’s talk about amputees He is one of over 1,000 soldiers returning home with a missing limb

in fact

of 500 amputees surveyed in a study:

57%

experience pain while wearing a prosthesis

70%

of all amputees surveyed do zero or one of the activites they did before the amputation

calf

often controls the robotic knee. otherwise usually a pylon

knee

many different kinds of knee. but they all help the calf free swing

of all amputations occur below the waist

30%

socket

the human interface. strapping into the socket means you’re safe and secure

“it was a big adjustment” Andrew Meyer, active above knee amputee

foot

helps establish a regular gait pattern. many different styles.

ankle

some lock and some are free swinging, depends on if they’re robitic

depression

4x

higher than the world average

amputees use 1.5 times effort per step compared to able bodied people

so what is being done to help? Outdoor magazine recently featured the newest method of rehab for returning soldiers:

adventure

but mark can’t join them

+

parts in a prosthetic:

meet dave

the leading extreme sport prosthetic won’t bend at the knee isn’t a complete solution is very heavy (but durable)

the world of prosthetics is a busy and confusing place. it’s time to dig in

O


researching for actionable insights A Rock Climbing Prosthesis Study:

I climbed the rockwall

Three above knee amputees climbed a rockwall using five different prosthetics. Biometric data was collected from all the climbs. Additionally, they subjectively rated the climbs.

interviews Interviewees had over 40 combined years of experience in prosthetic. They included clinicians and and an active above knee amputee

though close, the foot backwards won due to subjectivity

“Keep this thing as simple as possible”

Mike Lagerstrand - va prosthetist Starting the Climb is not an easy task, it’s mostly arms in the beginning since footholds are limited.

O2 used

Getting over ridges is very difficult, because the straight leg cannot bend, or apply force to assist the climber.

“There is a big need for this thing”

Patrick Taylor - head of va prosthetics

climb time

“You’d probably want a sleeve and suction working” Rock Rocco - prothetist

full: knee unlocked

full: knee unlocked

short: foot backward

short: foot forwards

no prosthetic

on some occasions it would have been nicer of the straight leg was shorter, so the climber has a wider range of motion

Near the top things can get tiring, because of the deadweight of the leg, combined with the stress on the muscles.

“An articulated knee would really be useful for me” Andrew Meyer - above knee amputee


Rapid Ideation Design Requirements modular If this is to be used for both hiking and climbing, it should have a hiking mode and a climbing mode. However, Modularity should affect weight as little as possible

durable The leg needs to be built out of standard prosthetic materials, but can incorporate extra reinforcement in certain areas. Often times the simpler it is the more durable it will be

lightweight No one wants to climb with any extra dead weight. Making this leg as light as possible is paramount to its success.

comfortable

The biggest reason amputees won’t wear a new prosthetic is simply because it isn’t comfortable. Extra pains will be taken to ensure this prosthetic is as comfortable as any.


time for validation Validation was conducted with three different prosthetists, as well as an active above knee amputee. The simplest, and lightest of the three solution was heavily favored. the heavyweight

the welterweight

the lightweight

The most intense of all the three, this concept features a quadruple suspension system, and a protective rollcage for a heavy duty shock.

This concept sits right in the middle of the spectrum. It utilizes a shock to absorb impact, but the suspension is not as extreme. This concept was consistently ignored during validation

The simplest and lightest of all three concepts this concept would have up to 9 inches of telescoping motion, and potentially include a free swinging knee.

hits

hits

hits

fabric pocket for tools

shock absorber

weight

good suspension

valve placement

simplicity

aesthetically a winner

socket bumper

rubber overmolded socket

large height change

misses

misses

misses

good suspension

too much mass

not as visually exciting

fabric pocket for tools

height diminished by shock

missing a failsafe

aesthetically a winner

offset shock absorber

no shock absorber

rubber overmolded socket

too complicated


further refinement The refinement process consisted of iterative 3d modeling based off of rough hand sculpted models. These models were then used to generate full scale plots in order to test human factors and scaling.


The Everest Leg: freedom without compromise Climb

Hike bumper prevents socket wear

slimmer profile air valve works well with clothing knee swings freely for hiking. tool free adjustment

knee locks for climbing

easy but safe double pushbutton control shortens leg by 6.75 inches foot turns 180o for climbing. The sturdy steel climbing piece can take over 1200 pounds of force

strong titanium pillar

Tabi style foot allows for greater control on uneven terrain. no shoes necessary.


Details and auxiliary content So how does it work?

Hike with a freely swinging knee and a fully extended leg.

buttons

Using an allen wrench, tighten the sockets in the knee until it won’t bend.

socket

pushing down on both buttons, step down in order to shorten the leg 6.75 in

foot



everest leg